History FollowTheLeader / ComicBooks

9th Feb '17 9:12:07 PM comicwriter
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** The X-Men, along with the ''New Comicbook/TeenTitans'', set the gold standard for angst and melodrama in superhero comics, as well as telling more personal, character-driven stories that didn't rely on A-list characters who had their own books. The widely-reviled [[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica Justice League Detroit]] was DC's attempt at [[ReTool ReTooling]] the JLA into an X-Men clone, by getting rid of most of the A-listers and replacing them with a [[YoungerAndHipper younger]] and more diverse cast.

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** The X-Men, along with the ''New Comicbook/TeenTitans'', set the gold standard for angst and melodrama in superhero comics, as well as telling more personal, character-driven stories that didn't rely on A-list characters who had their own books. The widely-reviled [[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica Justice League Detroit]] was basically DC's attempt at [[ReTool ReTooling]] trying to make the JLA into an X-Men clone, clone by getting rid of replacing most of the A-listers and replacing them with a [[YoungerAndHipper younger]] and younger]], more diverse cast.characters who didn't have solo titles.
9th Feb '17 9:09:32 PM comicwriter
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** The X-Men, along with the ''New Comicbook/TeenTitans'', set the gold standard for angst and melodrama in superhero comics, as well as telling more personal, character-driven stories. The widely-reviled [[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica Justice League Detroit]] was DC's attempt at [[ReTool ReTooling]] the JLA into an X-Men clone.

to:

** The X-Men, along with the ''New Comicbook/TeenTitans'', set the gold standard for angst and melodrama in superhero comics, as well as telling more personal, character-driven stories. stories that didn't rely on A-list characters who had their own books. The widely-reviled [[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica Justice League Detroit]] was DC's attempt at [[ReTool ReTooling]] the JLA into an X-Men clone.clone, by getting rid of most of the A-listers and replacing them with a [[YoungerAndHipper younger]] and more diverse cast.
9th Feb '17 9:00:13 PM comicwriter
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* Comicbook/{{Robin}} might as well be the {{Trope Namer|s}} for the KidSidekick, and his popularity in UsefulNotes/{{the Golden Age|OfComicBooks}} led to a [[FountainOfExpies string of similar kid partners]]. ComicBook/CaptainAmerica and [[ComicBook/BuckyBarnes Bucky]], ComicBook/GreenArrow and Speedy, ComicBook/BlueBeetle and Sparky, Black Terror and Kid Terror, Mr. Scarlet and Pinky, [[ComicBook/{{Shazam}} Captain Marvel]] and Captain Marvel Jr.... the list goes on an on.
** Then during UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|OfComicBooks}} came ComicBook/{{Aquaman}} and Aqualad, Superman and ComicBook/{{Supergirl}}, and Franchise/WonderWoman and ComicBook/WonderGirl.

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* Comicbook/{{Robin}} might as well be the {{Trope Namer|s}} for the KidSidekick, and his popularity in UsefulNotes/{{the Golden Age|OfComicBooks}} led to a [[FountainOfExpies string of similar kid partners]]. ComicBook/CaptainAmerica and [[ComicBook/BuckyBarnes Bucky]], ComicBook/GreenArrow and Speedy, ComicBook/BlueBeetle and Sparky, Black Terror and Kid Terror, Mr. Scarlet and Pinky, [[ComicBook/{{Shazam}} Captain Marvel]] Marvel]], Mary Marvel and Captain Marvel Jr.... the list goes on an on.
** Then during UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|OfComicBooks}} came ComicBook/{{Aquaman}} existing characters Superman, Comicbook/WonderWoman and Aqualad, Superman Comicbook/{{Aquaman}} got their own teen counterparts in Comicbook/{{Supergirl}}, Comicbook/WonderGirl and ComicBook/{{Supergirl}}, and Franchise/WonderWoman and ComicBook/WonderGirl.Aqualad.
28th Jul '16 8:27:52 AM Willbyr
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* Marvel's ''Manga/MarvelMangaverse'' imprint was a rather blatant attempt to cash in on the success American networks had found with shows like ''Anime/SailorMoon'', ''DragonBallZ'', ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'', and ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}''.

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* Marvel's ''Manga/MarvelMangaverse'' imprint was a rather blatant attempt to cash in on the success American networks had found with shows like ''Anime/SailorMoon'', ''DragonBallZ'', ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'', and ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}''.
15th Jun '16 2:02:24 AM morenohijazo
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* Even though the book itself wasn't a huge seller, the fandom that rose up around Creator/KellySueDeconnick's ''[[Comicbook/MsMarvel Captain Marvel]]'' is often credited with the explosion of female-led titles that occurred at Marvel after its release.

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* Even though the book itself wasn't a huge seller, the fandom that rose up around Creator/KellySueDeconnick's ''[[Comicbook/MsMarvel Captain Marvel]]'' is often credited with the explosion of female-led titles that occurred at Marvel after its release.release.
* ''ComicBook/ZipiYZape'': It has been argued that the strip started out as a rather unsubtle rip-off of ''ComicStrip/TheKatzenjammerKids'' before eventually growing into its own thing.
24th Mar '16 9:52:30 PM merotoker
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** The X-Men, along with the ''New Comicbook/TeenTitans'', set the gold standard for angst and melodrama in superhero comics, as well as telling more personal, character-driven stories. The widely-reviled [[JusticeLeagueOfAmerica Justice League Detroit]] was DC's attempt at [[ReTool ReTooling]] the JLA into an X-Men clone.

to:

** The X-Men, along with the ''New Comicbook/TeenTitans'', set the gold standard for angst and melodrama in superhero comics, as well as telling more personal, character-driven stories. The widely-reviled [[JusticeLeagueOfAmerica [[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica Justice League Detroit]] was DC's attempt at [[ReTool ReTooling]] the JLA into an X-Men clone.



* ''ComicBook/BatmanYearOne'' was the {{UR Example}} of origin stories in the more recent eras. Now both Marvel and DC produce Year One stories, with varying degrees of success, although none of them could match Batman's.

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* ''ComicBook/BatmanYearOne'' was the {{UR Example}} UrExample of origin stories in the more recent eras. Now both Marvel and DC produce Year One stories, with varying degrees of success, although none of them could match Batman's.



* The surprise success of Creator/MattFraction's run on ''Comicbook/{{Hawkeye}}'' with David Aja and Annie Wu led to Marvel and DC launching a number of "quirky," more subdued books with more intimate tones and unconventional art styles, such as WarrenEllis' ''Comicbook/MoonKnight'' run. A lot of the new titles for ''Comicbook/AllNewAllDifferentMarvel'' and DC's ''DC You'' relaunch were very obviously inspired by Hawkeye.

to:

* The surprise success of Creator/MattFraction's run on ''Comicbook/{{Hawkeye}}'' with David Aja and Annie Wu led to Marvel and DC launching a number of "quirky," more subdued books with more intimate tones and unconventional art styles, such as WarrenEllis' Creator/WarrenEllis' ''Comicbook/MoonKnight'' run. A lot of the new titles for ''Comicbook/AllNewAllDifferentMarvel'' and DC's ''DC You'' relaunch were very obviously inspired by Hawkeye.



* Even though the book itself wasn't a huge seller, the fandom that rose up around Creator/KellySueDeconnick's ''[[Comicbook/MsMarvel Captain Marvel]]'' is often credited with the explosion of female-led titles that occurred at Marvel after its release.

to:

* Even though the book itself wasn't a huge seller, the fandom that rose up around Creator/KellySueDeconnick's ''[[Comicbook/MsMarvel Captain Marvel]]'' is often credited with the explosion of female-led titles that occurred at Marvel after its release.
22nd Jan '16 8:24:31 PM Prfnoff
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** UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks also had a secondary trend of vigilantes with ill-defined omnipotent powers, who'd fight street crime without much regard for ethics. See ComicBook/DoctorFate, Comicbook/GreenLantern, Comicbook/TheSpectre, Black Widow (No, not ''that'' Comicbook/BlackWidow), and so on.

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** UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks also had a secondary trend of vigilantes with ill-defined omnipotent powers, who'd fight street crime without much regard for ethics. See ComicBook/DoctorFate, Comicbook/GreenLantern, Comicbook/TheSpectre, Black Widow (No, not ''that'' Comicbook/BlackWidow), the Hangman, and so on.
6th Jan '16 10:21:42 PM Doug86
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* Nobody who's written Franchise/{{Batman}} in the past 20 years has been able to escape the influence of ''Comicbook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns''. This case is particularly hilarious because the single greatest influence on Batman's character wasn't even canon. Even Batman's entry in the All-Star series, which was supposed to throw out all the complicated backstory and let the DC heroes have more Silver-Age-style adventures, was written by The Goddamn FrankMiller himself, and Batman was even more cranky and psychotic than ever.

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* Nobody who's written Franchise/{{Batman}} in the past 20 years has been able to escape the influence of ''Comicbook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns''. This case is particularly hilarious because the single greatest influence on Batman's character wasn't even canon. Even Batman's entry in the All-Star series, which was supposed to throw out all the complicated backstory and let the DC heroes have more Silver-Age-style adventures, was written by The Goddamn FrankMiller Creator/FrankMiller himself, and Batman was even more cranky and psychotic than ever.
15th Nov '15 2:11:12 PM StFan
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* Creator/IsaacBaranoff's ''ComicBook/{{Horndog}}'' inspired a number of knock-offs. Baranoff even got in on the act himself by introducing ''HereWolf'', which was not substantially different from ''Horndog'', except for having human characters (it since differentiated itself though).

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* Creator/IsaacBaranoff's ''ComicBook/{{Horndog}}'' inspired a number of knock-offs. Baranoff even got in on the act himself by introducing ''HereWolf'', ''Webcomic/HereWolf'', which was not substantially different from ''Horndog'', except for having human characters (it since differentiated itself though).
30th Oct '15 11:30:23 PM merotoker
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* {{Robin}} might as well be the TropeNamer for the KidSidekick, and his popularity in the GoldenAge lead to a [[FountainOfExpies string of similar kid partners]]. ComicBook/CaptainAmerica and [[ComicBook/BuckyBarnes Bucky]], ComicBook/GreenArrow and Speedy, ComicBook/BlueBeetle and Sparky, Black Terror and Kid Terror, Mr. Scarlet and Pinky, [[ComicBook/{{Shazam}} Captain Marvel]] and Captain Marvel Jr.... the list goes on an on.
** Then during the SilverAge came ComicBook/{{Aquaman}} and Aqualad, Superman and ComicBook/{{Supergirl}}, and Franchise/WonderWoman and ComicBook/WonderGirl.

to:

* {{Robin}} Comicbook/{{Robin}} might as well be the TropeNamer {{Trope Namer|s}} for the KidSidekick, and his popularity in the GoldenAge lead UsefulNotes/{{the Golden Age|OfComicBooks}} led to a [[FountainOfExpies string of similar kid partners]]. ComicBook/CaptainAmerica and [[ComicBook/BuckyBarnes Bucky]], ComicBook/GreenArrow and Speedy, ComicBook/BlueBeetle and Sparky, Black Terror and Kid Terror, Mr. Scarlet and Pinky, [[ComicBook/{{Shazam}} Captain Marvel]] and Captain Marvel Jr.... the list goes on an on.
** Then during the SilverAge UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|OfComicBooks}} came ComicBook/{{Aquaman}} and Aqualad, Superman and ComicBook/{{Supergirl}}, and Franchise/WonderWoman and ComicBook/WonderGirl.



* In {{the Silver Age|OfComicBooks}}, all comics followed trends, to the point where it was an in-joke among comic writers and fans, for example an EC story about hiring Jack Kamen includes the line, "Jack, you old son! I haven't seen you for two trends!" EC followed trends religiously for a while, then started their own, Horror Comics! This in turn led in part to UsefulNotes/TheComicsCode (boo! hiss!).
* Marvel's ''Comicbook/FantasticFour'' series was created in direct response to the massive success of DC's ''JusticeLeagueOfAmerica''. Specifically, editor Martin Goodman told StanLee to come up with a team book to cash in on the trend DC had started.
* Creator/MarvelComics' success, particularly with ''ComicBook/{{Spider-Man}}'', the first teen superhero, had many publishers trying for a more teenager-friendly product; sadly, these often faded into TotallyRadical.

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* In {{the UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|OfComicBooks}}, all comics followed trends, to the point where it was an in-joke among comic writers and fans, for example an EC story about hiring Jack Kamen includes the line, "Jack, you old son! I haven't seen you for two trends!" EC followed trends religiously for a while, then started their own, Horror Comics! This in turn led in part to UsefulNotes/TheComicsCode (boo! hiss!).
* Marvel's ''Comicbook/FantasticFour'' series was created in direct response to the massive success of DC's ''JusticeLeagueOfAmerica''. ''Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica''. Specifically, editor Martin Goodman told StanLee Creator/StanLee to come up with a team book to cash in on the trend DC had started.
* Creator/MarvelComics' success, particularly with ''ComicBook/{{Spider-Man}}'', ''Franchise/SpiderMan'', the first teen superhero, had many publishers trying for a more teenager-friendly product; sadly, these often faded into TotallyRadical.



* After ''CaptainAmerica'' was retitled ''Captain America and TheFalcon'', there began a trend of giving superheroes a BlackBestFriend or partner. Among the most notable ones would be [[Comicbook/WarMachine James "Rhodey" Rhodes]] and [[Comicbook/GreenLantern John Stewart]].
** Rhodey also arguably popularized the AffirmativeActionLegacy trend, especially with his burst of popularity in the 90's. Afterwards we saw an explosion of minority replacement characters like {{Steel}}, [[Comicbook/{{Batgirl 2000}} Cassandra Cain]], and [[ComicBook/GreenArrow Connor Hawke]].
* Before ''All-New, All-Different Comicbook/{{X-Men}}'', most superheroes were [=WASPs=]. ''X-Men'' pioneered the concept of diversity (at least [[TokenMinority the token kind]]) in superhero comics.
** And it's even OlderThanTheyThink; the first international multiracial hero team was ''{{Cyborg 009}}'', though it didn't achieve the success in the West that the X-Men did.

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* After ''CaptainAmerica'' ''Comicbook/CaptainAmerica'' was retitled ''Captain America and TheFalcon'', ComicBook/TheFalcon'', there began a trend of giving superheroes a BlackBestFriend or partner. Among the most notable ones would be [[Comicbook/WarMachine James "Rhodey" Rhodes]] and [[Comicbook/GreenLantern [[Franchise/GreenLantern John Stewart]].
**
Stewart]]. Rhodey also arguably popularized the AffirmativeActionLegacy trend, especially with his burst of popularity in the 90's. Afterwards we saw an explosion of minority replacement characters like {{Steel}}, [[Comicbook/{{Batgirl 2000}} Cassandra Cain]], and [[ComicBook/GreenArrow Connor Hawke]].
* Before ''All-New, All-Different Comicbook/{{X-Men}}'', Comicbook/XMen'', most superheroes were [=WASPs=]. ''X-Men'' pioneered the concept of diversity (at least [[TokenMinority the token kind]]) in superhero comics.
** And it's even OlderThanTheyThink; the first international multiracial hero team was ''{{Cyborg ''Manga/{{Cyborg 009}}'', though it didn't achieve the success in the West that the X-Men did.



* Marvel's ''MarvelMangaverse'' imprint was a rather blatant attempt to cash in on the success American networks had found with shows like ''Anime/SailorMoon'', ''DragonBallZ'', ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'', and ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}''.
* Some fans claimed Marvel did this with SpiderWoman by giving her a more practical, female-friendly redesign after DC hired Brenden Fletcher, Babs Tarr, and Cameron Stewart to implement a similar redesign and revamp for ''[[Comicbook/{{Batgirl 2011}} Batgirl]]''. However, Kris Anka claims he designed the costume a few months before DC debuted the new Batgirl, and the fact that the new Spider-Woman design was unveiled shortly after the positive reception Batgirl received is a complete coincidence.

to:

* Marvel's ''MarvelMangaverse'' ''Manga/MarvelMangaverse'' imprint was a rather blatant attempt to cash in on the success American networks had found with shows like ''Anime/SailorMoon'', ''DragonBallZ'', ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'', and ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}''.
* Some fans claimed Marvel did this with SpiderWoman ComicBook/SpiderWoman by giving her a more practical, female-friendly redesign after DC hired Brenden Fletcher, Babs Tarr, and Cameron Stewart to implement a similar redesign and revamp for ''[[Comicbook/{{Batgirl 2011}} Batgirl]]''. However, Kris Anka claims he designed the costume a few months before DC debuted the new Batgirl, and the fact that the new Spider-Woman design was unveiled shortly after the positive reception Batgirl received is a complete coincidence.



** The ever-hilarious Website/YouTube series ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WHXeg7GhVbc&feature=channel Marvel/DC Happy Hour]]'' parodied this by having the second season's StoryArc involve the Joker using nanotechnology in an android named Lance to brainwash heroes like Franchise/{{Superman}}, Franchise/WonderWoman, ComicBook/IronMan, Comicbook/IncredibleHulk, and {{Wolverine}} into thinking that their loved ones died horribly right in front of them so that they would be more dark and brooding, like Franchise/{{Batman}}, except that they would break [[ThouShaltNotKill his one rule]] in pursuit of Justice. The only heroes he couldn't brainwash were Comicbook/GhostRider, Comicbook/ThePunisher (because he was already a dark, brooding, homicidal vigilante), and Franchise/SpiderMan (because the events of ''Comicbook/OneMoreDay'' had already altered his perception of reality, and he ''has'' lost everything but never loses his optimism).

to:

** The ever-hilarious Website/YouTube series ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WHXeg7GhVbc&feature=channel Marvel/DC Happy Hour]]'' parodied this by having the second season's StoryArc involve the Joker using nanotechnology in an android named Lance to brainwash heroes like Franchise/{{Superman}}, Franchise/WonderWoman, ComicBook/IronMan, Comicbook/IncredibleHulk, and {{Wolverine}} Comicbook/{{Wolverine}} into thinking that their loved ones died horribly right in front of them so that they would be more dark and brooding, like Franchise/{{Batman}}, except that they would break [[ThouShaltNotKill his one rule]] in pursuit of Justice. The only heroes he couldn't brainwash were Comicbook/GhostRider, Comicbook/ThePunisher (because he was already a dark, brooding, homicidal vigilante), and Franchise/SpiderMan (because the events of ''Comicbook/OneMoreDay'' had already altered his perception of reality, and he ''has'' lost everything but never loses his optimism).



* At the height of the popularity of ''Comicbook/{{Spawn}}'', Marvel tried to cash-in rather shamelessly with ''[[http://static.comicvine.com/uploads/original/12/123677/2351180-616645_nightwatch1_large.jpg Nightwatch]]''.
** DC did the exact same thing with their post-''Comicbook/ZeroHour'' relaunch of ''[[http://images2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20080910053748/marvel_dc/images/b/b0/Manhunter_Vol_2_0.jpg Manhunter]]''.

to:

* At the height of the popularity of ''Comicbook/{{Spawn}}'', Marvel tried to cash-in rather shamelessly with ''[[http://static.comicvine.com/uploads/original/12/123677/2351180-616645_nightwatch1_large.jpg Nightwatch]]''.
**
Nightwatch]]''. DC did the exact same thing with their post-''Comicbook/ZeroHour'' relaunch of ''[[http://images2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20080910053748/marvel_dc/images/b/b0/Manhunter_Vol_2_0.jpg Manhunter]]''.



* After the success of ''ComicBook/{{Diabolik}}'', Italian comic books were invaded by series [[VillainProtagonist starring an obviously evil murderous thief]], gifted with great intelligence and whose name included the letter 'K'. While most of them have disappeared, ''Diabolik'' is still going on, and so two of the followers: ''ComicBook/{{Cattivik}}'' (a very funny and [[WhatDoYouMeanItWasntMadeOnDrugs nonsensical]] ShallowParody, with a protagonist that is not intelligent but TooDumbTooLive) and, from ''Creator/{{Disney}}'', Paperinik (an alter ego of DonaldDuck who started out as avenger of himself, later turned to UnscrupolousHero and then to full hero, [[AntiHero if a bit sadistic]]. Best known internationally for ''ComicBook/PaperinikNewAdventures'').

to:

* After the success of ''ComicBook/{{Diabolik}}'', Italian comic books were invaded by series [[VillainProtagonist starring an obviously evil murderous thief]], gifted with great intelligence and whose name included the letter 'K'. While most of them have disappeared, ''Diabolik'' is still going on, and so two of the followers: ''ComicBook/{{Cattivik}}'' (a very funny and [[WhatDoYouMeanItWasntMadeOnDrugs nonsensical]] ShallowParody, with a protagonist that is not intelligent but TooDumbTooLive) TooDumbToLive) and, from ''Creator/{{Disney}}'', Paperinik (an alter ego of DonaldDuck WesternAnimation/DonaldDuck who started out as avenger of himself, later turned to UnscrupolousHero UnscrupulousHero and then to full hero, [[AntiHero if a bit sadistic]]. Best known internationally for ''ComicBook/PaperinikNewAdventures'').



* The surprise success of MattFraction's run on ''{{Hawkeye}}'' with David Aja and Annie Wu led to Marvel and DC launching a number of "quirky," more subdued books with more intimate tones and unconventional art styles, such as WarrenEllis' ''Comicbook/MoonKnight'' run. A lot of the new titles for ''Comicbook/AllNewAllDifferentMarvel'' and DC's ''DC You'' relaunch were very obviously inspired by Hawkeye.

to:

* The surprise success of MattFraction's Creator/MattFraction's run on ''{{Hawkeye}}'' ''Comicbook/{{Hawkeye}}'' with David Aja and Annie Wu led to Marvel and DC launching a number of "quirky," more subdued books with more intimate tones and unconventional art styles, such as WarrenEllis' ''Comicbook/MoonKnight'' run. A lot of the new titles for ''Comicbook/AllNewAllDifferentMarvel'' and DC's ''DC You'' relaunch were very obviously inspired by Hawkeye.



* Even though the book itself wasn't a huge seller, the fandom that rose up around Creator/KellySueDeconnick's ''[[MsMarvel Captain Marvel]]'' is often credited with the explosion of female-led titles that occurred at Marvel after its release.

to:

* Even though the book itself wasn't a huge seller, the fandom that rose up around Creator/KellySueDeconnick's ''[[MsMarvel ''[[Comicbook/MsMarvel Captain Marvel]]'' is often credited with the explosion of female-led titles that occurred at Marvel after its release.
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