History Headscratchers / Aladdin

22nd Jul '17 9:22:11 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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*** While it doesn't make sense why Jafar didn't TRY it wouldn't surprise me at all if Genie cannot make a being more powerful than himself. Just being freed severely weakens Genies and in many of the myths freeing the Genie requires you to take it's place.

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*** While it doesn't make sense why Jafar didn't TRY it wouldn't surprise me at all if Genie cannot make a being more powerful than himself. Just being freed severely weakens Genies and in many of the myths freeing the Genie requires you to take it's its place.
12th Jul '17 10:07:20 PM RavenWilder
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** Or maybe Genie ''used'' to be able to bring people back from the dead, but it was such a horrible ZombieApocalypse scenario that he convinced his master at the time to use up a wish to make it so Genie can't bring people back from the dead ''anymore''.
24th Jun '17 12:35:36 AM Gess
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*** No, she's the future ''wife'' of the ruler. It likely never occured to the Sultan to teach her the ways of ruling because why bother?
20th Jun '17 8:07:19 PM chasemaddigan
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'''''Return of Jafar'''''

* What exactly was so difficult in explaining the situation with Iago in the second movie? "He saved my life. I know he was a bastard, and probably still is, but I owe him, so I'm asking you to spare him in return." BAM, done.
** Aladdin panicking and everyone else's general extreme dislike of Iago probably had something to do with that not being so simple.
** Also, it was at the point in the series where Aladdin still had the flaw of not being able to trust people and rely more on trickery and deceit. He did spend most of his life as a criminal after all.
* Is there an official explanation as to why Genie Jafar is stronger than Genie in ''The Return Of Jafar''? I've seen a lot of supposition (freed genies have less power than enslaved ones, Jafar stacked his Sorcerer wish onto the Genie one). But has Disney said anything on the subject?
** Remember when Genie [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9_Bdn8mtgBA#t=3m46s returns and says]] that his powers are now "semi-phenomenal, nearly-cosmic"? That's the case here. Jafar, on the other hand, has full phenomenal cosmic powers. The "freed genies have less power than enslaved ones" supposition is 100% supported by the dialogue, and explains why Genie had a lot of moments of uselessness on the animated series (since it's difficult to have nail-biting adventures when you have a living DeusExMachina as one of your best friends).
*** That's probably the only explanation. I wasn't aware of it since I haven't seen the movie in years. However, I still have issue with that explanation. Jafar (if memory serves) wanted Abis Mal to wish him free, if freed Genies are weaker couldn't they have let Abis Mal make the wish? Why were they dead set on destroying Jafar?
*** A freed genie may be weaker, but is still a Genie. One who'd be much more ruthless and creative than the friendly Genie ever was when it came to attacking. Jafar being bound to the lamp limited what he could do.
** A genie while more powerful in terms of brute strength also has more limitations. Specifically the inability to kill anybody. Though that particular weakness raises A LOT of questions particularly in the sequel.
** Jafar made the wish with the intention to become more powerful than Genie, and explicitly wished to become an 'all powerful genie'. This might have made Jafar mightier than Genie and/or made some of the rules not affect him.
** Freeing Jafar would have made him weaker yes, but he still would have had massive power that he was now free to use however he wanted, and Genie would have been one of the only beings on the planet powerful enough to have a chance against him. More importantly however, freeing Jafar would have made him immortal. Freed genies are still eternal if no longer all powerful, but they are also no longer bound to the lamp, meaning that it would be much much harder to destroy Jafar assuming that it would even be possible at all than if they just broke a lamp.
* Why does Genie have bracelets in ''Return of Jafar'' and the TV series? Isn't he free?
** Because he thinks they're cool. He explains in an episode of the TV series, "The only thing I'm a slave to is fashion." Sometimes a bracelet is just a cigar ... er ...
** Genie might be free-lancing, in effect he became his own master, (and therefore also his own slave). This lets him still be a proper genie and magically help out Aladdin but on a purely voluntary basis.
** After wearing them for so long, Genie is uncomfortable without them. Do you wear a watch regularly enough that you don't feel quite right if you're not? Same principle.
*** Or like taping up your wrists before a tennis match. Magic might be more focused by using the bracelets.
** The animators thought he looked weird without them.
*** He did.
** For deflecting bullets. Also, as a reminder of his former captivity... genie law stipulated that he'd lose his powers if he allowed a man to bind them.
** Simply because Genie likes wearing them even though he no longer has to. It's just like how in the series he still lives inside the lamp even though now he's no longer forced to, it's just something that he finds comfortable.
* Near the end of ''Return of Jafar'' Abysmal refuses to free Jafar so he could instead spend his third wish on treasure. Jafar ends up conjuring some, which Abysmal pretty astutely suspects to be illusional, and as villains quarrel heroes get a shot at Jafar's lamp. What buggers me is that how in the world could Abysmal neglect the fact that he currently resided in THE SULTAN'S PALACE!!! Which just happened to house THE (appropriately) SULTAN'S TREASURY!!! Come on, that must be like a pipe dream of every thief in the world. And he had it right beneath his feet and apparently never even bothered to peep inside. Well, even he did chose that moment to grip the IdiotBall even tighter than usual, how come Jafar (who used to LIVE in the palace) didn't think of that opportunity?
** Given that Jafar always wanted to be Sultan, he probably wasn't keen on emptying what was potentially going to be his own treasure chambers (the fact that he could easily get more was beside the point; it was ''his'') -- and Abis Mal was just smart enough to realize that stealing from an angry genie ''probably'' wasn't the best idea.
*** But as a Genie he then had cosmic powers! Control over matter and energy and the very fibre of existence! Why would he still be preoccupied with such puny down-to-earth affair as gold? Not to say that he only needed to convince Abys-Mal to free him and then he could just take it all away. Perhaps he wanted to astound Abysmal with the sight of treasures appearing out of thin air?
* Jafar in the second movie in general. Isn't there quite a lot for a Genie, that he undertakes on his own accord and powers he uses without even an excuse of his master's wish?
** Moreover, he spares Aladdin's life in the waterfall, because there are "things much worse then mere death". Indeed, there are, but Jafar's idea of those seems rather confusing and surprisingly not evil. So, Aladdin gets falsely accused of murder by Razoul who hated him anyway. Big deal. Then he gets sentenced to death by "Jasmine" which ''is'' a big deal or would be if Jafar didn't blow his cover right before the oncoming execution. And...that's it? Jafar wouldn't torture his friends in front of him, he wouldn't have Aladdin killed in a slow and painful manner, he wouldn't even stay and witness the destruction of his nemesis in person and gloat? Why is he suddenly all Dr. Evil?
*** Finally, wouldn't his actions in the FinalBattle classify as a murder attempt? Making a person drown in lava could in no way be get around with his usual "surprised what you can live through" mantra. And since Carpet is sentient didn't Jafar technically murder it?
*** Genies cannot kill, directly. All he did was change Carpet into something very brittle and gravity did the rest. Like Eden said, Genies can't kill anyone but they can make it's ridiculously easy for other things to do it for them
*** It doesn't seem like Carpet actually died at any point. Genies can't kill, and can't bring the dead back to life, but Carpet is flying around happily as you please after the spell is broken and he's back to normal -- so he probably wasn't dead in the first place. It seems to take more to kill a magic carpet than just breaking it into pieces.
*** There is nothing to suggest that Genies can't bring the dead back to life, at least in some fashion. Genie specifically mentions in the first movie that it's not a pretty picture, he doesn't like doing it. That's not the way you describe something you CAN'T do that the way you describe something you WON'T do.
*** To answer the gloating part, I assume it's because Jafar IS just that nasty. If Aladdin had died at the waterfalls, he wouldn't have known it was Jafar. Just sort of a final mocking bit, I guess. Plus, the image of Jafar's face on Jasmine's body is pretty gross.
*** I always thought that the rules were that powerful that they warped reality to keep themselves from being broken.
*** Jafar spends the entire movie bending the genie rules rather than outright breaking them. Ultimately the lava would have worked, otherwise Iago dropping Jafar's lamp into a bunch of lava he conjured up wouldn't have done anything as it would have been tantamount to suicide and thus against the rules. Jafar is using technicalities to try to kill the protagonists and get free of the lamp, the lava and freezing Carpet were just a part of that.
* Why isn't Abysmal apprehended in the end of the second movie?
** Because he's the villain's goofy sidekick, and the standard contract for them includes a "get away scot-free at the end of the movie" clause. Little-known fact.
*** Also, no one knew he was still in the garden hanging from the tree. I assume he later scampered off, sans pants.
* During the FinalBattle Iago sweeps at the lamp, snatches it and then attempts to pass it to Aladdin so he could drop it into lava that...surrounded them all. Uh? Why the hell did Iago go for a precise drop, when he could just topple the lamp ''into'' lava right away, exactly like he did later?! Yes, I know, the scene with a near-dead Iago kicking the lamp was intense, alright, but what was the point? Oh, and on the Jafar's part, I know he was an all-powerful and deranged Genie and all, but seriously, leaving his precious lamp lying on a tiny islet in the middle of a lava lake? WTF?! It's not like he couldn't just, you know, '''pick it up and take it away from danger'''!!!
** Actually, it may very well be that he ''couldn't'' pick it up and take it away from danger. If you watch the movies, neither Genie nor Jafar ''ever actually touch their lamps while bound to them''. They enter and exit them, but they never actually pick them up and hold them. Only after Genie is freed in the first movie, does he hold the lamp in his hands... and he looks completely overwhelmed; it's very possible that this is the first time he's actually been able to hold the lamp with his own hands instead of relying on his masters to take it to various places.
** Probably a case of "So close yet so far." Jafar was likely overconfident at that point and wanted the lamp dangling right in front of the heroes where they just barely can't get to it. Also, the above reply.
* This is more a general question but since Jafar seems to understand the limits of Geniedom a little better let's put it here. Are the Genie Rules set in stone or are they more a series of guide lines? I ask because there are several points in both movies with both genies that seem to suggest the Genie is free to some extent to interpret the rules as they please. Genie was annoyed that Aladdin didn't actually wish to be out of the Cave of Wonders but clearly he did it and he treated it more like, hey, you got me good! than like some massive law of the universe had been broken. Later though Aladdin is clearly unconscious and about to drown and Genie interprets gravity pulling his head down as I wish AND THAT ONE COUNTED. WTF. When Jafar gets the lamp Genie moves all of Agraba to a mountain top seemingly for no reason. Jafar spares Aladdin at the waterfalls and at least claims it was because he wanted to not because he was contractually obligated and the entire lava fight sequence makes no sense in that context. If Genies can't kill the worst that could happen to the heroes was maiming (still bad) the worst that could happen to Jafar was death.
* Continued from above. Why did Genie indulge Jafar in a fight he knew he couldn't win instead of engaging him in a fight he potentially could win? There is no reason to believe Genie couldn't destroy Jafar's LAMP. He knows the lamp is the weakness and he instead tries to go toe to toe with a being he knows outclasses him in raw power but may not have learned (as he clearly hadn't by the films end) to be cautious about where his lamp is.
** Because Abysmal wasn't there, and Genie couldn't automatically know who had the lamp or where they were.
* Why didn't the gang try to take control of Jafar's lamp? It would probably be easier than what they went through, (perhaps they could bribe Aby Smal?) and then Jafar would be facing a worse fate than death: a slave to his enemies.
** Why they didn't keep the lamp in the first place is because the Cave of Wonders was thought to be secure. Controlling the lamp of a genie who doesn't like you is probably tantamount to suicide. The lamp limits a genie but they don't seem to be truly trapped inside them nor does it seem like you can force a genie into the lamp against their will. If an unconscious Aladdin can ''wish'' to be saved from drowning and Abis Mal can be wished to the bottom of the ocean (nothing suggests that drowning under those conditions was impossible per the rules) the last thing anybody would want would be a malicious genie hovering about for something that could be interpreted as a fatal or extremely inconvenient wish.
*** In short, they didn't want to become the characters of {{Wishmaster}}.
** Also, Jafar demonstrates in this very movie that he's ''extremely'' good at twisting wishes around to his "master's" misfortune. Having him as a slave could potentially be ''worse'' than having him as an enemy.


'''''King of Thieves'''''

* The rules for the Oracle from ''King Of Thieves'' seem to be contradictory. When Iago asks why anyone would want it, not knowing what it was, she appeared and answered his question. This would seem to imply that ''any'' question spoken by ''anyone'' touching the staff qualifies for a formal appearance and answer. But during the first fight with Cassim Al asks him "Do you have an invitation?" while holding the thing, and nothing happens.
** And later on Cassim asks a question when someone else is holding it! So what, now it's any question asked within earshot?
** To be fair, the Oracle is fully sentient, and, among other things, actually ''guided'' Aladdin on asking the right question. Presumably, since it ''is'' a all-knowing Oracle, it would know which people are worth of helping, and which ones are better if tricked out of their questions.
** Or maybe, if you ask a question that isn't directed at anyone in particular while near the Oracle / if you ask the Oracle directly, then it will answer you. If however you ask a question that you were directing toward someone specifically, the Oracle doesn't answer that question, so that's maybe why the invitation question didn't get answered.
** Simple explanation: Iago is the series' designated ButtMonkey. Of ''course'' he would be the only one not to be given a fair chance to save his question for when he actually needed it.
* From ''King of Thieves'': irrelevant, but why exactly is Sa'luk gray?
** Even more headscratchingly, he's normal flesh colors on the VHS cover.
** He probably has argyria (silver poisoning), which permanently turns the skin a bluish-grey. Possibly he was attempting to smuggle some silver coins by ''eating them'' one day.
* In ''Aladdin and the King of Thieves'' the Oracle says that every holder of the staff only gets to ask one question. And Iago's experience seems to imply that ''anyone'' who touches the staff and asks a question will be answered by the Oracle, whether they were expecting her or not. And yet when the Forty Thieves crash his wedding Aladdin asks "Where's the King of Thieves?" while holding the thing. See [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GdeyxEL3T8s&feature=context-vrec this video]] starting at 1:11. The Oracle does not appear, and Aladdin gets to ask a question later. In addition, Cassim asks a question of the Oracle while someone ''else'' is holding the staff. I know, I know, kid's movie, but would it have been too much to ask for an additional rule? Something like "The Oracle will appear when someone within earshot says 'Oracle', followed by a question?"
** This has been asked and discussed on this very page, so I'll just repeat my original thoughts on it: Iago is the series' designated ButtMonkey. Of ''course'' he would be the only one not to be given a fair chance to save his question for when he actually needed it.
* Why does Cassim try to steal the Oracle after he knew who Aladdin was? Why not just ask Aladdin to use it? The Hand of Midas doesn't seem to belong to anyone, so it's not like he or Jasmine would have a moral objection to a treasure hunt. (Even if Aladdin didn't believe in the Hand, there was no reason not to let Cassim try to find it.) He didn't just destroy his relationship with Aladdin out of greed, he destroyed it when it was completely unnecessary.
** It's a lot like the point mentioned about Aladdin and Iago in ''Return of Jafar''. Cassim was just used to being a thief and stealing was second nature to him. He seems very materialistic and he only agrees to go to the wedding when Iago reminds him about the treasure. His plan all along was to use the wedding as a distraction so he could sneak into the treasury.
* When Cassim uses the Hand of Midas inside its temple/palace/whatever, it turns everything to gold, even the water. Later he throws it onto the deck of the ship, the ship turns to gold and sinks...and the water remains normal. Shouldn't the whole oceanic system be gold now?
** The water itself didn't turn gold. Since everything around the water was gold, the water reflected that color.
* In ''King of Thieves'' why does Aladdin think [[MissingMom Jasmine]] wouldn't be able to understand what it's like to grow up without a father?
** Could be because she didn't grow up without a father. We don't know when her mother died, but since we never get to see any of Jasmine's childhood, it's possible that Jasmine grew up with both parents and only lost her mother after she'd entered her teens or something similar.
** Not to mention they're talking about ''fathers'', and Jasmine still has hers.
** Also, Jasmine at least has one parent; Aladdin didn't get squat.
** Aladdin had assumed his father was dead. Now all he knows is that his father is alive but has been missing his whole life. He's referring to growing up now knowing that his father ''left'' him.
* Two points: Cassim acts as if the Oracle exists solely to help someone find the Hand of Midas, so why is it you can ask her anything you want as if she's all-knowing? And the Genie states she is ''an'' Oracle rather than ''the'' Oracle, implying there are others. Perhaps they all have the same general purpose omniscience, but each also has individual things, like the Hand of Midas, that they know a lot more about? When she is asked about the Hand, she does become a guiding star to show the way, hovers over the Vanishing Isle as it rises, and declares "You have arrived", all things she didn't do when Aladdin asked about his father. And the interior of the Hand's chamber ''is'' adorned with statues and carvings cast in the Oracle's likeness... Second, if everything the Hand touches turns to gold, why doesn't the wooden handle it's mounted on? Is it specifically enchanted to be immune, so that you can handle it without dooming yourself?
** A) There's no reason to assume the Oracle is ''just'' for the Hand of Midas. Presumably she was just the only magical method for finding the treasure Cassim knew about. Remember when he hears Aladdin has a Genie ("have you used all three wishes yet?"). As for the question, Aladdin only asked ''where'' his father was and the Oracle told him. Cassim asked to ''find'' the Hand of Midas - and the location was very specific and only there for a brief amount of time - so the Oracle was bound by her laws or whatever to show him ''exactly'' where it was. B) Yes we can assume the handle is enchanted. The hand would be pretty useless as treasure if one couldn't even hold it somehow.
*** All good points. However, one thing still not addressed is why there was statuary and carvings that looked like the Oracle inside the Vanishing Isle. This still suggests that even if there were other ways to find the Hand, and the Oracle can tell you about all kinds of things, she still has some special connection to it.

'''''Aladdin'' TV Series'''

* How come Jafar hasn't tried attacking Aladdin/Jasmine again? - Yes, the lamp was destroyed, but if genie's are immortal, how come his soul hasn't emerged and attacked people instead f just lazing about in death - it may have destroyed his body; but what about his powers and spirit? Anyway, the crossover establishes that he'd be friendly enough with Hades; so couldn't he pull a few strings?
** Remember what Genie said in "The Return of Jafar". "You destroy Jafar's lamp, you destroy Jafar". Never saw the crossover (I personally ignore them due to bizarreness), but genies are not invulnerable in Aladdin continuity. They might not die of natural causes, but genies can be killed.
** As I recall the crossover, he wasn't "friendly enough with Hades" at all... he wound up in the Underworld after his lamp was destroyed, he and Hades actually didn't like each other ''at all'', but they agreed to work together to try and screw over their respective nemeses. After it didn't work Hades probably said "Screw this guy" and set Jafar to pushing a boulder made of fishhooks up a hill made of glass shards or something.
* If the people in Aladdin believe in Allah then why did Jafar go to the Greek Underworld when he died?
** This was answered in the episode itself by Jafar. "You see, there's been a grievous error."
** Just because they believe it doesn't make it true.
** Its a huge Main/ContinuitySnarl to facilitate the crossover. The Aladdin film establishes the time period as being medieval with the presence of Islam but the series backdates to the pre-roman period to be contemporary with Hercules. I can't remember if reference was made to religion in the Aladdin series, but either way the series characters are rendered non-Muslim.
*** In the song, "Prince Ali", Genie mentions 'galloping hordes', easily Huns, making it circa 300-400 AD, ripe time for Greek/Roman Mythology, pre-Islam, no ContinuitySnarl.
*** It could just as easily involve the Mongols, which would be after the foundation of Islam.
*** Or the "galloping hordes" could actually be the Christian Crusaders; but this would all be better on Wild Mass Guessing.
** It could be that in the underworld, time doesn't actually exist. Therefore, someone who dies years after Hercules' time would still be there to be glimpsed, like Jafar.
*** Several characters in the first Aladdin movie mention Allah.
*** Saying "Allah" doesn't make them Muslims. It's the Arabic word for God, and in fact is used by Arabic speakers of other religions, particularly Christianity and Judaism.
*** Not that big a deal. The real Arabian Nights similarly anachronistically puts the word "Allah" in the mouths of characters from ancient folktales that pre-date Islam, or stories from other countries that weren't Muslim. This is common practice for authentic written collections of folklore, just like the anachronistic use of Catholicism (and everything else) in the original King Arthur legends. The * original* original Aladdin was supposed to be a * Chinese* boy, meaning that the Arabian Nights' use of terms like "Allah" and "djinn" throughout is thoroughly out-of-place.
*** Not necessarily; there has long been a large Muslim population in China and the character ''does'' have an Arabic name. Also, some Muslims speculate that "Allah" is not really an Arabic word. They say instead that it is the special name by which God likes to be called and they claim it was used by all the prophets, from Adam to Muhammad.
*** And to make things more confusing, one of the Delhi Sultans, by the name of 'Alah ad-Din' actually financed his army and rise to the throne using the treasure he gained from a Deccani Sultan's underground treasure chamber, making this bit at least TruthInTelevision. He also married the Deccani Sultan's daughter, thus gaining Treasure and a Princess by journeying to the 'Cave of Wonders'
** As for the "real" universe of Disney's Aladdin, isn't it pretty clear by now that Agrabah takes place in a fantasy universe only thematically related to the real world and the real Islamic empire? All of this is to some degree moot -- the fact that the Genie has been trapped for "ten thousand years" at the beginning of the first movie and yet we get flashbacks to his earlier masters still existing in a recognizably "Arabian" civilization means this universe * can't* take place in historical time.
*** This Troper's knowledge of Islam and Greek religions is shaky at best, but he would put money on the idea that Jafar would not go to Heaven. Just for the sake of speculation, we might assume that Islam's Hell and Greek's Tartarus are, if not the same place, at least concurrent in some way. Thus, when Jafar gets what's coming to him, he could gain the attention of Hades, more easily than perhaps normally given Jafar's tendency to stand out in a crowd.
** It could just be like the WesternAnimation/SouthPark where it turns out, to many people of various faith's chagrin that "the correct religion was Mormonism". "It turns out the Greeks were right", perhaps?
** You guys, '''he was an evil sorcerer'''. This more than just disqualifies him as an observant Muslim -- occultists tend to develop their own weird theologies if they're religious at all. Even if everyone else in the movies is Muslim, it's possible that he ''did'' believe in the Greek underworld, or that he just got shunted into it due to the nature of his occult dealings.
** I happen to be a Muslim and nothing in Aladdin implied the characters were Muslim at all, it is much more likely it was of the theories above, they simply used the Arabic term for God.
** Who what now? When does Jafar go to the Greek underworld?
*** An episode of the Hercules animated series, "Hercules and the Arabian Night", has Jafar showing up in Hades. The two villains wind up teaming up in an attempt to defeat Hercules and Aladdin by getting them to fight each other.
** Maybe there are multiple underworlds and Jafar applied for a transfer.
*** Could be--the Norse pantheon was shown to exist in the Disney/{{Hercules}} animated series.
* If the Genie was freed in the first movie, why do some people in the series still act like he's a possession of Aladdin, or one of his powers? Mozenrath was jealous of Aladdin for getting magical power the easy way (by "having" a genie), for instance. And when Chaos created an evil copy of Aladdin, it came with an evil Genie, to which Chaos reacted with mild surprise, then realized was a logical consequence of copying Aladdin (whereas his pet monkey was apparently an independent enough entity to not be copied).
** Maybe that's not because he's a "genie" but because he's the designated goofy Main/{{Sidekick}}-slash-bodyguard of Main/TheHero. He's part of Main/TheHero's package.
*** Ewww.
*** "Is that a lamp in your pocket, or..." *gets coat*
** In the Aladdinverse, you normally have to pick out three carefully-worded wishes to get anything from a genie. Aladdin has a genie sidekick who does all sorts of fun things for him without being Bound By The Rules Of The Genie (tm).
** Considering how awed Genie was that Aladdin set him free, it's probably a rare (if not unique) thing in their world. Most people would therefore assume that ''any'' genie has a master. For that matter, given how powerful Genie is, believing that he's being controlled by a human is probably a comfort to many people: this particular specimen might be harmless goofball, but genies in folklore were ''dangerous'', and didn't have a can't-kill-anyone rule to keep their behavior in check.
** On Abu not being copied, I'm actually going to argue storyline here. I'm not sure which aired first, but the series did have a two-part episode that, among other things, gave Abu a backstory (as well as adding significantly to Aladdin's). Makes sense to me that that version of Aladdin would never have met Abu, or wouldn't have cared enough to initiate the events that led to Abu and Aladdin teaming up. Of course, this is Chaos we're talking about, so it may be pointless to try to apply logic to this...
** Well, if we're taking the evil Aladdin's previous actions into account, then there's a good chance his third wish was "I wish you were my slave." In that case, the evil Genie might be considered a piece of equipment. As for Mozenrath... He obviously just doesn't understand ThePowerOfFriendship.
*** Slight problem . . . would the Chaos version of Aladdin still be considered a diamond in the rough, the primary criterion for obtaining possession of the genie in the first place?
*** In his own twisted and evil universe he would've been the paragon of evilness just as the real Aladdin is a paragon of righteousness, so yes.
*** One of the big rules the Genie laid down in the beginning was you can't wish for infinite wishes.
*** Not quite true. In an episode of the TV series, the orphan girl master of Genie's girlfriend accidentally wishes she and her genie could "always be together". The genie is bound to serve and look after the girl until she dies.
*** Which was most likely done out of desire for a parental figure, and is less servitude than it is filling an emotional gap. It's also adorable.
*** Chaos copy could use different rules, as far as we know. Or, Evil Aladdin being a polar opposite, is smart and worded an iron-strength wish that translate as "Make every wish of mine true from now to eternity".
** On the show, most people assumed that all of Aladdin's non-human friends belonged to him; one non-villain even referred to Abu, Iago, and the Genie as Aladdin's "pets," which understandably pissed them off. Also, I to remember the episode where Chaos made an evil Aladdin, and guess how Aladdin stopped him? He used the copy's lamp, having guessed correctly that an evil Aladdin would've never freed his Genie. Ha! I is answers!
*** Indeed, the evil Aladdin never freed his genie, and never met Abu. Evil Aladdin probably just saved up his wishes, and used them sparingly.
** You don't need to use infinite wishes or anything like that to make a Genie stick around and help you. You just need one or two ''open ended'' wishes. Wish for something along the lines of, "Protect me from any unnatural death/future attack," and "Help me defeat my enemies, both present and future." Any spells the Genie slings from then on would simply be counted as part of those two wishes, and you hold the third in reserve so it doesn't close out the contract.
** The Genie is Aladdin's {{Familiar}}. He owes Aladdin his freedom, so it makes sense he'd magically bond himself to Al to look out for him in any way that he can while still being free of the lamp.
* Since when did Iago become a regular character in the series and had a HeelFaceTurn? I remember in the first movie [[spoiler: He was trapped in the lamp with Jafar.]] How did he become Aladdin's ally?
** Watch the second movie.
* In the TV show, Sadira switches places with Jasmine, and everyone except the animals is fooled. So... Why were animals immune? Why was Genie affected? This spell is powerful enough to fool a semi-powerful supernatural being, but for some reason animals are overlooked?
** It's explicitly stated in a later episode that although Sadira possesses a very potent kind of magic, she isn't at all good with it. In fact most of her villainy has to do with her being unable to control whatever she summons. It's not that strange that her reality-warping spell has a few bugs she couldn't iron out.
-->'''Sadira''': The ''animals''! The spell didn't work on the ''animals''! (''after she realizes the resident critters can see through the spell that switched her with Jasmine'')
*** The tone of her voice suggests she hadn't even ''thought'' about that.
4th Jun '17 9:14:54 PM sugaricequeen
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** Most likely, there's some unspoken cosmic rule that prevents one genie from being the master of another genie, as that might give them a little ''too'' much power. If this were the case, then Jafar's transformation into a genie would've rendered his previous two wishes null and void, and so everything that had happened as a result of them was reversed.

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** Most likely, there's some unspoken cosmic rule that prevents one genie from being the master of another genie, as that might give them a little ''too'' much power. If this were the case, then Jafar's transformation into a genie would've rendered his previous two wishes null and void, and so everything that had happened as a result of them was reversed. (Either that, or Genie himself just fixed everything - since Jafar made his third wish, he's no longer obligated to serve him or further his own personal ends.)
4th Jun '17 9:11:52 PM sugaricequeen
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** Most likely, there's some unspoken cosmic rule that prevents one genie from being the master of another genie, as that might give them a little ''too'' much power. If this were the case, then Jafar's transformation into a genie would've rendered his previous two wishes null and void, and so everything that had happened as a result of them was reversed.
30th May '17 3:45:57 PM Peridonyx
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* Is it just me, or does Jafar invoke DidntThinkThisThrough when trying to kill "Prince Ali"? At this point, Jafar still doesn't know about Aladdin's secret, so the former could, for all he knows, be risking war with another kingdom that would obviously take umbrage to their heir "disappearing" during a simple diplomatic visit.

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* Is it just me, or does Jafar invoke DidntThinkThisThrough when trying to kill "Prince Ali"? At this point, Jafar still doesn't know about Aladdin's secret, so the former could, could -- for all he knows, knows -- be risking war with another kingdom that would obviously take umbrage to their heir "disappearing" during a simple diplomatic visit.



*** Pretty hard to buy, though, given Jafar (1) explicitly seeing "Ali"'s nigh-endless parade (which visibly includes what look like various kinds of soldiers) and (2) not knowing about Genie's presence yet. Chalk it up to a good old-fashioned VillainBall?

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*** Pretty hard to buy, though, given Jafar (1) explicitly seeing "Ali"'s nigh-endless parade (which [[note]]Which visibly includes what look like various kinds of soldiers) soldiers.[[/note]] and (2) not knowing about Genie's presence yet. Chalk it up to a good old-fashioned VillainBall?


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**** "Wayward (and foolish) prince" or not, all those paraders sure seem willing to make the trek just to satisfy him, so the possibility of some big retribution from such a seemingly well-off kingdom if something happens to him wouldn't be a stretch. (Unless you already know about Genie, which the audience does (but Jafar doesn't (yet)), of course.) Hence why I'm still calling it a VillainBall gamble for Jafar.
16th May '17 8:56:31 AM Anorgil
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*** It's not that hard to buy: Jafar had already grilled Ali about which kingdom he was from, and Ali had never given him a good answer; that alone should have aroused Jafar's suspicions that Ali wasn't a prince at all.

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*** It's not that hard to buy: Jafar had already grilled Ali about which kingdom he was from, and Ali had never given him a good answer; that alone should have aroused Jafar's suspicions that Ali wasn't a prince at all. And even if he were, he had claimed to be from a very distant kingdom which probably wouldn't have gone to war over the loss of a wayward (and foolish) prince.
16th May '17 8:51:55 AM Anorgil
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*** It's not that hard to buy: Jafar had already grilled Ali about which kingdom he was from, and Ali had never given him a good answer; that alone should have aroused his suspicions.

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*** It's not that hard to buy: Jafar had already grilled Ali about which kingdom he was from, and Ali had never given him a good answer; that alone should have aroused his suspicions.Jafar's suspicions that Ali wasn't a prince at all.
16th May '17 8:51:19 AM Anorgil
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*** It's not that hard to buy: Jafar had already grilled Ali about which kingdom he was from, and Ali had never given him a good answer; that alone should have aroused his suspicions.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Headscratchers.Aladdin