History Headscratchers / HarryPotterOther

24th May '16 11:30:22 AM QuarrelsomeChevon
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** That may be true. But if the original books ''were'' written based off of stereotypes of British people, they must've flown right over my head, likely because I know very little about Britain. But even if the author/writer is British, I still would've like to have been able to read/watch something about my own country without having to work my way through some sort of social commentary first.
21st May '16 12:47:27 PM inspibrain101
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* I'm not entirely sure if this has been confirmed by Word of God, but it seems that J.K. Rowling wrote the Harry Potter series to progress in maturity with its original audience; starting at an elementary school level with "Sorcerer's/Philosopher's Stone," and ending with Young Adult level "Deathly Hallows". There are two parts to my issue with this: First, we're now stuck with a series where the first book is read to kids as a bedtime story, and the last book is... hopefully not. Is this really a good marketing strategy? You'd hope that you would be able to pick up more readers over the years, and it seemeth to me that it would be difficult to do that if you don't have a consistent target audience. Granted, it's still a good series, but it's like the first movie in a trilogy being PG and the last being rated R. Values dissonance on my part, maybe? Probably. Second: J.K. treats the Harry Potter world as either "Children's fairy tale" or "Dark, Fantasy drama". For example, the Dursley's treatment of Harry is generally treated in a light-hearted, Cinderella style, Quidditch is a fun wizarding game, and Ron and Harry steal a flying car and get into shenanigans. Fun for the whole family, wheee! But on the other hand, there are some deep and disturbing implications about government, racism, and the media, and some seriously disturbing death and battle scenes in the last few books. MAKE UP YOUR MIND! We can't take some parts lightly and others seriously- like the use of the Cruciatus curse versus the cartoonish Dursleys. It's either a fairy tale, or an epic fantasy. I'm fine with either, but I don't enjoy the flip-flopping.

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* I'm not entirely sure if this has been confirmed by Word of God, but it seems that J.K. Rowling wrote the Harry Potter series to progress in maturity with its original audience; starting at an elementary school level with "Sorcerer's/Philosopher's Stone," and ending with Young Adult level "Deathly Hallows". There are two parts to my issue with this: First, we're now stuck with a series where the first book is read to kids as a bedtime story, and the last book is... hopefully not. Is this really a good marketing strategy? You'd hope that you would be able to pick up more readers over the years, and it seemeth to me that it would be difficult to do that if you don't have a consistent target audience. Granted, it's still a good series, but it's like the first movie in a trilogy being PG and the last being rated R. Values dissonance on my part, maybe? Probably. Second: J.K. treats the Harry Potter world as either "Children's fairy tale" or "Dark, Fantasy drama". For example, the Dursley's treatment of Harry is generally treated in a light-hearted, Cinderella style, Quidditch is a fun wizarding game, and Ron and Harry steal a flying car and get into shenanigans. Fun for the whole family, wheee! But on the other hand, there are some deep and disturbing implications about government, racism, and the media, and some seriously disturbing death and battle scenes in the last few books. MAKE UP YOUR MIND! We can't take some parts lightly and others seriously- like the use of the Cruciatus curse versus the cartoonish Dursleys. In the same book, we're supposed to be outraged at the lack of quality teaching in DADA, yet chuckle fondly at the students' boredom in History of Magic- taught by a GHOST?! Point is, the switch in seriousness implies some blatant double standards. It's either a fairy tale, or an epic fantasy. I'm fine with either, but I don't enjoy the flip-flopping.
20th May '16 5:12:50 PM inspibrain101
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[[folder: Fairy Tale or Epic Fantasy?]]
* I'm not entirely sure if this has been confirmed by Word of God, but it seems that J.K. Rowling wrote the Harry Potter series to progress in maturity with its original audience; starting at an elementary school level with "Sorcerer's/Philosopher's Stone," and ending with Young Adult level "Deathly Hallows". There are two parts to my issue with this: First, we're now stuck with a series where the first book is read to kids as a bedtime story, and the last book is... hopefully not. Is this really a good marketing strategy? You'd hope that you would be able to pick up more readers over the years, and it seemeth to me that it would be difficult to do that if you don't have a consistent target audience. Granted, it's still a good series, but it's like the first movie in a trilogy being PG and the last being rated R. Values dissonance on my part, maybe? Probably. Second: J.K. treats the Harry Potter world as either "Children's fairy tale" or "Dark, Fantasy drama". For example, the Dursley's treatment of Harry is generally treated in a light-hearted, Cinderella style, Quidditch is a fun wizarding game, and Ron and Harry steal a flying car and get into shenanigans. Fun for the whole family, wheee! But on the other hand, there are some deep and disturbing implications about government, racism, and the media, and some seriously disturbing death and battle scenes in the last few books. MAKE UP YOUR MIND! We can't take some parts lightly and others seriously- like the use of the Cruciatus curse versus the cartoonish Dursleys. It's either a fairy tale, or an epic fantasy. I'm fine with either, but I don't enjoy the flip-flopping.
[[/folder]]
13th May '16 10:42:27 AM Luppercus
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** I'm Latin American and well, there is an stereotype that Americans are much more conservative than Europeans and that laws are endorsed in a more drastic way, as for example, things like trigger-happy sheriffs, almost no gun control, the three strikes or sentencing someone for pedophile if he has sex with a 17 year old, all of it probably more Hollywood than reality, but is still the perception that a lot of the world have. European countries are generally seen as more liberal places were a lot of things tha are still taboo here in the Americas are to some degree more accepted there, which can probably also not be entirely true, but stereotypes do have a certain base in reality. So, the combination of both visions and the fact that the franchise always had social commentary using satiric representation, cause the effect. The division between magical and muggle government can also respond to two possible stereotypes; that the American society is very dividied between Left-wing Democrats and Right-wing Republicans to a point there is almost no co-operation between the two (this is uncommon in other countries as generally are more political diversity, take Germany or Spain for example) or the other idea that is very present in popular thought is that the US government is kind of authoritarian especially regarding internal treats and paranormal situations (y'know, Area 51, Roswell, etc.) so if the US government have information about a magical race of people their relationships will be hardly as cordial as in Europe.

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** I'm Latin American and well, there is an stereotype that Americans are much more conservative than Europeans and that laws are endorsed endorse in a more drastic way, as for example, things like trigger-happy sheriffs, almost no gun control, the three strikes or sentencing someone for pedophile if he has sex with a 17 year old, all of it probably more Hollywood than reality, but is still the perception that a lot of the world have. European countries are generally seen as more liberal places were a lot of things tha are still taboo here in the Americas are to some degree more accepted there, which can probably also not be entirely true, but stereotypes do have a certain base in reality. So, the combination of both visions and the fact that the franchise always had social commentary using satiric representation, cause the effect. The division between magical and muggle government can also respond to two possible stereotypes; that the American society is very dividied between Left-wing Democrats and Right-wing Republicans to a point there is almost no co-operation between the two (this is uncommon in other countries as generally are more political diversity, take Germany or Spain for example) or the other idea that is very present in popular thought is that the US government is kind of authoritarian especially regarding internal treats and paranormal situations (y'know, Area 51, Roswell, etc.) so if the US government have information about a magical race of people their relationships will be hardly as cordial as in Europe.


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**Stereotypes are normally not a true representation of anything. Yet, they're base generally in the image that certain countries project due to their media. I'm pretty sure there are many missconceptions about Latin America, Canada or Europe too.
12th May '16 6:08:40 PM QuarrelsomeChevon
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** Original poster here...Sorry, but despite being American myself, I have no ideas as to the meaning behind a lot of things people say are wrong with my country, like Democrats vs. Republicans - I don't really know what the two groups do - or converatism and liberalism...I'm just not one for stereotypes...Though then again, I've also never had any hard feelings towards Britain or anything, so maybe there was some sort of social commentary being made that flew right over my head in the original books - it just kind of bothers me that I'm finally learning about magic in my home country, only for it to be so much darker and much more controlled (and in some ways, uncontrolled), and it just makes it a lot less...''magical'' than how the original books had portrayed this stuff. I'm just hoping the movie won't focus too much on it.
12th May '16 7:43:59 AM Luppercus
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** I'm Latin American and well, there is an stereotype that Americans are much more conservative than Europeans and that laws are endorsed in a more drastic way, as for example, things like trigger-happy sheriffs, almost no gun control, the three strikes or sentencing someone for pedophile if he has sex with a 17 year old, all of it probably more Hollywood than reality, but is still the perception that a lot of the world have. European countries are generally seen as more liberal places were a lot of things tha are still taboo here in the Americas are to some degree more accepted there, which can probably also not be entirely true, but stereotypes do have a certain base in reality. So, the combination fo both visions and the fact that the franchise always had social commentary using satiric representation, cause the effect. The division between magical and muggle government can also respond to two possible stereotypes; that the American society is very dividied between Left-wing Democrats and Right-wing Republicans to a point there is almost no co-operation between the two (this is uncommon in other countries as generally are more political diversity, take Germany or Spain for example) or the other idea that is very present in popular thought is that the US government is kind of authoritarian especially regarding internal treats and paranormal situations (y'know, Area 51, Roswell, etc.) so if the US government have information about a magical race of people their relationships will be hardly as cordial as in Europe.

to:

** I'm Latin American and well, there is an stereotype that Americans are much more conservative than Europeans and that laws are endorsed in a more drastic way, as for example, things like trigger-happy sheriffs, almost no gun control, the three strikes or sentencing someone for pedophile if he has sex with a 17 year old, all of it probably more Hollywood than reality, but is still the perception that a lot of the world have. European countries are generally seen as more liberal places were a lot of things tha are still taboo here in the Americas are to some degree more accepted there, which can probably also not be entirely true, but stereotypes do have a certain base in reality. So, the combination fo of both visions and the fact that the franchise always had social commentary using satiric representation, cause the effect. The division between magical and muggle government can also respond to two possible stereotypes; that the American society is very dividied between Left-wing Democrats and Right-wing Republicans to a point there is almost no co-operation between the two (this is uncommon in other countries as generally are more political diversity, take Germany or Spain for example) or the other idea that is very present in popular thought is that the US government is kind of authoritarian especially regarding internal treats and paranormal situations (y'know, Area 51, Roswell, etc.) so if the US government have information about a magical race of people their relationships will be hardly as cordial as in Europe.
12th May '16 7:42:22 AM Luppercus
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**Take in consideration that he is looking for things were to put '''his soul''', even a normal person would be reluctant to choose any mundane object.



** I'm Latin American and well, there is an stereotype that Americans are much more conservative than Europeans and that laws are endorsed in a more drastic way, as for example, things like trigger-happy sheriffs, almost no gun control, the three strikes or sentencing someone for pedophile if he has sex with a 17 year old, all of it probably more Hollywood than reality, but is still the perception that a lot of the world have. European countries are generally seen as more liberal places were a lot of things tha are still taboo here in the Americas are to some degree more accepted there, which can probably also not be entirely true, but stereotypes do have a certain base in reality. So, the combination fo both visions and the fact that the franchise always had social commentary using satiric representation, cause the effect. The division between magical and muggle government can also respond to two possible stereotypes; una that the American society is very dividied between Left-wing Democrats and Right-wing Republicans to a point there is almost no co-operation between the two (this is uncommon in other countries as generally are more political diversity, take Germany or Spain for example) or the other idea that is very present in popular thought is that the US government is kind of authoritarian especually regarding internal treats and paranormal situations (y'know, Area 51, Roswell, etc.) so if the US government have information about a magical race of people their relationships will be hardly as cordial as in Europe.

to:

** I'm Latin American and well, there is an stereotype that Americans are much more conservative than Europeans and that laws are endorsed in a more drastic way, as for example, things like trigger-happy sheriffs, almost no gun control, the three strikes or sentencing someone for pedophile if he has sex with a 17 year old, all of it probably more Hollywood than reality, but is still the perception that a lot of the world have. European countries are generally seen as more liberal places were a lot of things tha are still taboo here in the Americas are to some degree more accepted there, which can probably also not be entirely true, but stereotypes do have a certain base in reality. So, the combination fo both visions and the fact that the franchise always had social commentary using satiric representation, cause the effect. The division between magical and muggle government can also respond to two possible stereotypes; una that the American society is very dividied between Left-wing Democrats and Right-wing Republicans to a point there is almost no co-operation between the two (this is uncommon in other countries as generally are more political diversity, take Germany or Spain for example) or the other idea that is very present in popular thought is that the US government is kind of authoritarian especually especially regarding internal treats and paranormal situations (y'know, Area 51, Roswell, etc.) so if the US government have information about a magical race of people their relationships will be hardly as cordial as in Europe.
12th May '16 7:39:20 AM Luppercus
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**I'm Latin American and well, there is an stereotype that Americans are much more conservative than Europeans and that laws are endorsed in a more drastic way, as for example, things like trigger-happy sheriffs, almost no gun control, the three strikes or sentencing someone for pedophile if he has sex with a 17 year old, all of it probably more Hollywood than reality, but is still the perception that a lot of the world have. European countries are generally seen as more liberal places were a lot of things tha are still taboo here in the Americas are to some degree more accepted there, which can probably also not be entirely true, but stereotypes do have a certain base in reality. So, the combination fo both visions and the fact that the franchise always had social commentary using satiric representation, cause the effect. The division between magical and muggle government can also respond to two possible stereotypes; una that the American society is very dividied between Left-wing Democrats and Right-wing Republicans to a point there is almost no co-operation between the two (this is uncommon in other countries as generally are more political diversity, take Germany or Spain for example) or the other idea that is very present in popular thought is that the US government is kind of authoritarian especually regarding internal treats and paranormal situations (y'know, Area 51, Roswell, etc.) so if the US government have information about a magical race of people their relationships will be hardly as cordial as in Europe.
11th May '16 10:29:56 PM QuarrelsomeChevon
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** The reason talking to snakes was important was because it was what Salazar Slytherin was known for, and even then, it was really only ''very'' important in the second book, when everyone thought Harry was his heir since he could speak the tongue. After that, it's really just that Voldemort happens to be the last of the Gaunts who are descended from Slytherin and can speak Parseltongue - he had an affinity for snakes even when he was young, so they're important to him.
11th May '16 10:26:01 PM QuarrelsomeChevon
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** Also...no. Fleur being married to Bill and Hermione being pen pals with Viktor Krum does not equate to Hogwarts having the support of foreign countries or their schools during the war, especially in the last book where the Ministry ''and'' school were both being run by Death Eaters and Dumbledore was already dead. It's possible some of the foreign relations were trying to help, but if they were, it couldn't have been a very organized fighting force since there was no one high enough in the British magical community there to organize it. A great deal of what happened in the second war was accomplished largely due to mass vigilantism.


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** For the argument that gardening is tough, that's why they teach Herbology at Hogwarts. Watering the planets? Use that water-summoning spell. Fertilizing, harvesting, there are probably charms for those, bugs could be repelled with magic, animal feed, you just need a little bit to be duplicated and you can make more...Not as difficult as it is to Muggles. (Or No-Majs, I guess, as we call them in America...)
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