History Flanderization / ComicBooks

15th Nov '17 2:35:29 AM Kickisund
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** DreadfulMusician Cacofonix starts out as at least an average bard - Asterix blows off listening to his music once due to being busy (which annoyed him) and the people sitting near to his performance at the final banquet are cringing with their hands over their ears, but the villagers also perform a plot-important traditional dance to his music with every indication that they are enjoying it. As the comic progresses other characters (especially Fulliautomatix the blacksmith) start beating him up to prevent him from singing, which develops into a running gag, and he's shown to live in a hut at the top of a tree, where no-one can hear him. By the time Uderzo took over writing, he was so bad that he causes rain whenever he plays, which develops to the point where he ends up being so bad that merely playing a few notes creates an apocalyptic rainstorm that lasts for days.

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** DreadfulMusician Cacofonix starts out as at least an average bard - Asterix blows off listening to his music once due to being busy (which annoyed him) and the people sitting near to his performance at the final banquet are cringing with their hands over their ears, but the villagers also perform a plot-important traditional dance to his music with every indication that they are enjoying it. As the comic progresses progresses, other characters (especially Fulliautomatix the blacksmith) start beating him up to prevent him from singing, which develops into a running gag, and he's shown to live in a hut at the top of a tree, where no-one can hear him. By the time Uderzo took over writing, he was so bad that he causes rain whenever he plays, which develops to the point where he ends up being so bad that merely playing a few notes creates an apocalyptic rainstorm that lasts for days.
6th Nov '17 12:50:14 PM lillolillo
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** Brainiac 5 from the ''ComicBook/{{Legion Of Super-Heroes}}'' is an utterly brilliant genius with limited social skills. He might be impatient and rude, but he clearly cared for his teammates and people on the whole. Throughout several decades and reboots "may be an obnoxious jerkass sometimes" somehow devolved into "is an unbearable smug jerkass who can hardly stand his own teammates", and modern Legion writers appear to have a hard time remembering he's a hero.
** Originally ''ComicBook/PowerGirl'' had a mischievous side, flirty side. Her New 52 version appeared in ''Worlds' Finest'' has little characterization other than "extremely lewd and man-hungry".
5th Nov '17 1:57:07 PM DarkPhoenix94
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** As of ''ComicBook/SecretEmpire'', Hank [[spoiler: after having merged with Ultron]], finally snaps and calls out the then 'Captain HYDRA' Steve and the AI version for all the stuff that they've pulled which, especially in Tony's case (Steve was morally flipped against his will), makes the incident with Janet, awful as it was, look like a playground scuffle. He has a point, unfortunately.



** ComicBook/TheJoker has gone through this. Originally he was just a very wily criminal whose modus operandi was little more than "shits and giggles". Then came the Dark Age of comic books, and all of a sudden the Joker is the Yin to Batman's Yang, with just about every story over the last 20-plus years being about his feud with the Caped Crusader. You'd be hard-pressed to find a story involving the Joker committing a crime that ''wasn't'' meant to be an attack on Batman, the one exception being his corruption of Harley Quinn. In the ComicBook/{{New 52}}, the Joker's clown aspect has been dropped completely and his characterization can be summed up as "Batman's Arch Nemesis"
** Killer Moth ''suffered'' because of this trope. When he first appeared, Killer Moth was more or less the EvilCounterpart of Batman, despite his bright, gaudy costume. An evil criminal mastermind that everyone turned to for help, he was quite the threat. Then ComicBook/{{Batgirl}} showed up. They needed someone to show that Batgirl was a worthy addition to the Bat-Family and chose Moth as the target. However, being beaten by an untrained beginner vigilante who only showed up because of sheer circumstance turned Moth into the laughingstock of the Bat-Rogues almost ''immediately.'' Suddenly, Killer Moth went from "Batman's equal" to "pathetic nobody". They tried to salvage his character in the 90s by trying to turn him into a FromNobodyToNightmare by transforming him into Charaxas during ''ComicBook/UnderworldUnleashed'', but it didn't stick, ultimately being killed by Superboy-Prime in ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis''. Even other adaptations such as ''WesternAnimation/TheBatman'' and ''[[VideoGame/LEGOAdaptationGame LEGO Batman 3]]'' wouldn't be kind to him.
** Jim Gordon when he became Batman. So y'know how 90% of the time Jim is okay with vigilantes who don't kill? How he's worked with Batman for years and is actually ''friendly'' with him, as well as the other Batfamily members? And how he only frowns on vigilantes who kill or got oo far? Well when he's Batman, he hates all vigilantes in Gotham because he's a cop. Heck, "cop" is his defining trait, and actually the only noticeable one aside from the typical "I have to be Batman my own way" shtick that ''every'' Batman successor goes through.

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** ComicBook/TheJoker has gone through this. Originally he was just a very wily criminal whose modus operandi was little more than "shits and giggles". Then came the Dark Age of comic books, and all of a sudden the Joker is the Yin to Batman's Yang, with just about every story over the last 20-plus years being about his feud with the Caped Crusader. You'd be hard-pressed to find a story involving the Joker committing a crime that ''wasn't'' meant to be an attack on Batman, the one exception being his corruption of Harley Quinn. In the ComicBook/{{New 52}}, the Joker's clown aspect has been dropped completely and his characterization can be summed up as "Batman's Arch Nemesis"
Nemesis". This was ultimately explained with the revelation that there wasn't ''one'' Joker. There were ''three.''
** Killer Moth ''suffered'' because of this trope. When he first appeared, Killer Moth was more or less the EvilCounterpart of Batman, despite his bright, gaudy costume. An evil criminal mastermind that everyone turned to for help, he was quite the threat. Then ComicBook/{{Batgirl}} showed up. They needed someone to show that Batgirl was a worthy addition to the Bat-Family and chose Moth as the target. However, being beaten by an untrained beginner vigilante who only showed up because of sheer circumstance turned Moth into the laughingstock of the Bat-Rogues almost ''immediately.'' Suddenly, Killer Moth went from "Batman's equal" to "pathetic nobody". They tried to salvage his character in the 90s by trying to turn him into a FromNobodyToNightmare by transforming him into Charaxas Charaxes during ''ComicBook/UnderworldUnleashed'', but it didn't stick, ultimately being killed by Superboy-Prime in ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis''. Even other adaptations such as ''WesternAnimation/TheBatman'' and ''[[VideoGame/LEGOAdaptationGame LEGO Batman 3]]'' wouldn't be kind to him.
** Jim Gordon when he became Batman. So y'know how 90% of the time Jim is okay with vigilantes who don't kill? How he's worked with Batman for years and is actually ''friendly'' with him, as well as the other Batfamily members? And how he only frowns on vigilantes who kill or got oo go too far? Well when he's Batman, he hates all vigilantes in Gotham because he's a cop. Heck, "cop" is his defining trait, and actually the only noticeable one aside from the typical "I have to be Batman my own way" shtick that ''every'' Batman successor goes through.through.
*** Though in ''Batgirl'', he purposefully short-circuited the suit briefly to talk to Batgirl (who he doesn't know is his daughter), and quietly says that he doesn't want to hunt vigilantes down, but it's his job, so it's best if she gets off the streets before he has to chase her down.



* ComicBook/BoosterGold started as a well-meaning hero whose love of money often got him in over his head. Over the course of the '80s and '90s, writers forgot about the "well-meaning" part and turned him into a money-grubbing jerk. Thankfully, over the course of ''Comicbook/InfiniteCrisis'' and ''ComicBook/FiftyTwo'' in the mid-'00s, DC built Booster back up, and now he's a genuine hero again--though the lure of fame and fortune still ''occasionally'' tempt him. Even better, he now ''intentionally'' acts like that, so [[SecretKeeper no-one except Batman and Superman]] realises that he's grown into a competent hero in his own right, whilst he roams the timestream protecting history from enemies who if they ever saw past his foolish reputation and realized he was the one foiling their schemes would not only kill him but do it in such a way that Booster Gold never existed. So now instead of promoting himself, Booster must do everything in his power to make people think he's an inept idiot, in order to carry out his mission to defend time itself. Even before 52, some writers had started pointing out that there was more to Booster Gold than met the eye. At one point one of the other heroes muses that, being from the future, Booster must have been aware that Doomsday was a monster that was fully capable of killing Superman. And he still stepped up and took the first actual punch Doomsday aimed at a hero on his personal forcefield, to protect another member of the League. Both this acknowledgment and the moment itself hint that some people never completely forgot that Booster was kind of badass.
* Considering how often ComicBook/{{Cyclops}} and Havok end up fighting one another, they sometimes get Flanderized into being locked in an eternal CainAndAbel, being unable to abide one another at the best of times and one of them being a super-villain (usually Havok) at worst. This portrayal appears in the Ultimate, Legends, and Misfits universes, where (unlike their 616 counterparts) they don't need the influence of any psychic brainwashing to bait them into fighting.

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* ComicBook/BoosterGold started as a well-meaning hero whose love of money often got him in over his head. Over the course of the '80s and '90s, writers forgot about the "well-meaning" part and turned him into a money-grubbing jerk. Thankfully, over the course of ''Comicbook/InfiniteCrisis'' and ''ComicBook/FiftyTwo'' in the mid-'00s, DC built Booster back up, and now he's a genuine hero again--though the lure of fame and fortune still ''occasionally'' tempt him. Even better, he now ''intentionally'' acts like that, so [[SecretKeeper no-one except Batman and Superman]] realises that he's grown into a competent hero in his own right, whilst he roams the timestream protecting history from enemies who if they ever saw past his foolish reputation and realized he was the one foiling their schemes would not only kill him but do it in such a way that Booster Gold never existed. So now instead of promoting himself, Booster must do everything in his power to make people think he's an inept idiot, in order to carry out his mission to defend time itself. Even before 52, some writers had started pointing out that there was more to Booster Gold than met the eye. At one point one of the other heroes muses that, being from the future, Booster must have been aware that Doomsday was a monster that was fully capable of killing Superman. And he still stepped up and took the first actual punch Doomsday aimed at a hero on his personal forcefield, to protect another member of the League. Both this acknowledgment acknowledgement and the moment itself hint that some people never completely forgot that Booster was kind of badass.
* Considering how often ComicBook/{{Cyclops}} and Havok end up fighting one another, they sometimes get Flanderized into being locked in an eternal CainAndAbel, being unable to abide one another at the best of times and one of them being a super-villain (usually Havok) Havok, but more recently Cyclops) at worst. This portrayal appears in the Ultimate, Legends, and Misfits universes, where (unlike their 616 counterparts) they don't need the influence of any psychic brainwashing to bait them into fighting.
30th Oct '17 12:24:12 PM lillolillo
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* Originally, ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' was something of a tough guy tackling (literally) wife beaters, war profiteers and abusive orphanages. By the end of the forties, however, he was the leading citizen of Metropolis, battling larger-than-life villains.
** Also when he was first introduced, he was a real scrapper and not afraid to get in the face of authority figures. That changed around UsefulNotes/WorldWarII along with Batman, however by the end of the fifties, he was flanderized into the ultimate boy scout and establishment figure. By the '80s, he'd become somewhat more morally ambiguous and a bit more cynical about people in power, especially after the ''ComicBook/TheManOfSteel'' reboot.
** When he was originally conceived, "faster than a speeding bullet! More powerful than a locomotive! Able to leap tall buildings in a single bound!" was ''the full'' list of Superman's powers. Now he's a PhysicalGod who can break the laws of physics on a whim and has more powers in his ''eyes'' than most superheroes have in ''total''.

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* ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'':
**
Originally, ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' Superman was something of a tough guy tackling (literally) wife beaters, war profiteers and abusive orphanages. By the end of the forties, however, he was the leading citizen of Metropolis, battling larger-than-life villains.
** Also when he was first introduced, he was a real scrapper and not afraid to get in the face of authority figures. That changed around UsefulNotes/WorldWarII along with Batman, however by the end of the fifties, he was flanderized into the ultimate boy scout and establishment figure. By the '80s, '70s, he'd become somewhat more morally ambiguous and a bit more cynical about people in power, especially after power.
** ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} started off as a sweetheart with quite a temper if pushed and a snarky side. Then [[ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths she got killed]] and writers and fans got into their heads
the ''ComicBook/TheManOfSteel'' reboot.
** When he
notion that she was originally conceived, "faster than a speeding bullet! More powerful than a locomotive! Able saccharine-sweet, ever-smiling girl who never, ever, talked against her cousin (which flies in the face of her character development throughout the Pre-Crisis period). In order to leap tall buildings in a single bound!" (over)compensate for this, [[ComicBook/Supergirl2005 subsequent]] [[ComicBook/Supergirl2011 reboots]] amped up her hotheadness and hotbloodedness to the point [[ComicBook/RedDaughterOfKrypton she was ''the full'' list of Superman's powers. Now he's turned into a PhysicalGod who can break Red Lantern]] and became "Miss Rage Issues" to the laws of physics on a whim and has more powers in his ''eyes'' than most superheroes have in ''total''.fandom's eyes.
7th Aug '17 10:12:49 PM WretchedFuliguline
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* Northstar of Marvel's ''ComicBook/AlphaFlight'' (later the ''Comicbook/XMen'') started off as an arrogant former athlete with an interest in politics and a devotion to his mentally ill sister. While John Byrne wasn't allowed to write Northstar as explicitly gay, he managed to work in a few hints. When Marvel finally got the bright idea to "out" Northstar... well, suddenly, it seemed like all that mature characterization vanished, and suddenly he was gay. Gay, gay, gay. ''So'' gay. Did he tell you how gay he is? Even worse, he went back to being a self-absorbed douche despite maturing over the course of Alpha Flight.
23rd May '17 7:57:11 PM Thranx
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** Contemporary Marvel writers have some fun with this when time-travel shenanigans bring later characters in contact with early Silver Age Hulk. Heroes (and villains) expecting the monosyllabic rage-monster are shocked to meet a gruff, clever Hulk who is functionally equivalent to a stronger, tougher, more devious Ben Grimm.
21st May '17 3:08:22 PM nombretomado
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* Hank Pym (aka ComicBook/AntMan) has suffered from this perhaps more than any other Marvel character. During a single incident in which he was suffering nervous breakdown and had just completed building a robot programmed to kill all of his his friends, [[NeverLiveItDown/ComicBooks Hank struck his wife]], Janet Van Dyne (TheWasp). This immediately had the effect of establishing him in canon both as a wife-beater and severely mentally ill. Dozens of writers over the years have gone back to this time and again, with at least three different stories having been told about the two of them coming to terms with what happened. Hank's remorse is so Flanderized and extreme that he called ''himself'' the Wasp when [[DeathIsCheap she was thought to be dead]].

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* Hank Pym (aka ComicBook/AntMan) has suffered from this perhaps more than any other Marvel character. During a single incident in which he was suffering nervous breakdown and had just completed building a robot programmed to kill all of his his friends, [[NeverLiveItDown/ComicBooks Hank struck his wife]], Janet Van Dyne (TheWasp).(ComicBook/TheWasp). This immediately had the effect of establishing him in canon both as a wife-beater and severely mentally ill. Dozens of writers over the years have gone back to this time and again, with at least three different stories having been told about the two of them coming to terms with what happened. Hank's remorse is so Flanderized and extreme that he called ''himself'' the Wasp when [[DeathIsCheap she was thought to be dead]].
17th Apr '17 7:18:27 PM Game_Fan
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* Hank Pym (aka ComicBook/AntMan) has suffered from this perhaps more than any other Marvel character. During a single incident in which he was suffering a nervous breakdown, [[NeverLiveItDown/ComicBooks Hank struck his wife]], Janet Van Dyne (TheWasp). Dozens of writers over the years have gone back to this time and again, with at least three different stories having been told about the two of them coming to terms with what happened. Hank's remorse is so Flanderized and extreme that he called ''himself'' the Wasp when [[DeathIsCheap she was thought to be dead]]. It's worth noting that both Spider-Man and Mr. Fantastic have hit their significant others in moments of extreme stress. While fans didn't much like either incident, neither character is regarded primarily as a "wife-beater" the way Pym is.

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* Hank Pym (aka ComicBook/AntMan) has suffered from this perhaps more than any other Marvel character. During a single incident in which he was suffering a nervous breakdown, breakdown and had just completed building a robot programmed to kill all of his his friends, [[NeverLiveItDown/ComicBooks Hank struck his wife]], Janet Van Dyne (TheWasp).(TheWasp). This immediately had the effect of establishing him in canon both as a wife-beater and severely mentally ill. Dozens of writers over the years have gone back to this time and again, with at least three different stories having been told about the two of them coming to terms with what happened. Hank's remorse is so Flanderized and extreme that he called ''himself'' the Wasp when [[DeathIsCheap she was thought to be dead]]. It's worth noting that both Spider-Man and Mr. Fantastic have hit their significant others in moments dead]].
** This carries over even to alternate version
of extreme stress. While fans didn't much like either incident, neither character is regarded primarily the character. The Ultimate Universe version of Pym was written as a "wife-beater" the way Pym is.cruel sadist who tortures his wife nearly to death and stole all of his ideas from her.
22nd Jan '17 11:46:09 AM Pinokio
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** A number of writers sadly only ever saw ComicBook/JeanGrey as either the Phoenix or "that cute girl Cyclops and Wolverine fight over." Jean Grey's reputation as the person who [[FirstLawOfResurrection resurrects frequently]] has been further exaggerated, with ''Phoenix Endsong'' demonstrating multiple deaths and resurrections over a few pages, further lampshaded in ''Deadly Genesis'', when Scott and Logan react to the possibility of her resurrection in the same panel. In ''[[ComicBook/AdjectivelessXMen X-Men]]'' vol 4, Jean Grey's DNA becomes a plot point in the creation of a new host for Madelyne Pryor, bringing about another discussion of the possibility of Jean Grey resurrecting.

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** A number of writers sadly only ever saw ComicBook/JeanGrey as either the Phoenix or "that cute girl Cyclops and Wolverine fight over." Jean Grey's reputation as the person who [[FirstLawOfResurrection resurrects frequently]] has been further exaggerated, with ''Phoenix Endsong'' demonstrating multiple deaths and resurrections over a few pages, further lampshaded in ''Deadly Genesis'', when Scott and Logan react to the possibility of her resurrection in the same panel. In ''[[ComicBook/AdjectivelessXMen X-Men]]'' vol 4, the possibility of Jean Grey's Grey resurrecting was further discussed when her DNA becomes became a plot point in the creation of a new host for Madelyne Pryor, bringing about another discussion of the possibility of Jean Grey resurrecting.Pryor.
22nd Jan '17 11:30:11 AM Pinokio
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** The Beast, a bit of a DumbJock in his early appearances, has become more frequently characterized by SesquipedalianLoquaciousness and a handful of catchphrases.
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