History Fridge / BackToTheFuture

24th Aug '16 6:20:26 PM costanton11
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* At first, Biff's grandmother is simply a grouchy character for the sake of a grouchy character. However, once you play the Telltale game and learn who Biff's parents are, you begin to realize that maybe she didn't have much reason to like Biff at all: her son was either a bootlegger under a life sentence, or her daughter was ''a victim of rape.'' (and then Biff is turning out like the rapist.)

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* At first, Biff's grandmother is simply a grouchy character for the sake of a grouchy character. However, once you play the Telltale game and learn who Biff's parents are, you begin to realize that maybe she didn't have much reason to like Biff at all: her son was either a bootlegger under a life sentence, or her daughter was ''a victim of rape.'' (and then sentence and Biff is turning out like the rapist.)him.
26th Jul '16 7:32:10 PM ErikModi
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*** Or that stricter evidentiary procedures and higher-tech crime scene investigation techniques makes it rather stupidly obvious if someone actually is innocent or not, and lawyers are simply seen as trying to futz with evidence or the perception thereof and thus obscuring the facts of the case. So, no more lawyers, let the raw data speak for itself.
26th Jul '16 6:59:44 PM ErikModi
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** After Lorraine attempts to leave, listen to her words. She's using classic abuse victim phrases to excuse Biff's behavior, stating that "she deserved it" and "he looks after us, he deserves our respect." Despite her (quite refreshing) outburst when she threatens to leave, Lorraine is a broken woman by this point, and it's positively gut-wrenching to watch, especially if you have an experience with abuse personally. Then, compare her in 1955, where she tells Biff she wouldn't marry him "even if [he] had a million dollars," before kicking him in the shin and slamming him over the head with her dress box. How this feisty girl became the broken woman of 1985A is best left unexplored.
26th Jul '16 6:36:43 PM ErikModi
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** Until Biff pushes the timeline so far that "Grey's Sports Almanac" is never published, instead he winds up with "Biff's Greatest Sports Bets."
26th Jul '16 5:54:07 PM ErikModi
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** That's really good. It could also be that the [=DeLorean=] stalls as a way of time itself trying subtly to prevent paradoxes. The most notable stall is Marty when he finally returns to 1985, and he has to run to the mall on foot, where he arrives basically just in time to see his past self travel back to 1955. The stall not only prevented two Marty's from being in exactly the same place at the same time, but also prevented Marty from interfering with the event of him going back to 1955 in the first place (which would have been an almost unavoidable side-effect of trying to warn Doc.)
26th Jul '16 5:49:00 PM ErikModi
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** It works like the YOU'RE FIRED fax, only Marty is the fax paper. He'd exist, and come to exist in his time, place, and position that he always did, as long as George and Lorraine got together, but what's "printed" on him could only change after some time had elapsed. He goes back a little while after Lorraine realized she'd be with George for the rest of her life, so the changes didn't catch up with him until after he'd gone back to 1985. New Marty IS Old Marty, just with new memories. The Marty that goes back to 1955 at the end of the movie whose memories have, presumably, never been changed and match the new ones, will just do the same things he always did, for a different reason (he might not know ''why'' Lorraine is attracted to him after he gets hit by a car, but he'd definitely want to save his father's life from getting run over). Or, since Doc knows how 4th-dimensional correspondence works, he could have hidden a letter for Marty in the deLorean explaining it all.

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** It works like the YOU'RE FIRED fax, only Marty is the fax paper. He'd exist, and come to exist in his time, place, and position that he always did, as long as George and Lorraine got together, but what's "printed" on him could only change after some time had elapsed. He goes back a little while after Lorraine realized she'd be with George for the rest of her life, so the changes didn't catch up with him until after he'd gone back to 1985. New Marty IS Old Marty, just with new memories. The Marty that goes back to 1955 at the end of the movie whose memories have, presumably, never been changed and match the new ones, will just do the same things he always did, for a different reason (he might not know ''why'' Lorraine is attracted to him after he gets hit by a car, but he'd definitely want to save his father's life from getting run over). Or, since Doc knows how 4th-dimensional correspondence works, he could have hidden a letter for Marty in the deLorean [=DeLorean=] explaining it all.



* Doc is fine with interfering with future events regarding Marty McFly Junior getting into trouble and ruining his life, but apparently he refuses to interfere in the event that brings about the downfall of Marty Senior. Why?

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* Doc is fine with interfering with future events regarding Marty McFly [=McFly=] Junior getting into trouble and ruining his life, but apparently he refuses to interfere in the event that brings about the downfall of Marty Senior. Why?



** Another possibility: Doc is a scientist, not a sociologist. He doesn't realize that the McFly family is already showing serious signs of trouble before the incident with Marty Jr. He thought he found the cause of the family's downfall, when he merely found the flash point. He did say when he was planning to disassemble the Time Machine that he would like to study the other great mystery in the universe -- women. So we already know that he has gaps in his knowledge where relationships are concerned...

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** Another possibility: Doc is a scientist, not a sociologist. He doesn't realize that the McFly [=McFly=] family is already showing serious signs of trouble before the incident with Marty Jr. He thought he found the cause of the family's downfall, when he merely found the flash point. He did say when he was planning to disassemble the Time Machine that he would like to study the other great mystery in the universe -- women. So we already know that he has gaps in his knowledge where relationships are concerned...concerned...


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** That's good, but there's another (perhaps complimentary) explanation. At the beginning of the film, Marty's rant about "I don't think I could take that kind of a rejection" is said almost word for word by George in 1955 (and Marty even says in 1985 that "I sound like my old man"). Seeing that, with just the courage to take the risk, his father made good on his creative ambitions may have shown Marty that he can do exactly the same thing.
29th Jun '16 6:20:12 PM Whistler
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** This one isn't all that hard to figure out. Doc was watching a video pertaining to the development of his time machine, and Marty at that moment first chooses to try to tell him about the future. From that point on Doc does not want to know anything about it. There are a lot of good reasons for why this could be. First, by his own admission the time machine was the first thing he invented that worked. Considering he spent his entire life as an inventor without success, imagine the vindication for him when he learned he not only eventually created something that works, but something as amazing as a time machine. Now imagine if he perceived a chance to never achieve that ambition if Marty told him something he did not want to hear. If Marty told him something that could make him change his future, then he could very well never invent the one thing that keeps his whole life from having been a failure. Consider also that Doc can see that Marty has quite clearly screwed up his own future. Doc by contrast does not want the same thing to happen to him. Even if he guessed the information was about his death, all not knowing would men is that he would die when he always died. At the end he puts in point blank when he says he refuses to accept the responsibility. For all his brilliance he cannot foresee what the future will be, he was not willing to risk changing his future or that of anyone else connected to him any more than he had to. It takes him many years and an obviously great amount of curiosity before he reassembles Marty's letter and receives the warning.
4th Jun '16 6:06:22 AM Doug86
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* 1955!Doc scoffed at the Japanese parts used to make the DeLorean claiming "no wonder it fell apart, the parts are from Japan!" While this was mostly a jab at the "Buy American" attitude the 80s had (when the film was made), he was justified in saying that because Japan was still recovering from WorldWarII which ended 10 years prior. While unintentional, Doc looked worried when Marty says everything is made in Japan because it means a former enemy has become a dominant power again. If true, it's invoking the JapanTakesOverTheWorld trope which was a major concern in the 80s (which was also referenced in the second movie).

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* 1955!Doc scoffed at the Japanese parts used to make the DeLorean claiming "no wonder it fell apart, the parts are from Japan!" While this was mostly a jab at the "Buy American" attitude the 80s had (when the film was made), he was justified in saying that because Japan was still recovering from WorldWarII UsefulNotes/WorldWarII which ended 10 years prior. While unintentional, Doc looked worried when Marty says everything is made in Japan because it means a former enemy has become a dominant power again. If true, it's invoking the JapanTakesOverTheWorld trope which was a major concern in the 80s (which was also referenced in the second movie).
30th May '16 5:20:03 PM Monkey_d_Lenny
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*** The comics actually explain how this is: Doc dismantled the hoverboard that was left behind and used one of it's core pieces to store up the 1.21 Jiggawatts and he built a new Flux Capacitor. As another troper mentioned above, there was no way for the train to get up to 88 MPH without crashing it so he got a steam-powered tricycle and used the Flux Capacitor to turn it into a proto-time machine, but he needed a diving suit since there was no frame to protect his body from time traveling. He jumped forward to 2035 and grabbed all the parts he needed to turn the train into a flying time machine before heading back and finishing it.
21st May '16 10:33:37 AM MereMemory
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*** Doc went forward in time enough to find the person who invented the mechanism that allow cars (and hoverboards) to fly, then stole the tech and maybe even killed the inventor - or paid them not to invent it. And that's why we didn't have hoverboards and flying car in the real 2015.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Fridge.BackToTheFuture