History Fridge / Community

7th May '17 7:36:12 AM BKelly95
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* In "[[Recap/CommunityS2E15Early21stCenturyRomanticism Early 21st Century Romanticism]]," Star-Burns shaves his sideburns into heart shapes, thus making him... "Heart-Burns".

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* In "[[Recap/CommunityS2E15Early21stCenturyRomanticism [[Recap/CommunityS2E15Early21stCenturyRomanticism Early 21st Century Romanticism]]," Romanticism]]:
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Star-Burns shaves his sideburns into heart shapes, thus making him... "Heart-Burns"."Heart-Burns".
** While the study group argues over whether or not to help Pierce with his painkiller addiction, Jeff says he can handle it because "He's a baby boomer. They invented drugs." Britta counters "Yeah, they also invented TV. Have you seen him control one of those?" When you think about it, Britta's counter-argument doesn't hold up. Televisions have advanced in technology over the years, adding color and remote control among other things. By comparison, how much have pharmaceuticals advanced?
2nd Apr '17 7:47:37 AM BKelly95
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Added DiffLines:

** Given how little effort Jeff puts into anything he does, it makes perfect sense that he's agnostic. He also put little effort into exploring his religious beliefs.


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** When Gilbert encounters the study group in the village, he reveals he's been level grinding while the others weren't looking. Essentially, he's been following LetsPlay standard practice.
22nd Mar '17 8:41:32 AM DoctorNemesis
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** Whenever Duncan contacts Jeff about the test answers, much to Jeff's exasperation he shows up in a ConspicuousTrenchcoat acting in a manner that practically screams "I am doing something very questionable!" In hindsight, since Duncan ends up screwing Jeff over with the test answers anyway, it's more than likely that this was all just ObfuscatingStupidity to lull Jeff into a false sense of superiority so that he wouldn't consider the possibility that Duncan was planning to stitch him up until it was too late.

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** Whenever Duncan contacts Jeff about the test answers, much to Jeff's exasperation he shows up in a ConspicuousTrenchcoat acting in a manner that practically screams "I am sneakily doing something very ethically questionable!" In hindsight, since Duncan ends up screwing Jeff over with the test answers anyway, it's more than likely that this was all just ObfuscatingStupidity to lull Jeff into a false sense of superiority and over-confidence so that he wouldn't consider the possibility suspect that Duncan someone apparently so bad at subterfuge was planning to stitch him up until it was too late.
25th Feb '17 1:52:38 AM DoctorNemesis
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Added DiffLines:

** Whenever Duncan contacts Jeff about the test answers, much to Jeff's exasperation he shows up in a ConspicuousTrenchcoat acting in a manner that practically screams "I am doing something very questionable!" In hindsight, since Duncan ends up screwing Jeff over with the test answers anyway, it's more than likely that this was all just ObfuscatingStupidity to lull Jeff into a false sense of superiority so that he wouldn't consider the possibility that Duncan was planning to stitch him up until it was too late.
22nd Feb '17 8:03:00 PM DoctorNemesis
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*** If we accept the premise that there's a critique of feminism going on, it also arguably critiques the different approaches these different waves have, and how dividing these lines in the sand between feminists only ends up hurting themselves and the issues they care about. Annie's approach to the issue, while agreeable and likeable, is a bit superficial in that it doesn't necessarily address the underlying problems, and she's a bit more keen on being liked than solving the problem. This has the result that while on the surface she's getting guys to support the cause, it's only because they're trying to get into her pants rather than because they care about solving the problem, meaning that they're fair-weather friends who are unlikely to stick around when the going gets tough. Britta, meanwhile, is all about addressing and combatting the underlying issues, but her approach is overly confrontational when she doesn't need to be ("You don't have to yell at us! No one is on the other side of this issue!"), and she repeatedly hurts her own cause by antagonising and offending potential[=/=]actual allies because she's unyieldingly dogmatic about her values and self-righteously moralistic towards those who don't share them 100%. This has the result that she ultimately spends more energy attacking people who already are or might be persuaded to be on her side for not being ideologically 'pure' than attacking the actual problem. Essentially, feminism would benefit from striking more of a friendly balance between the two sides, wherein they are focussed on the actual problem and confrontational where necessary, but still welcoming and inclusive enough to welcome those with different opinions and flexible enough to pick and choose their battles carefully.

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*** If we accept the premise that there's a critique of feminism going on, it also arguably critiques the different approaches these different waves have, and how dividing these lines in the sand between feminists only ends up hurting themselves and the issues they care about. Annie's approach to the issue, while agreeable and likeable, is a bit superficial in that it doesn't necessarily address the underlying problems, and she's a bit more keen on being liked than solving the problem. This has the result that while on the surface she's getting guys to support the cause, it's only because they're trying to get into her pants rather than because they care about solving the problem, meaning that they're fair-weather friends who are unlikely to stick around when the going gets tough. and help. Britta, meanwhile, is all about addressing and combatting the underlying issues, but her approach is overly unnecessarily confrontational when she doesn't need to be ("You don't have to yell at us! No one is on the other side of this issue!"), and she repeatedly hurts her own cause by antagonising and offending potential[=/=]actual allies because she's unyieldingly dogmatic about her values and self-righteously moralistic towards those who don't share them her values 100%. This has the result that she ultimately spends more energy attacking people who already are or might be persuaded to be on her side for not being ideologically 'pure' than attacking the actual problem. Essentially, feminism would benefit from striking more of a friendly balance between the two sides, wherein they are focussed on the actual problem and confrontational where necessary, but still welcoming and inclusive enough to welcome those with different opinions and flexible enough to pick and choose their battles carefully.
22nd Feb '17 7:51:09 PM DoctorNemesis
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*** If we accept the premise that there's a critique of feminism going on, it also arguably critiques the different approaches these different waves have, and how dividing these lines in the sand between feminists only ends up hurting themselves and the issues they care about. Annie's approach to the issue, while agreeable and likeable, is a bit superficial in that it doesn't necessarily address the underlying problems, and she's a bit more keen on being liked than solving the problem. This has the result that while on the surface she's getting guys to support the cause, it's only because they're trying to get into her pants rather than because they care about solving the problem. Britta, meanwhile, is all about addressing and combatting the underlying issues, but her approach is overly confrontational when she doesn't need to be ("You don't have to yell at us! No one is on the other side of this issue!"), and she repeatedly hurts her own cause by antagonising and offending potential allies because she's unyieldingly dogmatic and self-righteously moralistic about her values. This has the result that she ultimately spends more energy attacking people who already are or might be persuaded to be on her side for not being ideologically 'pure' than attacking the actual problem. Essentially, feminism would benefit from striking more of a friendly balance between the two sides.

to:

*** If we accept the premise that there's a critique of feminism going on, it also arguably critiques the different approaches these different waves have, and how dividing these lines in the sand between feminists only ends up hurting themselves and the issues they care about. Annie's approach to the issue, while agreeable and likeable, is a bit superficial in that it doesn't necessarily address the underlying problems, and she's a bit more keen on being liked than solving the problem. This has the result that while on the surface she's getting guys to support the cause, it's only because they're trying to get into her pants rather than because they care about solving the problem. problem, meaning that they're fair-weather friends who are unlikely to stick around when the going gets tough. Britta, meanwhile, is all about addressing and combatting the underlying issues, but her approach is overly confrontational when she doesn't need to be ("You don't have to yell at us! No one is on the other side of this issue!"), and she repeatedly hurts her own cause by antagonising and offending potential potential[=/=]actual allies because she's unyieldingly dogmatic about her values and self-righteously moralistic about her values.towards those who don't share them 100%. This has the result that she ultimately spends more energy attacking people who already are or might be persuaded to be on her side for not being ideologically 'pure' than attacking the actual problem. Essentially, feminism would benefit from striking more of a friendly balance between the two sides.sides, wherein they are focussed on the actual problem and confrontational where necessary, but still welcoming and inclusive enough to welcome those with different opinions and flexible enough to pick and choose their battles carefully.
22nd Feb '17 7:45:52 PM DoctorNemesis
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Added DiffLines:

*** If we accept the premise that there's a critique of feminism going on, it also arguably critiques the different approaches these different waves have, and how dividing these lines in the sand between feminists only ends up hurting themselves and the issues they care about. Annie's approach to the issue, while agreeable and likeable, is a bit superficial in that it doesn't necessarily address the underlying problems, and she's a bit more keen on being liked than solving the problem. This has the result that while on the surface she's getting guys to support the cause, it's only because they're trying to get into her pants rather than because they care about solving the problem. Britta, meanwhile, is all about addressing and combatting the underlying issues, but her approach is overly confrontational when she doesn't need to be ("You don't have to yell at us! No one is on the other side of this issue!"), and she repeatedly hurts her own cause by antagonising and offending potential allies because she's unyieldingly dogmatic and self-righteously moralistic about her values. This has the result that she ultimately spends more energy attacking people who already are or might be persuaded to be on her side for not being ideologically 'pure' than attacking the actual problem. Essentially, feminism would benefit from striking more of a friendly balance between the two sides.
20th Feb '17 9:51:28 PM DoctorNemesis
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*** When talking about parodies / critiques of feminism, consider also that Britta and Annie's conflict revolves primarily around sexuality. Britta objects to what she sees as Annie using her sexuality in order to attract the support of men to their cause, thus pandering to them and undermining what she feels are the political objectives of what they're doing. Annie, meanwhile, is offended by what ''she'' views as Britta judgemental and moralistic attitude to her behaviour and the ways she tries to bully, lecture and police Annie into modifying the way she acts (particularly around men) simply because she doesn't conform to Britta's own preferences and viewpoints. This also works as a rough parody of the debates around "sex-positive" feminism: to again (over-)simplify, one side (Britta) views many forms of female sexuality and sexual expression as merely pandering to men and continuing male privilege and oppression, while the other (Annie) views them as a necessary part of female liberation and the first side as, in its way, just as oppressive, puritanical and controlling of female sexuality as [[NotSoDifferent those they initially started fighting against]].

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*** When talking about parodies / critiques of feminism, consider also that Britta and Annie's conflict revolves primarily around sexuality. Britta objects to what she sees as Annie using her sexuality in order to attract the support of men to their cause, thus pandering to them and undermining what she feels are the political objectives of what they're doing. Annie, meanwhile, is offended by what ''she'' views as Britta Britta's judgemental and moralistic attitude to her behaviour and the ways she tries to bully, lecture and police Annie into modifying the way she acts (particularly around men) simply because she doesn't conform to Britta's own preferences and viewpoints. This also works as a rough parody of the debates around "sex-positive" feminism: to again (over-)simplify, one side (Britta) views many forms of female sexuality and sexual expression as merely pandering to men and continuing male privilege and oppression, while the other (Annie) views them as a necessary part of female liberation and the first side as, in its way, just as oppressive, puritanical and controlling of female sexuality as [[NotSoDifferent those they initially started fighting against]].
19th Feb '17 7:57:32 AM BKelly95
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*** Further evidence: Britta, the ardent feminist of the group, is the only one whose character has a decidedly feminine name (Lavernica).
26th Jan '17 8:47:08 PM DoctorNemesis
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*** When talking about parodies / critiques of feminism, consider also that Britta and Annie's conflict revolves primarily around sexuality. Britta objects to what she sees as Annie using her sexuality in order to attract the support of men to their cause, thus pandering to them and undermining what she feels are the political objectives of what they're doing. Annie, meanwhile, is offended by what ''she'' views as Britta judgemental and moralistic attitude to her behaviour and the ways she tries to bully, moralise and police Annie into modifying the way she acts (particularly around men) simply because she doesn't conform to Britta's own preferences and viewpoints. This also works as a rough parody of the debates around "sex-positive" feminism: to again (over-)simplify, one side (Britta) views many forms of female sexuality and sexual expression as merely pandering to men and continuing male privilege and oppression, while the other (Annie) views them as a necessary part of female liberation and the first side as, in its way, just as oppressive, puritanical and controlling of female sexuality as [[NotSoDifferent those they initially started fighting against]].

to:

*** When talking about parodies / critiques of feminism, consider also that Britta and Annie's conflict revolves primarily around sexuality. Britta objects to what she sees as Annie using her sexuality in order to attract the support of men to their cause, thus pandering to them and undermining what she feels are the political objectives of what they're doing. Annie, meanwhile, is offended by what ''she'' views as Britta judgemental and moralistic attitude to her behaviour and the ways she tries to bully, moralise lecture and police Annie into modifying the way she acts (particularly around men) simply because she doesn't conform to Britta's own preferences and viewpoints. This also works as a rough parody of the debates around "sex-positive" feminism: to again (over-)simplify, one side (Britta) views many forms of female sexuality and sexual expression as merely pandering to men and continuing male privilege and oppression, while the other (Annie) views them as a necessary part of female liberation and the first side as, in its way, just as oppressive, puritanical and controlling of female sexuality as [[NotSoDifferent those they initially started fighting against]].
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