History Fridge / Community

27th Mar '16 10:39:52 PM DoctorNemesis
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* In "[[Recap/CommunityS6E01Ladders Ladders]]", Abed wrote a speech for the Dean to read as a way to inform the viewers about what happened to the remaining members of the study group since the end of the season 5. The problem is that Abed wrote the speech ''before'' he learned that Shirley had left, and yet the speech didn't mention her at all.

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* In "[[Recap/CommunityS6E01Ladders Ladders]]", Abed wrote a speech for the Dean to read as a way to inform the viewers about what happened to the remaining members of the study group since the end of the season 5. The problem is that Abed wrote the speech ''before'' he learned that Shirley had left, and yet the speech didn't mention her at all.all.
** Since the speech was delivered ''after'' Shirley had left, presumably the material pertaining to her was simply removed.
27th Mar '16 4:05:41 PM nombretomado
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** After Abed discovers that Series/CougarTown has been pushed back to mid-season, Britta finds the British sitcom it was based on to fill the void, Cougarton Abbey. The title appears to be a {{Portmanteau}} of Series/CougarTown and DowntonAbbey. One episode of CougarTown had the cul-de-sac crew play a game where they'd combine the names of two movies in such a manner.

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** After Abed discovers that Series/CougarTown has been pushed back to mid-season, Britta finds the British sitcom it was based on to fill the void, Cougarton Abbey. The title appears to be a {{Portmanteau}} of Series/CougarTown ''Series/CougarTown'' and DowntonAbbey.''Series/DowntonAbbey''. One episode of CougarTown had the cul-de-sac crew play a game where they'd combine the names of two movies in such a manner.
19th Mar '16 1:37:49 AM Hossmeister
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28th Feb '16 9:15:54 AM nombretomado
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** Aside from a subplot where Troy and Abed are trying to watch ''{{Blade}}'' without interruption, there's not actually much to do with vampires in this episode... until you remember that the classic vampire subtext is of a mysterious man who has a powerful and all-consuming allure to women (usually metaphorically standing in for sex) despite being bad news for them, and who will, if they are allowed to sate their desires with him, ultimately lead them to ruin -- i.e. Blade. And Jeff spends the entire episode trying to figure out where this allure is somehow coming from. Hence '''origins''' of a '''vampire's''' (Blade's) '''mythology''' (sex appeal).

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** Aside from a subplot where Troy and Abed are trying to watch ''{{Blade}}'' ''Film/{{Blade}}'' without interruption, there's not actually much to do with vampires in this episode... until you remember that the classic vampire subtext is of a mysterious man who has a powerful and all-consuming allure to women (usually metaphorically standing in for sex) despite being bad news for them, and who will, if they are allowed to sate their desires with him, ultimately lead them to ruin -- i.e. Blade. And Jeff spends the entire episode trying to figure out where this allure is somehow coming from. Hence '''origins''' of a '''vampire's''' (Blade's) '''mythology''' (sex appeal).



** Troy seems notably disinterested and reluctant to help Britta with her problems throughout the episode and would rather watch ''{{Blade}}'', which makes him seem a bit callous and uncaring. Except, it's clearly established that Troy at the very least has a bit of a crush on Britta, Britta's problems in the episode centre around an old boyfriend who she finds irresistible despite herself, and there are few things worse than having to put up with someone you're romantically interested in continually going on about someone else...

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** Troy seems notably disinterested and reluctant to help Britta with her problems throughout the episode and would rather watch ''{{Blade}}'', ''Film/{{Blade}}'', which makes him seem a bit callous and uncaring. Except, it's clearly established that Troy at the very least has a bit of a crush on Britta, Britta's problems in the episode centre around an old boyfriend who she finds irresistible despite herself, and there are few things worse than having to put up with someone you're romantically interested in continually going on about someone else...
7th Feb '16 6:19:53 PM ading
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*** I don't want to upset the OP (s/he does make a good point about Duncan's morals) but although both events use the same term ("cheating"), getting answers to exam papers and Duncan's father committing adultery are fairly different forms of deception. My interpretation on Duncan's outburst about his dad is that it parallels to Abed's loss of his mother (for Christmas at least). We see that while Abed copes without his mother by wanting to spend time with friends and hoping to find a new perspective on Christmas, Duncan suppresses his anguish by undermining the Christmas spirit and criticism.
7th Feb '16 6:02:19 PM ading
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Added DiffLines:

** Britta's personality in this episode seems very different from in the rest of the series, with her actually being the OnlySaneMan of the study group rather than the hypocritical, self-hating idiot she would later become. However, upon careful examination, this isn't the case. Note how she freely admits, without any sense of guilt or irony, that she lied to Jeff to get him to do what she wanted, despite claiming the whole episode that she valued honesty above all else. She was ''always'' a hypocritical idiot, but the other characters (and the audience) just didn't know her well enough to see through her StraightMan act yet.
7th Feb '16 5:53:16 PM ading
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** Every study group member's story ends with something horrible happening to another member of the group, with the exceptions of Abed and Jeff. This is {{Foreshadowing}} that [[spoiler:Abed and possibly Jeff are the only two sane people in the group.]]
7th Feb '16 7:49:57 AM DoctorNemesis
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*** It would seem likely to me that the experiment would, if not prevent, then at least make it difficult for people to leave to go to the bathroom / get something to eat and then come back. If the purpose of the experiment is to see how long it takes people to explode while left to wait in a single room for a prolonged period of time, then letting people come and go is surely a good way of ruining it -- by letting them come and go at will, you're removing a key source of stress that people who were forced to wait in one room would experience. .

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*** It would seem likely to me that the experiment would, if not prevent, then at least make it difficult for people to leave to go to the bathroom / get something to eat and then come back. If the purpose of the experiment is to see how long it takes people to explode while left to wait in a single room for a prolonged period of time, then letting people freely come and go (even just to use the bathroom or get a drink) is surely a good way of ruining undermining it -- by letting them come and go at will, you're removing a key source of stress that people who were forced stress. Someone who's getting annoyed could just go to wait in one room would experience. . the bathroom or get a glass of water, calm down, and then come back more relaxed.
7th Feb '16 7:48:14 AM DoctorNemesis
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Added DiffLines:

*** It would seem likely to me that the experiment would, if not prevent, then at least make it difficult for people to leave to go to the bathroom / get something to eat and then come back. If the purpose of the experiment is to see how long it takes people to explode while left to wait in a single room for a prolonged period of time, then letting people come and go is surely a good way of ruining it -- by letting them come and go at will, you're removing a key source of stress that people who were forced to wait in one room would experience. .
7th Jan '16 8:01:15 AM DoctorNemesis
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*** Losing '''Annie''' makes it feel more indie movie. Things are a bit more relaxed -- however, there's also an element of danger without her (the gun is found and brandished around) and the group is lacking a distinct nurturing, healing presence (there's no one to tend Jeff's head injury and she's "a pretty good nurse"). Another way to interpret it is that this timeline is probably the least eventful of them all. While nothing particularly bad happens, nothing particularly good happens either. Things become stale and less exciting without Annie's drive and ambition around to propel the group.

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*** Losing '''Annie''' makes it feel things more indie movie. Things are a bit more relaxed relaxed. cool and 'indie' -- however, there's at first glance. However, while nothing particularly bad happens, nothing particularly ''good'' happens either. While Annie's neuroses might increase the tension, things become stale and less exciting without her drive and ambition to motivate everyone. There's also an element of danger without her (the gun is found and brandished around) and the group is lacking a distinct nurturing, healing presence (there's no one to tend Jeff's head injury and she's "a pretty good nurse"). Another way to interpret it is that this timeline is probably the least eventful of them all. While nothing particularly bad happens, nothing particularly good happens either. Things become stale and less exciting without Annie's drive and ambition around to propel the group.



*** Losing '''Pierce''' makes everyone happier (temporarily, at least) and leads to ship teases. Alternatively, losing Pierce is the forefront to casting out the more mature people since Shirley, after baking pies, is quickly dismissed by Jeff very condescendingly.

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*** Losing '''Pierce''' apparently makes everyone happier (temporarily, at least) and leads to ship teases. Alternatively, losing However, notice that Jeff is a lot more openly condescending and dismissive of Shirley's baking in this timeline; without Pierce is around as a convenient target for the forefront to casting out other members of the more mature people since Shirley, after baking pies, group, they start targeting and excluding others. This is quickly dismissed further reinforced by Jeff very condescendingly.the eventual absence of Pierce in the "darkest timeline" -- without him around, the group are freer to indulge in their darker impulses and turn "evil".



*** Losing '''Troy''' leads to chaos, madness and death. Things go to hell quickly. Furthermore, while other timelines may see everyone unhappy and at each other's throats, this one ends up with everyone actively turning 'evil' in some way -- more than anything else, this suggests that Troy is the true [[TheHeart heart]] of the group. The same timeline also suggests something similar about Pierce, oddly enough; when he's around, he acts as both a sufficient target for the group's negative impulses and as a warning for what'll happen if they overstep the line to prevent them from going to far. Take him out permanently, however, and the group are free to become 'evil' and act on their darker impulses.
*** A more negative interpretation is that Troy is in fact the cause of all the chaos and madness, since in his haste to get the pizza he caused the boulder to roll down. Or it's foreshadowing how Troy's departure from the group during the end of the Air Condition Repair Annex plotline caused the group to fall apart at the seams.
*** Or, if one subscribes to the theory that all timelines are in Abed's imagination, it could just be that Abed thinks that being seperated from Troy would lead to chaos and doom.

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*** Losing '''Troy''' leads to chaos, madness and death. Things go to hell quickly. Furthermore, while other timelines may see everyone unhappy and at each other's other’s throats, this one ends up with everyone actively turning 'evil' ‘evil’ in some way -- more than anything else, this suggests either that Troy is the true [[TheHeart heart]] of the group. The same timeline also suggests something similar about Pierce, oddly enough; when he's around, he acts as both a sufficient target for the group's negative impulses and as a warning for what'll happen if they overstep the line to prevent them from going to far. Take him out permanently, however, and the group are free or (particularly if we take the interpretation that this is merely how Abed is visualising the timeline) reinforcing how co-dependent Abed is with Troy, since he can't see Troy's absence leading to become 'evil' anything other than chaos and act on their darker impulses.
*** A more negative
doom. This also foreshadows events around Troy's absence later in the series. An alternative, less flattering interpretation is that Troy is in fact the cause of ''causes'' all the chaos and madness, since in disaster -- after all, it is his haste to get the pizza he caused the boulder to roll down. Or it's foreshadowing how Troy's departure from the group during the end of the Air Condition Repair Annex plotline caused the group to fall apart at the seams.
*** Or, if one subscribes to the theory that all timelines are in Abed's imagination, it could just be that Abed thinks that being seperated from Troy would
careless actions which directly lead to chaos and doom.the disaster which befalls the group



*** Losing '''Jeff''' makes the conflicts go away. Everyone's a lot more relaxed, happy and willing to let their hair down and have fun without him shooting them down before they start. A [[AlternateCharacterInterpretation more favourable]] interpretation of Jeff is that without him, a lot of the underlying tensions and issues facing the group remain pushed under the surface, where they might fester and do more damage in the long run unless they're exposed. However, it's also worth noting that several of these issues are either directly caused by him (mocking Troy and shooting down Britta), are exacerbated by him (his organized opposition to Shirley's baking only ends up making things worse and leads to her storming out; by cutting Britta off before she can start singing he just drives her to get high) or managed to be resolved both in a much less emotionally turbulent fashion and without his involvement (Annie's living situation). As such, while he might help expose problems that threaten the fabric of the group and help resolve them, he is at least partially responsible for many of them in the first place and his methods of attempting to resolve them may often hurt as much as they help.

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*** Losing '''Jeff''' makes many of the conflicts go away. Everyone's a lot more relaxed, happy and willing to let their hair down and have fun without him [[StopHavingFunGuy shooting them down before they start. start.]]
**
A [[AlternateCharacterInterpretation more favourable]] interpretation favourable AlternativeCharacterInterpretation of Jeff Jeff's absence in the final timeline is that that, without him, a lot of Jeff's presence, the underlying tensions and issues facing the group causes behind many of these conflicts remain pushed under the surface, buried, where they might fester and may do more damage in the long run unless they're exposed. damage. However, it's also worth noting it is noteworthy that several many of these issues are either directly caused by him them only became conflicts in the first place due to his actions, whether through his callous and snide personality (mocking Troy and shooting Troy), his attempts to police the group's behaviour to be more "normal" (shooting down Britta), are exacerbated by him Britta's attempts to sing, which leads her to get high instead) or the fact that, while he may try to solve the problem, he usually tries to do so in a lazy and half-assed way which often only exacerbates things (his organized organised opposition to Shirley's baking only baking, which ends up hurting her feelings and making things worse and leads to her storming out; by cutting Britta off before she can start singing he just drives her to get high) or managed to be resolved both in a much less emotionally turbulent fashion and without his involvement storm out). And at least one problem (Annie's living situation). As such, while he might help situation) is resolved without his input at all, whereas in the other timelines where it was raised his response was to dismissively brush it aside. Even if Jeff does expose the fundamental problems that threaten at the fabric heart of the group and help resolve them, group, he is at least partially responsible for many of them in the first place and his methods of attempting to resolve them may often hurt as much as they help.nevertheless be doing more harm than good.
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