History GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff / ComicBooks

22nd May '17 8:14:29 AM comicwriter
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** Japan really, ''really'' loves Franchise/{{Batman}}. Batman had a [[Manga/{{Batman}} manga]] in the 1960s (of which several stories appear in the American book ''Bat-Manga''), and has had several manga in more recent times -- ''Batman: Death Mask'', ''Batman: Child of Dreams'', and a story in ''Batman: Black and White'' by Creator/KatsuhiroOtomo. When Akita Shoten began serializing a ''Comicbook/{{Justice League|Of America}}'' manga in anticipation of [[Film/JusticeLeague the movie]], it was titled ''[[WolverinePublicity Batman and the Justice League]]'', making it clear just who Japan considered the star.

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** Japan really, ''really'' loves Franchise/{{Batman}}. Batman had a [[Manga/{{Batman}} manga]] in the 1960s (of which several stories appear in the American book ''Bat-Manga''), and has had several manga in more recent times -- ''Batman: Death Mask'', ''Batman: Child of Dreams'', and a story in ''Batman: Black and White'' by Creator/KatsuhiroOtomo. When Akita Shoten began serializing a ''Comicbook/{{Justice Comicbook/{{Justice League|Of America}}'' America}} manga in anticipation of [[Film/JusticeLeague the movie]], it was titled ''[[WolverinePublicity Batman and the Justice League]]'', making it clear just who Japan considered the star.
22nd May '17 8:13:53 AM comicwriter
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** Japan really, ''really'' loves Franchise/{{Batman}}. Batman had a [[Manga/{{Batman}} manga]] in the 1960s (of which several stories appear in the American book ''Bat-Manga''), and has had several manga in more recent times -- ''Batman: Death Mask'', ''Batman: Child of Dreams'', and a story in ''Batman: Black and White'' by Creator/KatsuhiroOtomo.

to:

** Japan really, ''really'' loves Franchise/{{Batman}}. Batman had a [[Manga/{{Batman}} manga]] in the 1960s (of which several stories appear in the American book ''Bat-Manga''), and has had several manga in more recent times -- ''Batman: Death Mask'', ''Batman: Child of Dreams'', and a story in ''Batman: Black and White'' by Creator/KatsuhiroOtomo. When Akita Shoten began serializing a ''Comicbook/{{Justice League|Of America}}'' manga in anticipation of [[Film/JusticeLeague the movie]], it was titled ''[[WolverinePublicity Batman and the Justice League]]'', making it clear just who Japan considered the star.
30th Apr '17 10:47:33 AM comicwriter
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** The ''ComicBook/XMen'' as a whole have been among the more popular American comics franchises in Japan ever since their '90s cartoon began airing there. Now, after four movies and two further cartoons, it's bigger than ever -- Madhouse has made a ''Anime/XMen'' anime. Psylocke, a fairly minor member of the ''ComicBook/XMen'', being inordinately popular simply because she was in ''VideoGame/XMenChildrenOfTheAtom'', ''VideoGame/MarvelSuperHeroes'' and ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom2'' despite hardly mattering to anyone in the country of her creation.

to:

** The ''ComicBook/XMen'' as a whole have been among the more popular American comics franchises in Japan ever since their '90s cartoon began airing there. Now, after four movies and two further cartoons, it's bigger than ever -- Madhouse has made a ''Anime/XMen'' anime. Psylocke, Comicbook/{{Psylocke}}, a fairly minor member of the ''ComicBook/XMen'', being inordinately popular simply because she was in ''VideoGame/XMenChildrenOfTheAtom'', ''VideoGame/MarvelSuperHeroes'' and ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom2'' despite hardly mattering to anyone in the country of her creation.
4th Mar '17 12:23:32 PM nombretomado
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** It should be noted that [[Creator/MarvelComics Marvel]] has more influence in Japan than its competitor Creator/DCComics, mostly because Marvel offers more relatable superheroes than what DC Comics has to offer. Across from Spider-Man and the X-Men, Iron Man and Captain America has gotten a small fanbase in Japan. Especially Captain America, as he not only represent the American value of freedom [[note]]The stereotype of an American in the Japanese perspective is often this trait[[/note]], but he also represents justice, honor, dignity, and duty as well (four of the most distinctive traits of an idealized LawfulGood superhero in many anime and manga alike). Iron Man has also gotten a small popularity in Japan due to his Mecha Suit. Marvel is popular enough to even feature a crossover with one of the most popular manga in Japan, ''Manga/AttackOnTitan''.

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** It should be noted that [[Creator/MarvelComics Marvel]] Creator/{{Marvel|Comics}} has more influence in Japan than its competitor Creator/DCComics, mostly because Marvel offers more relatable superheroes than what DC Comics has to offer. Across from Spider-Man and the X-Men, Iron Man and Captain America has gotten a small fanbase in Japan. Especially Captain America, as he not only represent the American value of freedom [[note]]The stereotype of an American in the Japanese perspective is often this trait[[/note]], but he also represents justice, honor, dignity, and duty as well (four of the most distinctive traits of an idealized LawfulGood superhero in many anime and manga alike). Iron Man has also gotten a small popularity in Japan due to his Mecha Suit. Marvel is popular enough to even feature a crossover with one of the most popular manga in Japan, ''Manga/AttackOnTitan''.



* SuperHero comics first appeared in Poland in TheNineties, thanks to the publisher TM-Semic. As a result, TM-Semic's three main initial titles ( ''ComicBook/SpiderMan'', ''ComicBook/XMen'' and ''ComicBook/ThePunisher'') have much larger fanbases than other MarvelComics heroes or teams (the biggest Polish Marvel fansite evolved from a strictly X-Men website, then ran out of material). And because the only three DC titles TM-Semic published were ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'', ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'', and ''Comicbook/GreenLantern'', while later they brought a few Image comics, much more people will recognize {{Spawn}} than WonderWoman (who possibly never even appeared in any TM-Semic comics). However, Vertigo titles and European Comics are still much more popular than the SuperHero genre.

to:

* SuperHero comics first appeared in Poland in TheNineties, thanks to the publisher TM-Semic. As a result, TM-Semic's three main initial titles ( ''ComicBook/SpiderMan'', ''ComicBook/XMen'' and ''ComicBook/ThePunisher'') have much larger fanbases than other MarvelComics Creator/MarvelComics heroes or teams (the biggest Polish Marvel fansite evolved from a strictly X-Men website, then ran out of material). And because the only three DC titles TM-Semic published were ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'', ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'', and ''Comicbook/GreenLantern'', while later they brought a few Image comics, much more people will recognize {{Spawn}} than WonderWoman (who possibly never even appeared in any TM-Semic comics). However, Vertigo titles and European Comics are still much more popular than the SuperHero genre.



* When MarvelComics created a British imprint in 1972, reprints of Marvel's superhero features did well enough, but British readers were much more receptive, for a longer period of time, to several non-superhero features than their American counterparts:

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* When MarvelComics Creator/MarvelComics created a British imprint in 1972, reprints of Marvel's superhero features did well enough, but British readers were much more receptive, for a longer period of time, to several non-superhero features than their American counterparts:
21st Feb '17 5:27:35 PM JoeMerl
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* In John Ostrander's ''ComicBook/MartianManhunter'', it was revealed that J'onn is the most recognized superhero in the southern hemisphere and in Japan.

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* In John Ostrander's ''ComicBook/MartianManhunter'', it was revealed that J'onn is the most recognized superhero in the southern hemisphere and in Japan. This may be a response to the RealLife fan question of why DC downplays him despite [[SuperPowerLottery his many awesome powers]].
20th Feb '17 11:47:40 AM Theriocephalus
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** The ''ComicBook/XMen'', As a whole they have been among the more popular American comics franchises in Japan ever since their '90s cartoon began airing there. Now, after four movies and two further cartoons, it's bigger than ever -- Madhouse has made a ''Anime/XMen'' anime. Psylocke, a fairly minor member of the ''ComicBook/XMen'', being inordinately popular simply because she was in ''VideoGame/XMenChildrenOfTheAtom'', ''VideoGame/MarvelSuperHeroes'' and ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom2'' despite hardly mattering to anyone in the country of her creation.

to:

** The ''ComicBook/XMen'', As ''ComicBook/XMen'' as a whole they have been among the more popular American comics franchises in Japan ever since their '90s cartoon began airing there. Now, after four movies and two further cartoons, it's bigger than ever -- Madhouse has made a ''Anime/XMen'' anime. Psylocke, a fairly minor member of the ''ComicBook/XMen'', being inordinately popular simply because she was in ''VideoGame/XMenChildrenOfTheAtom'', ''VideoGame/MarvelSuperHeroes'' and ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom2'' despite hardly mattering to anyone in the country of her creation.



** It should be noted that [[Creator/MarvelComics Marvel]], when compared to their competitive rival, Creator/DCComics, has more influence in Japan than Creator/DCComics. This is mostly because Marvel offers more relatable superheroes than what DC Comics superheroes has to offer. Across from Spider-Man and the X-Men, Iron Man and Captain America has gotten a small fanbase in Japan. Especially Captain America, as he not only represent the American value of freedom [[note]]The stereotype of an American in the Japanese perspective is often this trait[[/note]], but he also represents justice, honor, dignity, and duty as well (four of the most distinctive traits of an idealized LawfulGood superhero in many anime and manga alike). Iron Man has also gotten a small popularity in Japan due to his Mecha Suit. Marvel is popular enough to even feature a crossover with one of the most popular manga in Japan, ''Manga/AttackOnTitan''.

to:

** It should be noted that [[Creator/MarvelComics Marvel]], when compared to their competitive rival, Creator/DCComics, Marvel]] has more influence in Japan than Creator/DCComics. This is its competitor Creator/DCComics, mostly because Marvel offers more relatable superheroes than what DC Comics superheroes has to offer. Across from Spider-Man and the X-Men, Iron Man and Captain America has gotten a small fanbase in Japan. Especially Captain America, as he not only represent the American value of freedom [[note]]The stereotype of an American in the Japanese perspective is often this trait[[/note]], but he also represents justice, honor, dignity, and duty as well (four of the most distinctive traits of an idealized LawfulGood superhero in many anime and manga alike). Iron Man has also gotten a small popularity in Japan due to his Mecha Suit. Marvel is popular enough to even feature a crossover with one of the most popular manga in Japan, ''Manga/AttackOnTitan''.
18th Nov '16 6:08:23 AM YetAnotherAutist
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* ''Africans love [[Recap/TintinTintinInTheCongo Tintin in the Congo]]''. The album is widely considered as Hergé's biggest OldShame for its caricatural and paternalistically racist depiction of Congolese people. Oddly enough, it is quite popular in francophone Africa, and in [[MexicansLoveSpeedyGonzales modern Congo itself]] in particular. [[http://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2015/09/04/au-congo-tintin-est-une-star_4746163_3212.html Interviews of locals]] show that people don't mind the caricatures there (saying that local caricatures of white people there are in fact ''worse'' than what Hergé made of them), considering them as purely humor, and that Hergé; actually made the country's name world-famous and inspired the country to the point of making it Africa's number one provider of comic book artists. Not to mention the boost it gave to tourism.

to:

* ''Africans Africans love [[Recap/TintinTintinInTheCongo ''[[Recap/TintinTintinInTheCongo Tintin in the Congo]]''. The album is widely considered as Hergé's biggest OldShame for its caricatural and paternalistically racist depiction of Congolese people. Oddly enough, it is quite popular in francophone Africa, and in [[MexicansLoveSpeedyGonzales modern Congo itself]] in particular. [[http://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2015/09/04/au-congo-tintin-est-une-star_4746163_3212.html Interviews of locals]] show that people don't mind the caricatures there (saying that local caricatures of white people there are in fact ''worse'' than what Hergé made of them), considering them as purely humor, and that Hergé; actually made the country's name world-famous and inspired the country to the point of making it Africa's number one provider of comic book artists. Not to mention the boost it gave to tourism.
15th Nov '16 8:16:17 PM Monolaf317
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** Popular and well-loved mascot character in Japan, thanks in part to being a cute dog who happens to be marketed by {{Creator/Sanrio}}. Unfortunately, most Japanese seem unaware that the main character of the series is his ''owner'', despite the strip's long-running and faithful translation, which gets printed daily in Japanese newspapers and has numerous compilation books in both English and Japanese. He has also gotten everything from his own café to special donuts at Mr. Donut Japan. Because of how popular Snoopy is there, [[WesternAnimation/ThePeanutsMovie the recent movie in the franchise]] was retitled "I Love Snoopy", was released a week after the American release and [[http://lunawings.tumblr.com/post/135102688523/the-peanuts-movie-was-a-bit-more-exciting-than-i was shown in 4D]], which normally doesn't happen often in Japan.

to:

** Popular and well-loved mascot character in Japan, thanks in part to being a cute dog who happens to be marketed by {{Creator/Sanrio}}. Unfortunately, most Japanese seem unaware that the main character of the series is his ''owner'', despite the strip's long-running and faithful translation, which gets printed daily in Japanese newspapers and has numerous compilation books in both English and Japanese. He has also gotten everything from his own café to special donuts at Mr. Donut Japan. Because of how popular Snoopy is there, [[WesternAnimation/ThePeanutsMovie the recent 2015 movie in the franchise]] was retitled "I Love Snoopy", was released a week after the American release and [[http://lunawings.tumblr.com/post/135102688523/the-peanuts-movie-was-a-bit-more-exciting-than-i was shown in 4D]], which normally doesn't happen often in Japan.
15th Nov '16 8:15:33 PM Monolaf317
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27th Oct '16 1:50:14 PM morenohijazo
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Added DiffLines:

* ''ComicBook/MortadeloYFilemon'': Germans Love Clever & Smart: Germany was the country where the series got its biggest sales, second only to Spain. And the margin is pretty narrow. Nowadays (since over a decade) sadly a case of NoExportForYou.
** One of their best stories is set in Germany, with M&F going all around the country in their mission (and successfully crossing the Berlin Wall twice!).
*** Interestingly, the parts where they cross the Berlin Wall were replaced with something else in the German edition.
** And in Denmark (as ''Flip & Flop''). Ibañez even made a (pretty good) story set in Copenhagen in honor of his Danish fans, featuring the Little Mermaid Statue as a main character.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff.ComicBooks