History Fridge / PeterPan

7th Mar '18 5:25:27 PM Pamina
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

** Tiger Lily and her Indian tribe behave just the way a boy like Peter Pan would assume Indians behave (instead of behaving like any real life Native American tribe), which fits with the way Neverland seems to shape reality to conform to Peter Pan's imagination.
23rd Jan '18 3:30:19 AM CthonisPrincess
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The book and its sequel mention that Peter does ''NOT'' kill the lost boys; in the original book Peter sends them back to Earth and in its sequel its mentioned that that anyone, not just Peter, has the ability stay young forever in Neverland provided that they never ponder their future. Pondering the future and wondering what they would be if they grew up is all it takes to break the magic that keeps the individual young in Neverland, in the novel Ravello[[spoiler:Captain Hook]] refers to it "Betraying childhood and Looking Ahead" and it's also mentioned that people can trick others into growing up by asking them to answer the question "What do you want to be when you grow up?" Looking Ahead is the single Rule Peter has for the Lost Boys, and if Peter realises that they have broken the Rule, he banishes them to Nowhereland, meaning that they were to be ignored by the League of Pan (All of Peter's allies). [[spoiler: In the novel it's mentioned that the banished Lost Boys (Called the Roarers) resent Peter for banishing them until they realise that in the past they were tricked into growing up by Captain Hook and turn their full resentment on him instead.]]

to:

** The book and its sequel mention that Peter does ''NOT'' kill the lost boys; in the original book Peter sends them back to Earth and in its sequel its mentioned that that anyone, not just Peter, has the ability stay young forever in Neverland provided that they never ponder their future. Pondering the future and wondering what they would be if they grew up is all it takes to break the magic that keeps the individual young in Neverland, in the novel Ravello[[spoiler:Captain Ravello[[spoiler:Who is actually Captain Hook]] refers to it "Betraying childhood and Looking Ahead" and it's also mentioned that people can trick others into growing up by asking them to answer the question "What do you want to be when you grow up?" Looking Ahead is the single Rule Peter has for the Lost Boys, and if Peter realises that they have broken the Rule, he banishes them to Nowhereland, meaning that they were to be ignored by the League of Pan (All of Peter's allies). [[spoiler: In the novel it's mentioned that the banished Lost Boys (Called the Roarers) resent Peter for banishing them until they realise that in the past they were tricked into growing up by Captain Hook and turn their full resentment on him instead.]]
23rd Jan '18 3:29:32 AM CthonisPrincess
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The book and its sequel mention that Peter does ''NOT'' kill the lost boys; in the original book Peter sends them back to Earth and in its sequel its mentioned that that anyone, not just Peter, has the ability stay young forever in Neverland provided that they never ponder their future. Pondering the future and wondering what they would be if they grew up is all it takes to break the magic that keeps the individual young in Neverland, in the novel (Ravello [[spoiler:Captain Hook]]) refers to it "Betraying childhood and Looking Ahead" and it's also mentioned that people can trick others into growing up by asking them to answer the question "What do you want to be when you grow up?" Looking Ahead is the single Rule Peter has for the Lost Boys, and if Peter realises that they have broken the Rule, he banishes them to Nowhereland, meaning that they were to be ignored by the League of Pan (All of Peter's allies). [[spoiler: In the novel it's mentioned that the banished Lost Boys (Called the Roarers) resent Peter for banishing them until they realise that in the past they were tricked into growing up by Captain Hook and turn their full resentment on him instead.]]

to:

** The book and its sequel mention that Peter does ''NOT'' kill the lost boys; in the original book Peter sends them back to Earth and in its sequel its mentioned that that anyone, not just Peter, has the ability stay young forever in Neverland provided that they never ponder their future. Pondering the future and wondering what they would be if they grew up is all it takes to break the magic that keeps the individual young in Neverland, in the novel (Ravello [[spoiler:Captain Hook]]) Ravello[[spoiler:Captain Hook]] refers to it "Betraying childhood and Looking Ahead" and it's also mentioned that people can trick others into growing up by asking them to answer the question "What do you want to be when you grow up?" Looking Ahead is the single Rule Peter has for the Lost Boys, and if Peter realises that they have broken the Rule, he banishes them to Nowhereland, meaning that they were to be ignored by the League of Pan (All of Peter's allies). [[spoiler: In the novel it's mentioned that the banished Lost Boys (Called the Roarers) resent Peter for banishing them until they realise that in the past they were tricked into growing up by Captain Hook and turn their full resentment on him instead.]]
23rd Jan '18 3:28:38 AM CthonisPrincess
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** The book and its sequel mention that Peter does ''NOT'' kill the lost boys; in the original book Peter sends them back to Earth and in its sequel its mentioned that that anyone, not just Peter, has the ability stay young forever in Neverland provided that they never ponder their future. Pondering the future and wondering what they would be if they grew up is all it takes to break the magic that keeps the individual young in Neverland, in the novel (Ravello [[spoiler:Captain Hook]]) refers to it "Betraying childhood and Looking Ahead" and it's also mentioned that people can trick others into growing up by asking them to answer the question "What do you want to be when you grow up?" Looking Ahead is the single Rule Peter has for the Lost Boys, and if Peter realises that they have broken the Rule, he banishes them to Nowhereland, meaning that they were to be ignored by the League of Pan (All of Peter's allies). [[spoiler: In the novel it's mentioned that the banished Lost Boys (Called the Roarers) resent Peter for banishing them until they realise that in the past they were tricked into growing up by Captain Hook and turn their full resentment on him instead.]]

to:

*** ** The book and its sequel mention that Peter does ''NOT'' kill the lost boys; in the original book Peter sends them back to Earth and in its sequel its mentioned that that anyone, not just Peter, has the ability stay young forever in Neverland provided that they never ponder their future. Pondering the future and wondering what they would be if they grew up is all it takes to break the magic that keeps the individual young in Neverland, in the novel (Ravello [[spoiler:Captain Hook]]) refers to it "Betraying childhood and Looking Ahead" and it's also mentioned that people can trick others into growing up by asking them to answer the question "What do you want to be when you grow up?" Looking Ahead is the single Rule Peter has for the Lost Boys, and if Peter realises that they have broken the Rule, he banishes them to Nowhereland, meaning that they were to be ignored by the League of Pan (All of Peter's allies). [[spoiler: In the novel it's mentioned that the banished Lost Boys (Called the Roarers) resent Peter for banishing them until they realise that in the past they were tricked into growing up by Captain Hook and turn their full resentment on him instead.]]
23rd Jan '18 3:28:11 AM CthonisPrincess
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** The book and its sequel mention that Peter does ''NOT'' kill the lost boys; in the original book Peter sends them back to Earth and in its sequel its mentioned that that anyone, not just Peter, has the ability stay young forever in Neverland provided that they never ponder their future. Pondering the future and wondering what they would be if they grew up is all it takes to break the magic that keeps the individual young in Neverland, in the novel (Ravello [[spoiler:Captain Hook]]) refers to it "Betraying childhood and Looking Ahead" and it's also mentioned that people can trick others into growing up by asking them to answer the question "What do you want to be when you grow up?" Looking Ahead is the single Rule Peter has for the Lost Boys, and if Peter realises that they have broken the Rule, he banishes them to Nowhereland, meaning that they were to be ignored by the League of Pan (All of Peter's allies). [[spoiler: In the novel it's mentioned that the banished Lost Boys (Called the Roarers) resent Peter for banishing them until they realise that in the past they were tricked into growing up by Captain Hook and turn their full resentment on him instead.]]




to:

*** Unlikely because it's been confirmed by the sequel novel that in the original novel Peter never killed his allies and if they grew up (Something that can be prevented by never pondering the future, which was Peter's only rule for the Lost Boys), disobeyed him or betrayed him, he would retaliate by banishing them to Nowhereland (Mentioned above); and in the movie Peter looked rather dismayed at the thought of having to kill Slightly, Slightly only did this because he believed that it was only fair that he should pay for the death of Wendy with his own life.



* In the 2003 film version, Peter forgetting Michael & John's names (and often presence) is given off as a comedic effect, but one wonders that because Peter has a tendency to kill off boys...and having lived for so long...it's quite possible that Peter doesn't bother to learn or remember names or have a special connection with the boys if he is used to kill them off. From the start Peter had wanted Wendy to go with him to Neverland. (The camera has a split-second shot of Peter grimly staring at the boys right at the beginning of the movie when Wendy persuades Peter to let her brothers come along too and wakes them up from bed.)


to:

* In the 2003 film version, Peter forgetting Michael & John's names (and often presence) is given off as a comedic effect, but one wonders that because Peter has a tendency to kill off boys...and having lived for so long...it's quite possible that Peter doesn't bother to learn or remember names or have a special connection with the boys if he is used to kill killing them off. From the start Peter had wanted Wendy to go with him to Neverland. (The camera has a split-second shot of Peter grimly staring at the boys right at the beginning of the movie when Wendy persuades Peter to let her brothers come along too and wakes them up from bed.)

)
** As it's been mentioned above, Peter DID NOT kill the Lost Boys and that being forgetful is one of Peter's character traits.

7th Jan '18 7:30:31 PM Weirdguy149
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* Neverland has an interesting context to its name. After all, once you get flight from Tinker Bell or Hook's ship, you'll want to never land.
7th Jan '18 12:27:33 PM TrixieCherry
Is there an issue? Send a Message




to:

\n*In the 2003 film version, Peter forgetting Michael & John's names (and often presence) is given off as a comedic effect, but one wonders that because Peter has a tendency to kill off boys...and having lived for so long...it's quite possible that Peter doesn't bother to learn or remember names or have a special connection with the boys if he is used to kill them off. From the start Peter had wanted Wendy to go with him to Neverland. (The camera has a split-second shot of Peter grimly staring at the boys right at the beginning of the movie when Wendy persuades Peter to let her brothers come along too and wakes them up from bed.)

7th Jan '18 12:10:12 PM TrixieCherry
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

*In the film, one of the Lost Boys admits to shooting Wendy, his response is to kneel down and pull his top down to show his heart, ready for Peter to kill him. Note how ready the Lost Boys are to face being killed off when making Peter angry, how often has something like that happened that the Lost Boys do this without even being told to do so!?
**Also, in the book Peter kills off the boys when they get to old or not follow his orders. It's likely that Peter would have killed of the Lost Boys in the 2003 film version too.
20th Dec '16 10:21:49 AM LBHills
Is there an issue? Send a Message




to:

\n** In the Disney film, Peter's instructions were to 'go out and capture a couple Injuns', so Michael and John weren't planning to bring back a severed head or anything.

13th Jun '16 10:00:10 AM Rashuanu
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

*Throughout the movie you'll notice that Wendy has trouble flying. Pixie dust works best with happy thoughts. However, since coming to Never Land Wendy has been attacked, bullied, and frustrated with Peter. Factoring all that it's probably hard for her to think happy thoughts.
This list shows the last 10 events of 63. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Fridge.PeterPan