History FollowTheLeader / VideoGames

5th Feb '16 8:55:24 PM nombretomado
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** ''VideoGame/ArtOfFighting'' and similar Creator/{{SNK}} fighting games were imitated outside the UsefulNotes/NeoGeo by the Creator/{{Konami}} ArcadeGame ''Dragoon Might'' and the UsefulNptes/{{Amiga}} game ''Fightin' Spirit''.
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** ''VideoGame/ArtOfFighting'' and similar Creator/{{SNK}} fighting games were imitated outside the UsefulNotes/NeoGeo by the Creator/{{Konami}} ArcadeGame UsefulNotes/ArcadeGame ''Dragoon Might'' and the UsefulNptes/{{Amiga}} game ''Fightin' Spirit''.

* ''Espial'' and ''HAL 21'' were both carbon copies of ''VideoGame/{{Xevious}}'', as was Creator/DataEast's ''Zaviga''. Another very similar ArcadeGame was Creator/{{Sega}}'s ''Gardia''. ''Alphos'' for the PC88 was apparently developed as a clone but released under license from Namco because this early Enix game resembled ''Xevious'' too much. The original {{MSX}} versions of ''VideoGame/{{Zanac}}'' also look a lot like ''Xevious'', as does the original ''VideoGame/ThunderForce'', which was actually dolled-up in Korea as ''Super Xevious''.
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* ''Espial'' and ''HAL 21'' were both carbon copies of ''VideoGame/{{Xevious}}'', as was Creator/DataEast's ''Zaviga''. Another very similar ArcadeGame UsefulNotes/ArcadeGame was Creator/{{Sega}}'s ''Gardia''. ''Alphos'' for the PC88 was apparently developed as a clone but released under license from Namco because this early Enix game resembled ''Xevious'' too much. The original {{MSX}} versions of ''VideoGame/{{Zanac}}'' also look a lot like ''Xevious'', as does the original ''VideoGame/ThunderForce'', which was actually dolled-up in Korea as ''Super Xevious''.

* The great wave of "''VideoGame/{{Breakout}}'' clones" actually followed the release of ''VideoGame/{{Arkanoid}}'', in whose wake came {{Arcade Game}}s like ''Gigas'' and ''Quester'', and on European 8-bit computers ''Batty'' and ''Krakout''.
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* The great wave of "''VideoGame/{{Breakout}}'' clones" actually followed the release of ''VideoGame/{{Arkanoid}}'', in whose wake came {{Arcade UsefulNotes/{{Arcade Game}}s like ''Gigas'' and ''Quester'', and on European 8-bit computers ''Batty'' and ''Krakout''.

## The success of ''TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesTheArcadeGame'' led to the rise of the company itself doing arcade adaptions of popular cartoons/cartoons based on comic books, with up to 4 (6 for X-Men) player co-op. Titles such as ''VideoGame/XMen'', ''VideoGame/TheSimpsons'', and ''[[ComicBook/BuckyOHareAndTheToadWars Bucky O'Hare]]'' during the 90s. Konami did face some competition in the 4-player comic book BeatEmUp field: ''VideoGame/CaptainAmericaAndTheAvengers'' and a Creator/{{Sega}} ArcadeGame starring Spider-Man, Sub-Mariner, Black Cat and Hawkeye.
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## The success of ''TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesTheArcadeGame'' led to the rise of the company itself doing arcade adaptions of popular cartoons/cartoons based on comic books, with up to 4 (6 for X-Men) player co-op. Titles such as ''VideoGame/XMen'', ''VideoGame/TheSimpsons'', and ''[[ComicBook/BuckyOHareAndTheToadWars Bucky O'Hare]]'' during the 90s. Konami did face some competition in the 4-player comic book BeatEmUp field: ''VideoGame/CaptainAmericaAndTheAvengers'' and a Creator/{{Sega}} ArcadeGame UsefulNotes/ArcadeGame starring Spider-Man, Sub-Mariner, Black Cat and Hawkeye.

* The UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} ShootEmUp ''Blood Money'' takes blatant inspiration from the contemporary Creator/{{Irem}} ArcadeGame ''Mr. Heli''.
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* The UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} ShootEmUp ''Blood Money'' takes blatant inspiration from the contemporary Creator/{{Irem}} ArcadeGame UsefulNotes/ArcadeGame ''Mr. Heli''.

* The success of the UsefulNotes/NeoGeo inspired the creation of several arcade arcade boards with easily swapped game cartridges. Examples include the Creator/{{Taito}} F3, Creator/{{Capcom}}'s CPS Changer (which was basically a consolized release of the venerable [=CPS1=]), Creator/{{Jaleco}}'s Mega System 32, Kaneko's Super Nova System and IGS's [=PolyGame=] Master. Creator/DataEast's MLC System went for interchangeable daughterboards instead, though Data East's own Neo Geo games were more successful.
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* The success of the UsefulNotes/NeoGeo inspired the creation of several arcade arcade boards with easily swapped game cartridges. Examples include the Creator/{{Taito}} F3, Creator/{{Capcom}}'s CPS Changer (which was basically a consolized release of the venerable [=CPS1=]), Creator/{{Jaleco}}'s Mega System 32, Kaneko's Super Nova System and IGS's [=PolyGame=] Master. Creator/DataEast's MLC System went for interchangeable daughterboards instead, though Data East's own Neo Geo games were more successful.

* Several Japanese video games of the 1990s imitated ''VideoGame/{{Bomberman}}'', including ''Otoboke Ninja Colosseum'', the ArcadeGame ''Exvania'', and console remakes of ''VideoGame/HeiankyoAlien'' and ''VideoGame/{{Pengo}}''.
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* Several Japanese video games of the 1990s imitated ''VideoGame/{{Bomberman}}'', including ''Otoboke Ninja Colosseum'', the ArcadeGame UsefulNotes/ArcadeGame ''Exvania'', and console remakes of ''VideoGame/HeiankyoAlien'' and ''VideoGame/{{Pengo}}''.

* ''Super Sprint'' inspired a wave of top-down racing games from UK companies. Creator/{{Codemasters}} found success on 8-bit formats with ''BMX Simulator'' and ''Grand Prix Simulator'', while Leland produced the {{Arcade Game}}s ''Ivan "Ironman" Stewart's Super Off-Road'' and ''Danny Sullivan's Indy Heat''. Other British imitators included ''Rally Cross Challenge'' and ''Super Cars'', the latter featuring large scrolling courses instead of the single screens that ''Sprint''-likes can usually be distinguished by.
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* ''Super Sprint'' inspired a wave of top-down racing games from UK companies. Creator/{{Codemasters}} found success on 8-bit formats with ''BMX Simulator'' and ''Grand Prix Simulator'', while Leland produced the {{Arcade UsefulNotes/{{Arcade Game}}s ''Ivan "Ironman" Stewart's Super Off-Road'' and ''Danny Sullivan's Indy Heat''. Other British imitators included ''Rally Cross Challenge'' and ''Super Cars'', the latter featuring large scrolling courses instead of the single screens that ''Sprint''-likes can usually be distinguished by.
3rd Feb '16 7:28:07 AM Morgenthaler
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* In the late 1970s to early 1980s, a large number of video game companies rushed to release their own ''VideoGame/SpaceInvaders''-like games. Some of these were hardly distinguishable from the original, e.g. Leijac's ''Space King'' and IPM's ''IPM Invader'' by two companies now better known as Creator/{{Konami}} and Creator/{{Irem}}, respectively. Of all the early imitators, [[Creator/NamcoBandai Namco's]] ''{{Galaxian}}'' is probably the best remembered, while Creator/{{Nintendo}}'s ''Space Fever'' and Creator/{{Sega}}'s ''Invinco!'' may be regarded as mere footnotes to history. ''TI Invaders'' for the UsefulNotes/TI99, ''Avenger'' for the UsefulNotes/VIC20, and ''Space Assault'' for the UsefulNotes/ColorComputer were first-party ''Space Invaders'' clones for systems that never received authorized ports.
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* In the late 1970s to early 1980s, a large number of video game companies rushed to release their own ''VideoGame/SpaceInvaders''-like games. Some of these were hardly distinguishable from the original, e.g. Leijac's ''Space King'' and IPM's ''IPM Invader'' by two companies now better known as Creator/{{Konami}} and Creator/{{Irem}}, respectively. Of all the early imitators, [[Creator/NamcoBandai Namco's]] ''{{Galaxian}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Galaxian}}'' is probably the best remembered, while Creator/{{Nintendo}}'s ''Space Fever'' and Creator/{{Sega}}'s ''Invinco!'' may be regarded as mere footnotes to history. ''TI Invaders'' for the UsefulNotes/TI99, ''Avenger'' for the UsefulNotes/VIC20, and ''Space Assault'' for the UsefulNotes/ColorComputer were first-party ''Space Invaders'' clones for systems that never received authorized ports.
1st Feb '16 2:59:42 PM MyFinalEdits
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* ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'' didn't just create a lot of similar shooters using its concept. It also turned newer shooters to having MUCH darker narratives. ** And by "darker narratives", we mean "''Film/{{Red Dawn|1984}}'' as an FPS". One of which ''is'' "''Film/{{Red Dawn|1984}}'' as an FPS", ''VideoGame/{{Homefront}}'' but with North Korea attacking a weakened United States instead of Russia. * To say that ''VideoGame/XuanDouZhiWang'' is [[AlternateCompanyEquivalent Tencent's Chinese equivalent]] of ''VideoGame/{{The King of Fighters}}'' is like dividing by 1; it's already implied. That being said, [[SincerestFormOfFlattery it does the job well enough]], but the blatant similarities to ''KOF'' (especially after the game was demoed by two of China's best ''KOF'' players) seem like a lawsuit waiting to happen. ** [[HilariousInHindsight For a bit of irony]], [[VideoGame/FatalFury Terry Bogard]] and [[VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters Benimaru Nikaido]] [[GuestFighter are set to be added to]] ''XD''[='s=] roster. ** Another game from Tencent is a ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}''-like mobile game called ''Monster Combat''. Unlike many other ''Pokémon'' clones in China, this one has several differences in gameplay.
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* ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'' didn't just create a lot of similar shooters using its concept. It also turned newer shooters to having MUCH darker narratives. ** And by "darker narratives", we mean "''Film/{{Red narratives. For example: ''Film/{{Red Dawn|1984}}'' as an FPS". One of which ''is'' "''Film/{{Red Dawn|1984}}'' as an FPS", and ''VideoGame/{{Homefront}}'' but (but with North Korea attacking a weakened United States instead of Russia. Russia). * To say that ''VideoGame/XuanDouZhiWang'' is [[AlternateCompanyEquivalent Tencent's Chinese equivalent]] of ''VideoGame/{{The King of Fighters}}'' is like dividing by 1; it's already implied. That being said, [[SincerestFormOfFlattery it does the job well enough]], but the blatant similarities to ''KOF'' (especially after the game was demoed by two of China's best ''KOF'' players) seem like a lawsuit waiting to happen. ** happen. [[HilariousInHindsight For a bit of irony]], [[VideoGame/FatalFury Terry Bogard]] and [[VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters Benimaru Nikaido]] [[GuestFighter are set to be added to]] ''XD''[='s=] roster. ** Another game from Tencent is * There's a ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}''-like mobile game called ''Monster Combat''. Unlike many other ''Pokémon'' clones in China, this one has several differences in gameplay.
1st Feb '16 1:28:53 PM DastardlyDemolition
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** And by "darker narratives", we mean "''Film/{{Red Dawn|1984}}'' as an FPS".
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** And by "darker narratives", we mean "''Film/{{Red Dawn|1984}}'' as an FPS". One of which ''is'' "''Film/{{Red Dawn|1984}}'' as an FPS", ''VideoGame/{{Homefront}}'' but with North Korea attacking a weakened United States instead of Russia.
31st Jan '16 6:30:52 AM Prfnoff
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** ''VideoGame/ArtOfFighting'' and similar Creator/{{SNK}} fighting games were imitated outside the UsefulNotes/NeoGeo by the Creator/{{Konami}} ArcadeGame ''Dragoon Might'' and the UsefulNptes/{{Amiga}} game ''Fightin' Spirit''.
25th Jan '16 5:42:16 PM MarkLungo
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* In the late 1970s to early 1980s, a large number of video game companies rushed to release their own ''VideoGame/SpaceInvaders''-like games. Some of these were hardly distinguishable from the original, e.g. Leijac's ''Space King'' and IPM's ''IPM Invader'' by two companies now better known as Creator/{{Konami}} and Creator/{{Irem}}, respectively. Of all the early imitators, [[Creator/NamcoBandai Namco's]] ''{{Galaxian}}'' is probably the best remembered, while Creator/{{Nintendo}}'s ''Space Fever'' and Creator/{{Sega}}'s ''Invinco!'' may be regarded as mere footnotes to history. ''TI Invaders'' for the TI99, ''Avenger'' for the UsefulNotes/VIC20, and ''Space Assault'' for the UsefulNotes/ColorComputer were first-party ''Space Invaders'' clones for systems that never received authorized ports.
to:
* In the late 1970s to early 1980s, a large number of video game companies rushed to release their own ''VideoGame/SpaceInvaders''-like games. Some of these were hardly distinguishable from the original, e.g. Leijac's ''Space King'' and IPM's ''IPM Invader'' by two companies now better known as Creator/{{Konami}} and Creator/{{Irem}}, respectively. Of all the early imitators, [[Creator/NamcoBandai Namco's]] ''{{Galaxian}}'' is probably the best remembered, while Creator/{{Nintendo}}'s ''Space Fever'' and Creator/{{Sega}}'s ''Invinco!'' may be regarded as mere footnotes to history. ''TI Invaders'' for the TI99, UsefulNotes/TI99, ''Avenger'' for the UsefulNotes/VIC20, and ''Space Assault'' for the UsefulNotes/ColorComputer were first-party ''Space Invaders'' clones for systems that never received authorized ports.

* ''Videogame/PacMan'' gave rise to such a wave of unauthorized clones that the arcade version of ''Ms. Pac-Man'' and the UsefulNotes/AppleII version of ''Pac-Man'' were originally developed as such. ''K.C. Munchkin'' for the Videogame/{{Odyssey2}} was close enough to get sued, though it became something a bit different. ''Munch Man'' for the TI99 was almost too much like ''Pac-Man'' in its prototype version; the final release had a different maze and the superficial substitution of laying chains for eating dots. Creator/{{ADK}}'s ''Crush Roller'' ([[MarketBasedTitle also known as]] ''Make Trax'') similarly switched picking/eating stuff up to laying stuff down, and originally ran on an arcade board that cloned the ''Pac-Man'' hardware. Some developers of dot-collecting {{Maze Game}}s were a bit more inventive, and ''VideoGame/LadyBug'', ''Lock 'n' Chase'' and ''Mouse Trap'' were respectable enough games in their own right to see release on multiple platforms.
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* ''Videogame/PacMan'' gave rise to such a wave of unauthorized clones that the arcade version of ''Ms. Pac-Man'' and the UsefulNotes/AppleII version of ''Pac-Man'' were originally developed as such. ''K.C. Munchkin'' for the Videogame/{{Odyssey2}} was close enough to get sued, though it became something a bit different. ''Munch Man'' for the TI99 UsefulNotes/TI99 was almost too much like ''Pac-Man'' in its prototype version; the final release had a different maze and the superficial substitution of laying chains for eating dots. Creator/{{ADK}}'s ''Crush Roller'' ([[MarketBasedTitle also known as]] ''Make Trax'') similarly switched picking/eating stuff up to laying stuff down, and originally ran on an arcade board that cloned the ''Pac-Man'' hardware. Some developers of dot-collecting {{Maze Game}}s were a bit more inventive, and ''VideoGame/LadyBug'', ''Lock 'n' Chase'' and ''Mouse Trap'' were respectable enough games in their own right to see release on multiple platforms.
22nd Jan '16 8:43:16 PM Prfnoff
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* For a few years in the mid-'80s, a lot of British and Japanese software houses saw ''Star Force'' as a VerticalScrollingShooter worth imitating, the products being games such as ''Astro Warrior'' on the UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem and ''Light Force'' on the UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum.
11th Jan '16 9:51:20 AM BreadBull
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* During the mid-1990s, the success of ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' led to a glut of the MascotWithAttitude, especially in video games released during that time. All of them failed, either because they were just a ThemeParkVersion of Sonic himself, or because they hit the PolygonCeiling hard when gaming made the move to 3D later that decade, such as ''[[VideoGame/{{Bubsy}} Bubsy the Bobcat]]'' (though in fairness Sonic has had issues himself in that department). There's still one or two, like ''VideoGame/EarthwormJim'', that are remembered a bit more fondly, but Sonic is the only MascotWithAttitude to escape from this time, due to being the {{Trope Maker|s}}.
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* During the mid-1990s, the success of ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' led to a glut of the MascotWithAttitude, especially in video games released on the Genesis/Mega Drive and SNES during that time. All of them failed, either because they were just a ThemeParkVersion of Sonic himself, or because they hit the PolygonCeiling hard when gaming made the move to 3D later that decade, such as ''[[VideoGame/{{Bubsy}} Bubsy the Bobcat]]'' Bobcat and Bubsy 3D]]'' (though in fairness Sonic has had issues himself in that department). There's still one or two, like ''VideoGame/EarthwormJim'', ''VideoGame/RocketKnightAdventures'' and its sequel ''Sparkster'', that are remembered a bit more fondly, but Sonic is the only MascotWithAttitude to escape from this time, due to being the {{Trope Maker|s}}.

* The success of the ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' games (which themselves were created to compete with the ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' games) led to a slew of similar "[[MascotWithAttitude animals with attitude]]" games on the Genesis/Mega Drive and SNES. Some of these are considered classics but were sadly overlooked, such as ''VideoGame/RocketKnightAdventures'' and its sequel ''Sparkster'', but others were simply overhyped, unimaginative tripe such as the unfortunately titled, {{Anvilicious}}ly environmental ''VideoGame/AwesomePossum Kicks Dr. Machino's Butt'', and the infamous ''VideoGame/{{Bubsy}}''. The testament to Bubsy's complete failure is no doubt their attempt to reintroduce him to the gaming world: ''[[PolygonCeiling Bubsy 3D]]'', no doubt one of the worst games ever made, [[FranchiseKiller which killed the franchise]].
10th Jan '16 11:49:29 PM erforce
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*** The example above is funny when you remember Sony in the PS2 era had the [=EyeToy=], or the 2005 exercise title "Kinectic", [[VideoGame/WiiFit featured a British woman who'd lead you through a variety of workout routines, with her hair in a ponytail, belly button showing top and dark stretch pants. All while standing in a sterile spacious room and demonstrating with you and commenting on your progress.]] [[SarcasmMode But you've probably never heard of anything like that.]]
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*** The example above is funny when you remember Sony in the PS2 [=PS2=] era had the [=EyeToy=], or the 2005 exercise title "Kinectic", [[VideoGame/WiiFit featured a British woman who'd lead you through a variety of workout routines, with her hair in a ponytail, belly button showing top and dark stretch pants. All while standing in a sterile spacious room and demonstrating with you and commenting on your progress.]] [[SarcasmMode But you've probably never heard of anything like that.]]

** Sony's PS3 and {{Vita}} combo, and Microsoft's smart glass, following the announcement of the WiiU.
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** Sony's PS3 [=PS3=] and {{Vita}} Vita combo, and Microsoft's smart glass, following the announcement of the WiiU.[=WiiU=].

* ''God of War'' itself followed ''VideoGame/DevilMayCry'' as a spectacle fighter, and both being successors of the BeatEmUp genre. In addition, the success of ''Devil May Cry'' led to the rise of stylish-action games (before ''God of War'') in the early 2000s. Mainly the type games with an [[GameplayGrading end-of-level rank]] such as ''VideoGame/{{Bujingai}}'', ''VideoGame/ChaosLegion'', ''VideoGame/ViewtifulJoe'', ''VideoGame/{{Shinobi}}'' (PS2 version), and the ''VideoGame/NinjaGaiden'' reboot.
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* ''God of War'' itself followed ''VideoGame/DevilMayCry'' as a spectacle fighter, and both being successors of the BeatEmUp genre. In addition, the success of ''Devil May Cry'' led to the rise of stylish-action games (before ''God of War'') in the early 2000s. Mainly the type games with an [[GameplayGrading end-of-level rank]] such as ''VideoGame/{{Bujingai}}'', ''VideoGame/ChaosLegion'', ''VideoGame/ViewtifulJoe'', ''VideoGame/{{Shinobi}}'' (PS2 ([=PS2=] version), and the ''VideoGame/NinjaGaiden'' reboot.

* ''VideoGame/KatamariDamacy'', believe it or not. After the unexpected success of the game, Creator/{{Namco}} tried to follow up on it by creating other quirky, colorful games with a "growing" game mechanic, which resulted in ''VideoGame/NobyNobyBoy'' for the PS3 and ''The Munchables'' for the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}.
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* ''VideoGame/KatamariDamacy'', believe it or not. After the unexpected success of the game, Creator/{{Namco}} tried to follow up on it by creating other quirky, colorful games with a "growing" game mechanic, which resulted in ''VideoGame/NobyNobyBoy'' for the PS3 [=PS3=] and ''The Munchables'' for the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}.

** One game, ''Sorcerer's Maze'', is a Breakout clone made for the PS1. It was given a misleading title in order to fool gamers because it's [[NonIndicativeName just another Breakout clone]]. The game is actually fairly decent, and it has bosses.
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** One game, ''Sorcerer's Maze'', is a Breakout clone made for the PS1.[=PS1=]. It was given a misleading title in order to fool gamers because it's [[NonIndicativeName just another Breakout clone]]. The game is actually fairly decent, and it has bosses.
3rd Jan '16 12:18:39 PM Pinokio
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* [[MobilePhoneGame Mobile]] games with an [[AllegedlyFreeGame allegedly free]] {{freemium}} model exist within an ecosystem of copied features, including the stamina system and social features of Facebook games popularized by companies like Zynga, the GottaCatchThemAll, {{Mon}} and EvolutionPowerUp aspects of ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'' and ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'', MMORPG-inspired features from VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft, and the cost/power/defense stats and mechanics of [[CollectibleCardGame collectible card games]].
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