History GameBreaker / TabletopRPG

16th Aug '17 6:54:42 AM WaterBlap
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[TabletopGame/TheWitcherGameOfImagination The Witcher]] got a fair share of game-breakers that can turn fighting into nothing more than declaring who got killed on your turn. To be fair, [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything every type of character can got his own game-breaker]] and the game-breakers by themselves are nothing more than a way of showing how badass your character is at the point when they are possible to conduct. It's very important to understand how the successes and difficulties are counted, as each of the gamebreakers heavily relies on [[ReadTheFreakingManual how bonus damage and/or Defence ratings are counted]], so they are not as obvious as they seem here. In the case of CriticalHit every of those techniques turns into ThereIsNoKillLikeOverkill. Each Hit Roll goes on the same principle: there is a Defence rating of the attacked and skill of the attacker. Defence is lowered by skill and adjusted by potential modifiers (weather, light, being mounted and so on). This provide an equation Defence - Skill + (Positive and Negative Modifiers) = Amount Of Required Successes To Hit. Success is any outcome of 4 or above on standard dice (the game is based exclusively on d6) and the amount of dice taken for roll is equal to the Statistic of linked skill, so ''Shooting'' and ''Throwing'' are under Perception, while ''Armed combat'', ''Unarmed combat'' and [[MagicalGesture all forms of magic (Spellcasting, Witchers' Signs and Prayers)]] are under Dexterity. The higher the Stat, the easier it is to get sufficient amount of successes, even with low skills.

to:

[[TabletopGame/TheWitcherGameOfImagination The Witcher]] got a fair share of game-breakers that can turn fighting into nothing more than declaring who got killed on your turn. To be fair, [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything every type of character can got his own game-breaker]] game-breaker and the game-breakers by themselves are nothing more than a way of showing how badass your character is at the point when they are possible to conduct. It's very important to understand how the successes and difficulties are counted, as each of the gamebreakers heavily relies on [[ReadTheFreakingManual how bonus damage and/or Defence ratings are counted]], so they are not as obvious as they seem here. In the case of CriticalHit every of those techniques turns into ThereIsNoKillLikeOverkill. Each Hit Roll goes on the same principle: there is a Defence rating of the attacked and skill of the attacker. Defence is lowered by skill and adjusted by potential modifiers (weather, light, being mounted and so on). This provide an equation Defence - Skill + (Positive and Negative Modifiers) = Amount Of Required Successes To Hit. Success is any outcome of 4 or above on standard dice (the game is based exclusively on d6) and the amount of dice taken for roll is equal to the Statistic of linked skill, so ''Shooting'' and ''Throwing'' are under Perception, while ''Armed combat'', ''Unarmed combat'' and [[MagicalGesture all forms of magic (Spellcasting, Witchers' Signs and Prayers)]] are under Dexterity. The higher the Stat, the easier it is to get sufficient amount of successes, even with low skills.
20th Jun '17 3:41:36 PM billybobfred
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** There is no usage of Genesis (once an epic spell, 'downgraded' to a 9th-level spell) that isn't completely broken. Free demiplane? That only you know the location of? And you can determine the traits of? Including, say, making it a [[YearInsideHourOutside Fast-Flowing Time plane]]? Or giving it morphic traits, letting you warp it to your will? About the only justification for it is that by the time you've gotten 9th-level spells, the game is basically over anyway.

to:

** There is no usage of Genesis (once an epic spell, 'downgraded' to a 9th-level spell) that isn't completely broken. Free demiplane? That only you know the location of? And you can determine the traits of? Including, say, making it a [[YearInsideHourOutside Fast-Flowing Time plane]]? Or giving it morphic traits, letting you warp it to your will? About the only justification for it is that [[BraggingRightsReward by the time you've gotten 9th-level spells, the game is basically over anyway.anyway]].
17th Jun '17 2:22:19 AM Jan_z_Michal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Combat Reflexes are so fundamentally broken, it's hard to find any combat-oriented character without them. For measly 15 points, it adds +1 and +2 to variety of fast reaction skills, makes character ''immune'' to freezing in combat and also counts as a massive +6 bonus to InstantWakingSkills. More, ''entire party'' gains +1 to defense against surprise attacks and ''+2 if the character is a designated party leader''.

to:

* Combat Reflexes are so fundamentally broken, it's hard to find any combat-oriented character without them.''intentionally'' broken this way, as a thing every "professional" fighter should have. For measly 15 points, it adds +1 and +2 to variety of fast reaction skills, makes character ''immune'' to freezing in combat and also counts as a massive +6 bonus to InstantWakingSkills. More, ''entire party'' gains +1 to defense against surprise attacks and ''+2 if the character is a designated party leader''.
16th Jun '17 8:41:22 PM SAMAS
Is there an issue? Send a Message


''TabletopGame/{{Rifts}}'' is a game where ''everyone'' is a GameBreaker, and needs to be in order to survive the NintendoHard combat, but there's one O.C.C. that surpasses even the most broken Juicer or Crazy Hero. Glitter Boy. A character who gets a ''several million credit'' [[PoweredArmor mech suit]] with around ''700+ M.D.C.'' (Mega-Damage-Capacity). A normal character's armor has about 45-100 M.D.C. (To put this in perspective, 3 MD is enough to tear a car in half, and can kill a human several times over), and has a {{BFG}} that can inflict up to ''100'' M.D.C. or more in a single shot. A Glitter Boy can, with a little luck, ''survive a nuclear explosion''. What's the drawback for all this power? The character levels a little slowly, and they have to get out of their mech for a few minutes a day to prevent atrophy.

to:

''TabletopGame/{{Rifts}}'' is a game where ''everyone'' is a GameBreaker, and needs to be in order to survive the NintendoHard combat, but there's one O.C.C. that surpasses even the most broken Juicer or Crazy Hero. Glitter Boy. A character who gets a ''several million credit'' [[PoweredArmor mech suit]] with around ''700+ M.D.C.'' (Mega-Damage-Capacity). A normal character's armor has about 45-100 M.D.C. (To put this in perspective, 3 MD is enough to tear a car in half, and can kill a human several times over), and has a {{BFG}} that can inflict up to ''100'' M.D.C. or more in a single shot. A Glitter Boy can, with a little luck, ''survive a nuclear explosion''.explosion'', and takes half damage from laser attacks. What's the drawback for all this power? The character levels a little slowly, and they have to get out of their mech for a few minutes a day to prevent atrophy. Oh, and pretty much everybody knows what you're capable of and will try to kill ''you'' first.



* CJ Carella should have his own section, the man is/was a human Game Breaker. South America 2 has what is arguably the worst example of broken munchkinism. There is a psychic character class in there called the Gizmoteer. One of his powers is the ability to convert any energy weapon so that it runs on psychic energy instead of energy clips. The cost to recharge said weapon is equal to the weapon's payload. The very same book features a gun known as the Anti-Tank Rifle, a very high powered gun (like, it does more than the Glitter Boy {{BFG}} mentioned above) designed for armies to give infantry troops a chance against tanks. The drawback of the weapon is that it drains the entire energy clip in one shot, giving the weapon a payload of one. How munchkins can combine these elements to their advantage is left as an exercise for the student.

to:

* CJ Carella should have his own section, the man is/was a human Game Breaker. South America 2 has what is arguably the worst example of broken munchkinism. There is a psychic character class in there called the Gizmoteer. One of his powers is the ability to convert any energy weapon so that it runs on psychic energy instead of energy clips. The cost to recharge said weapon is equal to the weapon's payload. The very same book features a gun known as the Anti-Tank Rifle, a very high powered gun (like, it does more than about as much the Glitter Boy {{BFG}} mentioned above) designed for armies to give infantry troops a chance against tanks. The drawback of the weapon is that it drains the entire energy clip in one shot, giving the weapon a payload of one. How munchkins can combine these elements to their advantage is left as an exercise for the student.
26th Apr '17 4:21:49 PM Jan_z_Michal
Is there an issue? Send a Message
26th Apr '17 4:21:45 PM Jan_z_Michal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* High TL, but only if the GM allows it and it suits the campaign. Most likely byproduct of AncientAstronauts, TrappedInAnotherWorld and TimeTravel, it allows a character to use a higher tech-level than the baseline of the setting, thus having access to much better versions of the same skills and knowledge. It only costs 5 points per level, so at 20 points you can use modern skills in UsefulNotes/TheRenaissance, and at 30 - in Roman times. And obviously, High TL decreases or entirely removes penalties for jumping the technology curve, should the character have proper skills for that. Even such simple things like First Aid skill benefit greatly from High TL.

to:

* High TL, but only if the GM allows it and it suits the campaign. Most likely byproduct of AncientAstronauts, TrappedInAnotherWorld and TimeTravel, being [[AncientAstronauts Ancient Astronaut]], TimeTravel or ending up TrappedInAnotherWorld, it allows a character to use a higher tech-level than the baseline of the setting, thus having access to much better versions of the same skills and knowledge. It only costs 5 points per level, so at 20 points you can use modern skills in UsefulNotes/TheRenaissance, and at 30 - in Roman times. And obviously, High TL decreases or entirely removes penalties for jumping the technology curve, should the character have proper skills for that. Even such simple things like First Aid skill benefit greatly from High TL.
26th Apr '17 4:19:15 PM Jan_z_Michal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* High TL, but only if the GM allows it and it suits the campaign. Most likely byproduct of TrappedInAnotherWorld and TimeTravel, it allows a character to use a higher tech-level than the baseline of the setting, thus having access to much better versions of the same skills and knowledge. It only costs 5 points per level, so at 20 points you can use modern skills in UsefulNotes/TheRenaissance, and at 30 - in Roman times. And obviously, High TL decreases or entirely removes penalties for jumping the technology curve, should the character have proper skills for that. Even such simple things like First Aid skill benefit greatly from High TL.

to:

* High TL, but only if the GM allows it and it suits the campaign. Most likely byproduct of AncientAstronauts, TrappedInAnotherWorld and TimeTravel, it allows a character to use a higher tech-level than the baseline of the setting, thus having access to much better versions of the same skills and knowledge. It only costs 5 points per level, so at 20 points you can use modern skills in UsefulNotes/TheRenaissance, and at 30 - in Roman times. And obviously, High TL decreases or entirely removes penalties for jumping the technology curve, should the character have proper skills for that. Even such simple things like First Aid skill benefit greatly from High TL.
26th Apr '17 3:57:43 AM Jan_z_Michal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Gizmo. A 5 point advantage allowing a character to pull a small object from {{Hammerspace}} whenever needed, as long as it's within the possible gear the character could carry. The description provides an example of pulling dry matches from a pocket to light a fuse right after after diving or being thoroughly searched and yet pulling a hidden gun when put in front of the BigBad. Oh, and Gizmo has levels, so it's 5 points for item that can be pulled whenever characters need one. The most common use is about ''always'' having a lockpick when the plot demands it.

to:

* Gizmo. A 5 point advantage allowing a character to pull a small object from {{Hammerspace}} whenever needed, as long as it's within the possible gear the character could carry. The description provides an example of pulling dry matches from a pocket to light a fuse right after after diving or being thoroughly searched and yet pulling a hidden gun when put in front of the BigBad. Oh, and Gizmo has levels, so it's 5 points for per item that can be pulled whenever characters need one. The most common use is about having ''always'' having a lockpick on character when the plot demands it.
26th Apr '17 3:04:49 AM Jan_z_Michal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Due to [[PointBuildSystem the very nature]] of TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}, it's relatively easy to land such combinations of advantages and skills, ''but'' it charges so many points that your character may end up a BunnyEarsLawyer to get there. Or never get there due to point limit. Said that, there are few relatively cheap tricks allowing to break the game without spending more than 30 points onf them

to:

Due to [[PointBuildSystem the very nature]] of TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}, it's relatively easy to land such combinations of advantages and skills, ''but'' it charges so many points that your character may end up a BunnyEarsLawyer to get there. Or never get there due to point limit. Said that, there are few relatively cheap tricks allowing to break the game without spending more than 30 points onf on them



* First level of better appearance, Attractive, costs 4 points. It helps with pretty much ''all'' social skills and adds default +1 to reaction checks. While higher levels of better appearance cost a lot of points with purely roleplaying value, Attractive has too good to skip point-to-usefulness ratio for TheFace

to:

* First level of better appearance, Attractive, costs 4 points. It helps with pretty much ''all'' social skills and adds default +1 to reaction checks. While higher levels of better appearance cost a lot of more points with almost purely roleplaying value, Attractive has too good to skip point-to-usefulness ratio for TheFace[[TheFace party's face]].
26th Apr '17 2:52:44 AM Jan_z_Michal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** To a lesser extent, just having access to higher TL ''tools'' makes a massive difference, especially in low TL games. Should character have proper skills and be from proper (or higher) TL, it's very easy to make TL4 (early-modern period) tools with access to TL2 (Iron Age) resources, providing an absurd +4 bonus to their users and negating the -10 penalty when trying to build or make other TL4 things. GivingRadioToTheRomans is just a matter of finding a sponsor who will pay for initial investments.

to:

** To a lesser extent, just having access to higher TL ''tools'' makes a massive difference, especially in low TL games. Should character have proper skills and be from proper (or higher) TL, it's very easy to make TL4 [=TL4=] (early-modern period) tools with access to TL2 [=TL2=] (Iron Age) resources, providing an absurd +4 bonus to their users and negating the -10 penalty when trying to build or make other TL4 [=TL4=] things. GivingRadioToTheRomans is just a matter of finding a sponsor who will pay for initial investments.
This list shows the last 10 events of 252. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=GameBreaker.TabletopRPG