History Headscratchers / LawAndOrder

24th May '18 9:39:38 AM nightkiller
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** Then and now, all death sentences in the U.S. are subject to mandatory appeal.
21st Mar '18 1:16:23 PM LittleDancerGirl
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*** To quote a different show, "The courts are like dice. They have no memory." The jury system does not consistently hand out the same verdicts when presented with the same case, much less cases as different as that. This is convenient for dramatic purposes on the show, but it's also pretty much true.

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*** To quote a different show, "The courts are like dice. They have no memory." The jury system does not consistently hand out results of a previous, unrelated case have absolutely no bearing on what happens in the same verdicts case of the moment, especially when presented with you consider that the same case, much less cases as different as that. chances of there being any overlap between the two juries is vanishingly small. This is convenient for dramatic purposes on the show, but it's also pretty much true.true.
*** Also, the ultimate issue isn't about how sympathetic the character is, it's about whether they had the mental capacity to form intent. The kid in "Sheltered" was literally brainwashed to the extent where he couldn't form rational thought; he got off on an insanity defense and was sent to a psychiatric hospital. The killer in "Captive" knew what he was doing and killed out of jealousy. The reason his previous trauma was even relevant was because the defense was trying to use the same brainwashing argument, using the fact that he didn't escape when he had a chance as proof; finding out that he simply didn't want to go home pretty much destroys the argument.
16th Mar '18 9:33:47 PM TheGoodnight
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In the season 5 episode ďSeedĒ the cops investigate a fertility doctor, finding evidence he defrauded his patients with a treatment that didnít work, telling them they were pregnant then staging fake miscarriages to explain the lack of a baby. On the way, they uncover a different fraud, that for other patients seeking in vitro fertilization, heís used the same sperm donor dozens of times despite promising clients that a given donor is used only four times. After the lawyers take over abd go through some difficulties, they find the donor was the doctor himself. At that point they say they canít prosecute him for fraud because though itís despicable, thereís nothing illegal about using his own sperm and all he promised the patients was the donor would be anonymous. They have to struggle to persuade one couple who wanted to use the husbandís sperm to come forward, because apparently they were the only ones defrauded. So hereís the problem: what about the promise each donor would be used only four times? Wasnít that fraud? What about the fraudulent fertility treatment the cops found early on? Not as startling as the sperm donation, but it did lead to a womanís death that opened the episode. Why canít they prosecute him for any of that?
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24th Jan '18 10:12:40 AM cluosborne
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*** I imagine after Karlin's outburst in the DA's office, her behavior in the courtroom is going to get a lot more attention.

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*** * Another thing: This took place before social media existed. If Karlin was acting this way today, there'd be a lot more public attention/backlash.
**
I imagine after Karlin's outburst in the DA's office, her behavior in the courtroom is going to get a lot more attention.
24th Jan '18 10:09:12 AM cluosborne
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* Fear of retaliation perhaps. In an SVU episode, Judge Taft, a biased judge, had retaliated against a defense lawyer after he asked Taft to recuse himself.
* Another possibility is that most, if not all, of the defendants in question were not of means and felt that filing a complaint wouldn't help.
* Yet another possibility is that her decisions on her lengthy prison sentences were reduced on appeal. Or that her reputation was exaggerated.
*** I imagine after Karlin's outburst in the DA's office, her behavior in the courtroom is going to get a lot more attention.
21st Jan '18 11:54:59 PM cjqtwm
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"Judge Dread": Attempt on her life aside, how has ''no one'' brought forward a complaint regarding Judge [[HangingJudge Linda Karlin]]'s always-maximum sentences even for minor felonies (often in the ''hundreds of years'')? Her reputation with fifteen years on the bench is well known, but the episode never mentions any professional complaints from any other members of the judicial system (D.A.'s Office, appeals courts, etc.).
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21st Jul '17 9:11:00 PM DoctorNemesis
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** As for his personal relationships, it's not like Jack ever hid them or that there was ever anything salacious or unethical about them implied; as he himself once said, he just found some of his coworkers more intellectually and more emotionally stimulating than the women he met at the gym. Sure, I've no doubt any of his opponents might have tried to make some hay out of his past, but I assume that Jack would done what he did when Claire confronted him about them that time -- simply told the truth that those relationships were entirely above board, consensual and nothing to be ashamed of. If anything, the voters would probably have appreciated his honesty and frankness.

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** As for his personal relationships, it's not like Jack ever hid them or that there was ever anything salacious or unethical about them implied; as he himself once said, he just found some of his coworkers more intellectually and more emotionally stimulating than the women he met at the gym. Sure, I've no doubt any of his opponents might have tried to make some hay out of his past, but I assume that Jack would done what he did when Claire confronted him about them that time -- simply told the truth that those relationships were entirely above board, consensual and nothing to be ashamed of. If anything, the voters would probably have appreciated his honesty and frankness. An unmarried man dating his assistant(s) might not be the most proper thing to ever occur, but neither is it the worst sexual indiscretion ever performed by a politician (and to link to the point above, the current US President was elected in spite of video footage of him all but admitting to acts that are at very least sexual harassment, if not outright sexual assault).
21st Jul '17 9:07:00 PM DoctorNemesis
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** The voters might have also been in the mood for an 'outsider' figure, someone not seen to be as part of the establishment system. As we saw in 2016, the candidate with the backing of the political establishment, the wealthy and the big-business community isn't always the candidate that's guaranteed to win the election, and for all his flaws [=McCoy=] certainly has more to recommend him on his side than You-Know-Who did.

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** The voters might have also been in the mood for an 'outsider' figure, someone not seen to be as part of the establishment system. As we saw in 2016, the candidate with the backing of the political establishment, the wealthy and the big-business community isn't always the candidate that's guaranteed to win the election, and for all his flaws [=McCoy=] certainly has more to recommend him on his side than You-Know-Who did.did.
** As for his personal relationships, it's not like Jack ever hid them or that there was ever anything salacious or unethical about them implied; as he himself once said, he just found some of his coworkers more intellectually and more emotionally stimulating than the women he met at the gym. Sure, I've no doubt any of his opponents might have tried to make some hay out of his past, but I assume that Jack would done what he did when Claire confronted him about them that time -- simply told the truth that those relationships were entirely above board, consensual and nothing to be ashamed of. If anything, the voters would probably have appreciated his honesty and frankness.
21st Jul '17 9:01:50 PM DoctorNemesis
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** The voters might have also been in the mood for an 'outsider' figure, someone not seen to be as part of the establishment system. As we saw in 2016, the candidate with the establishment backing and the wealthy big-business support isn't always the candidate that's guaranteed to win the election, and [=McCoy=] certainly has more on his side than You-Know-Who did.

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** The voters might have also been in the mood for an 'outsider' figure, someone not seen to be as part of the establishment system. As we saw in 2016, the candidate with the establishment backing and of the political establishment, the wealthy and the big-business support community isn't always the candidate that's guaranteed to win the election, and for all his flaws [=McCoy=] certainly has more to recommend him on his side than You-Know-Who did.
21st Jul '17 8:58:54 PM DoctorNemesis
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*** If anything his [[CowboyCop Cowboy District Attorney]] practices would endear him to a lot of people, sort of like [[Movies/TheDarkKnight Harvey Dent]], someone not afraid to confront criminals as part of the Giuliani-era New York. It's not necessarily what he ''does'' so much as what the people ''see'' him do. He has a high number of convictions and makes some truly good cases, so its not inconceivable that, [[AntiHero personal issues aside]], he could be popular enough to stay on as long as he did.

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*** If anything his [[CowboyCop Cowboy District Attorney]] practices would endear him to a lot of people, sort of like [[Movies/TheDarkKnight Harvey Dent]], someone not afraid to confront criminals as part of the Giuliani-era New York. It's not necessarily what he ''does'' so much as what the people ''see'' him do. He has a high number of convictions and makes some truly good cases, so its not inconceivable that, [[AntiHero personal issues aside]], he could be popular enough to stay on as long as he did.
** The voters might have also been in the mood for an 'outsider' figure, someone not seen to be as part of the establishment system. As we saw in 2016, the candidate with the establishment backing and the wealthy big-business support isn't always the candidate that's guaranteed to win the election, and [=McCoy=] certainly has more on his side than You-Know-Who
did.
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