History Headscratchers / Hogfather

3rd Jan '16 3:21:15 AM Bissek
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Added DiffLines:

[[/folder]]

[[folder:The Second Day of Hogswatch]]

* What would have happened if Ridcully had ''really'' sent back his present with a nasty little letter the next day as suggested in his interpretation of the Twelve Days song? The closest thing he's ever had to a true love is Granny Weatherwax.
19th Dec '15 1:23:49 PM Discar
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* Why was Mustrum Ridcully in Hogfather not played by BRIAN BLESSED (BUUUUURSAAAAAR!!!).
** Because some things are just ''too'' perfect?
** The universe would implode from sheer awesome.
** More serious, the dude is old. Probably not in the best shape if he's been carrying around that much for so long, if you know what I mean.
*** Brian Blessed has 3 times the lung capacity of the average human being, a good chunk of his mass is ammo storage for the sonic weapon array he calls a mouth.
*** The Archchancellor was played by Joss Ackland who is 8 years ''older'' than Brian Blessed.
** You have presented to us the mental image of a nude elderly Brian Blessed taking an abnormally high-powered shower (thank you, Bloody Stupid Johnson), with implications of washing certain body parts we do not normally wash. Do not take it personally if we ask that the image be removed ''immediately''.

to:

* Why was Mustrum Ridcully in Hogfather not played by BRIAN BLESSED (BUUUUURSAAAAAR!!!).
** Because some things are just ''too'' perfect?
** The universe would implode from sheer awesome.
** More serious,
New entries on the dude is old. Probably not in the best shape if he's been carrying around that much for so long, if you know what I mean.
*** Brian Blessed has 3 times the lung capacity of the average human being, a good chunk of his mass is ammo storage for the sonic weapon array he calls a mouth.
*** The Archchancellor was played by Joss Ackland who is 8 years ''older'' than Brian Blessed.
** You have presented to us the mental image of a nude elderly Brian Blessed taking an abnormally high-powered shower (thank you, Bloody Stupid Johnson), with implications of washing certain body parts we do not normally wash. Do not take it personally if we ask that the image be removed ''immediately''.
bottom.

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Match Girl]]



*** In-universe explanation is that on the Disc the afterlife is pretty crap for anyone that isn't a Feegle. Out-universe Pterry and most of his fans tend not to put much [[IncrediblyLamePun faith in deities]]. Being one with a god isn't half as good as actually living your life.
*** And as Death points out, it would have helped a lot more if the angels had come ''before'' the little girl froze to death, not after. They certainly have more than enough carrying capacity, as he points out, and coming after her death just isn't helpful at all.
*** If you asked ''the grandmother'' from the original story if she'd rather someone had come by and saved the girl's life, do you really think she'd have said no?
*** This being Discworld, there are multiple Heavens, and each Heaven is not ''necessarily'' as nice as the RealLife Heaven is supposed to be. The specific Heaven she was headed for was one populated entirely by angels who would deliberately refuse to save a little girl from death , not because they weren't powerful enough, but because ''they thought her death would make a better story''. It kinda makes sense that Death - who ''loves'' and ''cares about'' humanity - would be '''livid''' at such blatant [[TheSociopath sociopathy]] by [[CantArgueWithElves supposedly-superior beings]].

to:

*** ** In-universe explanation is that on the Disc the afterlife is pretty crap for anyone that isn't a Feegle. Out-universe Pterry and most of his fans tend not to put much [[IncrediblyLamePun faith in deities]]. Being one with a god isn't half as good as actually living your life.
*** ** And as Death points out, it would have helped a lot more if the angels had come ''before'' the little girl froze to death, not after. They certainly have more than enough carrying capacity, as he points out, and coming after her death just isn't helpful at all.
*** ** If you asked ''the grandmother'' from the original story if she'd rather someone had come by and saved the girl's life, do you really think she'd have said no?
*** ** This being Discworld, there are multiple Heavens, and each Heaven is not ''necessarily'' as nice as the RealLife Heaven is supposed to be. The specific Heaven she was headed for was one populated entirely by angels who would deliberately refuse to save a little girl from death , not because they weren't powerful enough, but because ''they thought her death would make a better story''. It kinda makes sense that Death - who ''loves'' and ''cares about'' humanity - would be '''livid''' at such blatant [[TheSociopath sociopathy]] by [[CantArgueWithElves supposedly-superior beings]].



*** Who else is better equipped to champion life but the being tasked with taking it away? It's his responsibility to reap the souls of untold millions, if not billions. If someone presented you with a starving, freezing orphan girl and gave you a gun and directions to a shelter for her, what would you do if they told you that killing her is the only option? You may argue that it's a mercy kill but Death does not really have that option, only an obligation.

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*** ** Who else is better equipped to champion life but the being tasked with taking it away? It's his responsibility to reap the souls of untold millions, if not billions. If someone presented you with a starving, freezing orphan girl and gave you a gun and directions to a shelter for her, what would you do if they told you that killing her is the only option? You may argue that it's a mercy kill but Death does not really have that option, only an obligation.



*** I am certain other people than Feegles can get a good afterlife on the Disc, such as Teach, Doctor Undershaft, Mrs. Flitworth and a few others. But, putting that aside:

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*** ** I am certain other people than Feegles can get a good afterlife on the Disc, such as Teach, Doctor Undershaft, Mrs. Flitworth and a few others. But, putting that aside:



*** I'm sorry, you're trying to tell me that Hans Christian Andersen was against charity, kindness, and social welfare? The man was ''very'' depressed and troubled. He wrote a story about a pathetic little girl who is helpless to change her fate, to whom the world is cruel, because that's what he perceived of life. He tried to console himself, his readers, and the girl by giving her a happy afterlife with her grandmother.
*** Maybe a better way to put it is that Terry isn't against Hans Christian Andersen, but against the way that most people (who don't think about its implications very hard) interpret the story that he wrote as some kind of heartwarming tale without any darker implications.

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*** ** I'm sorry, you're trying to tell me that Hans Christian Andersen was against charity, kindness, and social welfare? The man was ''very'' depressed and troubled. He wrote a story about a pathetic little girl who is helpless to change her fate, to whom the world is cruel, because that's what he perceived of life. He tried to console himself, his readers, and the girl by giving her a happy afterlife with her grandmother.
*** ** Maybe a better way to put it is that Terry isn't against Hans Christian Andersen, but against the way that most people (who don't think about its implications very hard) interpret the story that he wrote as some kind of heartwarming tale without any darker implications.



*** It's simple, you only have to ask yourself this question: Is it in the spirit of Hogwatch to let little girl freeze to death on the street?

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*** ** It's simple, you only have to ask yourself this question: Is it in the spirit of Hogwatch to let little girl freeze to death on the street?



*** She could live a full, happy life in Heaven. This is part of the larger problem of writing a story about the anthropomorphic personification of something that does not exist in the setting. People do not die on the Discworld, they go somewhere else. The only difference with the Tooth Fairy's castle is the corpses.
*** That's not correct at all. People do, in fact, die on the Discworld. This book is about, you know, ''Death''. It's never, at all, ever said that people just "go somewhere else" on the Discworld. They explicitly die.
*** The idea that seems to come up most often when discussing Death in these books is that once you're dead, you're done. You can still be *happy*, but your life is over -- you have no more possibilities, and can't accomplish anything, grow, change, or do any of the things that constitute a real life. Death is stasis -- which means that even if the girl just goes to Heaven, she's still being robbed of having a real life (which is arguably the most important thing that anyone can have). Just being *happy* isn't the same thing as "living."
*** That doesn't seem to be true. Mr. Tulip (who is, admittedly, a very unusual case) can feel "really -ing sorry" after his death, and at least partially redeems himself. Brutha continues to help people. Vorbis is being helped on the way through the desert. Ms. Lejean is ready for new experiences. Some people are reincarnated (e.g., "Bjorn again"). And so on and so forth. Discworld death definitely isn't always a stasis.
*** Stasis or not, benevolent or not, the afterlife isn't something people should be ''counting on'' to make up for a dismal, abbreviated Discly life. Life is to be cherished and made the most of, not casually discarded or muddled through as a mere prequel to what comes next; that's been part of Discworld's message ever since Cohen saved Bethan from being sacrificed to the moon goddess. Look at Djelibeybi, if you want to see how deep a rut living for the afterlife can dig for a society; better yet, ask Brutha what ''he'' thinks about the fate of the Little Match Girl, and you can bet he'd tell you: "Here and now, we are alive".

to:

*** ** She could live a full, happy life in Heaven. This is part of the larger problem of writing a story about the anthropomorphic personification of something that does not exist in the setting. People do not die on the Discworld, they go somewhere else. The only difference with the Tooth Fairy's castle is the corpses.
*** ** That's not correct at all. People do, in fact, die on the Discworld. This book is about, you know, ''Death''. It's never, at all, ever said that people just "go somewhere else" on the Discworld. They explicitly die.
*** ** The idea that seems to come up most often when discussing Death in these books is that once you're dead, you're done. You can still be *happy*, but your life is over -- you have no more possibilities, and can't accomplish anything, grow, change, or do any of the things that constitute a real life. Death is stasis -- which means that even if the girl just goes to Heaven, she's still being robbed of having a real life (which is arguably the most important thing that anyone can have). Just being *happy* isn't the same thing as "living."
*** ** That doesn't seem to be true. Mr. Tulip (who is, admittedly, a very unusual case) can feel "really -ing sorry" after his death, and at least partially redeems himself. Brutha continues to help people. Vorbis is being helped on the way through the desert. Ms. Lejean is ready for new experiences. Some people are reincarnated (e.g., "Bjorn again"). And so on and so forth. Discworld death definitely isn't always a stasis.
*** ** Stasis or not, benevolent or not, the afterlife isn't something people should be ''counting on'' to make up for a dismal, abbreviated Discly life. Life is to be cherished and made the most of, not casually discarded or muddled through as a mere prequel to what comes next; that's been part of Discworld's message ever since Cohen saved Bethan from being sacrificed to the moon goddess. Look at Djelibeybi, if you want to see how deep a rut living for the afterlife can dig for a society; better yet, ask Brutha what ''he'' thinks about the fate of the Little Match Girl, and you can bet he'd tell you: "Here and now, we are alive".



[[/folder]]

[[folder:Wenceslas]]



*** It was a few things: 1. The king was giving him leftovers (condescension); 2. The king was giving the old man far too much, and food that wouldn't keep as further leftovers (wastefulness); and 3, as pointed out, the old man didn't want it, because the old man had ''already'' spent time, money, and effort on his own meal, which goes to waste if he takes the king's "gift". Death gives him a bit of pork, which is more of an addition or complement to his meal, rather than replacing it.
*** True, the king's gifts were leftovers, and he was a dick about it. But still, Death criticized his basic motives not just the gifts (he's self-serving, he did not help the old man before, nor he will after) and I think that's hypocritical.
*** It's only hypocritical if Death intervened ''knowing'' that doing so would make himself feel good. He's seldom had the opportunity to do good deeds before, so is unfamiliar enough with the concept that they're satisfying that he probably wasn't anticipating any such reward when he involved himself: he just wanted to stop the ''king'' from indulging his royal ego that way.

to:

*** ** It was a few things: 1. The king was giving him leftovers (condescension); 2. The king was giving the old man far too much, and food that wouldn't keep as further leftovers (wastefulness); and 3, as pointed out, the old man didn't want it, because the old man had ''already'' spent time, money, and effort on his own meal, which goes to waste if he takes the king's "gift". Death gives him a bit of pork, which is more of an addition or complement to his meal, rather than replacing it.
*** ** True, the king's gifts were leftovers, and he was a dick about it. But still, Death criticized his basic motives not just the gifts (he's self-serving, he did not help the old man before, nor he will after) and I think that's hypocritical.
*** ** It's only hypocritical if Death intervened ''knowing'' that doing so would make himself feel good. He's seldom had the opportunity to do good deeds before, so is unfamiliar enough with the concept that they're satisfying that he probably wasn't anticipating any such reward when he involved himself: he just wanted to stop the ''king'' from indulging his royal ego that way.



[[/folder]]

[[folder:New gods]]



[[/folder]]

[[folder:Albert's time]]



[[/folder]]

[[folder:Price of gifts]]



* Violet the tooth fairy girl and Bilious the Oh God of Hangovers are attracted to each other. Violet compounds the Oh God's attraction by mentioning she's part of a temperance movement and doesn't drink. Where does Susan know Violet from? They've seen each other at Biers, a pub ...
** Biers serves a rather ecclectic clientelle, and it makes sense that not ''all'' the drinks there are alcoholic (or edible by human standards for that matter). Angua goes there and orders fruit juice in ''Feet of Clay''.

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[[/folder]]

[[folder:Violet and temperence]]

* Violet the tooth fairy girl and Bilious the Oh God of Hangovers are attracted to each other. Violet compounds the Oh God's attraction by mentioning she's part of a temperance movement and doesn't drink. Where does Susan know Violet from? They've seen each other at Biers, a pub ...
pub.
** Biers serves a rather ecclectic clientelle, eclectic clientele, and it makes sense that not ''all'' the drinks there are alcoholic (or edible by human standards for that matter). Angua goes there and orders fruit juice in ''Feet of Clay''.



** Tooth Fairy girls are InvisibleToNormals when they're working. It's possible that Biers is simply the ''only'' place in the city where Violet can be assured of service if she needs a snack break during her rounds.

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** Tooth Fairy girls are InvisibleToNormals when they're working. It's possible that Biers is simply the ''only'' place in the city where Violet can be assured of service if she needs a snack break during her rounds.rounds.

[[/folder]]
12th Nov '15 10:41:17 AM WildKatGirl
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* Aside from The Little Match Girl, the book also skewers the story of Good King Wenceslas. The king's charity is portrayed as self-serving, and he humiliates the old man with it. [[AC:Were you here last month? Will you be here next week? No. But tonight you wanted to feel all warm inside. Tonight you will want them to say: what a good king he is]] Death tells the king, and orders him to go. So far so good. But then, he gives a bunch of pork to the old man. How is that different? How is it not charity? Was Death there last month? Will he be there next week? Of course not. And just like the king, he does it because he wants to feel good about himself. He outright says afterwards to Albert: "[[AC:Wasn't that nice? I feel I was cut out for this sort of thing, you know. It's nice to do a job where people look forward to seeing you.]] How is ''his'' self-serving act of charity different from the king's?

to:

* Aside from The Little Match Girl, the book also skewers the story of Good King Wenceslas. The king's charity is portrayed as self-serving, and he humiliates the old man with it. [[AC:Were you here last month? Will you be here next week? No. But tonight you wanted to feel all warm inside. Tonight you will want them to say: what a good king he is]] Death tells the king, and orders him to go. So far so good. But then, he gives a bunch of pork to the old man. How is that different? How is it not charity? Was Death there last month? Will he be there next week? Of course not. And just like the king, he does it because he wants to feel good about himself. He outright says afterwards to Albert: "[[AC:Wasn't [[AC:Wasn't that nice? I feel I was cut out for this sort of thing, you know. It's nice to do a job where people look forward to seeing you.]] How is ''his'' self-serving act of charity different from the king's?
12th Nov '15 10:39:48 AM WildKatGirl
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* Aside from The Little Match Girl, the book also skewers the story of Good King Wenceslas. The king's charity is portrayed as self-serving, and he humiliates the old man with it. [[AC:Were you here last month? Will you be here next week? No. But tonight you wanted to feel all warm inside. Tonight you will want them to say: what a good king he is]] Death tells the king, and orders him to go. So far so good. But then, he gives a bunch of pork to the old man. How is that different? How is it not charity? Was Death there last month? Will he be there next week? Of course not. And just like the king, he does it because he wants to feel good about himself. He outright says afterwards to Albert: "WASNíT THAT NICE? I FEEL I WAS CUT OUT FOR THIS SORT OF THING, YOU KNOW. ITíS NICE TO DO A JOB WHERE PEOPLE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU." How is ''his'' self-serving act of charity different from the king's?

to:

* Aside from The Little Match Girl, the book also skewers the story of Good King Wenceslas. The king's charity is portrayed as self-serving, and he humiliates the old man with it. [[AC:Were you here last month? Will you be here next week? No. But tonight you wanted to feel all warm inside. Tonight you will want them to say: what a good king he is]] Death tells the king, and orders him to go. So far so good. But then, he gives a bunch of pork to the old man. How is that different? How is it not charity? Was Death there last month? Will he be there next week? Of course not. And just like the king, he does it because he wants to feel good about himself. He outright says afterwards to Albert: "WASNíT THAT NICE? "[[AC:Wasn't that nice? I FEEL feel I WAS CUT OUT FOR THIS SORT OF THING, YOU KNOW. ITíS NICE TO DO A JOB WHERE PEOPLE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU." was cut out for this sort of thing, you know. It's nice to do a job where people look forward to seeing you.]] How is ''his'' self-serving act of charity different from the king's?
12th Nov '15 10:37:36 AM WildKatGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Aside from The Little Match Girl, the book also skewers the story of Good King Wenceslas. The king's charity is portrayed as self-serving, and he humiliates the old man with it. [["AC:Were you here last month? Will you be here next week? No. But tonight you wanted to feel all warm inside. Tonight you will want them to say: what a good king he is"]] Death tells the king, and orders him to go. So far so good. But then, he gives a bunch of pork to the old man. How is that different? How is it not charity? Was Death there last month? Will he be there next week? Of course not. And just like the king, he does it because he wants to feel good about himself. He outright says afterwards to Albert: "WASNíT THAT NICE? I FEEL I WAS CUT OUT FOR THIS SORT OF THING, YOU KNOW. ITíS NICE TO DO A JOB WHERE PEOPLE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU." How is ''his'' self-serving act of charity different from the king's?

to:

* Aside from The Little Match Girl, the book also skewers the story of Good King Wenceslas. The king's charity is portrayed as self-serving, and he humiliates the old man with it. [["AC:Were [[AC:Were you here last month? Will you be here next week? No. But tonight you wanted to feel all warm inside. Tonight you will want them to say: what a good king he is"]] is]] Death tells the king, and orders him to go. So far so good. But then, he gives a bunch of pork to the old man. How is that different? How is it not charity? Was Death there last month? Will he be there next week? Of course not. And just like the king, he does it because he wants to feel good about himself. He outright says afterwards to Albert: "WASNíT THAT NICE? I FEEL I WAS CUT OUT FOR THIS SORT OF THING, YOU KNOW. ITíS NICE TO DO A JOB WHERE PEOPLE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU." How is ''his'' self-serving act of charity different from the king's?
12th Nov '15 10:34:52 AM WildKatGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Aside from The Little Match Girl, the book also skewers the story of Good King Wenceslas. The king's charity is portrayed as self-serving, and he humiliates the old man with it. [["AC: Were you here last month? Will you be here next week? No. But tonight you wanted to feel all warm inside. Tonight you will want them to say: what a good king he is"]] Death tells the king, and orders him to go. So far so good. But then, he gives a bunch of pork to the old man. How is that different? How is it not charity? Was Death there last month? Will he be there next week? Of course not. And just like the king, he does it because he wants to feel good about himself. He outright says afterwards to Albert: "WASNíT THAT NICE? I FEEL I WAS CUT OUT FOR THIS SORT OF THING, YOU KNOW. ITíS NICE TO DO A JOB WHERE PEOPLE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU." How is ''his'' self-serving act of charity different from the king's?

to:

* Aside from The Little Match Girl, the book also skewers the story of Good King Wenceslas. The king's charity is portrayed as self-serving, and he humiliates the old man with it. [["AC: Were [["AC:Were you here last month? Will you be here next week? No. But tonight you wanted to feel all warm inside. Tonight you will want them to say: what a good king he is"]] Death tells the king, and orders him to go. So far so good. But then, he gives a bunch of pork to the old man. How is that different? How is it not charity? Was Death there last month? Will he be there next week? Of course not. And just like the king, he does it because he wants to feel good about himself. He outright says afterwards to Albert: "WASNíT THAT NICE? I FEEL I WAS CUT OUT FOR THIS SORT OF THING, YOU KNOW. ITíS NICE TO DO A JOB WHERE PEOPLE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU." How is ''his'' self-serving act of charity different from the king's?
12th Nov '15 10:33:27 AM WildKatGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Aside from The Little Match Girl, the book also skewers the story of Good King Wenceslas. The king's charity is portrayed as self-serving, and he humiliates the old man with it. [["AC: Were you here last month? Will you be here next week? No. But tonight you wanted to feel all warm inside. tonight you will want them to say: what a good king he is"]] Death tells the king, and orders him to go. So far so good. But then, he gives a bunch of pork to the old man. How is that different? How is it not charity? Was Death there last month? Will he be there next week? Of course not. And just like the king, he does it because he wants to feel good about himself. He outright says afterwards to Albert: "WASNíT THAT NICE? I FEEL I WAS CUT OUT FOR THIS SORT OF THING, YOU KNOW. ITíS NICE TO DO A JOB WHERE PEOPLE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU." How is ''his'' self-serving act of charity different from the king's?

to:

* Aside from The Little Match Girl, the book also skewers the story of Good King Wenceslas. The king's charity is portrayed as self-serving, and he humiliates the old man with it. [["AC: Were you here last month? Will you be here next week? No. But tonight you wanted to feel all warm inside. tonight Tonight you will want them to say: what a good king he is"]] Death tells the king, and orders him to go. So far so good. But then, he gives a bunch of pork to the old man. How is that different? How is it not charity? Was Death there last month? Will he be there next week? Of course not. And just like the king, he does it because he wants to feel good about himself. He outright says afterwards to Albert: "WASNíT THAT NICE? I FEEL I WAS CUT OUT FOR THIS SORT OF THING, YOU KNOW. ITíS NICE TO DO A JOB WHERE PEOPLE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU." How is ''his'' self-serving act of charity different from the king's?
12th Nov '15 10:31:13 AM WildKatGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Aside from The Little Match Girl, the book also skewers the story of Good King Wenceslas. The king's charity is portrayed as self-serving, and he humiliates the old man with it. "[[AC: Were you here last month?]] [[AC: WILL YOU BE HERE NEXT WEEK? NO. BUT TONIGHT YOU WANTED TO FEEL ALL WARM INSIDE. TONIGHT YOU WILL WANT THEM TO SAY: WHAT A GOOD KING HE IS"]] Death tells the king, and orders him to go. So far so good. But then, he gives a bunch of pork to the old man. How is that different? How is it not charity? Was Death there last month? Will he be there next week? Of course not. And just like the king, he does it because he wants to feel good about himself. He outright says afterwards to Albert: "WASNíT THAT NICE? I FEEL I WAS CUT OUT FOR THIS SORT OF THING, YOU KNOW. ITíS NICE TO DO A JOB WHERE PEOPLE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU." How is ''his'' self-serving act of charity different from the king's?

to:

* Aside from The Little Match Girl, the book also skewers the story of Good King Wenceslas. The king's charity is portrayed as self-serving, and he humiliates the old man with it. "[[AC: [["AC: Were you here last month?]] [[AC: WILL YOU BE HERE NEXT WEEK? NO. BUT TONIGHT YOU WANTED TO FEEL ALL WARM INSIDE. TONIGHT YOU WILL WANT THEM TO SAY: WHAT A GOOD KING HE IS"]] month? Will you be here next week? No. But tonight you wanted to feel all warm inside. tonight you will want them to say: what a good king he is"]] Death tells the king, and orders him to go. So far so good. But then, he gives a bunch of pork to the old man. How is that different? How is it not charity? Was Death there last month? Will he be there next week? Of course not. And just like the king, he does it because he wants to feel good about himself. He outright says afterwards to Albert: "WASNíT THAT NICE? I FEEL I WAS CUT OUT FOR THIS SORT OF THING, YOU KNOW. ITíS NICE TO DO A JOB WHERE PEOPLE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU." How is ''his'' self-serving act of charity different from the king's?
12th Nov '15 10:28:59 AM WildKatGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Aside from The Little Match Girl, the book also skewers the story of Good King Wenceslas. The king's charity is portrayed as self-serving, and he humiliates the old man with it. "[[AC: Were you here last month?]] WILL YOU BE HERE NEXT WEEK? NO. BUT TONIGHT YOU WANTED TO FEEL ALL WARM INSIDE. TONIGHT YOU WILL WANT THEM TO SAY: WHAT A GOOD KING HE IS" Death tells the king, and orders him to go. So far so good. But then, he gives a bunch of pork to the old man. How is that different? How is it not charity? Was Death there last month? Will he be there next week? Of course not. And just like the king, he does it because he wants to feel good about himself. He outright says afterwards to Albert: "WASNíT THAT NICE? I FEEL I WAS CUT OUT FOR THIS SORT OF THING, YOU KNOW. ITíS NICE TO DO A JOB WHERE PEOPLE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU." How is ''his'' self-serving act of charity different from the king's?

to:

* Aside from The Little Match Girl, the book also skewers the story of Good King Wenceslas. The king's charity is portrayed as self-serving, and he humiliates the old man with it. "[[AC: Were you here last month?]] [[AC: WILL YOU BE HERE NEXT WEEK? NO. BUT TONIGHT YOU WANTED TO FEEL ALL WARM INSIDE. TONIGHT YOU WILL WANT THEM TO SAY: WHAT A GOOD KING HE IS" IS"]] Death tells the king, and orders him to go. So far so good. But then, he gives a bunch of pork to the old man. How is that different? How is it not charity? Was Death there last month? Will he be there next week? Of course not. And just like the king, he does it because he wants to feel good about himself. He outright says afterwards to Albert: "WASNíT THAT NICE? I FEEL I WAS CUT OUT FOR THIS SORT OF THING, YOU KNOW. ITíS NICE TO DO A JOB WHERE PEOPLE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU." How is ''his'' self-serving act of charity different from the king's?
12th Nov '15 10:28:10 AM WildKatGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Aside from The Little Match Girl, the book also skewers the story of Good King Wenceslas. The king's charity is portrayed as self-serving, and he humiliates the old man with it. "[[AC Were you here last month?]] WILL YOU BE HERE NEXT WEEK? NO. BUT TONIGHT YOU WANTED TO FEEL ALL WARM INSIDE. TONIGHT YOU WILL WANT THEM TO SAY: WHAT A GOOD KING HE IS" Death tells the king, and orders him to go. So far so good. But then, he gives a bunch of pork to the old man. How is that different? How is it not charity? Was Death there last month? Will he be there next week? Of course not. And just like the king, he does it because he wants to feel good about himself. He outright says afterwards to Albert: "WASNíT THAT NICE? I FEEL I WAS CUT OUT FOR THIS SORT OF THING, YOU KNOW. ITíS NICE TO DO A JOB WHERE PEOPLE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU." How is ''his'' self-serving act of charity different from the king's?

to:

* Aside from The Little Match Girl, the book also skewers the story of Good King Wenceslas. The king's charity is portrayed as self-serving, and he humiliates the old man with it. "[[AC "[[AC: Were you here last month?]] WILL YOU BE HERE NEXT WEEK? NO. BUT TONIGHT YOU WANTED TO FEEL ALL WARM INSIDE. TONIGHT YOU WILL WANT THEM TO SAY: WHAT A GOOD KING HE IS" Death tells the king, and orders him to go. So far so good. But then, he gives a bunch of pork to the old man. How is that different? How is it not charity? Was Death there last month? Will he be there next week? Of course not. And just like the king, he does it because he wants to feel good about himself. He outright says afterwards to Albert: "WASNíT THAT NICE? I FEEL I WAS CUT OUT FOR THIS SORT OF THING, YOU KNOW. ITíS NICE TO DO A JOB WHERE PEOPLE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU." How is ''his'' self-serving act of charity different from the king's?
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