History Fridge / Twilight

21st Jul '17 11:26:14 AM SallyShears
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* Think about what Stephanie Meyer's portrayal of "true love" and "normal" relationships implies about her own upbringing and subculture. And the culture of some of the hardcore fans who see nothing abusive in Edward and Bella or Sam and Emily's relationship. Keep in mind that many average conservative Christians highly disapprove of the shallow and abusive idea of "love" in this book. Exactly what type of "family values" do Meyer and her fans come from? We probably don't want to know.
28th Jun '17 11:23:41 AM AnonFangeekGirl
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* So vampires in this verse are extremely cold. So cold that when Bella is cuddling with Edward she's shivering even with a blanket wrapped around her! When they had sex while she was human wouldn't he probably freeze her? Or cause frostbite? Wouldn't it be more painful than pleasurable? Also wouldn't his junk essentially act like a ice box for his sperm, constantly keeping it frozen thus making it impossible for her to get pregnant? My brain hurts.

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* So vampires in this verse are extremely cold. So cold that when Bella is cuddling with Edward she's shivering even with a blanket wrapped around her! When they had sex while she was human wouldn't he probably freeze her? Or cause frostbite? Wouldn't it be more painful than pleasurable? Also wouldn't his junk essentially act like a ice box for his sperm, constantly keeping it frozen thus making it impossible for her to get pregnant? My brain hurts.hurts.
* So imprinting is intended to get the best mate for the new generation of wolves. Age isn't an issue, and species isn't an issue (since Jacob imprinted on Renesmee, a half-vampire). Does that mean that werewolves can imprint on wolves and/or dogs, since they would be able to have sex with them in wolf form?
28th Jun '17 2:46:09 AM SergeshD123
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*** This is a fridge brilliance section, dude, it's where we explain things logically.
26th Jun '17 5:47:54 PM SallyShears
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* Edward's controlling nature makes sense given the WordOfGod/Fanon rule that becoming a vampire locks you in the mental state of your death. Rosalie was "defiled" right before her wedding, and thus is obsessed with marriage, babies, and looking her best; Jasper was seduced by evil vampire women, so it's safe to say he died happy, hence his happy nature as a vampire; Alice likewise was too brain-fried to care about anything when she became a vampire, hence her bubbly nature; Emmet's death was simply a tragedy of nature, hence why he doesn't have any huge trauma or bitterness, but does pick fights with bears; Esme is obsessively maternal, because she tried to kill herself after losing a baby; and Edward? He died in an epidemic. He wasn't murdered, or killed by an animal he could fight, but slowly being killed and watching everyone around him be killed by an insidious force he couldn't ''control at all.'' So he compensates by trying to control Bella. Yikes!
13th Jun '17 10:03:44 PM nombretomado
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** Those things are nice, but 'technology' is often misleading in war. The most complicated, expensive, and recently-produced device is not always the best - and this would not be a Conventional or Limited War. Such expensive, resource-intensive, hard-to-maintain devices could never be the chief weapons of the world's war effort. It would be a Guerilla War like The Philippines, North China, Cuba, Belarus, Afghanistan - and a Total War like WorldWarOne or WorldWarTwo. Centres of government and administration, utilities and transport, and the munitions factories and petroleum industries needed to continue the war would all be horribly vulnerable and frankly impossible to defend alongside the entire civilian population. Either large areas and populations would have to go undefended, or lightly-armed militia (coupled with a willingness to devastate huge areas with the use of fire-support regardless of civilian deaths and maimings) would have to be a stop-gap before they received sufficient heavy weapons 2-10 years after the mobilisation to a Total War World Economy - and this is assuming that the vehicle-portable heavy weapons are even able to hit and kill the damned creatures in the first place. If they are not, then the fighting would have to depend on fire-support up to and perhaps including tactical nuclear weapons. Victory over the Vampires could be possible, but the world would have much if not most of its people killed in the toughest and biggest unconventional war humanity had ever executed.

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** Those things are nice, but 'technology' is often misleading in war. The most complicated, expensive, and recently-produced device is not always the best - and this would not be a Conventional or Limited War. Such expensive, resource-intensive, hard-to-maintain devices could never be the chief weapons of the world's war effort. It would be a Guerilla War like The Philippines, North China, Cuba, Belarus, Afghanistan - and a Total War like WorldWarOne UsefulNotes/WorldWarI or WorldWarTwo.UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. Centres of government and administration, utilities and transport, and the munitions factories and petroleum industries needed to continue the war would all be horribly vulnerable and frankly impossible to defend alongside the entire civilian population. Either large areas and populations would have to go undefended, or lightly-armed militia (coupled with a willingness to devastate huge areas with the use of fire-support regardless of civilian deaths and maimings) would have to be a stop-gap before they received sufficient heavy weapons 2-10 years after the mobilisation to a Total War World Economy - and this is assuming that the vehicle-portable heavy weapons are even able to hit and kill the damned creatures in the first place. If they are not, then the fighting would have to depend on fire-support up to and perhaps including tactical nuclear weapons. Victory over the Vampires could be possible, but the world would have much if not most of its people killed in the toughest and biggest unconventional war humanity had ever executed.
10th Jun '17 12:14:13 PM Ashbobash10
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** I saw it as Marcus knew that Aro had killed Didyme, but because of Chelsea's power she was able to keep him loyal to the Volturi. He is depressed because he is being forced to be loyal to the man who took his mate away.
31st Mar '17 4:21:36 AM lilithmercy
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* Alice's vision in the Breaking Dawn movie involving werewolves isn't a plothole. Given the Volturi were surprised about the existence of the shapeshifter style werewolves, it's likely Aro didn't know about them blocking her powers, and unless he was specifically looking for info on them, he likely didn't find out by rooting through anyone's head. She's outright bullshitting. She thought up a vision where Aro and his best soldiers died, and she bluffed him!
21st Jan '17 6:32:47 PM nombretomado
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*** Vampirism has been a sexual metaphor for as long as it's appeared in literature. Meyer wasn't doing anything clever there. In fact, looking at the way vampires are handled in a story is really telling about how the contemporary society views sex. {{Dracula}} was originally an ugly old man who seduced young women into being his slaves and whores, but one can't help but be drawn to him, for some reason -- Victorian society on sex in a nutshell. This changes over time, as Dracula becomes a ManOfWealthAndTaste, but still unrepentantly evil, on through vampires with variation, some more evil than others, until you hit the modern sexual revolutions and heavily romanticized vampires in AnneRice novels and such. There is then a revival of the awareness of the dangers of sex and therefore vampirism but still a romanticized version present in Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer and Series/{{Angel}}, where vampires seem to represent sexually aggressive individuals that the [[YouGoGirl Superpowered-Empowered]] ActionGirl must eliminate (and also enter into relationships and have sex with -- though that's shown to have nasty consequences too). After all this, we get ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'', penned by a Mormon housewife, about ultra-hot, Adonis-like, cold-as-marble-but-still-"perfect" vampires that the MarySue protagonist desperately wants to be with but can't, not until she's married, because she just can't, ok? [[AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle And now you understand vampirism as a sexual metaphor]].

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*** Vampirism has been a sexual metaphor for as long as it's appeared in literature. Meyer wasn't doing anything clever there. In fact, looking at the way vampires are handled in a story is really telling about how the contemporary society views sex. {{Dracula}} was originally an ugly old man who seduced young women into being his slaves and whores, but one can't help but be drawn to him, for some reason -- Victorian society on sex in a nutshell. This changes over time, as Dracula becomes a ManOfWealthAndTaste, but still unrepentantly evil, on through vampires with variation, some more evil than others, until you hit the modern sexual revolutions and heavily romanticized vampires in AnneRice Creator/AnneRice novels and such. There is then a revival of the awareness of the dangers of sex and therefore vampirism but still a romanticized version present in Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer and Series/{{Angel}}, where vampires seem to represent sexually aggressive individuals that the [[YouGoGirl Superpowered-Empowered]] ActionGirl must eliminate (and also enter into relationships and have sex with -- though that's shown to have nasty consequences too). After all this, we get ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'', penned by a Mormon housewife, about ultra-hot, Adonis-like, cold-as-marble-but-still-"perfect" vampires that the MarySue protagonist desperately wants to be with but can't, not until she's married, because she just can't, ok? [[AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle And now you understand vampirism as a sexual metaphor]].
3rd Jan '17 9:26:58 PM zandercan
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* Once you remember that Bella is a teenager, her reckless and ill-conceived behavior actually makes perfect sense. She's headstrong, impressionable, and lacks the wisdom she would need to realize just how bad the choices she's making really are, and she sticks with Edward throughout almost the entire narrative purely because she's too immature to realize their relationship is not healthy; when the relationship is called off for a few months, she sinks into a period of depression because she's too young and inexperienced to understand that she needs to move on; and she makes choices that hurt the people around her because she hasn't grown up enough to think of anyone's happiness but her own. When you think about it, she's just making the same mistakes many other teenage girls have made in the real world, and the only thing that's actually stopping her from being relatable is the fact that the background narration is sheltering her from the fallout of her actions.

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* Once you remember that Bella is a teenager, an average teenager at the outset and barely into adulthood from the second book on, her reckless and ill-conceived behavior actually makes perfect sense. She's headstrong, impressionable, and lacks the wisdom she would need to realize just how bad the choices she's making throughout the narrative really are, and she sticks with Edward throughout almost the entire narrative purely because she's too immature to realize their relationship is not healthy; when the relationship is called off for a few months, she sinks into a period of depression because she's too young and inexperienced to understand that she needs to move on; and she makes choices that hurt the people around her because she hasn't grown up enough to think of anyone's happiness but her own. When you think about it, she's just making a lot of the same mistakes many other teenage girls her age have made in the real world, and the only thing that's actually stopping her from being relatable is the fact that the background narration is sheltering her from the fallout of her actions. fantastical elements aside.
29th Dec '16 11:49:17 PM zandercan
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* Once you remember that Bella is a teenager, her reckless and ill-conceived behavior actually makes perfect sense. She's headstrong, impressionable, and lacks the wisdom she would need to realize just how bad the choices she's making really are, and she sticks with Edward throughout almost the entire narrative purely because she's too immature to realize their relationship is not healthy; when the relationship is called off for a few months, she sinks into a period of depression because she's too young and inexperienced to understand that she needs to move on; and she makes choices that hurt the people around her because she hasn't grown up enough to think of anyone's happiness but her own. When you think about it, she's just making the same mistakes many other teenage girls have made in the real world, and the only thing that's actually stopping her from being relatable is the fact that the background narration is sheltering her from the fallout of her actions.
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