History Headscratchers / LittleShopOfHorrors

2nd Feb '17 7:17:32 PM Adriantancy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** My two cents is that (a) Seymour invoked force majeur in his contracts so he can wriggle out of them without penalties, though he will have to return the balances of fees paid minus expenses, and (b) sued the estate of the late Mushnik to the ground for maintaining an unsafely wired and gas-leaky work place that incidentally also blew Mushnik and Orin into smithereens (except for some understandably small tissue traces) and collected big after the insurance companies paid up for the lost lives and ruined place. Audrey will be a co-plaintiff as an endangered employee plus an addition action to compensate her for the mental distress etc. for being so cruelly deprived of her dentist boyfriend. She will collect a nice, fat sum too.

to:

** My two cents is that (a) Seymour invoked force majeur in his contracts so he can wriggle out of them without penalties, though he will have to return the balances of fees paid minus expenses, and (b) sued the estate of the late Mushnik to the ground for maintaining an unsafely wired and gas-leaky work place that incidentally also blew Mushnik and Orin into smithereens (except for some understandably small tissue traces) and collected big after the insurance companies paid up for the lost lives and ruined place. Audrey will be a co-plaintiff as an endangered employee plus an addition action to compensate her for the mental distress etc. for being so cruelly deprived of her dentist boyfriend. She boyfriend who just so happen to be visiting that evening to admire her wedding gown tryout for their upcoming nuptials. There won't be a dry eye at that insurance adjucation, and she will collect a nice, fat sum too.
2nd Feb '17 7:13:32 PM Adriantancy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** My two cents is that (a) Seymour invoked force majeur in his contracts so he can wriggle out of them without penalties, though he will have to return the balances of fees paid minus expenses, and (b) sued the estate of the late Mushnik to the ground for maintaining an unsafely wired and gas-leaky work place that incidentally also blew Mushnik and Orin into smithereens (except for some understandably small tissue traces) and collected after the insurance companies paid up for the lost lives and ruined place. Audrey will be a co-plaintiff and will collect a nice, fat sum too.

to:

** My two cents is that (a) Seymour invoked force majeur in his contracts so he can wriggle out of them without penalties, though he will have to return the balances of fees paid minus expenses, and (b) sued the estate of the late Mushnik to the ground for maintaining an unsafely wired and gas-leaky work place that incidentally also blew Mushnik and Orin into smithereens (except for some understandably small tissue traces) and collected big after the insurance companies paid up for the lost lives and ruined place. Audrey will be a co-plaintiff and as an endangered employee plus an addition action to compensate her for the mental distress etc. for being so cruelly deprived of her dentist boyfriend. She will collect a nice, fat sum too.
2nd Feb '17 7:07:56 PM Adriantancy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** My two cents is that (a) Seymour invoked force majeur in his contracts so he can wriggle out of them without penalties, though he will have to return the balances of fees paid minus expenses, and (b) sued the estate of the late Mushnik to the ground for maintaining an unsafe gas-explossy work place that incidentally also blew Mushnik and Orin into smithereens (except for some understandably small tissue traces) and collected after the insurance companies paid up for the lost lives and ruined place. Audrey will be a co-plaintiff and will collect a nice, fat sum too.

to:

** My two cents is that (a) Seymour invoked force majeur in his contracts so he can wriggle out of them without penalties, though he will have to return the balances of fees paid minus expenses, and (b) sued the estate of the late Mushnik to the ground for maintaining an unsafe gas-explossy unsafely wired and gas-leaky work place that incidentally also blew Mushnik and Orin into smithereens (except for some understandably small tissue traces) and collected after the insurance companies paid up for the lost lives and ruined place. Audrey will be a co-plaintiff and will collect a nice, fat sum too.
2nd Feb '17 7:05:26 PM Adriantancy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** My two cents is that (a) Seymour invoked force majeur in his contracts so he can wriggle out of them without penalties, though he will have to return the balances minus expenses, and (b) sued the estate of the late Mushnik for maintaining an unsafe gas-explossy work place and collected after the insurance companies paid up for the ruined shop. Audrey will be a co-plaintiff and collected a nice sum too.

to:

** My two cents is that (a) Seymour invoked force majeur in his contracts so he can wriggle out of them without penalties, though he will have to return the balances of fees paid minus expenses, and (b) sued the estate of the late Mushnik to the ground for maintaining an unsafe gas-explossy work place that incidentally also blew Mushnik and Orin into smithereens (except for some understandably small tissue traces) and collected after the insurance companies paid up for the lost lives and ruined shop. place. Audrey will be a co-plaintiff and collected will collect a nice nice, fat sum too.
2nd Feb '17 6:58:33 PM Adriantancy
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** My two cents is that (a) Seymour invoked force majeur in his contracts so he can wriggle out of them without penalties, though he will have to return the balances minus expenses, and (b) sued the estate of the late Mushnik for maintaining an unsafe gas-explossy work place and collected after the insurance companies paid up for the ruined shop. Audrey will be a co-plaintiff and collected a nice sum too.
9th Jul '16 1:28:42 AM Vandegraff1
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** I always figured Seymour would have had to come up with a believable story for the cops to explain what happened to the shop, unless he wanted to be locked up for murder or committed to an asylum by telling the truth. If he went with a story about a structural collapse or a gas-main explosion, the destruction of the plant would have appeared to be completely out of his hands, and proving breach of contract would have likely been difficult in such circumstances.
13th Jun '16 11:51:33 AM AdelePotter
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** There's one line just before the climax where Seymour complains that Twoey "won't touch a mouse or anything," implying he did try it. Given Twoey's nature, it's debatable whether Twoey ''can't'' eat non-human blood, or if he just ''won't''.
25th Mar '16 12:05:26 PM AlinhoAlisson
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* OK, so Audrey II is dead, Seymour and Audrey move into the suburbs and everything is nice and dandy... But what happened to all the contracts Seymour signed about the plant? If [[RealityEnsues reality ensued]], he'd be sued to his last cent for breach of contract, lose all the money and they'd have to move back to a CrapsackWorld like Skid Row.
17th Feb '16 6:39:19 PM Blackjack254
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*** Also, the original ending isn't really faithful to the play, in that it's not really meant to be played seriously in the play as it is here. In the play, Seymour, Audrey, and Mushnik appear as buds and sing "Don't feed the Plants", for example.
21st Nov '15 4:09:58 PM rememberthehood1941
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** It makes more sense for the way Seymour is portrayed in the movie vs the play. In the movie, Seymour doesn't have much time to think about what's going on when he kills both Orin and Mushnik. Plus, they BOTH were portrayed as terrible people in the movie, what with Mushnik blackmailing Seymour into giving him the plant. If Seymour had let him live, things could have been even worse. In the play,however, Seymour thinks about it and makes a decision before killing both of them. There's an entire song where the Orin is begging for his life, and if you take the jokes out of it, it really is horrifying. Then there's no blackmail in the play. Mushnik is just doing his civic duty and keeping a probable murderer off the streets, and more importantly, out of his shop. Does he have ulterior motives? Sure, maybe, depending on how it's played. But it's still not likely that Seymour understands that intention. In fact, one could argue that Mushnik is the only male character who could ever be considered as a decent human being. After all, he took Seymour out of the orphanage and gave him a place to stay, even after he turned out to be a useless lump of a person. Despite him getting frustrated with them sometimes, he really did care for his employees and tried to help them whenever he could, so long as it didn't cost him anything. In spite of all he owes Mushnik, and the fact that Mushnik had done nothing wrong, Seymour stone cold killed the guy by tricking him into the plant. In the movie it looked almost like Seymour tried to stop him from going into the plant. The movie tried too hard to have Seymour be sympathetic and ended up changing the character to the point where he didn't deserve to die. After all, what did he do wrong? In the play, the only way for Seymour to atone for his sins is to sacrifice himself in an attempt to reverse his mistakes.

to:

** It makes more sense for the way Seymour is portrayed in the movie vs the play. In the movie, Seymour doesn't have much time to think about what's going on when he kills both Orin and Mushnik. Plus, they BOTH were portrayed as terrible people in the movie, what with Mushnik blackmailing Seymour into giving him the plant. If Seymour had let him live, things could have been even worse. In the play,however, Seymour thinks about it and makes a decision before killing both of them. There's an entire song where the Orin is begging for his life, and if you take the jokes out of it, it really is horrifying. Then there's no blackmail in the play. Mushnik is just doing his civic duty and keeping a probable murderer off the streets, and more importantly, out of his shop. Does he have ulterior motives? Sure, maybe, depending on how it's played. But it's still not likely that Seymour understands that intention. In fact, one could argue that Mushnik is the only male character who could ever be considered as a decent human being. After all, he took Seymour out of the orphanage and gave him a place to stay, even after he turned out to be a useless lump of a person.person AND he's the first person to tell Audrey that Orin is bad news. Despite him getting frustrated with them sometimes, he really did care for his employees and tried to help them whenever he could, so long as it didn't cost him anything. In spite of all he owes Mushnik, and the fact that Mushnik had done nothing wrong, Seymour stone cold killed the guy by tricking him into the plant. In the movie it looked almost like Seymour tried to stop him from going into the plant. The movie tried too hard to have Seymour be sympathetic and ended up changing the character to the point where he didn't deserve to die. After all, what did he do wrong? In the play, the only way for Seymour to atone for his sins is to sacrifice himself in an attempt to reverse his mistakes.


Added DiffLines:

*** The film's version was shown using a telephone to lure Audrey to the shop. Wouldn't be a complete stretch to [[FridgeBrilliance calling Dr. Martin impersonating Seymour to get him to talk about the deal in the original ending]].
This list shows the last 10 events of 81. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Headscratchers.LittleShopOfHorrors