History GuideDangIt / PlatformGames

18th Apr '17 11:04:57 AM Mineboot45
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[[folder:Prince of Persia]]
* In ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia1'', to kill your shadow, you have to SheatheYourSword, which ''causes the shadow to do so as well''. (He's attacking you out of ''fear''; once he sees that you mean him no harm, he's happy to return the favor.) Then simply walk or run toward him until you recombine. You do have to wait for the flashing to end, but you don't have to run off the platform; it's perfectly okay to jump (which might actually be more appropriate, since this is supposed to be a "leap of faith").
** There's also a minor one at the end of Level 8, where you find yourself stuck behind a door, which can be opened only by a button on the other side. What you might think is the solution -- get in and out of that room before the door closes. The actual solution: [[spoiler:Wait for a mouse to come and press the button]]. Fun...
* In ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia2: The Shadow and the Flame'', the player must die in a mundane way, killed by an easy-to-defeat [[{{Mooks}} Mook]] at a specific spot, while there are several, much more extravagant ways to die around (particularly falling into BottomlessPits) in order to obtain the titular Flame. A lot of people never figure this out and skip the level using cheats. Contrary to popular belief, the sword in the ruins isn't one of these: true, touching it appears to kill you, but it also immediately fades to a cutscene explaining more backstory.
** This probably isn't any consolation, but the tipoff was supposed to be the huge sign you passed that said "He who would steal the flame must die". That was a double entendre (i.e. try to take the flame = you die, die willingly = you get the flame). If nothing else, getting burned to a crisp or falling to your death 30 times should've at least prompted you to try SOMETHING different (something a theme throughout this series).
** Lets not forget the final level, where you need to turn into the flaming shadow in order to beat Jaffar, by turning left and right repeatedly. Most, if not all players discover this by accident while playing around with the prince in one of the last levels.
*** In fairness, this ''is'' mentioned in the instructions, and it even tells you the exact requirement. The hard part is remembering it at that point in the game. Oh, and meeting the requirement. And, quite possibly, getting killed by Jaffar a dozen times.
*** Also the fact that you only survive it if you have enough life; there are potions available on one screen to increase it sufficiently, but it's not exactly obvious that you can climb down to there off one platform when the ones slightly further along are BottomlessPits.
* Some of the life upgrades in ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersiaWarriorWithin'' were nearly impossible to find. One is found early in the game through a hole in the ceiling. The box which can be used to access it is behind a breakable gate - except that you don't have the gate-breaking sword yet, and if you haven't played the previous game, you wouldn't know this gate might be breakable. Instead, you would have to backtrack to that part of the game when you get the sword. Another life upgrade can only be accessed by descending down a very deep chasm, which seems bottomless from above.
** There's also a BlockPuzzle when you first enter the library which requires dragging one of the mirrors away from the wall to reveal a crack through which your companion can sneak to activate a lever later in the puzzle. The problem? The puzzle can be passed up to the point where the lever needs moving WITHOUT dragging the mirror out. Meaning that you get most of the way through and then can't figure out where on earth you went wrong, nor why your stupid companion is just standing there instead of pulling the damn lever. Guide Dang It. Heck, even some of the guides don't make it properly clear...
[[/folder]]



* In ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia1'', to kill your shadow, you have to SheatheYourSword, which ''causes the shadow to do so as well''. (He's attacking you out of ''fear''; once he sees that you mean him no harm, he's happy to return the favor.) Then simply walk or run toward him until you recombine. You do have to wait for the flashing to end, but you don't have to run off the platform; it's perfectly okay to jump (which might actually be more appropriate, since this is supposed to be a "leap of faith").
** There's also a minor one at the end of Level 8, where you find yourself stuck behind a door, which can be opened only by a button on the other side. What you might think is the solution -- get in and out of that room before the door closes. The actual solution: [[spoiler:Wait for a mouse to come and press the button]]. Fun...
* In ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia2: The Shadow and the Flame'', the player must die in a mundane way, killed by an easy-to-defeat [[{{Mooks}} Mook]] at a specific spot, while there are several, much more extravagant ways to die around (particularly falling into BottomlessPits) in order to obtain the titular Flame. A lot of people never figure this out and skip the level using cheats. Contrary to popular belief, the sword in the ruins isn't one of these: true, touching it appears to kill you, but it also immediately fades to a cutscene explaining more backstory.
** This probably isn't any consolation, but the tipoff was supposed to be the huge sign you passed that said "He who would steal the flame must die". That was a double entendre (i.e. try to take the flame = you die, die willingly = you get the flame). If nothing else, getting burned to a crisp or falling to your death 30 times should've at least prompted you to try SOMETHING different (something a theme throughout this series).
** Lets not forget the final level, where you need to turn into the flaming shadow in order to beat Jaffar, by turning left and right repeatedly. Most, if not all players discover this by accident while playing around with the prince in one of the last levels.
*** In fairness, this ''is'' mentioned in the instructions, and it even tells you the exact requirement. The hard part is remembering it at that point in the game. Oh, and meeting the requirement. And, quite possibly, getting killed by Jaffar a dozen times.
*** Also the fact that you only survive it if you have enough life; there are potions available on one screen to increase it sufficiently, but it's not exactly obvious that you can climb down to there off one platform when the ones slightly further along are BottomlessPits.
* Some of the life upgrades in ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersiaWarriorWithin'' were nearly impossible to find. One is found early in the game through a hole in the ceiling. The box which can be used to access it is behind a breakable gate - except that you don't have the gate-breaking sword yet, and if you haven't played the previous game, you wouldn't know this gate might be breakable. Instead, you would have to backtrack to that part of the game when you get the sword. Another life upgrade can only be accessed by descending down a very deep chasm, which seems bottomless from above.
** There's also a BlockPuzzle when you first enter the library which requires dragging one of the mirrors away from the wall to reveal a crack through which your companion can sneak to activate a lever later in the puzzle. The problem? The puzzle can be passed up to the point where the lever needs moving WITHOUT dragging the mirror out. Meaning that you get most of the way through and then can't figure out where on earth you went wrong, nor why your stupid companion is just standing there instead of pulling the damn lever. Guide Dang It. Heck, even some of the guides don't make it properly clear...
18th Apr '17 11:04:19 AM Mineboot45
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Added DiffLines:

18th Apr '17 11:03:51 AM Mineboot45
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[[foldercontrol]]



[[folder:Jumpman]]
The ''VideoGame/{{Jumpman}}'' games had a large number of these. Pretty impressive, considering there were only two games:
* The Grand Puzzle levels (levels 7, 15, and 30 in the original game) nearly defined this trope. Each of these three stages would have four bonus bombs/items that were worth 5 times the normal pick-ups. However, going about getting these required a lot of experimentation to achieve. This is made worse as one mistake would likely prevent you from reaching any of the bonuses at all!
** Grand Puzzle I would place a ladder piece on your back if you grabbed any of the bombs aside from four specific ones. You are then to place the piece by climbing to the top of the central ladder. Not only are there no hints aside from the ladder piece to allude to this, but should you die while holding a piece (given the bonus bombs position), the bonus bombs instantly become [[PermanentlyMissableContent unobtainable]].
** Grand Puzzle II was even more difficult to solve, but at least it wasn't an all-or-nothing gamble. The most difficult one to figure out, though, was how to obtain the treasure at the bottom of the level. Every time you got near the treasure, the doors would slam shut in your face. Solution? Collect one of the bombs and make yourself invisible, then using only sound and minor guessing, feel your way down the ladder and walk to the lamp. Oh, and that had better be the very last item you get, otherwise the gates will close and force you to suicide to escape.
** Grand Puzzle III pushed obscure to the limit (in a way it fits, since this is the final level). Getting to the bonus bombs is simple enough. All you have to collect all but four bombs, then jump into the square that's been moving around, which teleports you to an alternate version of the level. Sounds easy enough to figure out...Until you factor in the knowledge that this square will kill you if you touch it at any other time! The only hint you are given is that the square turns yellow when you have enough bombs (hope you didn't have a black and white screen to play this on). Even then, if you don't touch the square at the right place in the level, you will fall to your death when the level restructures itself. Oh, but they saved the best tidbit for last. You have ONE life to get these four bombs with, no matter how many you saved to that point. Die at any time (including from that teleport), and you can kiss those bonuses goodbye! Oh yes, there are eight bombs in the alternate stage, with four of them being not just normal bombs, but instant death-traps...Have fun! On the plus side, when you die in the alternate stage, you instantly go to the end of the game.
* Level 20 "Figurit" from the original game is one of the largest offenders on this list. Nearly every bomb you collect will change the layout of the stage, from breaking ladders to adding platforms to creating a deadly pitfall. Should you grab any of the bombs out of the correct order, you will either make the stage harder, force the loss of a life due to you now being in an inescapable trap, or even rendering the stage completely {{Unwinnable}}. This wasn't so bad if the player chose "Advanced", allowing them to start at level 19. Otherwise...
* The sequel, Jumpman Junior, also made a sequel to Figurit on level 5, "Figurit's Revenge". While it was very hard to make the stage impossible, they increased the number of death-traps, making it very likely you'd lose any lives you had stockpiled to traps you wouldn't know existed until triggered.
** Level 25, "Mystery Maze", was a level that was completely obscured in darkness. The only way to uncover the area was to move around, which fortunately would remain permanently revealed on that playthrough. The problem that made this hard is that a few of the bombs in that level were often in areas that required leaps of faith to reach...Not that you would know if the bombs were there or not to begin with, as they too were hidden in the shadows. Also, let's add the fact that there are THREE different versions of the level in this game, with it loading a random one each time you play.
** Level 9 in the sequel, "Black Out", had the same idea. Fortunately though, there was only the one version.
** Anyone who claims to have gotten the full bonus from the eighth level in the sequel ("Spellbound") on their first couple tries AND without a guide is either incredibly lucky or an outright liar. Each of the twelve bombs in this stage puts a letter in the column at the center of the level. When all twelve are collected, you earn points for each letter placed in the correct order. There is no way to tell which bomb has which letter except with prior playthroughs, nor is there any way to tell exactly what you are spelling, likely leaving several players wondering just what the point of this level was.
** After finishing the level, one might notice that four of the bombs produce a space, a J, an X and a Y. It takes just a little anagramming to figure out the phrase is "[[spoiler:EPYX JUMPMAN]]". [[spoiler:Of course, now the trick is realizing you have to spell it ''backward''.]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Other Examples]]



* The ''VideoGame/{{Jumpman}}'' games had a large number of these. Pretty impressive, considering there were only two games:
** The Grand Puzzle levels (levels 7, 15, and 30 in the original game) nearly defined this trope. Each of these three stages would have four bonus bombs/items that were worth 5 times the normal pick-ups. However, going about getting these required a lot of experimentation to achieve. This is made worse as one mistake would likely prevent you from reaching any of the bonuses at all!
*** Grand Puzzle I would place a ladder piece on your back if you grabbed any of the bombs aside from four specific ones. You are then to place the piece by climbing to the top of the central ladder. Not only are there no hints aside from the ladder piece to allude to this, but should you die while holding a piece (given the bonus bombs position), the bonus bombs instantly become [[PermanentlyMissableContent unobtainable]].
*** Grand Puzzle II was even more difficult to solve, but at least it wasn't an all-or-nothing gamble. The most difficult one to figure out, though, was how to obtain the treasure at the bottom of the level. Every time you got near the treasure, the doors would slam shut in your face. Solution? Collect one of the bombs and make yourself invisible, then using only sound and minor guessing, feel your way down the ladder and walk to the lamp. Oh, and that had better be the very last item you get, otherwise the gates will close and force you to suicide to escape.
*** Grand Puzzle III pushed obscure to the limit (in a way it fits, since this is the final level). Getting to the bonus bombs is simple enough. All you have to collect all but four bombs, then jump into the square that's been moving around, which teleports you to an alternate version of the level. Sounds easy enough to figure out...Until you factor in the knowledge that this square will kill you if you touch it at any other time! The only hint you are given is that the square turns yellow when you have enough bombs (hope you didn't have a black and white screen to play this on). Even then, if you don't touch the square at the right place in the level, you will fall to your death when the level restructures itself. Oh, but they saved the best tidbit for last. You have ONE life to get these four bombs with, no matter how many you saved to that point. Die at any time (including from that teleport), and you can kiss those bonuses goodbye! Oh yes, there are eight bombs in the alternate stage, with four of them being not just normal bombs, but instant death-traps...Have fun! On the plus side, when you die in the alternate stage, you instantly go to the end of the game.
** Level 20 "Figurit" from the original game is one of the largest offenders on this list. Nearly every bomb you collect will change the layout of the stage, from breaking ladders to adding platforms to creating a deadly pitfall. Should you grab any of the bombs out of the correct order, you will either make the stage harder, force the loss of a life due to you now being in an inescapable trap, or even rendering the stage completely {{Unwinnable}}. This wasn't so bad if the player chose "Advanced", allowing them to start at level 19. Otherwise...
*** The sequel, Jumpman Junior, also made a sequel to Figurit on level 5, "Figurit's Revenge". While it was very hard to make the stage impossible, they increased the number of death-traps, making it very likely you'd lose any lives you had stockpiled to traps you wouldn't know existed until triggered.
** Level 25, "Mystery Maze", was a level that was completely obscured in darkness. The only way to uncover the area was to move around, which fortunately would remain permanently revealed on that playthrough. The problem that made this hard is that a few of the bombs in that level were often in areas that required leaps of faith to reach...Not that you would know if the bombs were there or not to begin with, as they too were hidden in the shadows. Also, let's add the fact that there are THREE different versions of the level in this game, with it loading a random one each time you play.
*** Level 9 in the sequel, "Black Out", had the same idea. Fortunately though, there was only the one version.
** Anyone who claims to have gotten the full bonus from the eighth level in the sequel ("Spellbound") on their first couple tries AND without a guide is either incredibly lucky or an outright liar. Each of the twelve bombs in this stage puts a letter in the column at the center of the level. When all twelve are collected, you earn points for each letter placed in the correct order. There is no way to tell which bomb has which letter except with prior playthroughs, nor is there any way to tell exactly what you are spelling, likely leaving several players wondering just what the point of this level was.
*** After finishing the level, one might notice that four of the bombs produce a space, a J, an X and a Y. It takes just a little anagramming to figure out the phrase is "[[spoiler:EPYX JUMPMAN]]". [[spoiler:Of course, now the trick is realizing you have to spell it ''backward''.]]


Added DiffLines:

[[/folder]]
18th Apr '17 10:59:52 AM Mineboot45
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18th Apr '17 10:59:26 AM Mineboot45
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*** Getting the ProtoShield is even worse. First you need to find Proto Man in Cloud Man's stage. No big deal, just use Rush Coil to get to the suspicious stair you otherwise can't reach. Proto Man will give you an entirely redundant and irrelevant hint (Use the flame weapon in the woods). Nice, I guess? Except you don't have a flame weapon... yet. Until this point, you could think it's the same as ''VideoGame/MegaMan6'' where Proto Man only gets a cameo to give you the Energy Equalizer except this time he didn't give you crap. Here comes the guide dang it part: You need to find Proto Man again on Turbo Man's stage. To find him you need to go through a fake wall at the top of the Hyper Rocket Buster room. This time, there's absolutely no indication of the fake wall existence so you kinda need to stumble there. Once again, he gives you a totally irrelevant tip (you can't slide while using the Super Adapter, something you can easily know as soon as you get the Adapter). AND YOU'RE NOT DONE YET. No, now you need to go back to Shade Man stage. Once you destroy the pumpkin mini-boss the normal way, you will get to a room with a lone Sniper Joe in there. You kill him and then you proceed through another fake wall to a new room where you will finally fight against Proto Man and once you defeat him you get the Protoshield. And unlike the Energy Equalizer and the other items in the game, you can't buy it at Auto's store. All of this for [[PowerupLetdown a quite mediocre reward that gimps your offensive skills]].

to:

*** Getting the ProtoShield Proto Shield is even worse. First you need to find Proto Man in Cloud Man's stage. No big deal, just use Rush Coil to get to the suspicious stair you otherwise can't reach. Proto Man will give you an entirely redundant and irrelevant hint (Use the flame weapon in the woods). Nice, I guess? Except you don't have a flame weapon... yet. Until this point, you could think it's the same as ''VideoGame/MegaMan6'' where Proto Man only gets a cameo to give you the Energy Equalizer except this time he didn't give you crap. Here comes the guide dang it part: You need to find Proto Man again on Turbo Man's stage. To find him you need to go through a fake wall at the top of the Hyper Rocket Buster room. This time, there's absolutely no indication of the fake wall existence so you kinda need to stumble there. Once again, he gives you a totally irrelevant tip (you can't slide while using the Super Adapter, something you can easily know as soon as you get the Adapter). AND YOU'RE NOT DONE YET. No, now you need to go back to Shade Man stage. Once you destroy the pumpkin mini-boss the normal way, you will get to a room with a lone Sniper Joe in there. You kill him and then you proceed through another fake wall to a new room where you will finally fight against Proto Man and once you defeat him you get the Protoshield. And unlike the Energy Equalizer and the other items in the game, you can't buy it at Auto's store. All of this for [[PowerupLetdown a quite mediocre reward that gimps your offensive skills]].
18th Apr '17 10:58:22 AM Mineboot45
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[[folder:Mega Man]]
* ''VideoGame/MegaManClassic'':
** In ''VideoGame/MegaMan5'', the letter plate in Stone Man's stage is hidden in a secret room behind a destructible piece of wall. Unfortunately, that piece looks only slightly different, so you are very unlikely to notice it unless you're actively looking for a secret room already. There are more secret rooms in this stage with generic items, one of them being a rare Mystery Tank. Finally, there is an extra life in plain sight within a wall, but no part of the wall is destructible; there is an invisible passage, but it's too high up to reach it simply by jumping you have to use Rush Coil to reach something you don't even know is there.
** In ''VideoGame/MegaMan7'', the locations of every important item you can get with Rush Search can qualify. But the Energy Equalizer takes the cake. While the rest of the items can be found by just using Rush Search on every different ladder, to get the Energy Equalizer you need to defeat the Shade Man miniboss in a specific way (by attacking the outher shell). There's no indication to make it appear you're making any damage other than the eyes of the pumpkin flashing. Once you defeat it, without touching the inner core, the boss will explode on the right side of the screen revealing an entire new section for the level. Once there you will need to scan the entire new section to find the Energy Equalizer... or you can use Rush Search under Dr Wily portrait to find it.
*** Getting the ProtoShield is even worse. First you need to find Proto Man in Cloud Man's stage. No big deal, just use Rush Coil to get to the suspicious stair you otherwise can't reach. Proto Man will give you an entirely redundant and irrelevant hint (Use the flame weapon in the woods). Nice, I guess? Except you don't have a flame weapon... yet. Until this point, you could think it's the same as ''VideoGame/MegaMan6'' where Proto Man only gets a cameo to give you the Energy Equalizer except this time he didn't give you crap. Here comes the guide dang it part: You need to find Proto Man again on Turbo Man's stage. To find him you need to go through a fake wall at the top of the Hyper Rocket Buster room. This time, there's absolutely no indication of the fake wall existence so you kinda need to stumble there. Once again, he gives you a totally irrelevant tip (you can't slide while using the Super Adapter, something you can easily know as soon as you get the Adapter). AND YOU'RE NOT DONE YET. No, now you need to go back to Shade Man stage. Once you destroy the pumpkin mini-boss the normal way, you will get to a room with a lone Sniper Joe in there. You kill him and then you proceed through another fake wall to a new room where you will finally fight against Proto Man and once you defeat him you get the Protoshield. And unlike the Energy Equalizer and the other items in the game, you can't buy it at Auto's store. All of this for [[PowerupLetdown a quite mediocre reward that gimps your offensive skills]].
* ''VideoGame/MegaManX'':
** In ''VideoGame/MegaManX3'', who the heck was supposed to guess that you had to get the Arm upgrade and use the charged Triad Thunder in order to drop the rocks in Tunnel Rhino's stage?
** And even that's more intuitive than the ''other'' place where the charged Triad Thunder is required... the beginning of Crush Crawfish's stage, where it can destroy a floor leading to a Ride Armor capsule. There is no indication that the destroyable area is any different from the rest of the floor around it.
** To acquire the most powerful armor in ''VideoGame/MegaManX5,'' you are required to drop X down what appears to be a bottomless pit in one of the final stages; if you're on the correct side of the shaft, you'll fall through a false wall into the room with the armor in it. The kicker is that the armor won't be there at all if you played through the stage with any of X's other armors, and there's nothing in-game to suggest this is the case. To be fair, the game will allow you to collect the armor with Zero regardless (although if you complete the stage with either character and neglect to pick up the armor, it's [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost]]).
** The hidden ultimate upgrades in ''X1''-''X3'' (The Hadoken, Shoryuken, and Gold Armor) are all likewise obtuse. And except for the Hadoken, they are also [[PermanentlyMissableContent permanently lost]] once you complete that level.
** The Gold Armor is doubly bad because, while the capsule to get it is not ''terribly'' hard to find, the armor itself can be rendered unobtainable by getting any Upgrade Chips earlier, something you wouldn't know before reaching the Gold Armor without a guide.
** Getting the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Z-Saber]] in X3. You have to bring Zero into a mini-boss fight in one of the final levels and defeat it with him, causing him to get damaged and hand his Saber over to X; said Saber is an added final charge level and can swipe off half of every boss's health other than the Final Boss. Except not only does this lock you out of seeing Zero in the ending, but ''nowhere else in the game can Zero enter boss/mini-boss rooms'' -- aside from a single necessary case in the ''intro stage.'' And there's no indication for him being able to enter this one in particular, either.
*** Plus the game does a good job of making you never want to use Zero because you need him alive for the best ending, but he dies forever if you ever lose as him at all. Why would you enter the room of a miniboss you've never fought, near the end of a game, as a character who dies forever if you lose as him?
* ''VideoGame/MegaManZero 4'' had a particularly bad one in the form of the item recipes. You combine two, three, or four chips you get from enemies, and sometimes, you get a special chip that can be used to power up Zero's abilities or give him new ones. Unfortunately, there are a lot of chips in the game, and the only indication you have of whether a particular set will actually make anything is if it does after you put them all together (and use them up in the process). You can get a few recipes from [=NPCs=], and the Cyber-elf gives you (vague) hints about a few of them, but there are far more recipes in the game that you have absolutely no clues for than ones you do...including some quite useful ones, such as the double-jump chip. If you're going for a complete set, hope you like lots and lots of trial and error and farming! Oh, and at least one of the chips you need shows up in only [[PermanentlyMissableContent one stage that cannot be revisited]] and that you are immediately thrust into at a certain point in the game.
[[/folder]]



* ''VideoGame/MegaManClassic'':
** In ''VideoGame/MegaMan5'', the letter plate in Stone Man's stage is hidden in a secret room behind a destructible piece of wall. Unfortunately, that piece looks only slightly different, so you are very unlikely to notice it unless you're actively looking for a secret room already. There are more secret rooms in this stage with generic items, one of them being a rare Mystery Tank. Finally, there is an extra life in plain sight within a wall, but no part of the wall is destructible; there is an invisible passage, but it's too high up to reach it simply by jumping you have to use Rush Coil to reach something you don't even know is there.
** In ''VideoGame/MegaMan7'', the locations of every important item you can get with Rush Search can qualify. But the Energy Equalizer takes the cake. While the rest of the items can be found by just using Rush Search on every different ladder, to get the Energy Equalizer you need to defeat the Shade Man miniboss in a specific way (by attacking the outher shell). There's no indication to make it appear you're making any damage other than the eyes of the pumpkin flashing. Once you defeat it, without touching the inner core, the boss will explode on the right side of the screen revealing an entire new section for the level. Once there you will need to scan the entire new section to find the Energy Equalizer... or you can use Rush Search under Dr Wily portrait to find it.
*** Getting the ProtoShield is even worse. First you need to find Proto Man in Cloud Man stage. No big deal, just use Rush Coil to get to the suspicious stair you otherwise can't reach. Proto Man will give you an entirely redundant and irrelevant hint (Use the flame weapon in the woods). Nice, I guess? Except you don't have a flame weapon... yet. Until this point, you could think it's the same as ''VideoGame/MegaMan6'' where Proto Man only gets a cameo to give you the Energy Equalizer except this time he didn't give you crap. Here comes the guide dang it part: You need to find Proto Man again on Turbo Man stage. To find him you need to go through a fake wall at the top of the Hyper Rocket Buster room. This time, there's absolutely no indication of the fake wall existence so you kinda need to stumble there. Once again, he gives you a totally irrelevant tip (you can't slide while using the Super Adapter, something you can easily know as soon as you get the Adapter). AND YOU'RE NOT DONE YET. No, now you need to go back to Shade Man stage. Once you destroy the pumpkin mini-boss the normal way, you will get to a room with a lone Sniper Joe in there. You kill him and then you proceed through another fake wall to a new room where you will finally fight against Proto Man and once you defeat him you get the Protoshield. And unlike the Energy Equalizer and the other items in the game, you can't buy it at Auto's store. All of this for [[PowerupLetdown a quite mediocre reward that gimps your offensive skills]].
* ''VideoGame/MegaManX'':
** In ''VideoGame/MegaManX3'', who the heck was supposed to guess that you had to get the Arm upgrade and use the charged Triad Thunder in order to drop the rocks in Tunnel Rhino's stage?
** And even that's more intuitive than the ''other'' place where the charged Triad Thunder is required... the beginning of Crush Crawfish's stage, where it can destroy a floor leading to a Ride Armor capsule. There is no indication that the destroyable area is any different from the rest of the floor around it.
** To acquire the most powerful armor in ''VideoGame/MegaManX5,'' you are required to drop X down what appears to be a bottomless pit in one of the final stages; if you're on the correct side of the shaft, you'll fall through a false wall into the room with the armor in it. The kicker is that the armor won't be there at all if you played through the stage with any of X's other armors, and there's nothing in-game to suggest this is the case. To be fair, the game will allow you to collect the armor with Zero regardless (although if you complete the stage with either character and neglect to pick up the armor, it's [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost]]).
** The hidden ultimate upgrades in ''X1''-''X3'' (The Hadoken, Shoryuken, and Gold Armor) are all likewise obtuse. And except for the Hadoken, they are also [[PermanentlyMissableContent permanently lost]] once you complete that level.
** The Gold Armor is doubly bad because, while the capsule to get it is not ''terribly'' hard to find, the armor itself can be rendered unobtainable by getting any Upgrade Chips earlier, something you wouldn't know before reaching the Gold Armor without a guide.
** Getting the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Z-Saber]] in X3. You have to bring Zero into a mini-boss fight in one of the final levels and defeat it with him, causing him to get damaged and hand his Saber over to X; said Saber is an added final charge level and can swipe off half of every boss's health other than the Final Boss. Except not only does this lock you out of seeing Zero in the ending, but ''nowhere else in the game can Zero enter boss/mini-boss rooms'' -- aside from a single necessary case in the ''intro stage.'' And there's no indication for him being able to enter this one in particular, either.
*** Plus the game does a good job of making you never want to use Zero because you need him alive for the best ending, but he dies forever if you ever lose as him at all. Why would you enter the room of a miniboss you've never fought, near the end of a game, as a character who dies forever if you lose as him?
* ''VideoGame/MegaManZero 4'' had a particularly bad one in the form of the item recipes. You combine two, three, or four chips you get from enemies, and sometimes, you get a special chip that can be used to power up Zero's abilities or give him new ones. Unfortunately, there are a lot of chips in the game, and the only indication you have of whether a particular set will actually make anything is if it does after you put them all together (and use them up in the process). You can get a few recipes from [=NPCs=], and the Cyber-elf gives you (vague) hints about a few of them, but there are far more recipes in the game that you have absolutely no clues for than ones you do...including some quite useful ones, such as the double-jump chip. If you're going for a complete set, hope you like lots and lots of trial and error and farming! Oh, and at least one of the chips you need shows up in only [[PermanentlyMissableContent one stage that cannot be revisited]] and that you are immediately thrust into at a certain point in the game.

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* ''VideoGame/MegaManClassic'':
** In ''VideoGame/MegaMan5'', the letter plate in Stone Man's stage is hidden in a secret room behind a destructible piece of wall. Unfortunately, that piece looks only slightly different, so you are very unlikely to notice it unless you're actively looking for a secret room already. There are more secret rooms in this stage with generic items, one of them being a rare Mystery Tank. Finally, there is an extra life in plain sight within a wall, but no part of the wall is destructible; there is an invisible passage, but it's too high up to reach it simply by jumping you have to use Rush Coil to reach something you don't even know is there.
** In ''VideoGame/MegaMan7'', the locations of every important item you can get with Rush Search can qualify. But the Energy Equalizer takes the cake. While the rest of the items can be found by just using Rush Search on every different ladder, to get the Energy Equalizer you need to defeat the Shade Man miniboss in a specific way (by attacking the outher shell). There's no indication to make it appear you're making any damage other than the eyes of the pumpkin flashing. Once you defeat it, without touching the inner core, the boss will explode on the right side of the screen revealing an entire new section for the level. Once there you will need to scan the entire new section to find the Energy Equalizer... or you can use Rush Search under Dr Wily portrait to find it.
*** Getting the ProtoShield is even worse. First you need to find Proto Man in Cloud Man stage. No big deal, just use Rush Coil to get to the suspicious stair you otherwise can't reach. Proto Man will give you an entirely redundant and irrelevant hint (Use the flame weapon in the woods). Nice, I guess? Except you don't have a flame weapon... yet. Until this point, you could think it's the same as ''VideoGame/MegaMan6'' where Proto Man only gets a cameo to give you the Energy Equalizer except this time he didn't give you crap. Here comes the guide dang it part: You need to find Proto Man again on Turbo Man stage. To find him you need to go through a fake wall at the top of the Hyper Rocket Buster room. This time, there's absolutely no indication of the fake wall existence so you kinda need to stumble there. Once again, he gives you a totally irrelevant tip (you can't slide while using the Super Adapter, something you can easily know as soon as you get the Adapter). AND YOU'RE NOT DONE YET. No, now you need to go back to Shade Man stage. Once you destroy the pumpkin mini-boss the normal way, you will get to a room with a lone Sniper Joe in there. You kill him and then you proceed through another fake wall to a new room where you will finally fight against Proto Man and once you defeat him you get the Protoshield. And unlike the Energy Equalizer and the other items in the game, you can't buy it at Auto's store. All of this for [[PowerupLetdown a quite mediocre reward that gimps your offensive skills]].
* ''VideoGame/MegaManX'':
** In ''VideoGame/MegaManX3'', who the heck was supposed to guess that you had to get the Arm upgrade and use the charged Triad Thunder in order to drop the rocks in Tunnel Rhino's stage?
** And even that's more intuitive than the ''other'' place where the charged Triad Thunder is required... the beginning of Crush Crawfish's stage, where it can destroy a floor leading to a Ride Armor capsule. There is no indication that the destroyable area is any different from the rest of the floor around it.
** To acquire the most powerful armor in ''VideoGame/MegaManX5,'' you are required to drop X down what appears to be a bottomless pit in one of the final stages; if you're on the correct side of the shaft, you'll fall through a false wall into the room with the armor in it. The kicker is that the armor won't be there at all if you played through the stage with any of X's other armors, and there's nothing in-game to suggest this is the case. To be fair, the game will allow you to collect the armor with Zero regardless (although if you complete the stage with either character and neglect to pick up the armor, it's [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost]]).
** The hidden ultimate upgrades in ''X1''-''X3'' (The Hadoken, Shoryuken, and Gold Armor) are all likewise obtuse. And except for the Hadoken, they are also [[PermanentlyMissableContent permanently lost]] once you complete that level.
** The Gold Armor is doubly bad because, while the capsule to get it is not ''terribly'' hard to find, the armor itself can be rendered unobtainable by getting any Upgrade Chips earlier, something you wouldn't know before reaching the Gold Armor without a guide.
** Getting the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Z-Saber]] in X3. You have to bring Zero into a mini-boss fight in one of the final levels and defeat it with him, causing him to get damaged and hand his Saber over to X; said Saber is an added final charge level and can swipe off half of every boss's health other than the Final Boss. Except not only does this lock you out of seeing Zero in the ending, but ''nowhere else in the game can Zero enter boss/mini-boss rooms'' -- aside from a single necessary case in the ''intro stage.'' And there's no indication for him being able to enter this one in particular, either.
*** Plus the game does a good job of making you never want to use Zero because you need him alive for the best ending, but he dies forever if you ever lose as him at all. Why would you enter the room of a miniboss you've never fought, near the end of a game, as a character who dies forever if you lose as him?
* ''VideoGame/MegaManZero 4'' had a particularly bad one in the form of the item recipes. You combine two, three, or four chips you get from enemies, and sometimes, you get a special chip that can be used to power up Zero's abilities or give him new ones. Unfortunately, there are a lot of chips in the game, and the only indication you have of whether a particular set will actually make anything is if it does after you put them all together (and use them up in the process). You can get a few recipes from [=NPCs=], and the Cyber-elf gives you (vague) hints about a few of them, but there are far more recipes in the game that you have absolutely no clues for than ones you do...including some quite useful ones, such as the double-jump chip. If you're going for a complete set, hope you like lots and lots of trial and error and farming! Oh, and at least one of the chips you need shows up in only [[PermanentlyMissableContent one stage that cannot be revisited]] and that you are immediately thrust into at a certain point in the game.
18th Apr '17 10:53:30 AM Mineboot45
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[[folder:Sonic the Hedgehog]]


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[[/folder]]

[[folder:Super Mario Bros.]]


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[[/folder]]
27th Mar '17 5:54:14 PM TheMartianGeek1
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*** Though the level's message box ''does'' mention it, just not exactly how it works.
6th Mar '17 12:37:35 PM ThePocket
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* In the original ''VideoGame/{{Shantae}}'', the final dungeon is on top of Mount Pointy, which Sky tells you is to the east. Since this is a 2D side-scroller, logic would dictate that east means right. She also says it's far away, which makes sense since her home town of Oasis Town is as far west as you've explored so far. And [[FromACertainPointOfView technically, she's not wrong]], since the game world wraps around and if you do go as far to the right as you can, you'll end up at Mount Pointy... at the edge of an impassible cliff. To get to the dungeon, you actually have to go left from Oasis Town and approach the mountain from the other side. What's worse, if you try to explore further left and hit the slippery slope, you'll fall down the other side and get stuck at the far right edge of the world all over again. Hope you've been stocking up on Warp Squids and had the foresight to save four for Oasis Town!
28th Feb '17 3:41:36 PM crazyrabbits
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** Unless you have incredibly-good skills with the pipe, the only way to access the Secret Exit in the Cheese Bridge Area is to have a cape and Yoshi, [[TemptingFate float ''underneath'' the Level Gate]], then dismount and jump upwards on the ''other'' side just as you go off the screen.

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** Unless you have incredibly-good skills with the pipe, cape, the only way to access the Secret Exit in the Cheese Bridge Area is to have a cape and Yoshi, [[TemptingFate float ''underneath'' the Level Gate]], then dismount and jump upwards on the ''other'' side just as you go off the screen.
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