History GameBreaker / TabletopRPG

26th Feb '16 12:35:40 PM ironballs16
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** There is a 15th level Ranger power called "Blade Cascade," which allows multiple hits as long as the previous hit connects. This inspired game-breaking accuracy builds; one such ([[FistOfTheNorthStar Kenshiro]] "Ratata" Orcuslayer) could kill Orcus at level 15 as long as the player did not roll a 1 (which is an automatic failure) on the d20. Wizards of the Coast quickly issued an errata stating that the maximum number of hits on the power was 5 (1 per 1.25 seconds of the combat round).'

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** There is a 15th level Ranger power called "Blade Cascade," which allows multiple hits as long as the previous hit connects. This inspired game-breaking accuracy builds; one such ([[FistOfTheNorthStar Kenshiro]] "Ratata" "[[VerbalTic Ratata]]" Orcuslayer) could kill Orcus at level 15 as long as the player did not roll a 1 (which is an automatic failure) on the d20. Wizards of the Coast quickly issued an errata stating that the maximum number of hits on the power was 5 (1 per 1.25 seconds of the combat round).'
4th Feb '16 10:30:12 AM TheTeaMustFlow
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** The ''Alarm'' spell also negates the entire purpose of the Rogue class.
15th Jan '16 6:41:20 AM Morgenthaler
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* [=SenZar=] seems to hate the gamemaster with a passion. The "status" power increases a player character's starting money from 1,000 Stars to 1,000,000, in a game with a comically broken artificing system. Proper munchkinisation can result in a player character starting with an armour value of 100, and being armed with a weapon which has a +10 attack bonus, causes an automatic 300 points of damage that will not heal short of 8th Order Magic while healing you for every point it deals, and forces any human you hit with it to make a power save or instantly die. [=SenZar=] is probably the only game where a starting character can be armed with a weapon able to kill a normal player character 20 or 30 times over.

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* [=SenZar=] ''TabletopGame/SenZar'' seems to hate the gamemaster with a passion. The "status" power increases a player character's starting money from 1,000 Stars to 1,000,000, in a game with a comically broken artificing system. Proper munchkinisation can result in a player character starting with an armour value of 100, and being armed with a weapon which has a +10 attack bonus, causes an automatic 300 points of damage that will not heal short of 8th Order Magic while healing you for every point it deals, and forces any human you hit with it to make a power save or instantly die. [=SenZar=] is probably the only game where a starting character can be armed with a weapon able to kill a normal player character 20 or 30 times over.



* ''{{Synnibar}}'', full stop. It is fairly reasonable for a party of five people with a decent starting sum and stats rolls to have every PC have 50,000 [[HitPoints Life Points]], shotguns loaded with [[ArmorPiercingAttack Lubricated Pelleum Steel]] slugs, and be able to attack three times per segment, twice.

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* ''{{Synnibar}}'', ''TabletopGame/{{Synnibar}}'', full stop. It is fairly reasonable for a party of five people with a decent starting sum and stats rolls to have every PC have 50,000 [[HitPoints Life Points]], shotguns loaded with [[ArmorPiercingAttack Lubricated Pelleum Steel]] slugs, and be able to attack three times per segment, twice.



* The designers of the superhero [=RPG=] ''WildTalents'' freely admit that their (fairly generic) powers-creation system can be easily abused if players are so inclined. The 2nd Edition rulebook even comes with a free example describing how to build a power that will allow the character who has it to extinguish the sun...
* The first edition of the ''LegendOfTheFiveRings'' RPG had quite a few gamebreakers. One of the most infamous was a joint grip maneuver from the "Mizu-do" unarmed combat style. A successful roll could disarm and incapacitate the target. Doesn't sound too bad, except that the target's abilities had almost no effect on the easy-to-perform maneuver. As a result, a starting character with fairly normal stats (Agility 3, Mizu-do 3) would have about a 50% chance of disarming some of the greatest swordsmen in the Emerald Empire.

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* The designers of the superhero [=RPG=] ''WildTalents'' ''TabletopGame/WildTalents'' freely admit that their (fairly generic) powers-creation system can be easily abused if players are so inclined. The 2nd Edition rulebook even comes with a free example describing how to build a power that will allow the character who has it to extinguish the sun...
* The first edition of the ''LegendOfTheFiveRings'' ''TabletopGame/LegendOfTheFiveRings'' RPG had quite a few gamebreakers. One of the most infamous was a joint grip maneuver from the "Mizu-do" unarmed combat style. A successful roll could disarm and incapacitate the target. Doesn't sound too bad, except that the target's abilities had almost no effect on the easy-to-perform maneuver. As a result, a starting character with fairly normal stats (Agility 3, Mizu-do 3) would have about a 50% chance of disarming some of the greatest swordsmen in the Emerald Empire.
5th Dec '15 9:56:53 PM Venatius
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** Another D&D version involves what is typically dubbed the ''Locate City bomb''. There is a spell called "Locate City" (a harmless divination spell), which has a ''area of effect'' of 10 miles per caster level. This is the crux of the thing -- by the intent of the spell, that number ought to be its ''range'', but making it the area of effect allows one to use an obscure series of feats to first give it the Cold subtype, then deal 2 Cold damage to everything in the area of effect, ''then'' change it to an Electric type spell. You can then use ''another'' feat that gives an Electric spell a Reflex save, allowing you to apply the Explosive Spell metamagic, forcing a second Reflex save to avoid being blasted to the edge of the area of effect. Failing this save will deal 1d6 damage for each 10ft travelled, allowing someone to instantly wipe out a whole city of commoners with no collateral damage (except for the blood splatters). Eventually, players figured out that this didn't actually work, but as all the problems were due to Locate City having a 2-D ''circle'' as its area of effect, some slightly higher-level spells that scaled to a 1 mile/caster level ''sphere'' fixed them. Although this is a mere 10% of Locate City, it should be noted that on average the damage dealt by ''one'' mile in this fashion is roughly ''four times'' the hp of the biggest, baddest dragon a party is likely to ever see before epic levels.

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** Another D&D version involves what is typically dubbed the ''Locate City bomb''. There is a spell called "Locate City" (a harmless divination spell), which has a ''area of effect'' of 10 miles per caster level. This is the crux of the thing -- by the intent of the spell, that number ought to be its ''range'', but making it the area of effect allows one to use an obscure series of feats to first give it the Cold subtype, then deal 2 Cold damage to everything in the area of effect, ''then'' change it to an Electric type spell. You can then use ''another'' feat that gives an Electric spell a Reflex save, allowing you to apply the Explosive Spell metamagic, forcing a second Reflex save to avoid being blasted to the edge of the area of effect. Failing this save will deal 1d6 damage for each 10ft travelled, allowing someone to instantly wipe out a whole city of commoners with no collateral damage (except for the blood splatters). Eventually, players figured out that this didn't actually work, but as all the problems were due to Locate City having a 2-D ''circle'' as its area of effect, some slightly higher-level spells that scaled to a 1 mile/caster level ''sphere'' fixed them. Although this is a mere 10% of Locate City, it should be noted that on average the damage dealt by ''one'' mile in this fashion is roughly ''four times'' the hp of the biggest, baddest dragon a party is likely to ever see before epic levels. Unfortunately, however, if there is ''any'' obstacle anywhere between a given victim and the nearest edge of the blast, they simply smack into it for 1d6 points of damage and stop moving. Thus, any commoners who are inside or otherwise near any impediment to movement would only be injured. There is also the risk of the caster [[HoistByHisOwnPetard being caught in the radius]].
5th Dec '15 9:45:48 PM Venatius
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*** If the cleric is feeling even more sadistic, they can toss in a [[CherryTapping Quickened Inflict Light Wounds]]. ILW is normally a poor spell, but it's guaranteed to deal at least 6 damage to an opponent who has no more than 4 hp left. The result: a one-turn KO.

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*** If the cleric is feeling even more sadistic, they can toss in a [[CherryTapping Quickened Inflict Light Wounds]]. ILW is normally a poor spell, but it's guaranteed to deal at least 6 damage (assuming you're a high enough level to cast Harm yourself) to an opponent who has no more than 4 hp left. The result: a one-turn KO.
5th Dec '15 9:43:42 PM Venatius
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** Another particularly special example is the Omniscificer. There is a spell which allows you to share the damage you take with others, and it is possible to cast this spell in both directions; because each person receives half the damage given, if you cast this on four people taking half the damage of a fifth person, and in turn dealing back to that fifth person half the damage they themselves receive; as you would then be receiving back a quarter of the damage you originally took from each of the four people, you thus have created an infinite damage loop (so long as you have dealt yourself at least 4 points of damage - say, by jumping off a 40 foot cliff), causing you to instantly take an infinite amount of damage as the damage washes back and forth between you and your helpers. Ordinarily this would be extremely fatal, but there is another spell which allows you to stay alive for a short period of time despite being reduced to -10 or fewer hit points (which would normally kill you). There is also a spell called ''masochism'' which causes you to gain a +1 bonus to all your skill checks per 10 damage you took in the previous round; as you have taken an infinite amount of damage, you now have a literally infinite bonus to all your skill checks, allowing you to succeed at any skill check automatically. Better still, there are (extremely large) penalties you can take to many skill checks to instantly take certain actions, and other skill checks are by their very nature instant (such as knowledge checks). This means that the Omniscificer can, among other things, instantly succeed at every knowledge check possible and thus know everything that can possibly be known from a successful knowledge check. They also have an infinitely large diplomacy (and bluff, and intimidate) check, meaning that they can convince anyone of anything, and with the proper spells, can communicate with anyone (including the gods), meaning that they can convince the GODS of anything. Now, all of this is impressive, but they are still stuck in an infinite damage loop; however, they can simply dismiss the spell creating that loop, and then fall over into a bucket of water and voluntarily fail a drown check. Due to the way that drowning rules work in D&D, when you fail your first drown check, your hit points are instantly set to 0... meaning that it heals you from -infinity hit points to a much more tolerable 0 hp, from which you can easily be resuscitated with any manner of curative magic (or alternatively, a contingent cure minor wounds spell).

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** Another particularly special example is the Omniscificer. There is a spell which allows you to share the damage you take with others, and it is possible to cast this spell in both directions; because each person receives half the damage given, if you cast this on four people taking half the damage of a fifth person, and in turn dealing back to that fifth person half the damage they themselves receive; as you would then be receiving back a quarter of the damage you originally took from each of the four people, you thus have created an infinite damage loop (so long as you have dealt yourself at least 4 points of damage - say, by jumping off a 40 foot cliff), causing you to instantly take an infinite amount of damage as the damage washes back and forth between you and your helpers. Ordinarily this would be extremely fatal, but there is another spell which allows you to stay alive for a short period of time despite being reduced to -10 or fewer hit points (which would normally kill you). There is also a spell called ''masochism'' which causes you to gain a +1 bonus to all your skill checks per 10 damage you took in the previous round; as you have taken an infinite amount of damage, you now have a literally infinite bonus to all your skill checks, allowing you to succeed at any skill check automatically. Better still, there are (extremely large) penalties you can take to many skill checks to instantly take certain actions, and other skill checks are by their very nature instant (such as knowledge checks). This means that the Omniscificer can, among other things, instantly succeed at every knowledge check possible and thus know everything that can possibly be known from a successful knowledge check. They also have an infinitely large diplomacy (and bluff, and intimidate) check, meaning that they can convince anyone of anything, and with the proper spells, can communicate with anyone (including the gods), meaning that they can convince the GODS of anything. Now, all of this is impressive, but they are still stuck in an infinite damage loop; however, they can simply dismiss the spell creating that loop, and then fall over into a bucket of water and voluntarily fail a drown check. Due to the way that drowning rules work in D&D, when you fail your first drown check, your hit points are instantly set to 0... meaning that it heals you from -infinity hit points to a much more tolerable 0 hp, from which you can easily be resuscitated with any manner of curative magic (or alternatively, a contingent cure minor wounds spell). Or the characters simply die and then fall into the bucket. The order of operations isn't explicit in the core book.
*** The description of how drowning works in the ''Stormwrack'' supplement book makes this a moot point, and the whole process impossible (without dying). Characters who can't/don't hold their breath start drowning the round ''after'' they fall into the water.
5th Dec '15 10:34:35 AM billybobfred
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** Another D&D version involves what is typically dubbed the ''locate city bomb''. There is a spell called "locate city" (a harmless divination spell), which has a radius effect of 10 miles per caster level. One then uses an obscure series of feats to first give it the Cold subtype, then deal 2 Cold damage to everything in the area of effect, ''then'' change it to an Electric type spell. You can then use ''another'' feat that gives an Electric spell a Reflex save, allowing you to apply the Explosive Spell metamagic to "locate city", forcing a second Reflex save to avoid being blasted to the edge of the area of effect. Failing this save will deal 1d6 damage for each 10ft travelled, allowing someone to instantly wipe out a whole city of commoners with no collateral damage (except for the blood splatters).
*** The Explosive Spell component of this combo has several noted problems. One is that the same very unusual area of effect that gives it such a noteworthy large area also makes it, by definition, two-dimensional (the spell explicitly affects a circle - not a three-dimensional area like a sphere or one of the other normal areas of effect). The damage is based on the distance those within the spell must be propelled to be ejected from the area - so, if a target is at the right elevation to even be hit by it, the shortest distance to escape the spell's area would simply be a few feet up or down. The target would need to be at least 20' tall and hit in the exact midsection to travel even the minimum 10' to take damage for distance traveled. Even disregarding this, if there is any obstacle within 10' of their path of travel, they will take 1d6 damage for striking it, and nothing further. Lastly, and most problematically: Explosive Spell explicitly works with "a cone, cylinder, line, or burst". Locate City is none of these.
**** The main advantage of locate city is that it's a very accessible spell (on four major spell lists as a 1st level spell) and has excellent scaling. There are several other options that characters gain access to later or with a bit more effort and worse scaling without the potential problems with locate city; i.e. 1 mile/level versus 10 miles/level. Although a mere 10% of locate city, it should be noted that on average the damage dealt by a single mile in this fashion is roughly ''four times'' the hp of the biggest, baddest dragon a party is likely to ever see before epic levels.
*** Modify the spell to deal ice damage then add in Fell Drain. A Fell Drain spell automatically gives everybody in the area 1 negative level... which will kill any level 1 commoner with no save, and then cause them to rise from the dead as a wight. [[ZombieApocalypse When the wights are all up, they can go kill everybody who's still alive and turn them into more wights]]. The fun part is that the [=PCs=] all will survive this combo easily, while the original combo, if it worked, would kill all of them as well.

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** Another D&D version involves what is typically dubbed the ''locate city ''Locate City bomb''. There is a spell called "locate city" "Locate City" (a harmless divination spell), which has a radius effect ''area of effect'' of 10 miles per caster level. One then uses This is the crux of the thing -- by the intent of the spell, that number ought to be its ''range'', but making it the area of effect allows one to use an obscure series of feats to first give it the Cold subtype, then deal 2 Cold damage to everything in the area of effect, ''then'' change it to an Electric type spell. You can then use ''another'' feat that gives an Electric spell a Reflex save, allowing you to apply the Explosive Spell metamagic to "locate city", metamagic, forcing a second Reflex save to avoid being blasted to the edge of the area of effect. Failing this save will deal 1d6 damage for each 10ft travelled, allowing someone to instantly wipe out a whole city of commoners with no collateral damage (except for the blood splatters).
*** The Explosive Spell component of
splatters). Eventually, players figured out that this combo has several noted problems. One is that didn't actually work, but as all the same very unusual area of effect that gives it such a noteworthy large area also makes it, by definition, two-dimensional (the spell explicitly affects a circle - not a three-dimensional area like a sphere or one of the other normal areas of effect). The damage is based on the distance those within the spell must be propelled problems were due to be ejected from the area - so, if a target is at the right elevation to even be hit by it, the shortest distance to escape the spell's area would simply be a few feet up or down. The target would need to be at least 20' tall and hit in the exact midsection to travel even the minimum 10' to take damage for distance traveled. Even disregarding this, if there is any obstacle within 10' of their path of travel, they will take 1d6 damage for striking it, and nothing further. Lastly, and most problematically: Explosive Spell explicitly works with "a cone, cylinder, line, or burst". Locate City is none having a 2-D ''circle'' as its area of these.
**** The main advantage of locate city is
effect, some slightly higher-level spells that it's scaled to a very accessible spell (on four major spell lists as a 1st 1 mile/caster level spell) and has excellent scaling. There are several other options that characters gain access to later or with a bit more effort and worse scaling without the potential problems with locate city; i.e. 1 mile/level versus 10 miles/level. ''sphere'' fixed them. Although this is a mere 10% of locate city, Locate City, it should be noted that on average the damage dealt by a single ''one'' mile in this fashion is roughly ''four times'' the hp of the biggest, baddest dragon a party is likely to ever see before epic levels.
*** Modify Alternately, modify the spell to deal ice damage then add in Fell Drain. A Fell Drain spell automatically gives everybody in the area 1 negative level... which will kill any level 1 commoner with no save, and then cause them to rise from the dead as a wight. [[ZombieApocalypse When the wights are all up, they can go kill everybody who's still alive and turn them into more wights]]. The fun part is that the [=PCs=] all will survive this combo easily, while the original combo, if it worked, would kill all of them as well.
14th Nov '15 5:26:54 PM nombretomado
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** And let's not get into the stuff you can come up with when you mix sourcebooks and even other Palladium [=RPGs=]. One horrific example is the [[{{Robotech}} Zentraedi]] [[MightyGlacier Titan]] [[SuperSoldier Juicer]] [[{{Undead}} Murder-Wraith]]. For the uninitiated, that's a fifty-plus-foot giant zombie with thousands of MDC that can only be harmed by magic or silver weapons. Good luck getting a GM that will allow it to happen, but it's perfectly game-legal. Yet again, C.J Carella was responsible for Titan Juicers and Murder Wraiths.

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** And let's not get into the stuff you can come up with when you mix sourcebooks and even other Palladium [=RPGs=]. One horrific example is the [[{{Robotech}} [[{{Anime/Robotech}} Zentraedi]] [[MightyGlacier Titan]] [[SuperSoldier Juicer]] [[{{Undead}} Murder-Wraith]]. For the uninitiated, that's a fifty-plus-foot giant zombie with thousands of MDC that can only be harmed by magic or silver weapons. Good luck getting a GM that will allow it to happen, but it's perfectly game-legal. Yet again, C.J Carella was responsible for Titan Juicers and Murder Wraiths.
15th Oct '15 3:07:53 PM ShinQuickMan
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*** Polymorph is still a very problematic spell in this edition. Forms are now much stronger, since the recipient can assume a form whose CR (or Challenge Rating, a number roughly estimating how well it would challenge a party of a given character level) equals to their own level! Of course, it's a concentration spell, only allows for the shapes of beasts (none of which have a CR greater than their own level), and the subject replaces all of their other features for the duration, but its still quite a buff. Even ignoring that function, the spell is effectly a "Save-or-Die" when used offensively, so long as you find other ways to kill the target without HP damage.

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*** Polymorph is still a very problematic spell in this edition. Forms are now much stronger, since the recipient can assume a form whose CR (or Challenge Rating, a number roughly estimating how well it would challenge a party of a given character level) equals to their own level! Of course, it's a concentration spell, only allows for the shapes of beasts (none of which have a CR greater than their own level), 8), and the subject replaces all of their other features for the duration, but its still quite a buff. Even ignoring that function, the spell is effectly a "Save-or-Die" when used offensively, so long as you find other ways to kill the target without HP damage.
13th Oct '15 1:36:06 PM ExoSaeptus
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** Similarly, in ''TabletopGame/Deathwatch'', you have the Devastator (sometimes known as the Cheesetator) with a Heavy Bolter. Average BS of 50-60 means it hits with about 4-5 shots per turn. That means it rolls 15d10 in damage, and a single 10 on any of those means that it does the 'weapon's entire profile again'. Did I mention that a single average hit is ~23 damage, enough to reduce the average full-health human character to near crits? And that's not even going into the Techmarine, which can take the Breaching Auger very early. Said Auger does 4d10+3 damage. Factoring in a Marine's Strength Bonus, that's 4d10+13. ''It can be dual-wielded'', and has rules so it can NoSell armour (Pen 7 + Power Field, which means a 75% chance of destroying any weapon without a power field as well used to parry it). It rolls five dice (with Tearing), with a reroll for two damage dice, and ''any'' result of a 10 means it does its entire profile again. With this thing, a Techmarine can and will turn anything in front of him into fondue in a turn or two.

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** Similarly, in ''TabletopGame/Deathwatch'', ''Deathwatch'', you have the Devastator (sometimes known as the Cheesetator) with a Heavy Bolter. Average BS of 50-60 means it hits with about 4-5 shots per turn. That means it rolls 15d10 in damage, and a single 10 on any of those means that it does the 'weapon's entire profile again'. Did I mention that a single average hit is ~23 damage, enough to reduce the average full-health human character to near crits? And that's not even going into the Techmarine, which can take the Breaching Auger very early. Said Auger does 4d10+3 damage. Factoring in a Marine's Strength Bonus, that's 4d10+13. ''It can be dual-wielded'', and has rules so it can NoSell armour (Pen 7 + Power Field, which means a 75% chance of destroying any weapon without a power field as well used to parry it). It rolls five dice (with Tearing), with a reroll for two damage dice, and ''any'' result of a 10 means it does its entire profile again. With this thing, a Techmarine can and will turn anything in front of him into fondue in a turn or two.
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