History Headscratchers / Aladdin

16th May '17 8:56:31 AM Anorgil
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*** It's not that hard to buy: Jafar had already grilled Ali about which kingdom he was from, and Ali had never given him a good answer; that alone should have aroused Jafar's suspicions that Ali wasn't a prince at all.

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*** It's not that hard to buy: Jafar had already grilled Ali about which kingdom he was from, and Ali had never given him a good answer; that alone should have aroused Jafar's suspicions that Ali wasn't a prince at all. And even if he were, he had claimed to be from a very distant kingdom which probably wouldn't have gone to war over the loss of a wayward (and foolish) prince.
16th May '17 8:51:55 AM Anorgil
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*** It's not that hard to buy: Jafar had already grilled Ali about which kingdom he was from, and Ali had never given him a good answer; that alone should have aroused his suspicions.

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*** It's not that hard to buy: Jafar had already grilled Ali about which kingdom he was from, and Ali had never given him a good answer; that alone should have aroused his suspicions.Jafar's suspicions that Ali wasn't a prince at all.
16th May '17 8:51:19 AM Anorgil
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*** It's not that hard to buy: Jafar had already grilled Ali about which kingdom he was from, and Ali had never given him a good answer; that alone should have aroused his suspicions.
10th May '17 4:09:12 PM QuarrelsomeChevon
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** I don't understand the point of this question. The Genie only ever mentioned three rules he had to abide by: he can't kill, can't revive the dead, and can't force someone to fall in love. How does creating an unliftable rock relate to those rules or any other limitations? Why wouldn't he be able to do it?
8th May '17 6:49:37 AM Tightwire
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** Dude, it's a magic cave designed to ''protect'' the lamp from unworthy dudes. The rest of it is all just window dressing. Probably some sorcerer ages ago made it to ensure the lamp was granted to a worthy dude.
*** There's a lamp in the middle of a cave. Are you a worthy enough dude to take it?
*** Er... Maybe more like "There's a lamp in the middle of a cave. Are you a worthy enough dude to take it?- ''And not touch anything else even though it's really really shiny?''

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** Dude, it's a magic cave designed to ''protect'' the lamp from unworthy dudes. The rest of it is all just window dressing. Probably some sorcerer ages ago made it to ensure the lamp was granted to a worthy dude.
*** There's a lamp in the middle of a cave. Are A tiger-god thing tells you a worthy enough dude to take it?
*** Er... Maybe more like "There's a lamp in
that this is the middle of a cave. Are only thing that matters. Will you a worthy enough dude stick to take it?- ''And not touch anything else even though it's really really shiny?''that?



*** You saw what happened when Abu took that ruby, the cave melted! The treasure was clearly a booby trap.
*** The treasure itself melted along with it. The treasure was likely all illusory to begin with, only to offer a temptation. It wasn't real treasure.



*** Uh, I explained this already. It was to prevent unworthy dudes from crossing the threshold with the worthy dude and getting the lamp. Abu isn't worthy, but the tiger guy didn't chomp down on him, did he?



*** Abu clearly wasn't worthy, since he grabbed a gem. The treasure is there to make sure no mistakes are made.



** Who says there ''is'' a treasure? It could just be an illusion.
** So the cave as a whole was designed as a test to find a worthy person to wield the lamp, and the cave's test came in two parts. The mouth of the cave (no pun intended) would test a person's inherent goodness, hence "the diamond in the rough." Whereas the treasure portion of the cave tested a person's responsibility and self-control, as both should be qualities of a "good" lamp-wielder

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** Who says there ''is'' a treasure? It could just be an illusion.
** So the cave as a whole was designed as a test to find a worthy person to wield the lamp, and the cave's test came in two parts. The mouth of the cave (no pun intended) would test a person's inherent goodness, hence "the diamond in the rough." Whereas the treasure portion of the cave tested a person's responsibility and self-control, as both should be qualities of a "good" lamp-wielderlamp-wielder.
** I reckon that the Cave could chomp down any time. Self-destruct any time too. It knew everything going on down there. If Al had brushed against a gold piece and not even noticed, it could have said, "I'm cool with that." When he trod on Carpet, that too. When Abu snatches up a gem with the intent to take more, it promptly gets all, "DIE DIE DIE!!!" on him.



*** The carpet does touch Abu: he yanks the monkey's tail.


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** Carpet is clearly a sentient creature. I reckon he used to be human. But he's now a carpet. He has no hands. He can't talk. I feel like only mortals can use the lamp. Now Carpet is part of the test. When Aladdin met this magical creature that was clearly intelligent, was he kind and friendly, or did he treat it like an object? When he was kind, Carpet knew that he was the Diamond, so he knew to take him to the lamp.
5th May '17 12:48:40 PM AbnormalMoose
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** 4.) Jafar's an asshole.
17th Apr '17 7:37:00 PM Rubber_Lotus
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** If the storyboards for "Humiliate the Boy" are anything to go by, then yes, some Phenomenal Cosmic Power pulls their fingers into position and does the magic for them.
17th Apr '17 7:24:52 PM PandaXclone2
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** The treasure in the Cave of Wonders could possibly be a nod to how genies (or djinn) granted wishes in original folklore; genies weren't so much the magical "*Poof!* There's your wish granted" sort, as they instead utilised their vast wisdom and accumulated wealth to grant their master's wishes. Granted, while Genie's obviously the former category of wish-granting, that treasure could actually be his and may to some extent be used in granting his wishes successfully; like purchasing the hypothetical legal paperwork to make Aladdin a true prince and the riches being thrown to the commoners during "Prince Ali". In which case the treasure shouldn't be touched simply because it is Genie's resources.

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** The treasure in the Cave of Wonders could possibly be a nod to how genies (or djinn) granted wishes in original folklore; genies weren't so much the magical "*Poof!* There's your wish granted" sort, as they instead utilised their vast wisdom and accumulated wealth to grant their master's wishes. Granted, [[LamePun Granted,]] while Genie's obviously the former category of wish-granting, that treasure could actually be his and may to some extent be used in granting his wishes successfully; like purchasing the hypothetical legal paperwork to make Aladdin a true prince and the riches being thrown to the commoners during "Prince Ali". In which case the treasure shouldn't be touched simply because it is Genie's resources.
17th Apr '17 10:31:59 AM PandaXclone2
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** The treasure in the Cave of Wonders could possibly be a nod to how genies (or djinn) granted wishes in original folklore; genies weren't so much the magical "*Poof!* There's your wish granted" sort, as they instead utilised their vast wisdom and accumulated wealth to grant their master's wishes. Granted, while Genie's obviously the former category of wish-granting, that treasure could actually be his and may to some extent be used in granting his wishes successfully. In which case the treasure shouldn't be touched simply because it is Genie's resources.

to:

** The treasure in the Cave of Wonders could possibly be a nod to how genies (or djinn) granted wishes in original folklore; genies weren't so much the magical "*Poof!* There's your wish granted" sort, as they instead utilised their vast wisdom and accumulated wealth to grant their master's wishes. Granted, while Genie's obviously the former category of wish-granting, that treasure could actually be his and may to some extent be used in granting his wishes successfully.successfully; like purchasing the hypothetical legal paperwork to make Aladdin a true prince and the riches being thrown to the commoners during "Prince Ali". In which case the treasure shouldn't be touched simply because it is Genie's resources.
17th Apr '17 10:26:15 AM PandaXclone2
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Added DiffLines:

** The treasure in the Cave of Wonders could possibly be a nod to how genies (or djinn) granted wishes in original folklore; genies weren't so much the magical "*Poof!* There's your wish granted" sort, as they instead utilised their vast wisdom and accumulated wealth to grant their master's wishes. Granted, while Genie's obviously the former category of wish-granting, that treasure could actually be his and may to some extent be used in granting his wishes successfully. In which case the treasure shouldn't be touched simply because it is Genie's resources.
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