History Headscratchers / LittleShopOfHorrors

21st Nov '15 4:09:58 PM rememberthehood1941
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** It makes more sense for the way Seymour is portrayed in the movie vs the play. In the movie, Seymour doesn't have much time to think about what's going on when he kills both Orin and Mushnik. Plus, they BOTH were portrayed as terrible people in the movie, what with Mushnik blackmailing Seymour into giving him the plant. If Seymour had let him live, things could have been even worse. In the play,however, Seymour thinks about it and makes a decision before killing both of them. There's an entire song where the Orin is begging for his life, and if you take the jokes out of it, it really is horrifying. Then there's no blackmail in the play. Mushnik is just doing his civic duty and keeping a probable murderer off the streets, and more importantly, out of his shop. Does he have ulterior motives? Sure, maybe, depending on how it's played. But it's still not likely that Seymour understands that intention. In fact, one could argue that Mushnik is the only male character who could ever be considered as a decent human being. After all, he took Seymour out of the orphanage and gave him a place to stay, even after he turned out to be a useless lump of a person. Despite him getting frustrated with them sometimes, he really did care for his employees and tried to help them whenever he could, so long as it didn't cost him anything. In spite of all he owes Mushnik, and the fact that Mushnik had done nothing wrong, Seymour stone cold killed the guy by tricking him into the plant. In the movie it looked almost like Seymour tried to stop him from going into the plant. The movie tried too hard to have Seymour be sympathetic and ended up changing the character to the point where he didn't deserve to die. After all, what did he do wrong? In the play, the only way for Seymour to atone for his sins is to sacrifice himself in an attempt to reverse his mistakes.
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** It makes more sense for the way Seymour is portrayed in the movie vs the play. In the movie, Seymour doesn't have much time to think about what's going on when he kills both Orin and Mushnik. Plus, they BOTH were portrayed as terrible people in the movie, what with Mushnik blackmailing Seymour into giving him the plant. If Seymour had let him live, things could have been even worse. In the play,however, Seymour thinks about it and makes a decision before killing both of them. There's an entire song where the Orin is begging for his life, and if you take the jokes out of it, it really is horrifying. Then there's no blackmail in the play. Mushnik is just doing his civic duty and keeping a probable murderer off the streets, and more importantly, out of his shop. Does he have ulterior motives? Sure, maybe, depending on how it's played. But it's still not likely that Seymour understands that intention. In fact, one could argue that Mushnik is the only male character who could ever be considered as a decent human being. After all, he took Seymour out of the orphanage and gave him a place to stay, even after he turned out to be a useless lump of a person.person AND he's the first person to tell Audrey that Orin is bad news. Despite him getting frustrated with them sometimes, he really did care for his employees and tried to help them whenever he could, so long as it didn't cost him anything. In spite of all he owes Mushnik, and the fact that Mushnik had done nothing wrong, Seymour stone cold killed the guy by tricking him into the plant. In the movie it looked almost like Seymour tried to stop him from going into the plant. The movie tried too hard to have Seymour be sympathetic and ended up changing the character to the point where he didn't deserve to die. After all, what did he do wrong? In the play, the only way for Seymour to atone for his sins is to sacrifice himself in an attempt to reverse his mistakes.

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** It makes more sense for the way Seymour is portrayed in the movie vs the play. In the movie, Seymour doesn't have much time to think about what's going on when he kills both Orin and Mushnik. Plus, they BOTH were portrayed as terrible people in the movie, what with Mushnik blackmailing Seymour into giving him the plant. If Seymour had let him live, things could have been even worse. In the play,however, Seymour thinks about it and makes a decision before killing both of them. There's an entire song where the Orin is begging for his life, and if you take the jokes out of it, it really is horrifying. Then there's no blackmail in the play. Mushnik is just doing his civic duty and keeping a probable murderer off the streets, and more importantly, out of his shop. Does he have ulterior motives? Sure, maybe, depending on how it's played. But it's still not likely that Seymour understands that intention. In fact, one could argue that Mushnik is the only male character who could ever be considered as a decent human being. After all, he took Seymour out of the orphanage and gave him a place to stay, even after he turned out to be a useless lump of a person. Despite him getting frustrated with them sometimes, he really did care for his employees and tried to help them whenever he could, so long as it didn't cost him anything. In spite of all he owes Mushnik, and the fact that Mushnik had done nothing wrong, Seymour stone cold killed the guy by tricking him into the plant. In the movie it looked almost like Seymour tried to stop him from going into the plant. *** The movie tried too hard film's version was shown using a telephone to have Seymour be sympathetic and ended up changing the character lure Audrey to the point where he didn't deserve shop. Wouldn't be a complete stretch to die. After all, what did he do wrong? In the play, the only way for [[FridgeBrilliance calling Dr. Martin impersonating Seymour to atone for his sins is get him to sacrifice himself talk about the deal in an attempt to reverse his mistakes.the original ending]].
6th Nov '15 1:13:20 AM PurpleAlert
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** Hiring competent workers for an all-day job, assuming that the plumbing changes is just fixing leaks or replacing individual pipes and not refitting the entire building. A refrigerated display just means plugging in a cooler in front of the shop windows, retiling crappy linoleum is easy because in a dump like that, it's probably just stick-ons or cheap laminate instead of actual ceramic, and painting with a proper crew doesn't take more than a few hours.
6th Nov '15 1:06:45 AM PurpleAlert
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** The steps lead out to the same alleyway that Seymour used to drag Orrin's body back to the shop, where Mushnik saw him. Granted it would have been the ''smarter'' thing to do, to avoid having to cross Audrey II's path, but Seymour's a coward fleeing the scene of (at this point) several crimes. It mattered more to him to keep up appearances (dressing nicely to leave the store through the front, as opposed to sneaking around in a suit and leaving through a gross alley) and avoid suspicion. Keep in mind, he's not actually ''afraid'' of Audrey II yet, because he thinks Audrey II still depends on him for food and, perfectly in character, all he thinks he needs to do to kill it is to do nothing at all.
23rd Mar '15 3:45:25 PM johabi
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** It's almost like Seymour struggles with low self image and doesn't think he's worth anything without his plant. And in the play, that's exactly what he decides anyway. As soon as he finds out that Audrey would still love him without the plant, he sets his mind on killing the plant right after Life Magazine takes the picture, taking the TV job, and moving far away with Audrey. That's not really a great plan in and of itself either, but he's under a lot of pressure, probably sleep deprived, not thinking straight, and not a very smart guy to begin with.
23rd Mar '15 3:33:00 PM johabi
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** It makes more sense for the way Seymour is portrayed in the movie vs the play. In the movie, Seymour doesn't have much time to think about what's going on when he kills both Orin and Mushnik. Plus, they BOTH were portrayed as terrible people in the movie, what with Mushnik blackmailing Seymour into giving him the plant. If Seymour had let him live, things could have been even worse. In the play,however, Seymour thinks about it and makes a decision before killing both of them. There's an entire song where the Orin is begging for his life, and if you take the jokes out of it, it really is horrifying. Then there's no blackmail in the play. Mushnik is just doing his civic duty and keeping a probable murderer off the streets, and more importantly, out of his shop. Does he have ulterior motives? Sure, maybe, depending on how it's played. But it's still not likely that Seymour understands that intention. In fact, one could argue that Mushnik is the only male character who could ever be considered as a decent human being. After all, he took Seymour out of the orphanage and gave him a place to stay, even after he turned out to be a useless lump of a person. Despite him getting frustrated with them sometimes, he really did care for his employees and tried to help them whenever he could, so long as it didn't cost him anything. In spite of all he owes Mushnik, and the fact that Mushnik had done nothing wrong, Seymour stone cold killed the guy by tricking him into the plant. In the movie it looked almost like Seymour tried to stop him from going into the plant. The movie tried too hard to have Seymour be sympathetic and ended up changing the character to the point where he didn't deserve to die. After all, what did he do wrong? In the play, the only way for Seymour to atone for his sins is to sacrifice himself in an attempt to reverse his mistakes.
11th Jan '15 9:47:40 PM Nymris
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***Actually people did notice. At the beginning of the movie Mushnik is reading a newspaper with its headline about the mysterious eclipse.
23rd Dec '14 3:58:50 PM TheUnknownUploader
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*** [[HoistByHisOwnPetard Seymour wouldn't have found the wire if Audrey II hadn't knocked the whole building down.]] It's still a DeusExmachina though; just one Audrey II caused.
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*** [[HoistByHisOwnPetard Seymour wouldn't have found the wire if Audrey II hadn't knocked the whole building down.]] It's still a DeusExmachina DeusExMachina though; just one Audrey II caused.
23rd Dec '14 3:58:15 PM TheUnknownUploader
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*** [[HoistByHisOwnPetard Seymour wouldn't have found the wire if Audrey II hadn't knocked the whole building down.]] It's still a DeusExmachina though; just one Audrey II caused.

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** Rational thinking is hard to do when you've committed murder thanks to a giant man-eating plant.

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** Yeah, it would've been better if they played "Don't Feed The Plants" when we see the little Audrey II. Not great, but better.

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** "Excuse me. I'm just bringing this bag of compost to the plant shop."
7th Dec '14 7:40:40 AM RodimusPhil
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**** Maybe he not only lets it die, but kills it himself.

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*Seymour seems to think he relies on the plant more than he really does during "The Meek Shall Inherit". His TV show offer is about regular gardening, not about the Audrey II, and the plant only needs to stay alive for the photo op as far as the Life Magazine deal goes. The only thing that seems like it requires the plant at all is the lecture tour, which is stated to be about the plant. **In addition, I see at least two major problems with the lecture tour idea. First: people will notice the mysterious disappearances during Seymour's stays, and may see a pattern emerge. Second: He doesn't know much about the plant beyond what it eats, and would he really tell people across the world what he's been feeding it?
4th Dec '14 3:49:34 PM RodimusPhil
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***Yes. In the stage version at least, Seymour said that Mr. Mushnik left a note saying that he had to visit his sister in Czechoslovakia. *In "Closed for Renovation" they say that it'll only be closed for one day. They also say that they'll be repainting, retiling, changing the plumbing, and installing a new refrigerated display. How can any small business, especially with only three employees, do that much renovation in one day?
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