History Fridge / TheElderScrollsVSkyrim

24th May '17 4:30:33 PM valar55
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* The rightmost skill in each of the FighterMageThief categories in the skill perk constellation screen is a skill in one category, but may be highly useful in the archetype purview directly to the right; Alchemy is in the Thief purview but is often also a Mage discipline, Enchanting is useful for Warrior types who want magic effects but not spells, and Archery gives warriors range power otherwise available only to Mage ranged casts, but is also useful for the Thief purview since you can strike hidden from afar.

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* The rightmost skill in each of the FighterMageThief categories in the skill perk constellation screen is a skill in one category, but may be highly useful in the archetype purview directly to the right; Alchemy is in the Thief purview but is often also a Mage discipline, Enchanting is useful for Warrior types who want magic effects but not spells, and Archery gives warriors range power otherwise available only to Mage ranged casts, casters, but is also useful for the Thief purview since you can strike hidden from afar.



** Rather oddly, Morrowind established that a) skooma is a very old drug, b) it is widely known that there ''is'' no cure for skooma addiction, c) the cure that is presented emphasises that there is no miracle cure or potion to take. Presumably, someone in those 200 years found that both Confessions of a Skooma-Eater and the Khajiit were wrong, and it is as simple as taking a (healing) potion.

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** Rather oddly, Morrowind established that a) skooma is a very old drug, b) it is widely known that there ''is'' no cure for skooma addiction, c) the cure that is presented emphasises emphasizes that there is no miracle cure or potion to take. Presumably, someone in those 200 years found that both Confessions of a Skooma-Eater and the Khajiit were wrong, and it is as simple as taking a (healing) potion.
6th May '17 2:02:55 PM Zaptech
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* Alduin is the only dragon known who can shout '''SLEN TIID VO'''. Now, consider what a Shout is: it's taking something and embodying the very concept into your soul, allowing you to express the words of that Shout into a Thu'um and remake the world. Consider ''what'' Alduin embodies: he is the personification of the World Eater, the end of the world. But Alduin doesn't exist to ''end'' the world, he simply returns the world to the Dawn Era, the primordial state where the Divines reshape and rebirth the world. Since Alduin ''is'' the process to restarting the world, it makes sense that he would be able to use a Shout that remakes that which has died.
6th May '17 3:23:33 AM Dragonborn44
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* Furthermore, the fact that the [[spoiler: Skeleton Key can unlock a person's potential]] raises the question as to why it's little more than an unbreakable lockpick for the Dragonborn. For meta reasons, it would be a GameBreaker of sorts. In-universe, unlocking a person's potential implies that said person had limits in terms of power. Regardless of how the player chooses to build their Dragonborn, in-universe, the Dragonborn has no such limits, and is only hindered by the number of Shouts they possess at any given time.
17th Apr '17 1:38:33 PM Dimentia44
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** It's possible for the Dragonborn to ask Calixto why the book is blank, and one of the theories he proposes (while contradictory to the above one) makes for even more fridgey goodness. If we take Calixto's word as true, then it is ''incredibly'' rare for anybody to not see anything at all when they read The Book of Fate. While some who experience this might just be so close to death that they have no fate left to be told to them (which is almost certainly [[SpannerInTheWorks not the case of the Dragonborn]]), others are thought to be special in the regard that they simply never had a fate to begin with. Now, this explanation ''does'' seem very likely to apply to the Dragonborn. Unlike every NPC in Skyrim, the Dragonborn is the only character who truly has any choice and control over their own destiny. They are the ones who decide who wins the civil war. They are the ones who decide whether the Blades return to glory or not. They are the ones who decide whether the Dark Brotherhood will return to glory or be crushed into irrelevancy. The Dragonborn is one of the few who cannot read The Book of Fate, because they are one of the only people who may decide their own fate.
16th Apr '17 11:14:45 PM Dimentia44
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** Yet another in-game book mentions that certain races should just expect to be distrusted if they are in a region that tends to be racist towards them (one example it gives is Argonians being commonly followed around the store by Dark Elf shopkeepers in Morrowind). However, it claims that Khajiit (and also Bosmer) are unique in the sense that even shopkeepers who are their ''own'' race will profile them and assume they're up to no good. Presumably Khajiit (and Bosmer) simply have a culture that encourages thievery.

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** Yet another in-game book mentions that certain races should just expect to be distrusted if book, "The Buying Game", includes a lecture on how each race is very particular in which other race they are in a region that tends most likely to be racist towards them (one example it gives is Argonians being commonly followed around the store by suspect of thievery (for example, a Dark Elf shopkeepers in Morrowind). would tend to profile an Argonian while a High Elf would be more likely to profile a Nord). However, it claims that Khajiit (and also Bosmer) are unique in the sense that every single race, even shopkeepers who are their ''own'' race will profile them ''own people'', are united in fearing that they are about to be robbed whenever one walks into their store. Since this confirms that even other Khajiit don't trust Khajiit, we can probably go ahead and assume they're up to no good. Presumably Khajiit (and Bosmer) simply have a culture that encourages thievery. thievery is just a part of their culture.
16th Apr '17 7:53:43 PM Dimentia44
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** Yet another in-game book mentions that certain races should just expect to be distrusted if they are in a region that tends to be racist towards them (one example it gives is Argonians being commonly followed around the store by Dark Elf shopkeepers in Morrowind). However, it claims that Khajiit (and also Bosmer) are unique in the sense that even shopkeepers who are their ''own'' race will profile them and assume they're up to no good. Presumably Khajiit (and Bosmer) simply have a culture that encourages thievery.
9th Apr '17 6:46:58 PM Zaptech
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* Let's think ahead to the next game for a minute. With the multiple possible resolutions to the civil war, how will history look in Elder Scrolls VI? A "Warp in the North" would be an AssPull. There's only one event that can possibly result from all three possible choices: ''The Thalmor attack and win''. And since the Thalmor are trying to outlaw worship of Talos, the plot of the next game will probably involve the consequences of Talos no longer being worshiped. This is a big deal because the Divines are responsible for how physics work. What happens when one loses power?
** Or, much like ''Fallout,'' Bethesda will simply choose a canon path (namely that the Eastern Brotherhood of Steel won the war with the Enclave in [=FO3=] and are now, with Liberty Prime, more powerful than the original) and run with that for future installments, especially if new DLC deals with the Thalmor and their ilk in some manner or another.
** Not necessarily. Even if you resolve the war in favor of one side or the other, it doesn't mean the war is actually permanently ''over.'' Even if you side with the Imperials, it might turn out that twenty years after the game, war breaks out again and this time the Nords win. Or conversely, even if you side with the Stormcloaks, maybe twenty years later the Empire invades in full force. There's a lot of possible options, so long as the next game takes place enough in the future. It just has to not say anything specific about how ''Skyrim'' was resolved.
** More likely the Thalmor decide to resume their war on the Imperials, and a Stormcloak-aligned Skyrim would eventually ally with the Empire, or at least not attack them and focus on the Thalmor themselves. Tullius even mentions that an even greater war with the Thalmor is on the horizon, and given that Mer tend to reproduce much more slowly than Men in the setting, the Imperial forces can more easily recover their numbers to take the war to the Thalmor instead. There's a reason the Thalmor Dossier on Ulfric states that a victory ''for either side'' is to be avoided and the civil war in Skyrim is to be drawn out as long as possible: the Thalmor ''can't'' defeat the Empire outright in a long, protracted direct conflict, so they resort to manipulating the nations of men against each other to weaken them. They did the same thing to the Redguards, resulting in an independent Hammerfell that was nevertheless able to repulse the Thalmor without Imperial support.
** Another possibility (if potentially character derailing) is that the Dragonborn either succumbed to the same innate urge for domination as the Dragons and seized Skyrim for their own, or was forced by Hermaeus Mora into doing so. Both are possibilities since the end of ''Dragonborn'' leaves the protagonist with the ability to bend people to their will and control Dragons, making it ''very'' easy to turn Elisif or Ulfric into a PuppetKing or raise an army if they chose to do so, coupled with Hermaeus Mora implying he has plans to turn them into his new right-hand man to replace Miraak.
9th Apr '17 6:40:34 PM Zaptech
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*** Remember that there is a statistic for "Bunnies Slaughtered" in the in-game menu... Who put that there, anyway? Sheogorath?
*** One of the great missed opportunities in the game was the lack of an achievement for killing enough bunnies - "Achievement Unlocked: [[WhatsOperaDoc Kill The Wabbit]]" would have been perfect.
9th Apr '17 6:39:49 PM Zaptech
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* Morokei has the Staff of Magnus. A little over 200 years ago, the staff was in a museum in Morrowind. Morokei would have had to travel to Morrowind and take the staff, presumably killing anyone in his way.
** Alternately, someone could have stolen, purchased, or otherwise obtained the Staff from the museum somehow, with its ending up in Morokei's hands through an unknown series of events afterward. (For example, the person who stole the staff might have decided to explore Labyrinthian and brought it along in case they needed its power, but ended up being no match for Morokei anyway.)
7th Apr '17 8:50:58 PM Zaptech
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%%Don't remove Fridge Logic. Fridge Logic also goes on the Fridge tab. See its relevant article.
[[folder:FridgeLogic]]
* The Dragonrend shout is such a BrownNote for dragons because dragons have no concept of transience; however, the Thu'um is based on the Dragon Language. How could the dragons have words for Mortal, Finite, and Temporary if they have no concept of such things?
** Probably used for the mortals back when the Dragons ruled all of Skyrim, which would explain Mortal. It was also made by the mortals, so they probably just found words close enough to them to start, which would explain Finite and how Mortal is used in this context. Temporary, on the other hand...
*** A lot of things don't last forever. For instance, their fire doesn't burn forever, so it is temporary, hence dragons having a word for temporary in the Draconic Language.
** Paarthurnax explicitly says that the Thu'um was created by mortals using words that the dragons cannot truly comprehend. Remember, we humans have words for things like "infinite" and "eternity," yet it is literally impossible for a human mind to truly comprehend such concepts. Dragons literally cannot comprehend mortality, and using the words for those concepts forces them to experience that. Such a thing is so mind-bogglingly incomprehensible to their minds that it knocks them out of the sky.
** Alduin ''does'' know at least the first word of Dragonrend, even if he doesn't use it as a shout; he calls you a "joor" when he revives and sics Salohknir on you. Though it makes you wonder why he didn't use it later against Paarthurnax... [[EvenEvilHasStandards Even World-Eaters Have Standards]], perhaps?
*** As stated above, it's because Dragons cannot truly comprehend the concept of mortality. You cannot use a Thu'um if you don't truly understand its meaning.
*** To put this in human-comprehensible terms, English has "can see into the fourth dimension" as a phrase, and humans can use that phrase, but we would be severely incapacitated if the full extent and implications of that phrase were thrust into our minds.
*** Alternatively, the dragons can understand those words but they can't comprehend the concepts being applied to ''them'' specifically. In other words, they understand what mortality is; they just can't comprehend actually being mortal.
*** Furthermore, this would be somewhat like a normal, untrained person uttering "Fus Ro Dah". Despite knowing the words of the Unrelenting Force shout, they simply ''aren't'' going to be capable of using the Thu'um because they have no concept of the deeper meaning behind those words. Likewise, a dragon could say the words of the Dragonrend shout, but they could not comprehend the true meaning of the words in a way that makes it a shout.
* A minor case, but the Dovahkiin is a dragon with a mortal's body, right? Technically, shouldn't you have been a dragon when you entered Azura's star? I know gameplay-wise this couldn't be done, but story-wise...
** The Dovahkiin probably appears in a mortal shape because that's what s/he think of him/herself, kind of how s/he appears in Sovngarde.
** Going by that logic, armor and weaponry, outside of the bound variants, shouldn't be present inside either. I think that, in that instance, his body was inside the star, in order to purge it.
*** That explains why you can keep the Daedra Hearts you loot from the Dremora.
* Why did Madanach never use the convenient escape route in his cell?
** Political expediency?
*** Let's see... walk out and get back to raiding and killing and pillaging... or stay where he is working behind the scenes, carefully wearing his enemies down from the inside before stabbing them in the back? I'd stay where I was.
* How can you pick up dragon scales off a dead dragon ''after'' its skin burns off?
** Pay close attention when smithing dragonscale armor. You generally need three or four "scales" to forge even the boots and gauntlets. Now look at the size of the dragons you have to kill. They're about the size of an average school bus. You need the scales left behind by maybe two entire dragons to forge a single suit of armor for a tiny human, and this armor is backed with iron, leather, and dragonbone. It seems pretty clear that the "scales" you recover from the dragon are from the bits and pieces of the dragon's body that you've been blasting, shooting, or hacking off as the battle progresses.
** There are also a few leftover globs of skin on a burnt-up dragon. Perhaps that's where you get the dragonskin leather?
** This might also be a case of GameplayAndStorySegregation, so that rather than burning off into nothing and the Dragon's perfectly white skeleton remaining, the aftermath looks more like a collection of charred bones surrounded by ashes. In that case, you're simply finding the most unburned and usable pieces left on the corpse, hence why you only end up with between 1-4 scales or bones per Dragon corpse.
* Talk to the alchemist in Whiterun, and she frequently tries to offload a shelf of assorted disease treatments on you. Why does anybody need various tinctures and salves and so forth, when you can frequently find wonder cures in dungeons and shops, and praying to a Divine will cure you? Even the supernatural things like Vampirism can be cured with faith and/or cold medicine, as long as you get help fast enough. It seems like disease should have been wiped off of Nirn centuries ago.
** The blessings can be passed off as only the Dragonborn can receive an actual effect. In ''Oblivion'', you could not receive a blessing if you were more evil than good; but that's not the case in this game, presumably because the Dragonborn is partly Aedric. As for the Potions of Cure Disease, remember that those potions are freaking expensive, and hawk feathers are extremely rare. If you notice, only poor people in the game have diseases, because they are the only ones that can't afford the potion.
** I always interpreted it as the treatments and medicines actually working, and either the game assumes you bought/made the right potion, or the cure disease potion is a specific wonder-drug/cure-all. The poor shmucks being sick all the time? How often in real life does a medicine work instantly?
** Bear in mind that shrines are generally only found in cities- and while there are certainly many out in the wilderness this would necessitate finding them first. If you play the game at all, you'll certainly come across any shopkeeper as being a traveler simply by virtue of not being a usual face in the neighborhood (or being an entirely new one)- so they make the obvious (and correct) conclusion that you must spend alot of time out on the road or in the wilderness. That said, and ignoring the fact that there aren't many shrines out in the wild, what tends to be the main source of disease in Skyrim? The wildlife. So of course the alchemist in Whiterun will be pushing to offload as many Cure Disease potions as she can- Whiterun is literally the center of Skyrim, where most caravans, traders, mercenaries and adventurers will stop near or in. Most of Skyrim is brutal and wild, teeming with things that want to kill you, and even if they ''don't'' kill you, there's a good chance that they'll leave you stricken with something unpleasant. Cure Disease is good for business.
* Why does human flesh (especially if you are human) carry the damage health attribute? I mean it might be disgusting to do sure but if you are human it makes no sense.
** Actually, this makes a lot of sense, ''[[EspeciallyZoidberg especially for humans]]''. Cannibalism in real life is known to cause insanity due to some strange reaction. This is actually the reason for Mad Cow Disease; lazy farmers would feed their cattle the brains of other cattle, which made them get really sick. Likewise, a human eating another human will also get very sick.
*** Mad cow disease is caused by [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prion prions]], which are proteins that damage various cell structures, can change other proteins to prions by touching them and cannot be destroyed like other proteins. This is why the disease can be passed on by eating an infected cow, whatever your species.
** Ok then, but how does the cult in Markath fit into this? They don't damage their health, do they? Neither do you, for that matter.
*** [[AWizardDidIt Namira did it]]. And who's to say it doesn't affect them? As I said, cannibalism can you drive you insane. The people in Markarth are absolutely batshit!
* The official strategy guide says that Kodlak Whitemane, the Harbinger of the Companions, is kept from fighting because he contracted "the rot" and is slowly dying of it. [[spoiler:Since he's a werewolf, he should be immune to all diseases. [[HandWave Perhaps this vaguely described "rot" condition is the one exception?]]]]
** Perhaps "the rot" is just an UnusualEuphemism for old age, rather than an actual disease?
*** One doesn't contract old age, and the guide makes it very clear that this is something he contracted. "The rot," as far as Google can explain, simply refers to decomposition; literally, his body is breaking down. As best I can figure, it's not a disease per se, because the [[spoiler:lycanthropy]] would have rendered him immune if that were the case. It might be the result of poison, though, since disease immunity wouldn't necessarily protect someone from that.
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