History Franchise / Alien

4th Oct '17 8:33:41 AM Commander145
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* ''Aliens: Bug Hunt'' Anthology of 18 short stories. (2017)

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* ''Aliens: Bug Hunt'' - Anthology of 18 short stories. (2017)
4th Oct '17 8:33:00 AM Commander145
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* ''Aliens: Bug Hunt'' Anthology of 18 short stories. (2017)
* ''Alien Covenant: Origins'' - Prequel to ''Film/AlienCovenant'' (2017)
10th Sep '17 8:57:04 PM MarqFJA
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* AirVentPassageway: Both humans and aliens make good use of air vents to get around without the other side noticing. The alien in the first film moves around the spaceship using air vents. In the second film, Newt survives by hiding in the air vents, and the Marines make their escape through the same vents. Newt uses them for more aggressive purposes in the Dark Horse adaptation.
* AlienBlood: The aliens have highly corrosive acid for blood.

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* AirVentPassageway: Both humans and aliens Xenomorphs make good use of air vents to get around without the other side noticing. The alien Xenomorph in the first film moves around the spaceship using air vents. In the second film, Newt survives by hiding in the air vents, and the Marines make their escape through the same vents. Newt uses them for more aggressive purposes in the Dark Horse adaptation.
* AlienBlood: The aliens have highly corrosive acid for blood.
adaptation.



* AllWebbedUp: This happens to several victims throughout the series. The Xenomorphs use some kind of unexplained organic resin to cocoon people, leaving them as bait for [[FaceFullOfAlienWingWong facehugger]] eggs.
* AlwaysChaoticEvil: The Aliens. They seemingly exist for the sole purpose of killing everything on a planet. It is subtly implied that they are indeed intelligent, not just bestial animals, which simply makes them even more terrifying. [[spoiler: If you listen to ''Prometheus'', this is because they were ''designed'' to be weapons. They can't help killing everything in sight that isn't them, it's what they're ''for''.]]



* ArtificialHuman: Ash, Bishop and Call (a bit of franchise-wide ThemeNaming which ''Prometheus'' appears to have continued with David). Ash from the first movie [[spoiler:is a particularly sinister example, since he secretly protects the alien and betrays the other crew members.]]
* ArtMajorBiology: The Alien's life cycle.
** The alien grows from a chestburster to a full-grown adult without apparently eating anything (or anyone) in the first film. This is explained in the original script when the crew corner the chestbuster in a supply closet filled with their food supply and lock it in while they try to find a way to deal with it. When they return it has escaped after eating their food and is next seen fully grown.
** Similarly, in the sequel the there are dozens of fully grown aliens (and a ''very'' fully grown queen) along with a giant organic maze in the terraforming facility, despite the fact that there are only some 150 humans to eat. Bishop mentions that the colonists also had livestock, which could serve as hosts/food for the aliens.
** It's proposed in an in-universe anatomical/zoological report on the xenomorphs (in the Dark Horse comic series) that the reason for their blood being acidic is that it is in fact a living battery (which would kinda work, seeing as how they're silicon-based lifeforms), and that they get all the energy needed for their (individually) relatively short lifespans as an adult from this as well as from their host organism and thus do not actually need to feed, nor do they even have digestive systems. This is similar to a lot of butterfly and moth species in real life (the thing with adults not eating... not the thing with bursting out of people's chests(!)), though they emerge from their cocoon as fully-grown adults, while the xenomorphs emerge from their living cocoons as infants, so just how biologically feasible this might actually be is debatable. Additionally, like bees, the Queens feed off of "royal jelly", a substance which (in-universe) is shown to have phenomenal medicinal and performance-boosting properties in humans.

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* ArtificialHuman: Ash, Bishop and Call (a bit of franchise-wide ThemeNaming which ''Prometheus'' appears to have continued with David). Ash from the first movie [[spoiler:is a particularly sinister example, since he secretly protects the alien Alien and betrays the other crew members.]]
* ArtMajorBiology: The Alien's life cycle.
** The alien grows from a chestburster to a full-grown adult without apparently eating anything (or anyone) in the first film. This is explained in the original script when the crew corner the chestbuster in a supply closet filled with their food supply and lock it in while they try to find a way to deal with it. When they return it has escaped after eating their food and is next seen fully grown.
** Similarly, in the sequel the there are dozens of fully grown aliens (and a ''very'' fully grown queen) along with a giant organic maze in the terraforming facility, despite the fact that there are only some 150 humans to eat. Bishop mentions that the colonists also had livestock, which could serve as hosts/food for the aliens.
** It's proposed in an in-universe anatomical/zoological report on the xenomorphs (in the Dark Horse comic series) that the reason for their blood being acidic is that it is in fact a living battery (which would kinda work, seeing as how they're silicon-based lifeforms), and that they get all the energy needed for their (individually) relatively short lifespans as an adult from this as well as from their host organism and thus do not actually need to feed, nor do they even have digestive systems. This is similar to a lot of butterfly and moth species in real life (the thing with adults not eating... not the thing with bursting out of people's chests(!)), though they emerge from their cocoon as fully-grown adults, while the xenomorphs emerge from their living cocoons as infants, so just how biologically feasible this might actually be is debatable. Additionally, like bees, the Queens feed off of "royal jelly", a substance which (in-universe) is shown to have phenomenal medicinal and performance-boosting properties in humans.
]]



* AttackAnimal: WordOfGod states that the Xenomorphs are these.



* BewareMyStingerTail: Even if the "sting" was not used, the xenomorphs on film still demonstrate this by using their bladed tails as a weapon, often [[ImpaledWithExtremePrejudice impaling a victim on them]].



* BizarreAlienBiology: Extremely so, and possibly one of the most famous examples.
* BloodyMurder: Acid blooded aliens.
* BodyHorror: The aliens' parasitical breeding cycle turns you into a living incubator. Cf. certain species of wasp. Nature even on Earth is not always cuddly and fluffy.



* BugWar: A small scale version. The first and third films center on a group of human noncombatants against a single alien, while the second and fourth films feature groups of armed people against a horde of aliens. The ''Franchise/AlienVsPredator'' series features a full scale battle between the species in the second movie. The "war" part didn't happened until ''Aliens versus Predator 2''.

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* BugWar: A small scale version. The first and third films center on a group of human noncombatants against a single alien, Alien, while the second and fourth films feature groups of armed people against a horde of aliens. Aliens. The ''Franchise/AlienVsPredator'' series features a full scale full-scale battle between the species in the second movie. The "war" part didn't happened until ''Aliens versus Predator 2''.



* CeilingCling: With instances of VerticalKidnapping.



* ColdSleepColdFuture: The world seems to get a little bit grimmer each time Ripley wakes up. In the first film, the Company is willing to risk the lives of a ship's crew to get its hands on an alien. In the second film, the Company (or at least Burke) is willing to sacrifice a whole colony to breed aliens. In the third film, Ripley wakes up on a planet that is inhabited solely by a prison. In the fourth film, the megacorporations have given way to an even more irresponsible military that actually goes through with alien genetic testing. The comic book canon is [[CrapsackWorld far worse than even this.]]

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* ColdSleepColdFuture: The world seems to get a little bit grimmer each time Ripley wakes up. In the first film, the Company is willing to risk the lives of a ship's crew to get its hands on an alien. Alien. In the second film, the Company (or at least Burke) is willing to sacrifice a whole colony to breed aliens.Aliens. In the third film, Ripley wakes up on a planet that is inhabited solely by a prison. In the fourth film, the megacorporations have given way to an even more irresponsible military that actually goes through with alien Alien genetic testing. The comic book canon is [[CrapsackWorld far worse than even this.]]



* ContinuousDecompression: Used in Part 1 and 2 during the ThrownOutTheAirlock scenes. Part 4 has incredibly big aliens blown out of incredibly small holes.

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* ContinuousDecompression: Used in Part 1 and 2 during the ThrownOutTheAirlock scenes. Part 4 has incredibly big aliens Aliens blown out of incredibly small holes.



* CreepyLongFingers: Most designs for the aliens give the extraterrestrial monsters long, clawed fingers. Some go so far as to make them more than a foot long.
* DominantSpeciesGenes: When Aliens implant themselves into other species, the result is obviously a xenomorph (black skin, spiked tail, huge head, Nested Mouth..) but it has slightly different characteristics depending on the species that was implanted (a dog gives a four-legged version instead of the usual type, a Predator has mandibles, etc.).



* EmpoweredBadassNormal: Ellen Ripley was a normal human who TookALevelInBadass by the end of ''Film/{{Aliens}}'' by destroying an entire alien hive by herself, fighting against acid-bleeding parasitic Xenomorphs. Then by ''Film/AlienResurrection'' her clone Ripley 8, who shares most of her memories, receives some Alien DNA as a result of a flaw in the cloning process. Ripley's own blood becomes slightly acidic, she gets a psychic connection with the Xenos, has reduced empathy and predatory instincts, and is able to [[MadeOfIron shrug off being hit in the face with a loaded barbell]].

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* EmpoweredBadassNormal: Ellen Ripley was a normal human who TookALevelInBadass by the end of ''Film/{{Aliens}}'' by destroying an entire alien Alien hive by herself, fighting against acid-bleeding parasitic Xenomorphs. Then by ''Film/AlienResurrection'' her clone Ripley 8, who shares most of her memories, receives some Alien DNA as a result of a flaw in the cloning process. Ripley's own blood becomes slightly acidic, she gets a psychic connection with the Xenos, has reduced empathy and predatory instincts, and is able to [[MadeOfIron shrug off being hit in the face with a loaded barbell]].



* EvilIsVisceral: In addition to creating many of the subtropes, the alien eggs and the visual design of the Space Jockey are also this.
* EvolutionaryRetCon: The xenomorphs from the later films are much more insectile and predatory than [[Film/{{Alien}} the original film]]'s man in a suit version.

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* EvilIsVisceral: In addition to creating many of the subtropes, the alien Alien eggs and the visual design of the Space Jockey are also this.
* EvolutionaryRetCon: The xenomorphs from the later films are much more insectile and predatory than [[Film/{{Alien}} the original film]]'s man in a suit version.
this.



* EyelessFace: The most distinctive trait of the Aliens other than...
* FaceFullOfAlienWingWong: The Xenomorphs' horrifying life cycle starts with this.
* FateWorseThanDeath: Giving "birth" to a Chestburster. This is highlighted by the iconic plea, "Kill... me!" spoken by impregnated alien victims.
* FetusTerrible: Chestbursters are parasites intended to evoke this.

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* EyelessFace: The most distinctive trait of the Aliens other than...
* FaceFullOfAlienWingWong: The Xenomorphs' horrifying life cycle starts with this.
* FateWorseThanDeath: Giving "birth" to a Chestburster. This is highlighted by the iconic plea, "Kill... me!" spoken by impregnated alien Alien victims.
* FetusTerrible: Chestbursters are parasites endoparasites intended to evoke this.



* GenreBlindness: Of all people, the CEO of Weyland-Yutani themselves. In their mad obsession to acquire the Xenomorph, they seem to keep forgetting that sending a bunch of "expendables" who are out of the loop to inadvertently bring the alien back to Earth and planting a mole in the team ''always'' backfires on them when the protagonists inevitably figure out they were set up and then kill the aliens themselves.

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* GenreBlindness: Of all people, the CEO of Weyland-Yutani themselves. In their mad obsession to acquire the Xenomorph, they seem to keep forgetting that sending a bunch of "expendables" who are out of the loop to inadvertently bring the alien Alien back to Earth and planting a mole in the team ''always'' backfires on them when the protagonists inevitably figure out they were set up and then kill the aliens Aliens themselves.



* GoodLipsEvilJaws: The Aliens.



* {{Hermaphrodite}}: The titular aliens themselves, at least according to H.R Giger.
* HiddenInPlainSight: See, this is the problem with living in a dark UsedFuture with monsters after you. In ''Alien'', the Alien stows itself in the wall paneling; in ''Aliens'', several Aliens are curled up in alcoves on the wall in the hive, perfectly blending in with the walls. They are even invisible on IR due to the pervasive heat.
* HissBeforeFleeing
* HiveCasteSystem: The series features several stages of life for Xenomorphs, from facehuggers through chestbursters to your standard double-jawed Giger nightmare. And then there was the Queen, who laid eggs and was [[MamaBear fiercely protective of her offspring]]. It was implied and then later confirmed in the movies, video games and books that the xenomorphs take on characteristics from the host they gestate within. That explains why a chestbuster coming from a dog looks doglike and why one from a ''Franchise/{{Predator}}'' is bigger than those from humans and has the characteristic mandibles and dreadlocks.
* HollywoodAcid: Xenomorph blood easily chews through ship decks, industrial steel floor grates, and body armor. Never mind what it can do to flesh. Notable in that its potency freaks ''everyone'' out; one character makes noises about "[[TechnoBabble molecular acid]]" in the first film, and an executive speaks of "concentrated acid" in a patronizing manner in the second - they're basically saying, "Umm... Acid '''isn't''' supposed to '''''do''''' that!"
* HornyDevils: Giger designed the aliens to embody the fear of rape. The face-huggers essentially rape their victims and impregnate them. In the first film, it's implied that an adult alien sodomizes Lambert with its tail.



* ImpaledWithExtremePrejudice: Happens a few times, what with the Aliens having bladed tails.
* ItCanThink: The aliens are revealed to be intelligent in the series. See the film pages for more details.

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* ImpaledWithExtremePrejudice: Happens a few times, what with the Aliens having bladed tails. \n* ItCanThink: The aliens are revealed to be intelligent That said, Ripley turns the tables on the Alien in the series. See the film pages for more details.first movie by impaling it with a '''harpoon''' in their final confrontation.



* KillItWithFire: Want to survive fighting the aliens in close quarters? Flamethrowers are the only way to avoid being hit with their acidic blood at close range.
* LargeAndInCharge: The Xenomorph foot soldiers or "drones" are already significantly larger than their hosts (usually humans), but the Queen Xenomorph who creates all the others is about the size of a ''T. Rex''.
* LegoGenetics: The Xenomorphs, as part of their bioweapon design, can assimilate useful traits from their hosts to better survive in the environment and become stronger, and it often extends to physical appearance. The first two films had human-like Xenos, and the third featured a quadruped Xeno that came from a dog (or a bovine, depending on the version). The video games, comics and toy line take it to greater lengths with flying Xenos with wings like a bird or bat (an alien Queen that burst out of ComicBook/{{Vampirella}}), gorilla Xenos with long powerful arms, bull and rhinoceros Xenos, and in the Franchise/{{Batman}} crossover comics the Xenomorphs even had physical similarities to the various villains their DNA was combined with (with the Killer Croc Alien being a gigantic crocodile-like beast). And the most iconic type, the Predalien, a Xenomorph born from a Predator with a shorter skull, mandibles, dreadlocks, and a stockier build than other humanoid Xenos. Interestingly, with few exceptions, the Queen Aliens and other higher castes like the Praetorian do not assimilate traits, keeping the Xenomorph line pure-blooded.



* MainliningTheMonster: Aliens produce Royal Jelly which has the same role for this species as it has for real-life bees. However, it is also an extremely valuable substance in human society, used as a powerful and mind-enhancing drug for wealthy individuals. Since the only source of Royal Jelly is often deep inside an alien hive, collecting it can be very dangerous. The ''Hive'' mini-series details such an operation.

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* MainliningTheMonster: Aliens produce Royal Jelly which has the same role for this species as it has for real-life bees. However, it is also an extremely valuable substance in human society, used as a powerful and mind-enhancing drug for wealthy individuals. Since the only source of Royal Jelly is often deep inside an alien Alien hive, collecting it can be very dangerous. The ''Hive'' mini-series details such an operation.



* MercyKill: Often requested by victims. Usually granted, if the opportunity is there.
* MetamorphosisMonster: The Aliens go from parasite to two-legged horror.
* MonsterIsAMommy: The Alien Queens.
* MoreTeethThanTheOsmondFamily: The titular Aliens.

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* MercyKill: Often requested by victims. victims of the Xenomorph's parasitic life cycle. Usually granted, if the opportunity is there.
* MetamorphosisMonster: The Aliens go from parasite to two-legged horror.
* MonsterIsAMommy: The Alien Queens.
* MoreTeethThanTheOsmondFamily: The titular Aliens.
there.



* NestedMouths: The Aliens. Probably the most iconic case.
* NonhumansLackAttributes: The Xenomorphs have no genitalia. ''We hope''.



* OneGenderRace[=/=]MonogenderMonsters: Xenomorphs are canonicaly all-female. One deleted scene showed that the average drone can lay eggs when separated from the Hive.



* {{Phlegmings}}: Every time the aliens appear.



* SculptedPhysique: The Alien, which is not surprising considering artist Creator/HRGiger's other works. This use of the trope actually makes sense production wise since the alien's black and tube-like exterior made it blend in on the spacecraft. This is so effective in the first film, that the first time we see the adult Alien, it's ''hanging in full view of the camera'' and you probably mistook it for piping![[note]]For the curious, it's the scene where one crewman goes after the cat and he looks upwards at the chains hanging from the ceiling. See the metallic looking bundle in the bottom right? There's the cowboy![[/note]]



* SiliconBasedLife: Xenomorphs are apparently silicon based.



* StarfishAliens: The Aliens.
* SuspiciouslyStealthyPredator: The xenomorphs. They nest in warm, humid places which help mask their infrared profile, their bodies blend in well with darkness and pipes, and they can remain completely motionless. It is almost as though they are perfectly adapted to concealing themselves in an obviously artificial environment.



* TertiarySexualCharacteristics: The Queen Alien's feet are shaped like high-heeled shoes.



* TookALevelInBadass: Ripley's mutation from being a scientist to a badass alien killer is a running theme through the franchise.

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* TookALevelInBadass: Ripley's mutation from being a scientist to a badass alien Alien killer is a running theme through the franchise.



* VerticalKidnapping: The Aliens are fond of doing this. Famous last words include "Maybe they don't show up on infrared at all..." and "This is rumor control, here are the FACTS."



* XenoNucleicAcid: The Xenomorphs have what's called a "DNA Reflex", which is apparently why they end up looking similar to their host species. This is further elaborated on in novels and guides, such as The Weyland-Yutani Report. The Chestburster functions much like a cancer, being built from the body's own cells and integrating 10-15% of its DNA in order to prevent an immune response. This causes the Xenomorph to develop similar physical traits, possibly mental ones as well, such as a specific gait or physical features. The reverse is also true; the host has some of the Xenomorph's genetic material integrated into its body during the Chestburster's incubation.
8th Sep '17 8:21:44 AM MarqFJA
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-->'''Ripley 8''' (regarding [[spoiler:Analee Call]] revealing herself as an android in ''Resurrection''): I should have known. No human being is that ''humane''.

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-->'''Ripley 8''' (regarding [[spoiler:Analee [[spoiler:Annalee Call]] revealing herself as an android in ''Resurrection''): I should have known. No human being is that ''humane''.
2nd Sep '17 2:05:28 PM StFan
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[[AC:{{Films}}:]]

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[[AC:{{Films}}:]][[AC:Films]]



** ''[[Film/{{Alien 3}} Alien³]]'' (1992)

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** ''[[Film/{{Alien 3}} Alien³]]'' ''Film/Alien3'' (1992)



[[AC:ComicBooks]]

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[[AC:ComicBooks]]
[[AC:Comic Books]]



[[AC:{{Literature}}]]

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[[AC:{{Literature}}]]
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[[AC:VideoGames]]

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[[AC:VideoGames]]
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[[AC:ComicBooks]]

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** ''Franchise/{{Superman}}/Aliens'' (1995)
** ''Franchise/{{Batman}}/Aliens'' (1998, 2003)

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** ''Franchise/{{Superman}}/Aliens'' ''Franchise/{{Superman}}[=/=]Aliens'' (1995)
** ''Franchise/{{Batman}}/Aliens'' ''Franchise/{{Batman}}[=/=]Aliens'' (1998, 2003)



** ''Aliens/ComicBook/{{Vampirella}}'' (2015)

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** ''Aliens/ComicBook/{{Vampirella}}'' ''Aliens[=/=]ComicBook/{{Vampirella}}'' (2015)



[[AC:{{Literature}}]]

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[[AC:{{Literature}}]]
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[[AC:VideoGames]]

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[[folder:A-G]]

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[[folder:A-G]][[folder:Tropes A to G]]



[[folder:H-M]]

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[[folder:H-M]][[folder:Tropes H to M]]



[[folder:N-S]]

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[[folder:N-S]][[folder:Tropes N to S]]



[[folder:T-Z]]

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[[folder:T-Z]][[folder:Tropes T to Z]]



* TropeCodifier: The series as a whole is this for UsedFuture, along with ''Franchise/StarWars'' (which Cameron cites as a direct inspiration). ''Aliens'' in particular defined the StandardHumanSpaceship visual style for humans and their [[OurWeaponsWillBeBoxyInTheFuture military tech]] in a StandardSciFiSetting. ''Series/BabylonFive'', ''VideoGame/FreeSpace'', ''VideoGame/StarCraft'', ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'', and ''Franchise/MassEffect'' (to name a few) all draw on it.
** In a case of a work codifying tropes for an entirely different medium, the films cemented a number of formulae embraced by FirstPersonShooters and ThirdPersonShooters several years after the second film. The gun-floating-on-the-bottom-of-the-screen POVCam and target-centered OverTheShoulder shots from the Marine gunner's incursion and Ripley's final assault on the hive, for instance, are prototypes for the standard screen layouts of both genres, as well as the cramped hallway sieges that defined the early days of 3d shooters. The gunner's flashy heavy weaponry, the grenade launcher on the assault rifles, and Ripley's kludged-together multi-firearm, meanwhile, together established a precedent that ensured the future prominence of tropes like GatlingGood, SwissArmyGun, SecondaryFire, WalkingArmory, and the {{BFG}}.
* UnitedSpaceOfAmerica: it's all but explicitly stated that the US is still a superpower centuries in the future, complete with its own colonies. Also, the Colonial Marines are clearly shown as American.

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* TropeCodifier: TropeCodifier:
**
The series as a whole is this for UsedFuture, along with ''Franchise/StarWars'' (which Cameron cites as a direct inspiration). ''Aliens'' in particular defined the StandardHumanSpaceship visual style for humans and their [[OurWeaponsWillBeBoxyInTheFuture military tech]] in a StandardSciFiSetting. ''Series/BabylonFive'', ''VideoGame/FreeSpace'', ''VideoGame/StarCraft'', ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'', and ''Franchise/MassEffect'' (to name a few) all draw on it.
** In a case of a work codifying tropes for an entirely different medium, the films cemented a number of formulae embraced by FirstPersonShooters and ThirdPersonShooters several years after the second film. The gun-floating-on-the-bottom-of-the-screen POVCam and target-centered OverTheShoulder shots from the Marine gunner's incursion and Ripley's final assault on the hive, for instance, are prototypes for the standard screen layouts of both genres, as well as the cramped hallway sieges that defined the early days of 3d 3D shooters. The gunner's flashy heavy weaponry, the grenade launcher on the assault rifles, and Ripley's kludged-together multi-firearm, meanwhile, together established a precedent that ensured the future prominence of tropes like GatlingGood, SwissArmyGun, SecondaryFire, WalkingArmory, and the {{BFG}}.
* UnitedSpaceOfAmerica: it's It's all but explicitly stated that the US is still a superpower centuries in the future, complete with its own colonies. Also, the Colonial Marines are clearly shown as American.



* XenoNucleicAcid: The Xenomorphs have what's called a "DNA Reflex," which is apparently why they end up looking similar to their host species. This is further elaborated on in novels and guides, such as The Weyland-Yutani Report. The Chestburster functions much like a cancer, being built from the body's own cells and integrating 10-15% of its DNA in order to prevent an immune response. This causes the Xenomorph to develop similar physical traits, possibly mental ones as well, such as a specific gait or physical features. The reverse is also true; the host has some of the Xenomorph's genetic material integrated into its body during the Chestburster's incubation.

to:

* XenoNucleicAcid: The Xenomorphs have what's called a "DNA Reflex," Reflex", which is apparently why they end up looking similar to their host species. This is further elaborated on in novels and guides, such as The Weyland-Yutani Report. The Chestburster functions much like a cancer, being built from the body's own cells and integrating 10-15% of its DNA in order to prevent an immune response. This causes the Xenomorph to develop similar physical traits, possibly mental ones as well, such as a specific gait or physical features. The reverse is also true; the host has some of the Xenomorph's genetic material integrated into its body during the Chestburster's incubation.
1st Sep '17 5:33:02 AM jormis29
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* ''Alien 3: The Gun'' - 1993

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* ''Alien 3: The Gun'' ''VideoGame/Alien3TheGun'' - 1993
2nd Aug '17 11:00:33 AM Scorpion451
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* AsceticAesthetic: {{Deconstructed}}.

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* AsceticAesthetic: {{Deconstructed}}.{{Deconstructed}} in several ways. The ''Nostromo'' in the first film, for instance, clearly had this look before the wear and tear set in. The colony in the second film, meanwhile, has a facade of this look over a greasy industrial substructure. The contrast between this trope, UsedFuture, and unsettling organic structures is a recurring theme throughout the franchise.
2nd Aug '17 10:43:46 AM Scorpion451
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* TropeCodifier: The series as a whole is this for UsedFuture, along with ''Franchise/StarWars'' (which Cameron cites as a direct inspiration). ''Aliens'' in particular defined the visual style for humans and their military tech in a StandardSciFiSetting. ''Series/BabylonFive'', ''VideoGame/FreeSpace'', ''VideoGame/StarCraft'', ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'', and ''Franchise/MassEffect'' (to name a few) all draw on it.

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* TropeCodifier: The series as a whole is this for UsedFuture, along with ''Franchise/StarWars'' (which Cameron cites as a direct inspiration). ''Aliens'' in particular defined the StandardHumanSpaceship visual style for humans and their [[OurWeaponsWillBeBoxyInTheFuture military tech tech]] in a StandardSciFiSetting. ''Series/BabylonFive'', ''VideoGame/FreeSpace'', ''VideoGame/StarCraft'', ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'', and ''Franchise/MassEffect'' (to name a few) all draw on it.
** In a case of a work codifying tropes for an entirely different medium, the films cemented a number of formulae embraced by FirstPersonShooters and ThirdPersonShooters several years after the second film. The gun-floating-on-the-bottom-of-the-screen POVCam and target-centered OverTheShoulder shots from the Marine gunner's incursion and Ripley's final assault on the hive, for instance, are prototypes for the standard screen layouts of both genres, as well as the cramped hallway sieges that defined the early days of 3d shooters. The gunner's flashy heavy weaponry, the grenade launcher on the assault rifles, and Ripley's kludged-together multi-firearm, meanwhile, together established a precedent that ensured the future prominence of tropes like GatlingGood, SwissArmyGun, SecondaryFire, WalkingArmory, and the {{BFG}}.
21st Jul '17 6:20:35 PM ThatTwerp
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* ''Ride/TheGreatMovieRide'' (1989)

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* ''Ride/TheGreatMovieRide'' (1989)
(1989 - 2017)
21st Jul '17 6:19:19 PM ThatTwerp
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