History Fridge / BackToTheFuture

13th Dec '17 12:58:56 AM PaulA
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*** Or they could have temporarily caused serious havoc in Hill Valley in 1955 until they were taken down by the citizenry. Assault rifles and grenade launchers have existed in very close to their present form since the WW2 era, and the kind of serious gun control laws that brought the term "zip gun" into prominence in the 1980's weren't enacted until the '60's, so it's extremely unlikely that Old Man Peabody was the only armed citizen in town.

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*** Or they could have temporarily caused serious havoc in Hill Valley in 1955 until they were taken down by the citizenry. Assault rifles and grenade launchers have existed in very close to their present form since the WW2 World War II era, and the kind of serious gun control laws that brought the term "zip gun" into prominence in the 1980's weren't enacted until the '60's, so it's extremely unlikely that Old Man Peabody was the only armed citizen in town.
20th Nov '17 12:44:39 PM Quill953
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*** What's horrifying about this is that Doc had been told in 1955 that he invents a time machine by 1985, 1955 Doc must have reached a revelation that he has thirty years to invent a working time machine or the universe gets torn apart by the paradox if he fails. This explains a lot about why he spends the next thirty years of his life pouring his entire family fortune into his research, his willingness to deal with Libyan terrorists and his rejection of being told any more about future events by Marty citing that he refuses to take the "responsibility" as a lot is already riding on him. No pressure, right?



** What's horrifying about this is that Doc has just been told that he invents a time machine, 1955 Doc must have reached a revelation that he has thirty years to invent a working time machine or the universe gets torn apart by the paradox if he fails. This explains a lot about why he spends the next thirty years of his life pouring his entire family fortune into his research, his willingness to deal with Libyan terrorists and his rejection of being told any more about future events by Marty. No pressure, right?
20th Nov '17 11:17:38 AM Quill953
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** The lightning storm itself might have been the result of all the temporal disturbances taking place in 1955, which ironically enabled not one, but two instances of time travel on its own.
20th Nov '17 11:09:13 AM Quill953
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** What's horrifying about this is that Doc has just been told that he invents a time machine, 1955 Doc must have reached a revelation that he has thirty years to invent a working time machine or the universe gets torn apart by the paradox if he fails. This explains a lot about why he spends the next thirty years of his life pouring his entire family fortune into his research, his willingness to deal with Libyan terrorists and his rejection of being told any more about future events by Marty. No pressure, right?
26th Sep '17 8:27:09 PM FGHIK
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*** They more than likely wouldn't just go back to 1955 and cause some chaos. They'd go back in time where major events took place, and remake the world into their ideal. So it'd be even worse.
23rd Aug '17 9:59:29 AM gothelittle
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**** Or they could have temporarily caused serious havoc in Hill Valley in 1955 until they were taken down by the citizenry. Assault rifles and grenade launchers have existed in very close to their present form since the WW2 era, and the kind of serious gun control laws that brought the term "zip gun" into prominence in the 1980's weren't enacted until the '60's, so it's extremely unlikely that Old Man Peabody was the only armed citizen in town.
15th Aug '17 7:30:48 PM ropertroper
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** But Uncle Joey is never mentioned in the improved timeline. It's never said if he's still in prison or not. Though a deleted scene from ''Part II'' shows that Lorainne was expecting Joey to get out of prison again in 2015 (and Marty telling her they should wait until he's been released to celebrate), while the comic book has a storyarc where Joey does get out in 1986.
6th Jul '17 1:41:38 PM costanton11
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* In the first episode of the game, in Marty's dream of the first experiment, the [=Delorean=] doesn't show up at 1:21 a.m. like in the movie. Come part 4, the [=Delorean=] repaired by Citizen Brown, due to its damage, first arrives a few minutes after he intended, then about 2 months after the date he landed to go toxin 1931, then several hours back in time when he tried to go back one minute. In other words, just like in the dream, the [=Delorean=] didn't arrive at the time it was supposed to.

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* In the first episode of the game, in Marty's dream of the first experiment, the [=Delorean=] doesn't show up at 1:21 a.m. like in the movie. Come part 4, the [=Delorean=] repaired by Citizen Brown, due to its damage, first arrives a few minutes after he intended, then about 2 months after the date he landed intended to go toxin to in 1931, then several hours back in time when he tried to go back one minute. In other words, just like in the dream, the [=Delorean=] didn't arrive at the time it was supposed to.
8th May '17 1:58:57 PM JamesAustin
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* So the [=Delorean=]'s flying circuits were destroyed when the lightning bolt struck it, but it was in mid air when that happened, so shouldn't it have plummeted to the ground and exploded when it arrived in 1885?

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* So the [=Delorean=]'s [=DeLorean=]'s flying circuits were destroyed when the lightning bolt struck it, but it was in mid air when that happened, so shouldn't it have plummeted to the ground and exploded when it arrived in 1885?



* In Part 3, when waiting for Doc to fire the "starter-pistol" to let Marty know when to floor it for the screen of the drive-in movie theater, you hear Marty quip, "[[ShoutOut Hi-ho]], [[TheLoneRanger Silver]]." What color is a [=DeLorean=]?

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* In Part 3, when waiting for Doc to fire the "starter-pistol" to let Marty know when to floor it for the screen of the drive-in movie theater, you hear Marty quip, "[[ShoutOut Hi-ho]], [[TheLoneRanger [[Radio/TheLoneRanger Silver]]." What color is a [=DeLorean=]?
17th Mar '17 8:29:11 AM costanton11
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* Consider the events of Part 2 from 1955 Biff's perspective. A crazy old man gives him a book containing information about the future. Later, he has the book stolen by 'Calvin' after being beaten up. Biff catches up with him and retrieves it. 'Calvin' inexplicably shows up outside Biff's moving car, gets the book back and is saved from being run over thanks to a flying car. Biff then crashes into a manure truck for the second time. Biff's not going to forget about all this. You'd think he'd figure out in the 1980s that Marty [=McFly=] really, really looks like the guy that ruined everything in 1955.
** Even if he does put two and two together and doesn't just chalk it up to a coincidence, what's Biff gonna do? Marty's father is the same guy who punched his lights out all those years ago when he tried to rape the woman who is now Marty's mother. Chances are, George isn't going to react any better towards Biff trying any funny stuff with one of his kids, and this Biff doesn't own the cops in this timeline. Even if he does figure it out, Biff has little choice but to suck it up.
** Perhaps Biff, and a number of others who knew 'Calvin', think that Marty is the result of Lorraine CheatingWithTheMilkman. The fact that 'Calvin' vanished means nothing - they'll just assume he moved and kept in touch with Lorraine.
*** This is why Biff is such a cowed bastard around the [=McFly=]'s. Because of all of this he is really, really scared of them. At the same time he probably has chalked all his weird memories about the book and everything up to just being a nervous breakdown, which probably precipitated a real nervous breakdown.



* In Part II, when Marty and Doc get back into the [=DeLorean=] after Biff used it, why didn't they notice that the time circuit readout had changed? There's a readout for telling the time traveler when the time machine had been last, and after Biff used it, that would have read "November 12, 1955" when before it had read "October 26, 1985." And considering from there they got back on the skyway, they had plenty of time to notice before they jumped back to 1985.
** Later on in the film, the readout is shown malfunctioning. Doc may have thought this was the first time the time circuits glitched out, or the time circuits had already been malfunctioning, and was showing a readout of 1955 for whatever reason.



* Based on what we know from the sequels, Doc's reassurance to Marty at the end of the first film that "you and Jennifer turn out fine" isn't quite accurate. Of course, the filmmakers have explained in interviews that they had no plans for sequels when they made the first film, and that they intended this scene merely as an amusing throwaway. So apparently they ended up developing the story of Marty and Jennifer's future a little differently than the first film suggested. But compare the way Doc delivers that line in the first film with the way he delivers it in the reenactment of that scene in the second film. The difference is subtle, but real. In the first film, he speaks the line matter-of-factly, and he has a sincere expression on his face. In the second film, after hearing Marty's query "Do we become assholes or something?", he pauses, his eyes turn to the back of his head for the briefest of moments, then he sputters, "Oh no no no no, you and Jennifer turn out fine." Unlike in the first film, it looks like he's hiding something. Considering that we later find out the pivotal accident which ruins Marty's musical aspirations is set to occur ''later the same day'', and Doc knows it, that shouldn't be surprising.



* Doc is fine with interfering with future events regarding Marty [=McFly=] Junior getting into trouble and ruining his life, but apparently he refuses to interfere in the event that brings about the downfall of Marty Senior. Why?
** Unless you're referring to the accident that Marty has that same day (before they go into the future), it's possible that Doc does not realize that the events that lead to Mary Senior getting fired will ''still'' happen even if he prevents Marty Junior from going to jail, assuming that in the original timeline Marty senior's downfall was even "getting fired." He does refer to the event with Marty Junior leading to a "chain reaction that brings down the [=McFly=] family." This brings up a rather intriguing possibility. Assuming that Doc did correctly trace the downfall of the family to the Marty Junior's arrest, it's possible that in the original future timeline Marty Senior didn't do what we see him do in the film. Therefore the Doc had no way to foresee said events as they never actually happened in the future he came from.
** Of course if you're talking about Marty's accident that day it could be chalked up to Doc's stalwart belief in someone not knowing "too much about their future."
** Another possibility: Doc is a scientist, not a sociologist. He doesn't realize that the [=McFly=] family is already showing serious signs of trouble before the incident with Marty Jr. He thought he found the cause of the family's downfall, when he merely found the flash point. He did say when he was planning to disassemble the Time Machine that he would like to study the other great mystery in the universe -- women. So we already know that he has gaps in his knowledge where relationships are concerned...



* In ''Part II'', why did Biff never get suspicious about the flying [=DeLorean=] he saw in 1985? Because at some point after that, flying cars become widespread, so he must have assumed it was a prototype.
** Also, the car accident that messed up Marty's life happens as a direct consequence of him fixing his family in the first movie, because in the unchanged timeline Biff wrecked the car, so Marty couldn't have drag raced anyone. The sudden appearance of Marty's chicken problem may also be directly linked to him now trying to live up to the high standard set by his overachiever father, instead of struggling with the poor self-confidence learned from his unaltered father.
** I agree with the theory about him not really being suspicious about the flying [=DeLorean=]. He even acknowledges that memory in 2015: "A flying [=DeLorean=]! I haven't seen one of those in... 30 years..."
** I always assumed that he WAS suspicious, but had no idea what could possibly have caused it. Eventually just filed it away in his mind as a memory that had occurred AFTER flying cars became common.



* The end of Part II. Seems to be a bit of silly movie magic that the mailman arrives exactly on time, doesn't it? But this is a letter that they'd been holding for a century, a package that would have been increasingly the topic of conversation as the time drew nearer. They had a betting pool going as to whether or not this "Marty [=McFly=]" was even going to be there. They likely had some debate over who would actually deliver it. If you had the opportunity to confirm or debunk a one hundred year old urban legend (even if it's only an urban legend around the office), wouldn't you take an almost extreme amount of precautions to ensure that you got there when you were supposed to?
** But why is he ''alone?''
*** It's late at night when he delivers the letter, chances are he's the dumb schmuck who got stuck having to stay an extra four or five hours to do the job while everybody else who works there went home. After all, their manager is probably a sensible enough man to know that sending a mob of Western Union reps to make a single delivery could be pretty intimidating (and bad for business!) and he wouldn't want to have to pay them ALL overtime. Either that, or Doc just told them not to go out of their collective way when the time came.
*** RuleOfDrama
*** Or maybe he was the only one who didn't bet in the pool, so is the only one who could be trusted (how easy would it be to either "forget" to show up and say there was no one or throw the letter into the bushes and say "Yeah, I gave it to him!"
*** Except, if I recall correctly, he said that he lost the bet.
*** Maybe they drew straws within the betting pool, and he just happened to be the poor shmuck who drew the short one.
*** I think simple curiosity would do the job to encourage him or whoever got nominated to play fair and do the job. I mean, yeah, you could hang around in a bar for a few hours and say he never showed up or throw the letter into the bushes and easily win the bet that way, but ... wouldn't you spend the rest of your life wondering? Wouldn't it niggle at the back of your head for all those years and eat away at you, that you had one chance to settle this little mystery once and for all and you pissed it away just to win a few measly, easily-lost dollars? Why ''not'' follow the rules and show up, just to settle it one way or another?
*** It's also his job to deliver letters like that. They probably had a sense of pride fulfilling their duties.
*** He seemed to take losing in great stride. Maybe he was the one who wouldn't have minded if he had lost.
*** Plus, he had Marty ''sign'' for the letter. So he's got that going for him.



* In ''Film/BackToTheFuturePartII'', after Biff returns the time machine, he seems to be in pain or dying, getting out of the [=DeLorean=]. I could never understand this. Was he having a heart attack? Did he hurt himself with his cane after getting it stuck and breaking it? And what was the point in even including that scene? But in rare example of a deleted scene actually being worth watching, one on the DVD reveals all. [[spoiler: He has interfered with his own past and destroyed his own existence! He gets "erased from existence". Just like Marty nearly did in the first part! And just like the Doc is always warning about!]] The only question I have now is why they took that scene out... they said that test audiences didn't understand it, but surely that explains what is otherwise a very puzzling scene, and adds a touch of brilliance to the movie.
** It's probably because it highlights one of the plot holes: if Biff "erased" himself by going back in time, then surely the same thing should happen to Doc and Marty. Or they should be replaced by new versions of themselves. Or Marty should have disappeared just as fast in the first movie. Etc. I think cutting the scene was a good idea - it challenges your suspension of disbelief.
*** But there's the brilliance: in either of the timelines from the first movies, Biff doesn't have sufficient funds or opportunities to afford all his vices. Hence he probably doesn't have the money to do, say, very hard drugs or alcohol for decades on end. But once he has the almanac, he does. The problem being that, given he can now afford all his vices, the odds are good he's going to die of a drug overdose, or heart attack, or whatever -- he's not going to ''make it'' to the old age when he would have originally seized the almanac. Hence he does a quick fade-out and dies when he returns to the future -- by giving himself the almanac, he's taken several decades off his own life.
*** Actually, if Biff was to adhere to the same rules as Marty and Doc, he probably could've lived on, but wouldn't have jumped back to the same timeline where Marty and Doc are (at Marty's future house). He'd have jumped back along the new timeline where he's a rich asshole. Marty and Doc would've been stranded in 2015. Of course, much of the time mechanics they use don't make sense anyway.
*** The reason why they decided to cut that scene is simple: had Biff disappeared, so would have the piece of his cane he dropped in the time machine! The scene where Doc finds it and shows it to Marty would have made no sense.
*** A theory that's been thrown around the internet, which is borne out in the Telltale game, is that 2015 would have changed into 2015-A around them, but this particular time they didn't notice because they were busy carrying Jennifer down the street. In the Telltale game, time is rewritten around the time travelers [[spoiler:when Edna destroys Hill Valley in 1876, causing the town in 1931 to be replaced with empty land. Hard to overlook something like that.]] As for why time travelers don't get overwritten when the time they're in is? Ripple-proof handwaving, I guess.
*** WordofGod suggested that Biff of the alternate 1985 ended up pushing Lorraine a little too far, and she shot him dead some time in the 90s, hence his disappearance when he returns to 2015. The test audiences could hardly be expected to guess this without further clarification, and without it the situation was too ambiguous, so they removed the scene.
*** Going back to the fact that Biff was erased much quicker than Marty, there's actually a simple answer to this too. The only reason Biff was erased so fast is because he went into the future past the point of no return. Marty still had time to save himself in 1955. If Marty had gone straight to 1985 without fixing his parents, he'd be gone in a blink just like Biff. My point being, Biff probably would've survived for the duration necessary to save himself, but instead opted to jump ahead giving himself no time and resulting in his immediate death.
** Also from ''Film/BackToTheFuturePartII'': How is 2015 Biff able to use the [=DeLorean=] Time Machine the way he does? Simple: He's a bit of a gear-head. In 1955, his '46 Model Ford has a special trick to starting it; a trick that only Biff knows. After Marty's changes to 1985, Biff has an auto detailing business set up - a business he still dabbles in by the year 2015. By then, I'm sure he's worked on a few cars with hover conversions. Combine that with the memories of seeing the flying [=DeLorean=] in 1985 and his eavesdropping on Doc and Marty's conversation in the alley, then you get how he's able to operate (to the best of his abilities [he is old, you know]) the time machine.
** Also, here's the logic to why Biff disappears fast and Marty didn't. Marty was fading out of existence slowly mainly because he was still before the point in time that would've ensured his birth. If Marty didn't get his parents back together by that moment and just left for home he would've been erased just as fast as Biff was because like Biff he wouldn't have logically existed in the time he was in and time would've caught up with him. Take this into account, when Biff is in the past giving himself the almanac he's perfectly fine. This is because Biff (like Marty) is preceding his point of non-existence and therefore technically still had time to correct the mistake which would lead him to inevitable death. Honestly, it's surprising test audiences didn't get it cause it'd be pretty easy to figure out without anything having to be explained that what he did in the past erased his own personal future. Also, since the cane top and the bag had been left away from Biff's person they didn't fade with him, kinda like how the guitar didn't disappear with Marty. I hope that clears up a couple of things.
*** The cane also wouldn't have disappeared because it would have been manufactured ''despite'' Biff, not because of him; Biff might not have been around to buy that particular cane, but someone somewhere would still have made it. (Of course, this opens up the further plot-hole that someone ''else'' would have purchased it and used it.)
** Have in mind that, in that point of the film, we had not seen yet the alternate 1985 and the consequences of Biff's time travel. His disappearance may make sense, but only when rewatching the film. Test audiences are first-time watchers: if they saw that scene, play pause and try to figure it out with only the things they had seen so far, they would be completely lost.



* From BTTF 2, I always though that the police woman telling Jennifer to "be careful in the future" was a very strange, generic way of referring to the time they occupied as The Future. Only after about 15 viewings did I realize that Jennifer was still suffering from the wooziness of Doc's knockout gas, and (correctly - she is in her personal future) misinterpreted what the officer said. What would have been less awkward was "Be ''more'' careful in the future", i.e., don't let that happen again.
* This one's really minor, but I didn't notice until I watched BTTF 2 for the Nth time that when A-Biff shows the Almanac it wears a plastic cover. The reason is obvious: Biff lost the original paper cover in 1955 when Strickland took the Oh-la-la magazine from him.
* In the same scene, why does it take so long for Biff to follow Marty when his Mooks come out of the elevator? His gun holds 5 bullets, all of which he uses before Marty exits the lounge. He had to go back for more bullets!
** Lastly, why did Marty go to the roof? Having Doc show up on the side of the building was the plan all along. Notice how Marty looks down and swears.



* Why does Old Biff choose to go to November 12, 1955 to give his younger self the almanac? Because he remembered betting on a game that had a sudden reversal for an unexpected outcome on that date, and that would hopefully prove to his dim-witted younger self that the almanac was real.
** Also, he likely considers it the defining day in his life, when George made him a laughingstock. It makes sense he would pick that day to "fix" things.
* After seeing Part II again just now, I laughed when Doc Brown says "If only the postal service was as reliable as the weather service", because at the end of the movie, [[spoiler:the postal service shows up at the exact spot at the exact second stated in the letter from Wild West era Doc to Marty.]]
** That was Western Union that held the letter, not the USPS.
** It's better than that, in 2015 Doc knew exactly when the rain would stop thanks to the excellent weather service. 1955 Doc was worried about his 'weather experiment' because "the weatherman says there isn't going to be any rain". So 1955 has bad weather forecasting but excellent mail delivery while 2015 has perfect weather forecasting and unreliable deliveries.



* Biff earns the nickname "Luckiest Man on Earth" in ''Part II'' after [[spoiler: he uses the almanac given to him by his future self to get rich off of gambling]]. At first, you dismiss it because [[spoiler: he's using the almanac to cheat]]. But think about it - how many of you [[spoiler: have been aided by your future selves to get rich]]? In a way, he really is the luckiest man on Earth.
* It was posed to me, why didn't Doc just give Marty a heads up that his kid was going to make a bad decision? Well because Doc had what he thought was a foolproof plan and didn't want to leave anything to chance. But then I wondered why Doc had to leap out of the car in future garb, shout to Marty that he needed to come with him right now (thus having to drag Jennifer along). Why not wait? Ask Marty to meet him at his house later and explain the situation in private? He's going to look like his son next week right? Well, no. Because Doc already knew about the accident Marty was destined to be in only days later and knew his time was short before Marty's injuries, changed mindset, and likely physical scarring would leave him unable or unwilling to risk another time travel adventure and impersonate his son.
** Alternatively, Doc hoped that the exposure to his future son's predicament and all might be enough to shove Marty just enough against the chicken issue that he wouldn't race Needles. After all, he must have known Griff would call Marty a chicken; it's bullying 101. And what is it Doc tells Marty about Griff? "Whatever he says, whatever happens, say no, you're not interested." Doc is CLEARLY trying to use what little time he has to save Marty, however vainly.



* One might wonder how the Sports Almanac would ''always'' have the correct sports results. After all, the worldwide proclamations of Biff's luck may affect the games in some way, such as which players join which teams, how players feel during the game, etc. Well, since the Almanac comes from the future, any changes to sporting results would be reflected in the Almanac by way of the Ripple Effect! 100% accuracy guaranteed!
** Until Biff pushes the timeline so far that "Grey's Sports Almanac" is never published, instead he winds up with "Biff's Greatest Sports Bets."



* Doc was willing to use time travel to save 2015 Marty's family in ''Part II'', but why wasn't he ever willing to keep Marty from ruining his life in the first place by doing something about the accident with the Rolls-Royce? The answer is he actually was, but in an indirect and roundabout way. By having Marty disguise as his son and turn down Griff Tannen's job, it would have hopefully made Marty grow out of the FatalFlaw which caused the accident in the first place. Doc understands that using the time machine to fix things is wrong and that improving oneself is better all around, so he instead opted to do something that would help Marty grow up instead.
** Doc actually explains, in the third film, why telling Marty straight out about the accident would be foolish: in the scene where he blurts out "That's exactly what causes you to get into that accident in the future," Marty asks him what he's talking about, and Doc replies that telling him "might make things worse." Doc realizes that if he tells him about the accident, Marty might manage to avoid that particular catastrophe, but then with the future thrown into flux something even worse might occur as a result of Marty's recklessness. He might even end up dead. The only way to prevent not only the accident but any other disaster resulting from this trait of Marty's is to teach Marty to outgrow the trait--and that's part of what Doc is trying to do, subtly, throughout the second and third film.



* ''Part II'''s 2015 looks a lot more advanced than our 2015. Why would that be? Doc Brown disappeared in 1985, but before he did so he could have published details to one bit of his project he could talk about - a car-sized nuclear reactor capable of producing power equivalent to a civil fission reactor (if only for short periods). This led on to the development of Mr. Fusion, and advanced technology by decades.



* The "lithium mode on" scene in BTTF2. Marty activates it and blames his kids for turning it off. From [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium_%28medication%29 this article]] on TheOtherWiki, we can infer that "lithium mode" consisted in dissolving lithium salts into the household water supply, which Marty used to treat himself. His kids did not need it, but they were forced to drink lithiated water anyway, which affected their brain chemistry and turned their behavior into what we see in the movie. They deactivated lithium mode because they wanted to snap out of it and be normal, but their father won't let them because he only thinks about his own needs.
** Or it's pumping lithium, an anti-depressant, through the air-conditioning. Given how crappy Future!Marty and Jennifer's lives are (Jennifer herself is often "tranqued") you can see they'd need it.



* In the second movie, after Marty and Doc have returned to their drastically altered future, where Hill Valley is overrun with crime, Marty places Jennifer on the porch of her house. Before leaving, he comments that there are bars on her windows, something that probably wasn't there before. We later find out that Marty's house is no longer owned by his family. So why would Jennifer's house still be owned by her family in this timeline? For all we know, Marty just put her on the front porch of a house full of serial killers and date rapists. Who knows what happened to her in between the time they dropped her off and came back.
** Marty has kind of an "oh shit" moment regarding this in the movie. Whatever happened, she was still on the porch and asleep and unharmed by the time Marty came to pick her up. Considering that only a few minutes had passed for her, and that the timeline had caught up with her across the transition from Hell Valley '85 back to it's proper state, nothing happened because whatever horrifying things would have happened to her were averted before they could actually transpire. What WOULD have happened, if "Hell Valley" had gone along unchecked, is probably better left to terrifying fan fiction.



* 2015 has ''no'' lawyers. Yes, it's a funny joke about the legal system, but think about it. Marty's son got ten years for being caught ''breaking and entering''. Suddenly 2015 looks a whole lot less fantastic when you realize you can get arrested for practically ''anything'' and worst of all, even if you are ''innocent'', you have NO chance of being either defended or acquitted.
** Made far worse. Sure Griff's a major butthead, but petty vandalism, assault (given that a number of people saw him trying to hit Marty with a baseball bat), coupled with destruction of a historic monument as it's the ''Courthouse''-Mall window's he went through? What was HIS sentence?! Did he deserve ''that'' fate?
*** Well, at least in Griff's case, yeah, he probably did. Everything he could have gotten arrested for, he actually did do, and he only did ''those'' things because he was so dedicated to cowing Marty (Jr.) that he resorted to physical violence ''in public''. As to getting arrested for anything, the police actually find Jennifer and assume she's a drug addict, and only react by ''bringing her home'' without even patting her down. Maybe the future justice system has no lawyers, but there are stricter protocols on when a person can or can't be taken into police custody?
*** Or it's not illegal to use the drugs Jennifer was using. Given the recent developments in legalization of marijuana in our world, that's fairly plausible.
** I would like to make a point about the "Having NO chance of being either defended or acquitted." comment. I would imagine that people would still be allowed to defend ''themselves'' in a court of law, but Marty Jr being... well ''him'' obviously wouldn't be able to make a very good case.
*** Or that stricter evidentiary procedures and higher-tech crime scene investigation techniques makes it rather stupidly obvious if someone actually is innocent or not, and lawyers are simply seen as trying to futz with evidence or the perception thereof and thus obscuring the facts of the case. So, no more lawyers, let the raw data speak for itself.
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