History Fridge / Twilight

31st Mar '17 4:21:36 AM lilithmercy
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* Alice's vision in the Breaking Dawn movie involving werewolves isn't a plothole. Given the Volturi were surprised about the existence of the shapeshifter style werewolves, it's likely Aro didn't know about them blocking her powers, and unless he was specifically looking for info on them, he likely didn't find out by rooting through anyone's head. She's outright bullshitting. She thought up a vision where Aro and his best soldiers died, and she bluffed him!
21st Jan '17 6:32:47 PM nombretomado
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*** Vampirism has been a sexual metaphor for as long as it's appeared in literature. Meyer wasn't doing anything clever there. In fact, looking at the way vampires are handled in a story is really telling about how the contemporary society views sex. {{Dracula}} was originally an ugly old man who seduced young women into being his slaves and whores, but one can't help but be drawn to him, for some reason -- Victorian society on sex in a nutshell. This changes over time, as Dracula becomes a ManOfWealthAndTaste, but still unrepentantly evil, on through vampires with variation, some more evil than others, until you hit the modern sexual revolutions and heavily romanticized vampires in AnneRice novels and such. There is then a revival of the awareness of the dangers of sex and therefore vampirism but still a romanticized version present in Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer and Series/{{Angel}}, where vampires seem to represent sexually aggressive individuals that the [[YouGoGirl Superpowered-Empowered]] ActionGirl must eliminate (and also enter into relationships and have sex with -- though that's shown to have nasty consequences too). After all this, we get ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'', penned by a Mormon housewife, about ultra-hot, Adonis-like, cold-as-marble-but-still-"perfect" vampires that the MarySue protagonist desperately wants to be with but can't, not until she's married, because she just can't, ok? [[AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle And now you understand vampirism as a sexual metaphor]].

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*** Vampirism has been a sexual metaphor for as long as it's appeared in literature. Meyer wasn't doing anything clever there. In fact, looking at the way vampires are handled in a story is really telling about how the contemporary society views sex. {{Dracula}} was originally an ugly old man who seduced young women into being his slaves and whores, but one can't help but be drawn to him, for some reason -- Victorian society on sex in a nutshell. This changes over time, as Dracula becomes a ManOfWealthAndTaste, but still unrepentantly evil, on through vampires with variation, some more evil than others, until you hit the modern sexual revolutions and heavily romanticized vampires in AnneRice Creator/AnneRice novels and such. There is then a revival of the awareness of the dangers of sex and therefore vampirism but still a romanticized version present in Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer and Series/{{Angel}}, where vampires seem to represent sexually aggressive individuals that the [[YouGoGirl Superpowered-Empowered]] ActionGirl must eliminate (and also enter into relationships and have sex with -- though that's shown to have nasty consequences too). After all this, we get ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'', penned by a Mormon housewife, about ultra-hot, Adonis-like, cold-as-marble-but-still-"perfect" vampires that the MarySue protagonist desperately wants to be with but can't, not until she's married, because she just can't, ok? [[AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle And now you understand vampirism as a sexual metaphor]].
3rd Jan '17 9:26:58 PM zandercan
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* Once you remember that Bella is a teenager, her reckless and ill-conceived behavior actually makes perfect sense. She's headstrong, impressionable, and lacks the wisdom she would need to realize just how bad the choices she's making really are, and she sticks with Edward throughout almost the entire narrative purely because she's too immature to realize their relationship is not healthy; when the relationship is called off for a few months, she sinks into a period of depression because she's too young and inexperienced to understand that she needs to move on; and she makes choices that hurt the people around her because she hasn't grown up enough to think of anyone's happiness but her own. When you think about it, she's just making the same mistakes many other teenage girls have made in the real world, and the only thing that's actually stopping her from being relatable is the fact that the background narration is sheltering her from the fallout of her actions.

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* Once you remember that Bella is a teenager, an average teenager at the outset and barely into adulthood from the second book on, her reckless and ill-conceived behavior actually makes perfect sense. She's headstrong, impressionable, and lacks the wisdom she would need to realize just how bad the choices she's making throughout the narrative really are, and she sticks with Edward throughout almost the entire narrative purely because she's too immature to realize their relationship is not healthy; when the relationship is called off for a few months, she sinks into a period of depression because she's too young and inexperienced to understand that she needs to move on; and she makes choices that hurt the people around her because she hasn't grown up enough to think of anyone's happiness but her own. When you think about it, she's just making a lot of the same mistakes many other teenage girls her age have made in the real world, and the only thing that's actually stopping her from being relatable is the fact that the background narration is sheltering her from the fallout of her actions. fantastical elements aside.
29th Dec '16 11:49:17 PM zandercan
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* Once you remember that Bella is a teenager, her reckless and ill-conceived behavior actually makes perfect sense. She's headstrong, impressionable, and lacks the wisdom she would need to realize just how bad the choices she's making really are, and she sticks with Edward throughout almost the entire narrative purely because she's too immature to realize their relationship is not healthy; when the relationship is called off for a few months, she sinks into a period of depression because she's too young and inexperienced to understand that she needs to move on; and she makes choices that hurt the people around her because she hasn't grown up enough to think of anyone's happiness but her own. When you think about it, she's just making the same mistakes many other teenage girls have made in the real world, and the only thing that's actually stopping her from being relatable is the fact that the background narration is sheltering her from the fallout of her actions.
13th Aug '16 2:18:22 PM MiracleChange
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*** Fridge TearJerker: These types of issues often form as a result of '''severe''' neglect and/or abuse (usually the ''sexual'' kind). Suddenly this entire series takes on a sad, dark light.

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*** Fridge TearJerker: These types of issues often form as a result of '''severe''' '''severe''' emotional neglect and/or abuse (usually abuse, usually the ''sexual'' kind). kind. (and mental illness, but that's another story.) Suddenly this entire series takes on a sad, dark light.
17th Jul '16 7:34:20 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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*** You have to keep in mind, though, that Edward is supposed to be from the early 1900's. Edward himself talks about how seventeen-year-olds were more mature and allowed more responsibilities (i.e. getting married). Either his mental state depreciated, he was an exception to the norm, or Stephanie Meyer [[TheyJustDidntCare didn't bother with being historically accurate.]] Given that we never really hear his reasoning it's a tough call. Personally, I think his behavior is more like a [[CantGrowUp fifteen-year-old in an immortal body]].

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*** You have to keep in mind, though, that Edward is supposed to be from the early 1900's. Edward himself talks about how seventeen-year-olds were more mature and allowed more responsibilities (i.e. getting married). Either his mental state depreciated, he was an exception to the norm, or Stephanie Meyer [[TheyJustDidntCare didn't bother with being historically accurate.]] accurate. Given that we never really hear his reasoning it's a tough call. Personally, I think his behavior is more like a [[CantGrowUp fifteen-year-old in an immortal body]].
1st Jun '16 11:01:29 PM EvilKid
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** Or like, your head try to understand what kind of complicated thing is in the text then later you understand it's more common/dumber than you initially thought. EvilKid
16th May '16 3:03:46 PM AnonFangeekGirl
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** There's a story out there called ''For You, I Will'' that pretty much lays out most of the problems for the imprinter. It has a wolf imprint on a total psychopath who makes him into an accessory to murder.
9th May '16 1:55:33 AM angelic.asmodel
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** Renesmee's middle name is Carlie, so that's the combination Bella would have picked if she'd gone down that route with a male child.
3rd May '16 11:40:09 AM zigzag722
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***This crosses over into Fridge Horror and some seriously UnfortunateImplications, when you consider that Meyer said at separate occasions that the process of turning into a vampire makes you beautiful and turns non-white people white.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Fridge.Twilight