History Film / TheLeagueOfExtraOrdinaryGentlemen

27th Mar '18 8:00:18 PM Homemaderat
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* CaliforniaDoubling: The Czech Republic, actually doubles for London.
19th Feb '18 11:39:56 PM gjjones
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* GrowingMusclesSequence: Jekyll changing to Hyde, [[spoiler: then Dante when he takes an overdose of Jekyll's serum]]. Though mid-transformation, Jekyll more closely resembles the [[BodyHorror Elephant Man]].

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* GrowingMusclesSequence: Jekyll changing to Hyde, [[spoiler: then Dante when he takes an overdose of Jekyll's serum]]. Though mid-transformation, Jekyll more closely resembles the [[BodyHorror Elephant Man]]. "It's me on a bad day," ''indeed''.
19th Feb '18 10:03:44 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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** Sawyer never gets his first name mentioned. When he first appears, he introduces himself as "Special Agent Sawyer of the American Secret Service," and for the remainder of the movie, all the other characters address him as Sawyer. His first name and a ShoutOut backstory is used once in a deleted scene, which can be viewed on the DVD; going strictly by the theatrical release, unless you're GenreSavvy enough to work out his identity on your own, you'd never know he was Tom Sawyer.

to:

** Sawyer never gets his first name mentioned. When he first appears, he introduces himself as "Special Agent Sawyer of the American Secret Service," and for the remainder of the movie, all the other characters address him as Sawyer. His first name and a ShoutOut backstory is used once in a deleted scene, which can be viewed on the DVD; going strictly by the theatrical release, unless you're GenreSavvy enough to you work out his identity on your own, you'd never know he was Tom Sawyer.
19th Feb '18 9:41:20 PM Homemaderat
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** Mr. Hyde here is somewhat of a SuperpoweredAlterEgo that is Hulk size and is brought out by Jekyll's drinking of his formula. In the comic Hyde eventually took over for Jekyll for good. Compared to the source novel this is both an upping where Hyde was originally smaller than Jekyll but one line can be read to imply he grew in size or health. There Jekyll started to change back to Hyde involuntary and it required more serum to reverse and stopped working. Jekyll was under the belief one of his chemicals he used may have been contaminated with something that made it work in the first place. Then Jekyll or Hyde commit suicide. It would stand to reason though that if he had of had more time he could have found more stable control over it.



** While the film makes mention of Hyde's terrible acts, on screen he's nowhere near as bad. Jekyll also has rather equal screen presence and can debate his evil side when looking in a mirror. In the comics Hyde is played up as a monstrous evil that eventually took over completely from Jekyll. The source novel had Jekyll start to change back to Hyde involuntary and it required more serum to reverse and stopped working. Jekyll was under the belief one of his chemicals he used may have been contaminated with something that made it work in the first place. Then Jekyll or Hyde commit suicide. It would stand to reason though that if he had of had more time he could have found more stable control over it. In an odd notion of debating book to comics to movie, Stevenson believed Jekyll not being able to come to terms with his actions as Hyde were also his own as being the character's greatest flaw. While the Hyde of this film is more heroic than anything in the book or comic, he does happen to overcome that flaw in what is arguably his greatest act of heroism.[[note]]Jekyll has been refusing to turn into Hyde, but when the Nautilus is about the sink Hyde in the reflection says he can save them. Jekyll lets him out and he does it as promised.[[/note]]
** Played straight with Captain Nemo and the British Intelligence in general. In the comics they were morally ambiguous at best, but the film presents them as more conventional heroes since, again, they were going for a more lighthearted style. Nemo and Jekyll do share a tense conversation about their pasts being questionable.

to:

** While the film makes mention of Hyde's terrible acts, on screen he's nowhere near as bad. Jekyll also has rather equal more screen presence and can debate his evil side when looking in a mirror. This film presents Jekyll as seeing Hyde as a monster who he can't bother to let free again. Ironically Hyde proves he can have his heroic tendencies when Jekyll willingly lets him out. [[note]]This is ironic given Stevenson regarded Jekyll's inability to recognize Hyde's crimes are also his crimes was his fatal flaw. In this film when Jekyll accepts his bad side is a part of him and could help, he becomes more heroic, overcoming that very flaw.[[/note]] This is different from the comics where Hyde is played up as a monstrous evil that eventually took over completely from Jekyll. The Jekyll and was a TokenEvilTeammate with questionable attitudes. In the source novel had Hyde was believed to be pure evil reflection of Jekyll start to change back to Hyde involuntary and but still a part of him. Making it required more serum to reverse and stopped working. Jekyll was under the belief one of his chemicals he used may have been contaminated less certain if when presented with something that made it work in the first place. Then Jekyll or Hyde commit suicide. It would stand to reason though that if he had of had more time he could have found more stable control over it. In an odd notion of debating book to comics to movie, Stevenson believed Jekyll not being able to come to terms with his actions as Hyde were also his own as being the character's greatest flaw. While the Hyde of this film is more heroic bigger than anything just hedonistic life in London if he'd step up like the book comic or comic, he does happen to overcome that flaw in what is arguably his greatest act of heroism.[[note]]Jekyll has been refusing to turn into Hyde, but when the Nautilus is about the sink Hyde in the reflection says he can save them. Jekyll lets him out and he does it as promised.[[/note]]
movie.
** Played straight with Captain Nemo and the British Intelligence in general. is a bit more straight of a hero here. In the comics they were morally ambiguous at best, but the film presents them as he had a bit more conventional heroes since, again, they were going for issue as things went along even though he was still a team player. In the source novel, Nemo is at best an AntiVillain who rebels against the Empire. He does get a bit better after his VillainousBreakdown but this version is still far more lighthearted style. openly heroic in helping the British Empire. Nemo and Jekyll do share does however have a tense conversation with Dr Jekyll about how their own pasts being questionable.are rather questionable at best.



* {{Bowdlerise}}

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* {{Bowdlerise}}{{Bowdlerise}}: The film in comparison to the comic is far tamer in some regards. What is interesting about this project however is of course each example also had a source material to also be compared back to. In short the film had bowdlerised some things that were UpToEleven in the comic back to the source or in a new direction.
19th Feb '18 8:50:14 PM Homemaderat
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** Played straight with Captain Nemo, Mr. Hyde, and the British Intelligence in general. In the comics they were morally ambiguous at best, but the film presents them as more conventional heroes since, again, they were going for a more lighthearted style. Nemo and Jekyll do share a tense conversation about their pasts being questionable.

to:

** While the film makes mention of Hyde's terrible acts, on screen he's nowhere near as bad. Jekyll also has rather equal screen presence and can debate his evil side when looking in a mirror. In the comics Hyde is played up as a monstrous evil that eventually took over completely from Jekyll. The source novel had Jekyll start to change back to Hyde involuntary and it required more serum to reverse and stopped working. Jekyll was under the belief one of his chemicals he used may have been contaminated with something that made it work in the first place. Then Jekyll or Hyde commit suicide. It would stand to reason though that if he had of had more time he could have found more stable control over it. In an odd notion of debating book to comics to movie, Stevenson believed Jekyll not being able to come to terms with his actions as Hyde were also his own as being the character's greatest flaw. While the Hyde of this film is more heroic than anything in the book or comic, he does happen to overcome that flaw in what is arguably his greatest act of heroism.[[note]]Jekyll has been refusing to turn into Hyde, but when the Nautilus is about the sink Hyde in the reflection says he can save them. Jekyll lets him out and he does it as promised.[[/note]]
** Played straight with Captain Nemo, Mr. Hyde, Nemo and the British Intelligence in general. In the comics they were morally ambiguous at best, but the film presents them as more conventional heroes since, again, they were going for a more lighthearted style. Nemo and Jekyll do share a tense conversation about their pasts being questionable.



** The film also foregrounds Jekyll, making Hyde out to be a SuperpoweredAlterEgo (that off-screen implied to be every much the monster as can be) ends up in a place where the doctor is able to reason with (if not control) in the end. In the comics Hyde took over completely from Jekyll at a point. The source novel had Jekyll start to change back to Hyde involuntary and it required more serum to reverse and stopped working. Jekyll was under the belief one of his chemicals he used may have been contaminated with something that made it work in the first place. There Hyde commits suicide but if he had of had more time it stands to reason he could have found more stable control over it.

to:

** The film also foregrounds Jekyll, making Hyde out is taken to be some levels much tamer than his comic counterpart. There he was taken up to eleven in regards to how much of a monster he is. While it is certainly implied Hyde did many horrible things he ends up as a SuperpoweredAlterEgo (that off-screen implied to be every much the monster as can be) that ends up in a place where the doctor is able to reason with (if not control) in the end. In the comics Hyde took over completely from Jekyll at a point. The source novel had Jekyll start to change back to Hyde involuntary and it required more serum to reverse and stopped working. Jekyll was under the belief one of his chemicals he used may have been contaminated with something that made it work in the first place. There Hyde commits suicide but if he had of had more time it stands to reason he could have found more stable control over it.end.
19th Feb '18 1:59:16 PM Homemaderat
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* AnachronismStew: All over the place. In the first scenes alone, for instance, the British soldiers being attacked are straight out of UsefulNotes/WorldWarI rather than 1899. And that isn't counting Nemo's automobile, which wouldn't look too much out of place in the 1920s-30s. It is best to assume the fiction being true part has led to some alternate history, as we could just keep going with examples that otherwise make no sense.

to:

* AnachronismStew: All over the place. In the first scenes alone, for instance, the British soldiers being attacked are straight out of UsefulNotes/WorldWarI rather than 1899. And that isn't counting Nemo's automobile, which wouldn't look too much out of place in the 1920s-30s. It is best to assume the fiction being true part has led to some alternate history, as we could just keep going with examples that otherwise make no sense.[[note]] On the dvd commentary track it is mentioned by WordOfGod that this was done on purpose to introduce technology that didn't exist in the real world earlier due to all the source novels being true in this world.[[/note]]



** Captain Nemo is also considerably more jovial and more of a team player, which is complete reversal from [[TeethClenchedTeamwork both the comic]] and Creator/JulesVerne's book in terms of [[{{Ubermensch}} personality]]. Nemo does get a little better after his VillainousBreakdown, but not to the extent he'd be this noble helping the empire.
** The film also foregrounds Jekyll, making Hyde out to be a (somewhat) more benign SuperpoweredAlterEgo whom the doctor is able to control in the end.

to:

** Captain Nemo is also considerably more jovial and more of a team player, which is complete reversal from [[TeethClenchedTeamwork both the comic]] and Creator/JulesVerne's book in terms of [[{{Ubermensch}} personality]]. Nemo does get a little better after his VillainousBreakdown, but not and could probably be convinced to help save the extent planet as a whole, it seems unlikely he'd be anywhere near this noble helping to be acting as an agent of the empire.
British Empire in doing so.
** The film also foregrounds Jekyll, making Hyde out to be a (somewhat) more benign SuperpoweredAlterEgo whom (that off-screen implied to be every much the monster as can be) ends up in a place where the doctor is able to control reason with (if not control) in the end. In the comics Hyde took over completely from Jekyll at a point. The source novel had Jekyll start to change back to Hyde involuntary and it required more serum to reverse and stopped working. Jekyll was under the belief one of his chemicals he used may have been contaminated with something that made it work in the first place. There Hyde commits suicide but if he had of had more time it stands to reason he could have found more stable control over it.



** Skinner is the only member of the League who is not directly imported from a 19th-century novel. This is because Griffin isn't in the public domain, at least as far as movie rights goes, unlike the rest of the League's members. Similarly, there's M's [[TheDragon Dragon]] Sanderson Reed (who also isn't from any preexisting source), a loose Campion Bond analogue.
** Dorian Gray is not a League member in the comic book but he ''does'' appear to exist in the comic's universe. Dorian Gray's portrait appears on the cover of Volume 1 as a FreezeFrameBonus, as does a painting of the ''Nautilus'' done by Basil Hallward, the artist who painted the portrait in the book. And a darkly humorous "Paint By Numbers" version of Gray's portrait is also included in the bonus materials for Volume 1.[[/note]] Furthermore, Griffin is mentioned as the source behind the invisibility potion, but not by name.

to:

** Skinner is the only member of the League who is not directly imported from a 19th-century novel. This is because Griffin isn't in the public domain, at least as far as movie rights goes, unlike the rest of the League's members. Similarly, there's M's [[TheDragon Dragon]] Sanderson Reed (who also isn't from any preexisting source), a loose Campion Bond analogue.
Furthermore, Griffin is mentioned as the source behind the invisibility potion, but not by name.
** Dorian Gray is not a League member in the comic book but he ''does'' appear to exist in the comic's universe. Dorian Gray's portrait appears on the cover of Volume 1 as a FreezeFrameBonus, as does a painting of the ''Nautilus'' done by Basil Hallward, the artist who painted the portrait in the book. And a darkly humorous "Paint By Numbers" version of Gray's portrait is also included in the bonus materials for Volume 1.[[/note]] Furthermore, Griffin is mentioned as the source behind the invisibility potion, but not by name.



** On minor levels, M's two associates Dante and Sanderson Reed are neither from the comic book nor any other fictional work.



%%* MeaningfulFuneral: The finale.

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%%* * MeaningfulFuneral: The finale.finale features Nemo taking everyone and Quatermain's body back to Africa to lay him to rest. As they leave a witch doctor chants over his grave echoing the idea that Quatermain mentions earlier that Africa wouldn't let him die.



* TinyHeadedBehemoth: Mr. Hyde.

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* TinyHeadedBehemoth: Mr. Hyde. [[spoiler: Also the much larger "Super-Hyde" in the film's climax.]]
19th Feb '18 1:39:10 PM Homemaderat
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* AdaptationalBadass:
** Quatermain is a BadassGrandpa who's every bit the GreatWhiteHunter that he was when he was younger, but in the comics was introduced as a burned-out opium addict. This being DarkerAndEdgier than the source, where Quatermain becomes more human throughout the series but never hits the lows he reaches in the comics.
** Here, Mina retains vampiric abilities from her past encounter with Dracula; in the comics she was a BadassNormal whose defining feature was her mysterious DarkAndTroubledPast. Mina's mental skills and leadership capability is zig-zagged between Dracula, comics and film. Although she does gain new chemist skills in this film as well.

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* AdaptationalBadass:
AdaptationalBadass: Several Examples of which, we'll compare both to the comic and their source materials.
** Quatermain is a BadassGrandpa who's every bit the GreatWhiteHunter that he was when he was younger, but in the comics was introduced as a burned-out opium addict. This The comics being DarkerAndEdgier than the source, where Quatermain becomes more human throughout the series but never hits the lows he reaches in the comics.
** Here, Mina retains vampiric abilities from her past encounter with Dracula; in the comics she was a BadassNormal whose defining feature was her mysterious DarkAndTroubledPast. Both the comic and the movie are examples that help show Mina's mental skills (in this film as now being a chemist) and leadership capability (being the leader in the comics) skills. In her other adaptations of her source novel Mina is zig-zagged between Dracula, comics and film. Although mostly reduced to being a DamselInDistress despite the fact she does gain new chemist skills in this film as well.was very much important to the boys even figuring out Dracula's plot.



* AnachronismStew: All over the place. In the first scenes alone, for instance, the British soldiers being attacked are straight out of UsefulNotes/WorldWarI rather than 1899. And that isn't counting Nemo's automobile, which wouldn't look too much out of place in the 1920s-30s.
** It is best to assume the fiction being true part has led to some alternate history, as we could just keep going with examples that otherwise make no sense.

to:

* AnachronismStew: All over the place. In the first scenes alone, for instance, the British soldiers being attacked are straight out of UsefulNotes/WorldWarI rather than 1899. And that isn't counting Nemo's automobile, which wouldn't look too much out of place in the 1920s-30s. \n** It is best to assume the fiction being true part has led to some alternate history, as we could just keep going with examples that otherwise make no sense.



* TinyHeadedBehemoth: Mr. Hyde. [[spoiler: Also the much larger "Super-Hyde" in the film's climax.]]

to:

* TinyHeadedBehemoth: Mr. Hyde. [[spoiler: Also the much larger "Super-Hyde" in the film's climax.]]



%%* UnwittingPawn: The League.

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%%* * UnwittingPawn: The League.League is assembled only as a way for [[spoiler:Professor Moriarty to gather their powers and technologies to create a weapons kit to sell to the nations of the world.]]
14th Feb '18 11:51:15 AM Homemaderat
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** Played straight with Captain Nemo, Mr. Hyde, and the British Intelligence in general. In the comics they were morally ambiguous at best, but the film presents them as more conventional heroes since, again, they were going for a more lighthearted style.

to:

** Played straight with Captain Nemo, Mr. Hyde, and the British Intelligence in general. In the comics they were morally ambiguous at best, but the film presents them as more conventional heroes since, again, they were going for a more lighthearted style. Nemo and Jekyll do share a tense conversation about their pasts being questionable.



* CompositeCharacter: The Fantom. With his name spelled with a "F" and his penchant for global terrorism, he appears as the pulp villain Fantômas. Yet he wears a mask resembling the Phantom of the Opera, which Quatermain lampshades. Likely this is because the Phantom is much more widely known by today's audiences than Fantômas. This of course taken to even more complicated extremes when [spoiler: he is revealed to be M from James Bond who in this universe is also the notorious Professor James Moriarty.]] So the final film version is one book character masquerading as two other characters in which one is a composite of two other characters.

to:

* CompositeCharacter: The Fantom. With his name spelled with a "F" and his penchant for global terrorism, he appears as the pulp villain Fantômas. Yet he wears a mask resembling the Phantom of the Opera, which Quatermain lampshades. Likely this is because the Phantom is much more widely known by today's audiences than Fantômas. This of course taken to even more complicated extremes when [spoiler: [[spoiler: he is revealed to be M from James Bond who in this universe is also the notorious Professor James Moriarty.]] So the final film version is one book character masquerading as two other characters in which one is a composite of two other characters.


Added DiffLines:

** Quatermain calls the Fantom's mask "operatic" as a nod to ''Literature/ThePhantomofTheOpera'' being part of that CompositeCharacter identity.
10th Feb '18 9:36:01 AM Homemaderat
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*** Another features ''Myth/RobinHood'', Sir Peter of ''Literature/{{Ivanhoe}} and at least one of the order of ''Literature/TheBlackArrow''.
*** The last has D'Artagnan and the ''Literature/TheThreeMuskeeters'', ''Literature/CaptainBlood'' and Sir Oliver Tressilian, ''Literature/TheSeaHawk''.

to:

*** Another features ''Myth/RobinHood'', Sir Peter of ''Literature/{{Ivanhoe}} ''Literature/{{Ivanhoe}}'' and at least one of the order of ''Literature/TheBlackArrow''.
''The Black Arrow''.
*** The last has D'Artagnan and the ''Literature/TheThreeMuskeeters'', ''Literature/TheThreeMusketeers'', ''Literature/CaptainBlood'' and Sir Oliver Tressilian, ''Literature/TheSeaHawk''.



%%* {{Bishonen}}: Sawyer.

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%%* * {{Bishonen}}: Sawyer.Tom Sawyer by comparison to his team mates is intended as the younger good looking male of the team.



** Tom Sawyer, though, is more ArtisticLicense. In Creator/MarkTwain's original novels they are set before UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar. (Southern slavery largely drives the plot of ''Literature/TheAdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn'': Huck runs away with his foster mother's house slave to keep her from selling him.) However as Twain continued with two more books and various unfinished works Twain didn't bother worrying about timelines matching up. As such a producer of this film used the idea that Tom Sawyer, Detective featured Tom as a teenager and was published not long before this film's timeline as a reason for his age based on that book's publication date rather than chronological age from the first one.

to:

** Tom Sawyer, though, is more ArtisticLicense. In Creator/MarkTwain's original novels they are set before UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar. (Southern slavery largely drives the plot of ''Literature/TheAdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn'': Huck runs away with his foster mother's house slave to keep her from selling him.) However as Twain continued with two more books and various unfinished works Twain didn't bother worrying about timelines matching up. As such a producer of this film used the idea that Tom Sawyer, Detective featured Tom as a teenager and was published not long before this film's timeline as a reason for his age based on that book's publication date rather than chronological age from the first one. Obviously this is one point that is truly unavoidable in trying to merge multiple sources together, some authors cared more about some thing than others.



* CluelessMystery: Quatermain works out the true identity of the BigBad, but there's never any indication given of ''how''. The only clues come in the form of his secretary calling him "Professor," and TheDragon calling him by his real first name (which is a very common one).

to:

* CluelessMystery: Quatermain works out the true identity of the BigBad, but there's never any indication given of ''how''. The only clues come in the form of his secretary calling him "Professor," and TheDragon calling him by his real first name (which is a very common one). We assume InUniverse, Moriarty's criminal career is well known enough for Quatermain to have assumed this.



** The paintings at the first meeting contain a group of shout outs. See AllThereInTheScript for the ones you'll need help on.



* YoungGun: Tom Sawyer. At first glance, this makes no sense; Tom Sawyer was a twelve-year-old in the pre-Civil War era, so if anything, he should be ''older'' than Quatermain. The producer uses ComicBookTime to justify this by pointing out that Tom was only 17 years old in ''Tom Sawyer, Detective'', which was published just a few years prior to the time period of the film's setting. It does bring up a notable problem, though, with the theory of all fiction being real. There's many books that don't ever give specific dates, and in some series time doesn't always flow to match the real world to the inside world. Mark Twain certainly did not take this as seriously as Alan Moore does. And when you get down to it, because of issues such as this, no matter who is writing a story of this type, at some point they are just going to have to HandWave certain things.

to:

* YoungGun: Tom Sawyer. At first glance, this makes no sense; Tom Sawyer was a twelve-year-old in the pre-Civil War era, so if anything, he should be ''older'' than Quatermain. The producer uses ComicBookTime to justify plays this by pointing out that Tom was only 17 years old in ''Tom Sawyer, Detective'', which was published just a few years prior to part as the time period of the film's setting. It does bring up a notable problem, though, young good looking guy with the theory of all fiction being real. There's many books that don't ever give specific dates, and in some series time doesn't always flow to match the real world to the inside world. Mark Twain certainly did not take a gun. See CanonForeigner for more on why this as seriously as Alan Moore does. And when you get down to it, because of issues such as this, no matter who is writing a story of this type, at some point they are just going to have to HandWave certain things.problem for some.
10th Feb '18 9:24:20 AM Homemaderat
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** Sawyer never gets his first name mentioned. When he first appears, he introduces himself as "Special Agent Sawyer of the American Secret Service," and for the remainder of the movie, all the other characters address him as Sawyer. His first name is used once in a deleted scene, which can be viewed on the DVD; going strictly by the theatrical release, unless you're GenreSavvy enough to work out his identity on your own, you'd never know he was Tom Sawyer.
** In the original script, it is revealed at the end that Skinner is actually an agent for British Intelligence. He was working undercover to see if Sanderson Reed was actually a double-agent working for the Fantom.

to:

** Sawyer never gets his first name mentioned. When he first appears, he introduces himself as "Special Agent Sawyer of the American Secret Service," and for the remainder of the movie, all the other characters address him as Sawyer. His first name and a ShoutOut backstory is used once in a deleted scene, which can be viewed on the DVD; going strictly by the theatrical release, unless you're GenreSavvy enough to work out his identity on your own, you'd never know he was Tom Sawyer.
** In the original script, it is revealed at the end that Skinner is actually an agent for British Intelligence. He was working undercover to see if Sanderson Reed was actually a double-agent working for the Fantom. Also direct mention is made that Sanderson Reed was the second Invisible Man.
** During the first meeting scene there are three custom made paintings hanging in the background that can be partially or fully seen throughout the scene. While some are pretty easy to guess if you know your books, some were only officially identified by details in the script.
*** One is similar to an actual previous League in the comic book. You see Lemuel Gulliver from ''Literature/GulliversTravels'', Natty Bumppo from ''Literature/TheLeatherstockingTales'', Percy Blakeney aka ''Literature/TheScarletPimpernel'' and ''Literature/DoctorSyn'' in his scarecrow outfit.
*** Another features ''Myth/RobinHood'', Sir Peter of ''Literature/{{Ivanhoe}} and at least one of the order of ''Literature/TheBlackArrow''.
*** The last has D'Artagnan and the ''Literature/TheThreeMuskeeters'', ''Literature/CaptainBlood'' and Sir Oliver Tressilian, ''Literature/TheSeaHawk''.



%%* CaliforniaDoubling: The Czech Republic, actually.

to:

%%* * CaliforniaDoubling: The Czech Republic, actually.actually doubles for London.



** Tom Sawyer, though, is plain ArtisticLicense: including him as a young man in a film set in 1899 conveniently ignores that the Creator/MarkTwain novels are set before UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar; Tom ought to be roughly Quatermain's age. (Southern slavery largely drives the plot of ''Literature/TheAdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn'': Huck runs away with his foster mother's house slave to keep her from selling him.) In one of the deleted scenes it's mentioned that Huck Finn was Tom's partner in the Secret Service and the Fantom killed him.

to:

** Tom Sawyer, though, is plain ArtisticLicense: including him as a young man in a film set in 1899 conveniently ignores that the Creator/MarkTwain more ArtisticLicense. In Creator/MarkTwain's original novels they are set before UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar; Tom ought to be roughly Quatermain's age. UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar. (Southern slavery largely drives the plot of ''Literature/TheAdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn'': Huck runs away with his foster mother's house slave to keep her from selling him.) In one However as Twain continued with two more books and various unfinished works Twain didn't bother worrying about timelines matching up. As such a producer of this film used the deleted scenes it's mentioned idea that Huck Finn Tom Sawyer, Detective featured Tom as a teenager and was Tom's partner in published not long before this film's timeline as a reason for his age based on that book's publication date rather than chronological age from the Secret Service and the Fantom killed him.first one.



* CompositeCharacter: The Fantom. With his name spelled with a "F" and his penchant for global terrorism, he appears as the pulp villain Fantômas. Yet he wears a mask resembling the Phantom of the Opera, which Quatermain lampshades. Likely this is because the Phantom is much more widely known by today's audiences than Fantômas.

to:

* CompositeCharacter: The Fantom. With his name spelled with a "F" and his penchant for global terrorism, he appears as the pulp villain Fantômas. Yet he wears a mask resembling the Phantom of the Opera, which Quatermain lampshades. Likely this is because the Phantom is much more widely known by today's audiences than Fantômas. This of course taken to even more complicated extremes when [spoiler: he is revealed to be M from James Bond who in this universe is also the notorious Professor James Moriarty.]] So the final film version is one book character masquerading as two other characters in which one is a composite of two other characters.
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