History Fridge / MacBeth

24th Dec '15 10:18:27 AM Gaon
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*** Well, precisely, if he ''was'' born in a very strange, quasi-mythological way, MacDuff would have reasons to be proud of it, as a foreshadowing of a demigod-like destiny for instance.
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*** Well, precisely, if he ''was'' born in a very strange, quasi-mythological way, MacDuff would have reasons to be proud of it, as a foreshadowing of a demigod-like destiny for instance.instance. *** Macduff's portrayal is that of a [[TheStoic silent, grim type]], partly because he doesn't really get a lot of focus but also because he really seems to prefer actions over words. Even in the battle of Macbeth he explicetly says "I have no words for thee, my voice is in my sword". It'd fit with his character that he doesn't really talk all that much about his past or his mother, thus Macbeth being blindsided by Macduff being "from his mother's womb untimely ripp'd".
25th Sep '15 1:52:03 PM ScroogeMacDuck
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** Premature births aren't that uncommon, and childbirth was the leading cause of death among women well into the 20th century (infections and blood loss, primarily). Also, in Shakespeare's day, c-sections would have been pretty much mythological, and even moreso in Macbeth's. Also, how often do you discuss the cirumstances of your birth with your mates?
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** Premature births aren't that uncommon, and childbirth was the leading cause of death among women well into the 20th century (infections and blood loss, primarily). Also, in Shakespeare's day, c-sections would have been pretty much mythological, and even moreso in Macbeth's. Also, how often do you discuss the cirumstances of your birth with your mates?mates? *** Well, precisely, if he ''was'' born in a very strange, quasi-mythological way, MacDuff would have reasons to be proud of it, as a foreshadowing of a demigod-like destiny for instance.
14th Jul '15 4:49:56 AM Divra
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* Wouldn't Macbeth have already ''known'' that Macduff was born via cesarean section? Granted, they're not that close, but he must have known that Macduff's mother died giving birth to him and that he was born earlier than usual, and thus joined the dots?
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* Wouldn't Macbeth have already ''known'' that Macduff was born via cesarean section? Granted, they're not that close, but he must have known that Macduff's mother died giving birth to him and that he was born earlier than usual, and thus joined the dots?dots? ** Premature births aren't that uncommon, and childbirth was the leading cause of death among women well into the 20th century (infections and blood loss, primarily). Also, in Shakespeare's day, c-sections would have been pretty much mythological, and even moreso in Macbeth's. Also, how often do you discuss the cirumstances of your birth with your mates?
11th Oct '14 3:35:53 PM Ciara13
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* Wouldn't Macbeth have already ''known'' that Macduff was born by caesarean section? Granted, they're not that close, but he must have known that Macduff's mother died giving birth to him and that he was born earlier than usual.
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* Wouldn't Macbeth have already ''known'' that Macduff was born by caesarean via cesarean section? Granted, they're not that close, but he must have known that Macduff's mother died giving birth to him and that he was born earlier than usual.usual, and thus joined the dots?
20th Jun '14 4:06:24 PM EvaUnit01
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[[AC:FridgeBrilliance]]
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[[AC:FridgeBrilliance]][[AC:FridgeLogic]]
18th Jun '14 9:36:09 AM Ciara13
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----
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-------- [[AC:FridgeBrilliance]] * Wouldn't Macbeth have already ''known'' that Macduff was born by caesarean section? Granted, they're not that close, but he must have known that Macduff's mother died giving birth to him and that he was born earlier than usual.
18th Apr '14 6:42:46 AM TheMightyHeptagon
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* In the second scene of the play, when the Sergeant is recounting Macbeth and Banquo's victory over Macdonwald's fleet, he drops the rather memorable line ''"As whence the sun 'gins his reflection, shipwrecking storms and direful thunders break..."''. It's likely meant to be a bit of figurative language...but, somewhat conspicuously, the very next line has the Witches describing a past incident where they magically conjured up a storm to wreck a merchant captain's ship. The line can be taken as a subtle hint that the Witches also had a hand in Macbeth's successes on the battlefield, and that they were pulling the strings in Macbeth's life from the get-go.
3rd Sep '13 7:49:16 AM dargor17
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** Well, Aristotle's classical definition of a tragedy is of a play inspiring both terror and pity in the viewers, and this definition applies perfectly to Macbeth.
22nd Feb '13 7:12:07 PM DynamicDragon
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----

** I once heard a short lecture about Macbeth that took me from thinking it was just okay to thinking it was megabrilliant. The lecture hinged on the Lady Macbeth line when she says, "I have given suck and know how tender 'tis to love the babe that milks me." It's kind of a throwaway line, since she changes the subject pretty quickly, but wait a minute - when? When has she given suck? This play is all about succession - if the Macbeths had kids, we'd definitely know about it, and they don't. The only explanation is that she must have had a child who died. And suddenly this play is about being a dead end- sure, [=Macbeth=] is winning the kingdom, but winning it for who? There's nobody for him to give it to when he dies, which makes the whole thing terribly pointless. And once you start looking, dead babies are EVERYWHERE in the play- Lady [=Macbeth=] talking about smashing a baby's skull and trading her breastmilk for gall, [=MacDuff=]'s kids getting murdered, the dead baby finger in the witches' brew, the two dead babies that appear in one of [=Macbeth=]'s visions (one wearing a CROWN, forcryingoutloud)... and there's more. And then who kills [=Macbeth=]? [=MacDuff=], who was from his mother's womb untimely ripped, of course, the antithesis of dead babiness. *** Actually, there is a perfectly straightforward explanation for this; while it is true that Macbeth (reigned 1040-1057) was childless, Queen Gruoch had a son, Lulach, by her first husband, Gille Coemgáin. When Macbeth was killed in battle in 1057, Lulach briefly succeeded him as King of Scotland before being killed in battle in 1058. It has been suggested that the references are evidence that Lulach was included in earlier drafts of the play.
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** * I once heard a short lecture about Macbeth that took me from thinking it was just okay to thinking it was megabrilliant. The lecture hinged on the Lady Macbeth line when she says, "I have given suck and know how tender 'tis to love the babe that milks me." It's kind of a throwaway line, since she changes the subject pretty quickly, but wait a minute - when? When has she given suck? This play is all about succession - if the Macbeths had kids, we'd definitely know about it, and they don't. The only explanation is that she must have had a child who died. And suddenly this play is about being a dead end- sure, [=Macbeth=] is winning the kingdom, but winning it for who? There's nobody for him to give it to when he dies, which makes the whole thing terribly pointless. And once you start looking, dead babies are EVERYWHERE in the play- Lady [=Macbeth=] talking about smashing a baby's skull and trading her breastmilk for gall, [=MacDuff=]'s kids getting murdered, the dead baby finger in the witches' brew, the two dead babies that appear in one of [=Macbeth=]'s visions (one wearing a CROWN, forcryingoutloud)... and there's more. And then who kills [=Macbeth=]? [=MacDuff=], who was from his mother's womb untimely ripped, of course, the antithesis of dead babiness. *** ** Actually, there is a perfectly straightforward explanation for this; while it is true that Macbeth (reigned 1040-1057) was childless, Queen Gruoch had a son, Lulach, by her first husband, Gille Coemgáin. When Macbeth was killed in battle in 1057, Lulach briefly succeeded him as King of Scotland before being killed in battle in 1058. It has been suggested that the references are evidence that Lulach was included in earlier drafts of the play.

** The bit about Lady [=MacBeth=] not being able to kill King Duncan because he looked so much like her father. Shakespeare probably didn't mention it because his audience would have known that Lady [=MacBeth=] and Duncan were first cousins; her father was Duncan's father's younger brother. (Which explains why [=MacBeth=] was able to take the throne; he was a Royal In Law already, AND a war hero.) *** Moreover, [=MacBeth=] was Royal kin on his own account - he and Duncan were first cousins, as their mothers were both daughters of Malcolm II (who had no sons). Maven
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** * The bit about Lady [=MacBeth=] not being able to kill King Duncan because he looked so much like her father. Shakespeare probably didn't mention it because his audience would have known that Lady [=MacBeth=] and Duncan were first cousins; her father was Duncan's father's younger brother. (Which explains why [=MacBeth=] was able to take the throne; he was a Royal In Law already, AND a war hero.) *** ** Moreover, [=MacBeth=] was Royal kin on his own account - he and Duncan were first cousins, as their mothers were both daughters of Malcolm II (who had no sons). Maven

* Macbeth is widely known as a tragedy; however, if you think about it, it's not. What was Shakespeare trying to evoke from the audience? It wasn't anger, humor, or heartwarming - it was terror. Shakespeare wrote the first horror story to ever be performed.
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* Macbeth is widely known as a tragedy; however, if you think about it, it's not. What was Shakespeare trying to evoke from the audience? It wasn't anger, humor, or heartwarming - it was terror. Shakespeare wrote the first horror story to ever be performed.performed. ----
19th Feb '13 2:44:35 PM Kaidariel
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Added DiffLines:
** They built on this layer for a production that I saw in Stratford in 2011. The witches were not crones, but children, and they used dolls to explain the prophesy and the apparitions. Later, though, those exact same children with those exact same toys were [=MacDuff=]'s children (and they were just as creepy). They emphasized all the mentions of children in the production.
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