History GrowingTheBeard / WesternAnimation

4th Feb '18 7:32:52 AM Manny20444
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** This happened again during the relaunch of the series as ''Justice League Unlimited''. The first season was more shaky with the writers getting used to the new half-hour format, greatest emphasis being put on [[ADayInTheLimelight Characters of the Day]] instead of the core 7, and the fan-favorites Flash and Hawkgirl being PutOnTheBus. The second half of the first season rectified this; Flash and Hawkgirl were back full-time, the series focused on a continuous storyline instead of self-contained episodes, and the writing and characterization got better.

to:

** *** This happened again during the relaunch of the series as ''Justice League Unlimited''. The first season was more shaky with the writers getting used to the new half-hour format, greatest emphasis being put on [[ADayInTheLimelight Characters of the Day]] instead of the core 7, and the fan-favorites Flash and Hawkgirl being PutOnTheBus. The second half of the first season rectified this; Flash and Hawkgirl were back full-time, the series focused on a continuous storyline instead of self-contained episodes, and the writing and characterization got better.
4th Feb '18 7:32:22 AM Manny20444
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** ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'': This trope is expressly discussed in the Season 2 DVD. The producers felt that the first season of ''Justice League'' was a competent production, improving as it progressed, but that it was in season two that the show became what they always wanted it to be. Many of the changes came about from their own disapproval and from listening to fan complaints. Bruce Timm explained that much of Season 1 was just trying to get the series started and they ended up rushing things where they should have taken more time. Season Two opened with "Twilight," a ComicBook/{{Darkseid}} episode, and the level of quality leaped over the best of the first season. Among the items discussed:
** They made a policy decision to avoid "[[TheWorfEffect Super-wimp]]" with Superman, which had a much larger effect on the first season than they had realized. Even the DependingOnTheWriter issues even in the comics, his primary job in fights was to get thrown into buildings or otherwise knocked around with relative ease (he was beaten up on his own show in a similar way but [[HeroicSecondWind always came back to win the fight]]; in the ensemble Justice League, another hero would just step in for him). A noticeable example came from the episode "The Enemy Below" where Superman is incapacitated by Deadshot's electrified manhole cover trap. In season two, he was more likely to tank or quickly recover from any attack that came his way, including Darkseid's Omega Beams and catching thrown vehicles instead of being hit by them.
** They wanted to increase the scale of the stories with larger backgrounds, more character models animated in critical scenes, bigger stakes, a visceral sense of physical contact and added emotional conflict even between the heroes. The rationale was "the show doesn't necessarily have to be ''dark'', but it has to be ''intense''" in order to make sure viewers were engrossed. The action became faster, more chaotic, more creative and less repetitive. Green Lantern was even chastised for being too [[GreenLanternRing straightforward with his ring]].
** They reintroduced a lot of the continuity from [[WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries BTAS]] and [[WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries STAS]], and some {{Call Forward}}s to ''WesternAnimation/BatmanBeyond'', that had not been included in season one. Originally they wanted JL to stand on its own merits, but understood fans are generally watching the show to see their favorite characters.
** They began laying the groundwork for many future story arcs, while the first season had episodes largely self-contained. In particular, many hints about Hawkgirl's history would come to a head on "Starcrossed," the season finale. Likewise the flirtation between Green Lantern and Hawkgirl became more obvious until they finally admitted their feelings to each other in the episode "Wild Cards".
** Bruce Timm said that he was often spurred on by Creator/MelBrooks's advice to [[RefugeInAudacity Ring the Bell]]; if a scene seemed like it might be too much and you were having second thoughts, do it anyway and ''make it bigger''. It was the official mantra of the production team that "Good enough isn't good enough". The animators had specific instructions to work until a scene was good enough and then make it better.
*** For many, Season 1's three-part finale "The Savage Time" is where the show hit this point. Besides the badass plot about the Justice League going back in time to UsefulNotes/WorldWarII to [[SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong stop Vandal Savage from taking over in the present]], for the first time it shows each member of the League being awesome, and Superman being restored to his former glory. It also probably didn't hurt that the set-up saw Batman, the SpotlightStealingSquad of the DCAU, benched - this allowed the writers to truly demonstrate what the other characters were capable of in creative ways, as opposed to the BadassNormal [[TheStrategist Strategist]] bailing them out/finding the solution (which would still happen thereafter, but not quite as often).

to:

** ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'': ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'':
***
This trope is expressly discussed in the Season 2 DVD. The producers felt that the first season of ''Justice League'' was a competent production, improving as it progressed, but that it was in season two that the show became what they always wanted it to be. Many of the changes came about from their own disapproval and from listening to fan complaints. Bruce Timm explained that much of Season 1 was just trying to get the series started and they ended up rushing things where they should have taken more time. Season Two opened with "Twilight," a ComicBook/{{Darkseid}} episode, and the level of quality leaped over the best of the first season. Among the items discussed:
** *** They made a policy decision to avoid "[[TheWorfEffect Super-wimp]]" with Superman, which had a much larger effect on the first season than they had realized. Even the DependingOnTheWriter issues even in the comics, his primary job in fights was to get thrown into buildings or otherwise knocked around with relative ease (he was beaten up on his own show in a similar way but [[HeroicSecondWind always came back to win the fight]]; in the ensemble Justice League, another hero would just step in for him). A noticeable example came from the episode "The Enemy Below" where Superman is incapacitated by Deadshot's electrified manhole cover trap. In season two, he was more likely to tank or quickly recover from any attack that came his way, including Darkseid's Omega Beams and catching thrown vehicles instead of being hit by them.
** *** They wanted to increase the scale of the stories with larger backgrounds, more character models animated in critical scenes, bigger stakes, a visceral sense of physical contact and added emotional conflict even between the heroes. The rationale was "the show doesn't necessarily have to be ''dark'', but it has to be ''intense''" in order to make sure viewers were engrossed. The action became faster, more chaotic, more creative and less repetitive. Green Lantern was even chastised for being too [[GreenLanternRing straightforward with his ring]].
** *** They reintroduced a lot of the continuity from [[WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries BTAS]] and [[WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries STAS]], and some {{Call Forward}}s to ''WesternAnimation/BatmanBeyond'', that had not been included in season one. Originally they wanted JL to stand on its own merits, but understood fans are generally watching the show to see their favorite characters.
** *** They began laying the groundwork for many future story arcs, while the first season had episodes largely self-contained. In particular, many hints about Hawkgirl's history would come to a head on "Starcrossed," the season finale. Likewise the flirtation between Green Lantern and Hawkgirl became more obvious until they finally admitted their feelings to each other in the episode "Wild Cards".
** *** Bruce Timm said that he was often spurred on by Creator/MelBrooks's advice to [[RefugeInAudacity Ring the Bell]]; if a scene seemed like it might be too much and you were having second thoughts, do it anyway and ''make it bigger''. It was the official mantra of the production team that "Good enough isn't good enough". The animators had specific instructions to work until a scene was good enough and then make it better.
*** For many, However, there are fans who believe that Season 1's three-part finale "The Savage Time" is where the show hit this point. Besides the badass plot about the Justice League going back in time to UsefulNotes/WorldWarII to [[SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong stop Vandal Savage from taking over in the present]], for the first time it shows each member of the League being awesome, and Superman being restored to his former glory. It also probably didn't hurt that the set-up saw Batman, the SpotlightStealingSquad of the DCAU, benched - this allowed the writers to truly demonstrate what the other characters were capable of in creative ways, as opposed to the BadassNormal [[TheStrategist Strategist]] bailing them out/finding the solution (which would still happen thereafter, but not quite as often).
4th Feb '18 7:30:35 AM Manny20444
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** ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'' season 2 is considered a vast improvement over season 1. Mostly thanks to writer Creator/DwayneMcDuffie joining the crew, but also managing to seriously think a few plots through such as "A Better World" and especially {{foreshadowing}} of the events of "Starcrossed". This was all largely evident in the season opener "Twilight" which was more aggressive in scope and personal in the stakes than almost anything in the first season.
** During the commentary track on "Twilight," Bruce Timm and those with him also say that starting with season 2 they wanted to push themselves more than they did with the first season. They use the metaphor of ringing a bell; that if you're going to ring a bell, do it as loud and as hard as you can.
** There's also "Hereafter", where Superman gets sent onto a desert planet with a red sun and has to survive without his powers. Not only is the first part, where the people of Earth think Big Blue is dead, genuinely touching, but Supes' interaction with the only intelligent inhabitant of the desert planet is some of the best-written stuff the series saw. It broke the mold of him having TheWorfEffect to showcase the other league and put him by himself in a hostile and unfamiliar environment.
** For many, Season 1's three-part finale "The Savage Time" is where the show hit this point. Besides the badass plot about the Justice League going back in time to UsefulNotes/WorldWarII to [[SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong stop Vandal Savage from taking over in the present]], for the first time it shows each member of the League being awesome, and Superman being restored to his former glory. It also probably didn't hurt that the set-up saw Batman, the SpotlightStealingSquad of the DCAU, benched - this allowed the writers to truly demonstrate what the other characters were capable of in creative ways, as opposed to the BadassNormal [[TheStrategist Strategist]] bailing them out/finding the solution (which would still happen thereafter, but not quite as often).

to:

** ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'' season 2 is considered a vast improvement over season 1. Mostly thanks to writer Creator/DwayneMcDuffie joining the crew, but also managing to seriously think a few plots through such as "A Better World" and especially {{foreshadowing}} of the events of "Starcrossed". ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'': This was all largely evident trope is expressly discussed in the season opener "Twilight" which was more aggressive in scope and personal in the stakes than almost anything in Season 2 DVD. The producers felt that the first season.
** During
season of ''Justice League'' was a competent production, improving as it progressed, but that it was in season two that the commentary track on show became what they always wanted it to be. Many of the changes came about from their own disapproval and from listening to fan complaints. Bruce Timm explained that much of Season 1 was just trying to get the series started and they ended up rushing things where they should have taken more time. Season Two opened with "Twilight," Bruce Timm a ComicBook/{{Darkseid}} episode, and those with him also say that starting with season 2 they wanted to push themselves more than they did with the level of quality leaped over the best of the first season. Among the items discussed:
**
They use made a policy decision to avoid "[[TheWorfEffect Super-wimp]]" with Superman, which had a much larger effect on the metaphor of ringing a bell; that if you're going first season than they had realized. Even the DependingOnTheWriter issues even in the comics, his primary job in fights was to ring get thrown into buildings or otherwise knocked around with relative ease (he was beaten up on his own show in a bell, do it as loud and as hard as you can.
** There's also "Hereafter",
similar way but [[HeroicSecondWind always came back to win the fight]]; in the ensemble Justice League, another hero would just step in for him). A noticeable example came from the episode "The Enemy Below" where Superman gets sent onto a desert planet is incapacitated by Deadshot's electrified manhole cover trap. In season two, he was more likely to tank or quickly recover from any attack that came his way, including Darkseid's Omega Beams and catching thrown vehicles instead of being hit by them.
** They wanted to increase the scale of the stories
with larger backgrounds, more character models animated in critical scenes, bigger stakes, a red sun visceral sense of physical contact and added emotional conflict even between the heroes. The rationale was "the show doesn't necessarily have to be ''dark'', but it has to survive without be ''intense''" in order to make sure viewers were engrossed. The action became faster, more chaotic, more creative and less repetitive. Green Lantern was even chastised for being too [[GreenLanternRing straightforward with his powers. Not only is ring]].
** They reintroduced a lot of the continuity from [[WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries BTAS]] and [[WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries STAS]], and some {{Call Forward}}s to ''WesternAnimation/BatmanBeyond'', that had not been included in season one. Originally they wanted JL to stand on its own merits, but understood fans are generally watching the show to see their favorite characters.
** They began laying the groundwork for many future story arcs, while
the first part, where season had episodes largely self-contained. In particular, many hints about Hawkgirl's history would come to a head on "Starcrossed," the people of Earth think Big Blue is dead, genuinely touching, but Supes' interaction with season finale. Likewise the only intelligent inhabitant flirtation between Green Lantern and Hawkgirl became more obvious until they finally admitted their feelings to each other in the episode "Wild Cards".
** Bruce Timm said that he was often spurred on by Creator/MelBrooks's advice to [[RefugeInAudacity Ring the Bell]]; if a scene seemed like it might be too much and you were having second thoughts, do it anyway and ''make it bigger''. It was the official mantra
of the desert planet is some of the best-written stuff the series saw. It broke the mold of him having TheWorfEffect production team that "Good enough isn't good enough". The animators had specific instructions to showcase the other league work until a scene was good enough and put him by himself in a hostile and unfamiliar environment.
**
then make it better.
***
For many, Season 1's three-part finale "The Savage Time" is where the show hit this point. Besides the badass plot about the Justice League going back in time to UsefulNotes/WorldWarII to [[SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong stop Vandal Savage from taking over in the present]], for the first time it shows each member of the League being awesome, and Superman being restored to his former glory. It also probably didn't hurt that the set-up saw Batman, the SpotlightStealingSquad of the DCAU, benched - this allowed the writers to truly demonstrate what the other characters were capable of in creative ways, as opposed to the BadassNormal [[TheStrategist Strategist]] bailing them out/finding the solution (which would still happen thereafter, but not quite as often).often).
** This happened again during the relaunch of the series as ''Justice League Unlimited''. The first season was more shaky with the writers getting used to the new half-hour format, greatest emphasis being put on [[ADayInTheLimelight Characters of the Day]] instead of the core 7, and the fan-favorites Flash and Hawkgirl being PutOnTheBus. The second half of the first season rectified this; Flash and Hawkgirl were back full-time, the series focused on a continuous storyline instead of self-contained episodes, and the writing and characterization got better.



* ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'':
** This trope is expressly discussed in the Season 2 DVD. The producers felt that season one of ''Justice League'' was a competent production, improving as it progressed, but that it was in season two that the show became what they always wanted it to be. Many of the changes came about from their own disapproval and from listening to fan complaints. Bruce Timm explained that much of Season 1 was just trying to get the series started and they ended up rushing things where they should have taken more time. Season Two opened with "Twilight," a ComicBook/{{Darkseid}} episode, and the level of quality leaped over the best of the first season. Among the items discussed:
** They made a policy decision to avoid "[[TheWorfEffect Super-wimp]]" with Superman, which had a much larger effect on the first season than they had realized. Even the DependingOnTheWriter issues even in the comics, his primary job in fights was to get thrown into buildings or otherwise knocked around with relative ease (he was beaten up on his own show in a similar way but [[HeroicSecondWind always came back to win the fight]]; in the ensemble Justice League, another hero would just step in for him). A noticeable example came from the episode "The Enemy Below" where Superman is incapacitated by Deadshot's electrified manhole cover trap. In season two he was more likely to tank or quickly recover from any attack that came his way, including Darkseid's Omega Beams and catching thrown vehicles instead of being hit by them.
** They wanted to increase the scale of the stories with larger backgrounds, more character models animated in critical scenes, bigger stakes, a visceral sense of physical contact and added emotional conflict even between the heroes. The rationale was "the show doesn't necessarily have to be ''dark'', but it has to be ''intense''" in order to make sure viewers were engrossed. The action became faster, more chaotic, more creative and less repetitive. Green Lantern was even chastised for being too [[GreenLanternRing straightforward with his ring]].
** In order to present the fact that the show was set in the DCAU, they reintroduced a lot of the continuity from [[WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries BTAS]] and [[WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries STAS]], and some {{Call Forward}}s to ''WesternAnimation/BatmanBeyond'', that had not been included in season one. Originally they wanted JL to stand on its own merits, but understood fans are generally watching the show to see their favorite characters.
** They began laying the groundwork for many future story arcs, while the first season had episodes largely self-contained. In particular, many hints about Hawkgirl's history would come to a head on "Starcrossed," the season finale. Likewise the flirtation between Green Lantern and Hawkgirl became more obvious until they finally admitted their feelings to each other.
** Bruce Timm said that he was often spurred on by Creator/MelBrooks's advice to [[RefugeInAudacity Ring the Bell]]; if a scene seemed like it might be too much and you were having second thoughts, do it anyway and ''make it bigger''. It was the official mantra of the production team that "Good enough isn't good enough". The animators had specific instructions to work until a scene was good enough and then make it better.
** This happened again during the relaunch of the series as ''Justice League Unlimited''. The first season was more shaky with the writers getting used to the new half-hour format, greatest emphasis being put on [[ADayInTheLimelight Characters of the Day]] instead of the core 7, and the fan-favorites Hawkgirl and Flash being PutOnTheBus. The second half of the first season rectified this; Flash and Hawkgirl were back full-time, the series focused on a continuous storyline instead of self-contained episodes, and the writing and characterization got better.
21st Jan '18 11:07:25 AM Manny20444
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Added DiffLines:

* ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'':
** This trope is expressly discussed in the Season 2 DVD. The producers felt that season one of ''Justice League'' was a competent production, improving as it progressed, but that it was in season two that the show became what they always wanted it to be. Many of the changes came about from their own disapproval and from listening to fan complaints. Bruce Timm explained that much of Season 1 was just trying to get the series started and they ended up rushing things where they should have taken more time. Season Two opened with "Twilight," a ComicBook/{{Darkseid}} episode, and the level of quality leaped over the best of the first season. Among the items discussed:
** They made a policy decision to avoid "[[TheWorfEffect Super-wimp]]" with Superman, which had a much larger effect on the first season than they had realized. Even the DependingOnTheWriter issues even in the comics, his primary job in fights was to get thrown into buildings or otherwise knocked around with relative ease (he was beaten up on his own show in a similar way but [[HeroicSecondWind always came back to win the fight]]; in the ensemble Justice League, another hero would just step in for him). A noticeable example came from the episode "The Enemy Below" where Superman is incapacitated by Deadshot's electrified manhole cover trap. In season two he was more likely to tank or quickly recover from any attack that came his way, including Darkseid's Omega Beams and catching thrown vehicles instead of being hit by them.
** They wanted to increase the scale of the stories with larger backgrounds, more character models animated in critical scenes, bigger stakes, a visceral sense of physical contact and added emotional conflict even between the heroes. The rationale was "the show doesn't necessarily have to be ''dark'', but it has to be ''intense''" in order to make sure viewers were engrossed. The action became faster, more chaotic, more creative and less repetitive. Green Lantern was even chastised for being too [[GreenLanternRing straightforward with his ring]].
** In order to present the fact that the show was set in the DCAU, they reintroduced a lot of the continuity from [[WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries BTAS]] and [[WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries STAS]], and some {{Call Forward}}s to ''WesternAnimation/BatmanBeyond'', that had not been included in season one. Originally they wanted JL to stand on its own merits, but understood fans are generally watching the show to see their favorite characters.
** They began laying the groundwork for many future story arcs, while the first season had episodes largely self-contained. In particular, many hints about Hawkgirl's history would come to a head on "Starcrossed," the season finale. Likewise the flirtation between Green Lantern and Hawkgirl became more obvious until they finally admitted their feelings to each other.
** Bruce Timm said that he was often spurred on by Creator/MelBrooks's advice to [[RefugeInAudacity Ring the Bell]]; if a scene seemed like it might be too much and you were having second thoughts, do it anyway and ''make it bigger''. It was the official mantra of the production team that "Good enough isn't good enough". The animators had specific instructions to work until a scene was good enough and then make it better.
** This happened again during the relaunch of the series as ''Justice League Unlimited''. The first season was more shaky with the writers getting used to the new half-hour format, greatest emphasis being put on [[ADayInTheLimelight Characters of the Day]] instead of the core 7, and the fan-favorites Hawkgirl and Flash being PutOnTheBus. The second half of the first season rectified this; Flash and Hawkgirl were back full-time, the series focused on a continuous storyline instead of self-contained episodes, and the writing and characterization got better.
15th Jan '18 2:04:08 AM Amagicalbadger
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* The second season of ''WesternAnimation/SonicBoom'' has been seen as this by many ''Sonic Boom'' supporters due to its more redefined animation, nods to the fandom and the fact the writers are making more emphasis when it comes to story and development.

to:

* The second season of ''WesternAnimation/SonicBoom'' has been seen as this by many ''Sonic Boom'' supporters due to its more redefined refined animation, nods to the fandom and the fact the writers are making more emphasis when it comes to story and development.
28th Dec '17 8:51:48 PM KyuTurtle
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** For many people, the series started out very slow. Many people specifically say the episodes "Sheesh! Cab, Bob?" and "Art Crawl" to be the point the show finally found its groove and became what it is now. ''Bob's Burgers'' is an odd case as many people go on to say that, while they were not trilled with the previous episodes at first, they were much more enjoyable to rewatch after watching more of the series.

to:

** For many people, the series started out very slow. Many people specifically say the episodes "Sheesh! Cab, Bob?" and "Art Crawl" to be the point the show finally found its groove and became what it is now. ''Bob's Burgers'' is an odd case as many people go on to say that, while they were not trilled thrilled with the previous episodes at first, they were much more enjoyable to rewatch after watching more of the series.
10th Dec '17 11:12:07 AM nombretomado
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** While nearly all of ''Disneytoon Studios'' DirectToVideo sequels remain ''very'' divisive among fans of DisneyAnimatedCanon, many note the 2000-onward era as the point they were often at least ''trying'' to make sequels that complemented the originals, with some even validated fit to release in theatres in certain regions. Due to high budget animation, scripting and acting, the likes of ''Bambi II'', ''Cinderella III: A Twist In Time'' and ''Return To Neverland'', even if not considered on the same level as their predecessors were, are often considered good pieces in their own right.

to:

** While nearly all of ''Disneytoon Studios'' DirectToVideo sequels remain ''very'' divisive among fans of DisneyAnimatedCanon, Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon, many note the 2000-onward era as the point they were often at least ''trying'' to make sequels that complemented the originals, with some even validated fit to release in theatres in certain regions. Due to high budget animation, scripting and acting, the likes of ''Bambi II'', ''Cinderella III: A Twist In Time'' and ''Return To Neverland'', even if not considered on the same level as their predecessors were, are often considered good pieces in their own right.
2nd Nov '17 8:02:53 PM DPsycho
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* Zigzagged with the esoteric [[Creator/VanBeurenStudios Van Beuren cartoon studio]]. It's generally agreed that the studio made a substantial upgrade in it's production values from 1934 and onward, due in part to slicker inking, larger budgets which allowed more polished animation and an upgrade to Technicolor, thanks in part to the studio bringing in Disney alumni Burt Gillett, who had previously directed the hit short ''Literature/ThreeLittlePigs. Unfortunately, the cartoons became substantially less entertaining and [[FollowTheLeader more derivative of Disney]] as a side effect]], and the studios inability to create a hit character series still lingered to where they started adapting hit comic strips of the day such as Toonerville Trolley and WesternAnimation/FelixTheCat instead (and Gillett reeked havoc on the studio internally due to his [[PrimaDonnaDirector blatant personality flaws and indecisive, perfectionist directing style]]). And then RKO ironically cancelled their distribution contract in favor of screening the [[WesternAnimation/ClassicDisneyShorts Disney shorts]] anyway, [[CreatorKiller abruptly sending the studio to its grave in 1936.]]

to:

* Zigzagged with the esoteric [[Creator/VanBeurenStudios Van Beuren cartoon studio]]. It's generally agreed that the studio made a substantial upgrade in it's its production values from 1934 and onward, due in part to slicker inking, larger budgets which allowed more polished animation and an upgrade to Technicolor, thanks in part to the studio bringing in Disney alumni Burt Gillett, who had previously directed the hit short ''Literature/ThreeLittlePigs. Unfortunately, the cartoons became substantially less entertaining and [[FollowTheLeader more derivative of Disney]] as a side effect]], and the studios inability to create a hit character series still lingered to where they started adapting hit comic strips of the day such as Toonerville Trolley and WesternAnimation/FelixTheCat instead (and Gillett reeked havoc on the studio internally due to his [[PrimaDonnaDirector blatant personality flaws and indecisive, perfectionist directing style]]). And then RKO ironically cancelled their distribution contract in favor of screening the [[WesternAnimation/ClassicDisneyShorts Disney shorts]] anyway, [[CreatorKiller abruptly sending the studio to its grave in 1936.]]
2nd Nov '17 12:07:00 PM DPsycho
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* The first couple of seasons of ''WesternAnimation/TheDreamstone'' are entertaining and ripe with good humor, but more or less a {{Strictly Formula}}ic VillainProtagonist series for the Urpneys, with core elements undeveloped or broken. Starting from the third season, the show gradually expands. The Noops become more competent and sympathetic, with their {{Flanderization}} and {{Designated Hero}} status against the Urpneys slowly undone and them allowed to get in on the humour and story more often. There is a much larger focus on world (or galaxy building), with a larger use of new realms and characters to spice up the formula and the dream process is a more frequent part of the plot (compared to the total of about one or two episodes from the first two seasons). This is also done while barely diluting any of the wonderful Urpney humor.

to:

* The first couple of seasons of ''WesternAnimation/TheDreamstone'' are entertaining and ripe with good humor, but more or less a {{Strictly Formula}}ic VillainProtagonist series for the Urpneys, with core elements undeveloped or broken. Starting from the third season, the show gradually expands. The Noops become more competent and sympathetic, with their {{Flanderization}} and {{Designated Hero}} status against the Urpneys slowly undone and undone, allowing them allowed to get in on the humour and story more often. There is a much larger focus on world (or galaxy building), galaxy) building, with a larger greater use of new realms and characters to spice up the formula formula, and the dream process is a more frequent part of the plot (compared to the total of about just one or two episodes from the first two seasons). This is also done while barely diluting any of the wonderful Urpney humor.
2nd Nov '17 11:53:20 AM DPsycho
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** While nearly all of ''Disneytoon Studios'' DirectToVideo sequels remain ''very'' divisive among fans of DisneyAnimatedCanon, many note the 2000-onward era as the point they were often at least ''trying'' to make sequels that complimented the originals, with some even validated fit to release in theatres in certain regions. Due to high budget animation, scripting and acting, the likes of ''Bambi II'', ''Cinderella III: A Twist In Time'' and ''Return To Neverland'', even if not considered on the same level as their predecessors were, are often considered good pieces in their own right.

to:

** While nearly all of ''Disneytoon Studios'' DirectToVideo sequels remain ''very'' divisive among fans of DisneyAnimatedCanon, many note the 2000-onward era as the point they were often at least ''trying'' to make sequels that complimented complemented the originals, with some even validated fit to release in theatres in certain regions. Due to high budget animation, scripting and acting, the likes of ''Bambi II'', ''Cinderella III: A Twist In Time'' and ''Return To Neverland'', even if not considered on the same level as their predecessors were, are often considered good pieces in their own right.
This list shows the last 10 events of 295. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=GrowingTheBeard.WesternAnimation