History Fridge / ThreeHundred

20th Nov '15 2:50:48 PM Deathhacker
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* One small omitted detail was that the Thespians and Thebans remained at the battle, while Dilios depicted the rest of them running in the tale. While this sounds like a dick move on Dilios's part, it actually makes sense since he wasn't at the battle and still haven't seen the corpses on the battlefield, so he was going on assumption. Furthermore, since the Spartans themselves thought it was brave of the Thespians and Thebans remaining to fight, it explains why Dilios didn't even consider the possibility of the non-Spartan forces remaining.
12th Nov '15 8:43:57 AM lorgskyegon
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** He's also telling Ephialtes that his name will go down in history as a traitor, much the same as Benedict Arnold in the United States or [[TheQuisling Vidkun Quisling]] in Europe.
12th Sep '15 8:30:36 AM MechWarrior
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* Another case of FridgeBrilliance: The movie and the comic aren't regarded as very accurate in terms of historical events but rather a take on actual events put into a medium that makes for a fantastic story. At the end of the film the events are being told to Greek troops to hype them up for the approaching battle. The entire premise of the movie and the comic it was based on amounts to wartime propaganda to raise the moral of the home team!

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* Another case of FridgeBrilliance: The movie and the comic aren't regarded as very accurate in terms of historical events but rather a take on actual events put into a medium that makes for a fantastic story. At the end of the film the events are being told to Greek troops to hype them up for the approaching battle. The entire premise of the movie and the comic it was based on amounts to wartime propaganda to raise the moral morale of the home team!
14th Jun '15 1:21:11 PM Wessmaniac
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* In ThreeHundred, Leonidas tells the traitor Ephialtes to live a long life. At first it seems that Leonidas is telling him "Good luck with your life," a moment later Ephialtes breaks down in tears. Why? He was trying to regain his father's spartan honor, and in Sparta, you where only respected if you fought and died in battle. - Strilight

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* In ThreeHundred, Leonidas tells the traitor Ephialtes to live a long life. At first it seems that Leonidas is telling him "Good luck with your life," a moment later Ephialtes breaks down in tears. Why? He was trying to regain his father's spartan honor, and in Sparta, you where were only respected if you fought and died in battle. - Strilight
2nd Jun '15 3:00:33 AM Reiko
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*When the Persian ambassador asks for earth and water this is actually a backhanded and realistic request for citizenship. Only Citizens of Sparta were allowed to own land in Sparta, so by asking for land, the Persian was asking to become a Citizen (and also a voting member in the council).
5th Nov '14 8:35:55 AM MrDeath
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* How, exactly, does a society where the entire male population does nothing but train for war not just fall over? Of course, what the film doesn't tell you is that the only reason this was both possible and necessary was that the Spartans were horrendously enthusiastic enslavers, and treated helots with little more respect than animals: part of the agoge, the Crypteia, involved the students randomly killing any helots they met. Even contemporary Greeks were appalled by the Spartans' wholesale enslavement of Messenia, but mostly because they were fellow Greeks.
5th Nov '14 8:34:56 AM MrDeath
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* [[spoiler:When we see Leonidas being killed by a torrential downpour of Persian arrows (in a GoryDiscretionShot), we never hear an arrow touching Leonidas. We just hear them land on the ground.]]
** [[spoiler:When we see a close-up of Leonidas' corpse, we see arrows puncturing every point of his body except his head.]]

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* [[spoiler:When we see Leonidas being killed by a torrential downpour of Persian arrows (in a GoryDiscretionShot), we never hear an arrow touching Leonidas. We just hear them land on the ground.]]
** [[spoiler:When
When we see a close-up of Leonidas' corpse, we see arrows puncturing every point of his body except his head.]]
5th Nov '14 8:16:47 AM SpectralTime
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** Similarly, as Kyle Kallgren of WebOriginal/BrowsHeldHigh famously pointed out, the ancient Greeks probably didn't have a word for blue, with Homer describing the sea as "wine-dark" and the sky as "bronze." Hence the film's infamously stylized color pallet, with yellow skies, dark purple seas, and almost no blue anywhere.
10th Aug '14 10:54:58 AM stuffedninja
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!!FridgeLogic
* [[spoiler:When we see Leonidas being killed by a torrential downpour of Persian arrows (in a GoryDiscretionShot), we never hear an arrow touching Leonidas. We just hear them land on the ground.]]
** [[spoiler:When we see a close-up of Leonidas' corpse, we see arrows puncturing every point of his body except his head.]]
6th Jul '14 11:32:53 PM creader
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!!FridgeBrilliance
This list shows the last 10 events of 19. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Fridge.ThreeHundred