History GameBreaker / TabletopRPG

12th Jan '17 7:38:36 PM billybobfred
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** {{Pathfinder}} closed this loophole by doing what any sensible GM would do and stating in the rules that some things are so unbelievable no Bluff check will ever let you convince anyone that they are true. Additional sourcebooks later clarified that a very assured Bluff check just makes the listener think you are very confident in what you say, that is, not actively lying to them. A king being told by a ''very'' convincing stranger that they were swapped at birth will likely conclude that the strange fool he's speaking with believes very strongly in a false scenario.

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** {{Pathfinder}} closed this loophole by doing what any sensible GM would do and stating in the rules that some things are so unbelievable no Bluff check will ever let you convince anyone that they are true. Additional sourcebooks later clarified that a very assured Bluff check just makes the listener think you are very confident in what you say, that is, not actively lying to them. A king being told by a ''very'' convincing stranger that they were swapped at birth will likely conclude that [[IBelieveThatYouBelieveIt the strange fool he's speaking with believes very strongly in a false scenario.scenario]].
15th Dec '16 2:46:01 PM GuiRitter
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* It's worth noting that, unlike with video games, it's common accepted practice for the DM to limit the options available to players to a subset of what is available and to disallow the LoopholeAbuse that most of these builds are built on. And if the players do end up building a completely formnidable character anyway, they'll generally work with the DM to make adjustments so the game is still fun for everyone. So unlike with video games, it's okay for a Tabletop RPG to risk combinatorial explosion by continually giving the players more options.

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* It's worth noting that, unlike with video games, it's common accepted practice for the DM to limit the options available to players to a subset of what is available and to disallow the LoopholeAbuse that most of these builds are built on. And if the players do end up building a completely formnidable formidable character anyway, they'll generally work with the DM to make adjustments so the game is still fun for everyone. So unlike with video games, it's okay for a Tabletop RPG to risk combinatorial explosion by continually giving the players more options.
14th Dec '16 5:15:30 PM AnonFangeekGirl
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** Where this reaches true stupidity is when you combine both spells above. Normally, a caster is restricted to only a single active Simulacrum of their own at a time. But you can easily circumvent that by having the clone use the Simulacrum spell themselves. Or better, have it Wish its own Simulacrum of the caster for a minuscule percentage of the casting time and none of the other resources. And then the clone of the clone does the same. Cue instant clone army.

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** Where this reaches true stupidity is when you combine both spells above. Normally, a caster is restricted to only a single active Simulacrum of their own at a time. But you can easily circumvent that by having the clone use the Simulacrum spell themselves. Or better, have it Wish its own Simulacrum of the caster for a minuscule percentage of the casting time and none of the other resources. And then the clone of the clone does the same. Cue instant clone army.CloneArmy.
26th Nov '16 3:40:48 PM GhostLad
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* The Scarred Witch Doctor, a witch Archetype applying to characters with orc blood. The Scarred Witch Doctor is unique in that its main casting stat isn't the traditional intelligence, wisdom, or charisma. It's constitution. So now you have one disgustingly bloated stat that not only boosts all of your primary class features, but you are receiving a significant amount of free hit points each level. SquishyWizard? I think not. But wait, it gets better. Simply by taking a half-orc (Which qualifies as an orc and a human when meeting prerequisites), you can apply your floating +2 ability bonus to constitution. This makes it appallingly easy to make a character with as much as twenty constitution in character creation in even the lowest point buy, considering the only other ability you need any points in is dexterity (The others being relegated to being amusing bonuses at best). So now you have a full caster who on average gets more hit points per level than the fighter and enough to even rival or exceed the barbarian, but the best part? Being a witch you have access to the Misfortune hex mentioned above.

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* The Scarred Witch Doctor, a witch Archetype applying to characters with orc blood. The Scarred Witch Doctor is unique in that its main casting stat isn't the traditional intelligence, wisdom, or charisma. It's constitution. So now you have one disgustingly bloated stat that not only boosts all of your primary class features, but you are receiving a significant amount of free hit points each level. SquishyWizard? I think not. But wait, it gets better. Simply by taking a half-orc (Which qualifies as an orc and a human when meeting prerequisites), you can apply your floating +2 ability bonus to constitution. This makes it appallingly easy to make a character with as much as twenty constitution in character creation in even the lowest point buy, considering the only other ability you need any points in is dexterity (The others being relegated to being amusing bonuses at best). So now you have a full caster who on average gets more hit points per level than the fighter and enough to even rival or exceed the barbarian, but the best part? Being a witch you have access to the Misfortune hex mentioned above. Naturally, this got nerfed back into the usual Witch casting stat of intelligence.
14th Nov '16 10:07:18 AM Pysiewicz
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* [[StanceSystem Fighting stances]] are an optional rule for this very reason - they are game-breaking enough [[UpToEleven to be pointed out as such in the source book]]. Each stance takes either ''Armed'' or ''Unarmed combat'' skills (depending which one is used) and changes them into additional buff. In case of defensive stance, your character becomes StoneWall - the skill is removed, but Defence is rised for the same amount, thus making characters virtually unhittable. Offensive stance turns the character into GlassCannon: it lowers Defence by skill, while doubling the skill itself, thus making it possible to hit anyone. Stances have a long list of other defuffs - they can be only used in close combat, you can't cast spells or use witcher's signs, no combat manoeuvres or charges are allowed and so forth. Then why they are game-breaking? You can still ''dodge'', which makes offensive stance doable for certain builds without being afraid of retribution. And defensive stance allows to block ''anything'', so who cares if you have hard time returning hits, if your enemies can't even touch you, as your Defence can go easily above 10 (meaning there is no way they can hit you regardless of skills and Stats) and that's without even taking outside factors into account. The defensive stance goes as far as allowing to pull YouShallNotPass against dozens of enemies if a character is placed in some choke point and thus can't be simply trampled.

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* [[StanceSystem Fighting stances]] are an optional rule for this very reason - they are game-breaking enough [[UpToEleven to be pointed out as such in the source book]]. Each stance takes either ''Armed'' or ''Unarmed combat'' skills (depending which one is used) and changes them into additional buff. In case of defensive stance, your character becomes StoneWall - the skill is removed, but Defence is rised for the same amount, thus making characters virtually unhittable. Offensive stance turns the character into GlassCannon: it lowers Defence by skill, while doubling the skill itself, thus making it possible to hit anyone. Stances have a long list of other defuffs debuffs - they can be only used in close combat, you can't cast spells or use witcher's signs, no combat manoeuvres or charges are allowed and so forth. Then why they are game-breaking? You can still ''dodge'', which makes offensive stance doable for certain builds without being afraid of retribution. And defensive stance allows to block ''anything'', so who cares if you have hard time returning hits, if your enemies can't even touch you, as your Defence can go easily above 10 (meaning there is no way they can hit you regardless of skills and Stats) and that's without even taking outside factors into account. The defensive stance goes as far as allowing to pull YouShallNotPass against dozens of enemies if a character is placed in some choke point and thus can't be simply trampled.
14th Nov '16 9:50:34 AM Pysiewicz
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* As insignificant as it sounds, the bonus 5 Skill Points all humans get for free during character creation allows to rise any of the starting skills from 1 to 3. It is entirely possible to get any of those skills to level 4, allowing an auto-success without a roll in basic checks, ''cheaper'' than rising any skill to 3 with any other race (5 points from 1 to 3 vs 4 points from 3 to 4). Even without any min-maxing involved, it's still a free level 3 skill.
8th Nov '16 10:23:53 AM dlchen145
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[[TabletopGame/TheWitcherGameOfImagination The Witcher]] got a fair share of game-breakers that can turn fighting into nothing more than declaring who got killed on your turn. To be fair, [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything every type of character can got his own game-breaker]] and the game-breakers by themselves are nothing more than a way of showing how {{Badass}} your character is at the point when they are possible to conduct. It's very important to understand how the successes and difficulties are counted, as each of the gamebreakers heavily relies on [[ReadTheFreakingManual how bonus damage and/or Defence ratings are counted]], so they are not as obvious as they seem here. In the case of CriticalHit every of those techniques turns into ThereIsNoKillLikeOverkill. Each Hit Roll goes on the same principle: there is a Defence rating of the attacked and skill of the attacker. Defence is lowered by skill and adjusted by potential modifiers (weather, light, being mounted and so on). This provide an equation Defence - Skill + (Positive and Negative Modifiers) = Amount Of Required Successes To Hit. Success is any outcome of 4 or above on standard dice (the game is based exclusively on d6) and the amount of dice taken for roll is equal to the Statistic of linked skill, so ''Shooting'' and ''Throwing'' are under Perception, while ''Armed combat'', ''Unarmed combat'' and [[MagicalGesture all forms of magic (Spellcasting, Witchers' Signs and Prayers)]] are under Dexterity. The higher the Stat, the easier it is to get sufficient amount of successes, even with low skills.

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[[TabletopGame/TheWitcherGameOfImagination The Witcher]] got a fair share of game-breakers that can turn fighting into nothing more than declaring who got killed on your turn. To be fair, [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything every type of character can got his own game-breaker]] and the game-breakers by themselves are nothing more than a way of showing how {{Badass}} badass your character is at the point when they are possible to conduct. It's very important to understand how the successes and difficulties are counted, as each of the gamebreakers heavily relies on [[ReadTheFreakingManual how bonus damage and/or Defence ratings are counted]], so they are not as obvious as they seem here. In the case of CriticalHit every of those techniques turns into ThereIsNoKillLikeOverkill. Each Hit Roll goes on the same principle: there is a Defence rating of the attacked and skill of the attacker. Defence is lowered by skill and adjusted by potential modifiers (weather, light, being mounted and so on). This provide an equation Defence - Skill + (Positive and Negative Modifiers) = Amount Of Required Successes To Hit. Success is any outcome of 4 or above on standard dice (the game is based exclusively on d6) and the amount of dice taken for roll is equal to the Statistic of linked skill, so ''Shooting'' and ''Throwing'' are under Perception, while ''Armed combat'', ''Unarmed combat'' and [[MagicalGesture all forms of magic (Spellcasting, Witchers' Signs and Prayers)]] are under Dexterity. The higher the Stat, the easier it is to get sufficient amount of successes, even with low skills.
6th Nov '16 6:32:36 PM Pysiewicz
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* ''Combination of blows'', the ''Unarmed'' equivalent of ''Riposte''. One of the most basic hand-to-hand maneuvers, requiring barely any skill, cheap to use and without any drawbacks whatsoever. It allows to perform few stikes in single, quick sequence, drastically multiplying the relatively low d3+Strength damage output of hand-to-hand combat. Since the source book wasn't precise about the limit, most players follow the provided example and cap it at 3 hits per sequence, because otherwise this move can simply cause ''an overkill''. The entire sequence can be of course aimed at any body part, so a good brawler can easily render limbs and ribs broken or outright knock someone cold due to extra multiplier for head trauma. The maneuver also comes with +1 do single dice of choice during Hit Roll, so it's impossible to crit-fail it and much more likely to either get a critical hit or at least extra success, further inflating the damage output.
** It can go a step further, when a character is wearing armoured gloves or something similar, since each hit will get +2 of fixed damage. Combined with perk ''Specialisation'', which is another +2, and suddenly the manoeuvre deals 18 damage as bare minimum, while 21 or even 24 is even more likely, since barely anyone will make boxer with 1 Strenght. This is why the general house rule is to limit the sequence to three strikes.

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* ''Combination of blows'', the ''Unarmed'' equivalent of ''Riposte''. One of the most basic hand-to-hand maneuvers, requiring barely any skill, cheap to use and without any drawbacks whatsoever. It allows to perform few stikes in a single, quick sequence, drastically multiplying the relatively low d3+Strength damage output of hand-to-hand combat. Since the source book wasn't precise about the limit, most players follow the provided example and cap it at 3 hits per sequence, because otherwise this move can simply cause ''an overkill''. The entire sequence can be of course aimed at any body part, so a good brawler can easily render limbs and ribs broken or outright knock someone cold due to the extra multiplier for head trauma. The maneuver also comes with +1 do to a single dice of choice during Hit Roll, so it's impossible to crit-fail it and much more likely to either get a critical hit or at least an extra success, further inflating the damage output.
** It can go a step further, when a character is wearing armoured gloves or something similar, since each hit will get +2 of fixed damage. Combined with perk ''Specialisation'', which is another +2, and suddenly the manoeuvre deals ''can't deal less than 18 damage as bare minimum, damage'', while 21 or even 24 is even more likely, since barely anyone will make a boxer with 1 Strenght. This is why the general house rule is to limit the sequence to three strikes.To put that into perspective - an average character has 26 Vitality.
6th Nov '16 3:19:19 PM Pysiewicz
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** It can go a step further, when a character is wearing armoured gloves or something similar, since each hit will get +2 of fixed damage. Combined with perk ''Specialisation'', which is another +2, and suddenly the manoeuvre deals 18 damage as bare minimum, while 21 or even 24 is even more likely, since barely anyone will make boxer with 1 Strenght. This is why the general house rule is to limit the sequence to three strikes.
6th Nov '16 3:11:20 PM Pysiewicz
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** Perks expanding the maximum pool of both Combat and Acrane Points are even worse in this regard. Not only they both increase the pool by 5, but they can be also bought three times each. And they are ''much'' cheaper than those mentioned above, while the points can be used for all kinds and sorts of manoeuvres and spells.

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** Perks expanding the maximum pool of both Combat and Acrane Arcane Points are even worse in this regard. Not only they both increase the pool by 5, but they can be also bought three times each. And they are ''much'' cheaper than those mentioned above, while the points can be used for all kinds and sorts of manoeuvres and spells.
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