History Film / RobRoy

6th Nov '16 2:38:30 AM Morgenthaler
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'''''Rob Roy''''' is a 1995 film (VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory, being vaguely inspired by real events; has almost nothing to do with the 1817 novel by Sir Creator/WalterScott) starring Creator/LiamNeeson, Creator/TimRoth, Creator/JessicaLange, Creator/BrianCox, and Creator/JohnHurt. It tells the [[JustLikeRobinHood heavily fictionalized]] story of Scottish folk hero Robert Roy [=MacGregor=], and his part in the Jacobite Rising. While it was overshadowed by [[Film/{{Braveheart}} that other 1995 movie about Scottish rebellion against the English]], the climactic SwordFight is held up as one of the best in film.

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'''''Rob Roy''''' ''Rob Roy'' is a 1995 film (VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory, being vaguely inspired by real events; has almost nothing to do with the 1817 novel by Sir Creator/WalterScott) starring Creator/LiamNeeson, Creator/TimRoth, Creator/JessicaLange, Creator/BrianCox, and Creator/JohnHurt. It tells the [[JustLikeRobinHood heavily fictionalized]] story of Scottish folk hero Robert Roy [=MacGregor=], and his part in the Jacobite Rising. While it was overshadowed by [[Film/{{Braveheart}} that other 1995 movie about Scottish rebellion against the English]], the climactic SwordFight is held up as one of the best in film.
6th Nov '16 2:38:16 AM Morgenthaler
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* {{Badass}}: Rob and Cunningham. Also the final duel's referee who makes it clear with his body language and tone of voice that the two aforementioned baddasses will abide by ''his'' rules and orders during the duel.
2nd Oct '16 8:56:12 PM TheWanderer
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* {{Flynning}}: Thoroughly averted in the final duel between Roy and Cunningham. The fight is extremely realistic, notably in that Cunningham (with a rapier) stays far from Roy (who wields a basket-hilted claymore), wary of his superior strength, longer reach, and heavier blade. He attempts to do Roy in by DeathOfAThousand cuts, a very valid strategy in sword fighting.

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* {{Flynning}}: Thoroughly averted in the final duel between Roy and Cunningham. The fight is extremely realistic, notably in that Cunningham (with (who is wielding a rapier) stays far from Roy Roy, (who wields a basket-hilted claymore), claymore) and is wary of his Roy's superior strength, longer reach, and heavier blade. He attempts to do Roy in by DeathOfAThousand cuts, DeathOfAThousandCuts, with the goal being to weaken Roy before finishing him off when Roy is too weak to resist. That is a very valid strategy in sword fighting.fighting, particularly with a rapier, and several recorded duels were fought and won using exactly that method.



* LeeroyJenkins: Alasdair. Rob is tempted to do this himself.

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* LeeroyJenkins: Alasdair. LeeroyJenkins:
** Alasdair gets a group of his clansmen slaughtered when he refuses to follow the plan to use HitAndRunTactics on the small army led by Cunningham, and instead tries to snipe Cunningham at extreme range.
** Cunningham attempted to provoke
Rob is tempted to do into doing this himself.as well.



-->--Referee: "You are here on a matter of honor. I am here to see that you settle it honorably. There will be no back-stabbing, you will not throw your blades, nor will you use weapons other than those agreed. If quarter should be asked..."
-->--Rob Roy: "No quarter will be asked."
-->--Cunningham: "Or given."
-->--Referee: "Attend upon your weapons and commence upon my mark."

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-->--Referee: "You --->'''Referee:''' You are here on a matter of honor. I am here to see that you settle it honorably. There will be no back-stabbing, you will not throw your blades, nor will you use weapons other than those agreed. If quarter should be asked..."
-->--Rob Roy: "No
asked-\\
'''Rob Roy:''' No
quarter will be asked."
-->--Cunningham: "Or
\\
'''Cunningham:''' Or
given."
-->--Referee: "Attend
\\
'''Referee:''' Attend
upon your weapons and commence upon my mark."



* OhCrap: Rob gets a gradually increasing one during the final duel, where he begins to see that, despite seeming like a fop and a coward who will only fight with an army at his back, Cunningham is a superb swordsman. The {{OhCrap}}ness increases when he realises that Argyll was not exaggerating Cunningham's prowess with a sword, and that he is totally outmatched in skill.

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* OhCrap: Rob gets a gradually increasing one during the final duel, where he begins to see that, despite seeming like a fop and a coward who will only fight with an army at his back, Cunningham is a superb swordsman. The {{OhCrap}}ness {{Oh Crap}}ness increases when he realises that Argyll was not exaggerating Cunningham's prowess with a sword, and that he is totally outmatched in skill.



* ShowingTheirWork: The swords used in the film are quite period-appropriate, with the English aristocrats favoring gentlemanly dueling smallswords and the Scottish men using the basket-hilted heavy claymores of the period.

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* ShowingTheirWork: The swords used in the film are quite period-appropriate, with the English aristocrats favoring gentlemanly dueling smallswords short swords and the Scottish men using the basket-hilted heavy claymores of the period.



* TooDumbToLive: Alastair Roy. Shooting at redcoats when you're in hiding? Not smart.

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* TooDumbToLive: Alastair Roy. Shooting at redcoats when they badly outnumber you and you're in supposed to be hiding? Not smart.



* VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: For one, the character of Archibald Cunningham never existed and is an invention of the movie; Montrose does exist, but he was a Duke, not Marquess, at the time this film is set, and of course is given a bit of a HistoricalVillainUpgrade for the movie, just as Roy is given a HistoricalHeroUpgrade (the real Roy was a cattle thief and a murderer; the former is only vaguely referenced). Incidentally, it has nothing to do with the 1817 novel by Walter Scott, which has a different plot entirely- being based around the Jacobite rebellion (which should have been occurring during the timeline of the movie, but are not mentioned at all)-, not to mention a different ''protagonist'' (Rob Roy is more of a FamedInStory supporting character whom the story revolves around).



* WeakButSkilled: Cunningham is obviously not as physically strong as his opponents Guthrie and Rob, but has far superior sword fighting skill.



* TheWorfEffect: We see Guthrie dispatching another swordsman to establish his toughness. Then he spends the rest of the film showing off how badass the main characters are.
* VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: For one, the character of Archibald Cunningham never existed and is an invention of the movie; Montrose does exist, but he was a Duke, not Marquess, at the time this film is set, and of course is given a bit of a HistoricalVillainUpgrade for the movie, just as Roy is given a HistoricalHeroUpgrade (the real Roy was a cattle thief and a murderer; the former is only vaguely referenced). Incidentally, it has nothing to do with the 1817 novel by Walter Scott, which has a different plot entirely- being based around the Jacobite rebellion (which should have been occurring during the timeline of the movie, but are not mentioned at all)-, not to mention a different ''protagonist'' (Rob Roy is more of a FamedInStory supporting character whom the story revolves around).

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* TheWorfEffect: We see Guthrie dispatching another swordsman to establish his toughness. Then he spends the rest of the film showing off how badass being beaten by the main characters are.
* VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: For one, the character of Archibald Cunningham never existed and is an invention of the movie; Montrose does exist, but he was a Duke, not Marquess, at the time this film is set, and of course is given a bit of a HistoricalVillainUpgrade for the movie, just as Roy is given a HistoricalHeroUpgrade (the real Roy was a cattle thief and a murderer; the former is only vaguely referenced). Incidentally, it has nothing
to do with the 1817 novel by Walter Scott, which has a different plot entirely- being based around the Jacobite rebellion (which should have been occurring during the timeline of the movie, but are not mentioned at all)-, not to mention a different ''protagonist'' (Rob Roy is more of a FamedInStory supporting character whom the story revolves around).
show off how badass they are.

20th May '16 10:34:49 PM Clendy82
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* TheyCallMeMisterTibbs: Montrose gets this treatment when he is insolently too familiar with an angry Duke of Argyll when the two meet at a gentrified salon.

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* TheyCallMeMisterTibbs: Montrose gets this treatment when he is insolently too familiar with an angry Duke of Argyll when the two meet at a gentrified poker salon.
20th May '16 10:01:57 PM Clendy82
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* TheyCallMeMisterTibbs: Montrose gets this treatment when he is insolently too familiar with an angry Duke of Argyll. After getting ranked out in a very public place, Montrose fumingly lampshades the trope:

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* TheyCallMeMisterTibbs: Montrose gets this treatment when he is insolently too familiar with an angry Duke of Argyll. After getting ranked out in a very public place, Montrose fumingly lampshades Argyll when the trope:two meet at a gentrified salon.
-->'''Montrose:''' John, you have the look of a man who means to play hard.
-->'''Argyll:''' Do not presume to speak above your station, sir. I will have my rank from you!
-->'''*soon after Argyll departs*'''
13th May '16 7:23:54 AM Dragon101
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* TheDragon: Archibald to Montrose.

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* TheDragon: DragonInChief: Archibald is TheDragon to Montrose. Montrose, but it's the former who is really the main villain of the story. Their relationship is somewhere between this an a BigBadDuumvirate- Archibald robs Montrose of his money and is easily the worst person of the two, but Montrose is the one with the status and wealth and he knows or at least suspects what Archibald has done and reluctantly goes along with it to further his own agenda. Archie, though, remains the one driving the plot and carrying out most of the crimes in the movie (and mostly ForTheEvulz), and it's Archie that Roy regards as his real enemy in the film.



* EvilBrit: Archie Cunningham. Montrose might technically be Scottish, but he presents himself and thinks of himself as being English.
26th Feb '16 8:27:20 PM lorgskyegon
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Added DiffLines:

* {{Flynning}}: Thoroughly averted in the final duel between Roy and Cunningham. The fight is extremely realistic, notably in that Cunningham (with a rapier) stays far from Roy (who wields a basket-hilted claymore), wary of his superior strength, longer reach, and heavier blade. He attempts to do Roy in by DeathOfAThousand cuts, a very valid strategy in sword fighting.
7th Feb '16 3:44:48 AM Dragon101
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* TheSociopath: Archibald Cunningham is a thief, a philanderer, a rapist and a murderer. Superficially charming enough to get most women into bed, but doesn't give a damn about them beyond sex- including if they kill themselves out of shame afterwards. He betrays and robs his own patron, then gets him to frame another man for his own crime. A smug, spoilt, unloved PsychopathicManchild who is used to others covering for his misdeeds, he ultimately gets cut in half for his laundry list of crimes and nobody- including his own ally- mourns for him afterwards.

to:

* TheSociopath: Archibald Cunningham is a thief, a philanderer, a rapist and a murderer.murderer who makes his way in life off of other peoples' money. Superficially charming enough to get most women into bed, but doesn't give a damn about them beyond sex- including if they kill themselves out of shame afterwards. He betrays and robs his own patron, then gets him to frame another man for his own crime. A smug, spoilt, unloved PsychopathicManchild who is used to others covering for his misdeeds, he ultimately gets cut in half for his laundry list of crimes and nobody- including his own ally- mourns for him afterwards.
7th Feb '16 3:42:23 AM Dragon101
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* TheSociopath: Archibald Cunningham is a thief, a philanderer, a rapist and a murderer. Superficially charming enough to get most women into bed, but doesn't give a damn about them beyond sex- including if they kill themselves out of shame afterwards. He betrays and robs his own patron, then gets him to frame another man for his own crime. A smug, spoilt, unloved PsychopathicManchild who is used to others covering for his misdeeds, he ultimately gets cut in half for his laundry list of crimes and nobody- including his own ally- mourns for him afterwards.



* VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: For one, the character of Archibald Cunningham never existed and is an invention of the movie; Montrose does exist, but he was a Duke, not Marquess, at the time this film is set, and of course is given a bit of a HistoricalVillainUpgrade for the movie, just as Roy is given a HistoricalHeroUpgrade (the real Roy was a cattle thief and a murderer; the former is only vaguely referenced). Incidentally, it has nothing to do with the 1817 novel by Walter Scott, which has a different plot entirely- being based around the Jacobite rebellion-, not to mention a different ''protagonist'' (Rob Roy is more of a FamedInStory supporting character whom the story revolves around).

to:

* VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: For one, the character of Archibald Cunningham never existed and is an invention of the movie; Montrose does exist, but he was a Duke, not Marquess, at the time this film is set, and of course is given a bit of a HistoricalVillainUpgrade for the movie, just as Roy is given a HistoricalHeroUpgrade (the real Roy was a cattle thief and a murderer; the former is only vaguely referenced). Incidentally, it has nothing to do with the 1817 novel by Walter Scott, which has a different plot entirely- being based around the Jacobite rebellion-, rebellion (which should have been occurring during the timeline of the movie, but are not mentioned at all)-, not to mention a different ''protagonist'' (Rob Roy is more of a FamedInStory supporting character whom the story revolves around).
7th Feb '16 3:30:48 AM Dragon101
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* VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: For one, the character of Archibald Cunningham never existed and is an invention of the novel; Montrose does exist, but he was a Duke, not Marquess, at the time this film is set, and of course is given a bit of a HistoricalVillainUpgrade for the movie, just as Roy is given a HistoricalHeroUpgrade (the real Roy was a cattle thief and a murderer; the former is only vaguely referenced). Incidentally, it has nothing to do with the 1817 novel by Walter Scott, which has a different plot entirely- being based around the Jacobite rebellion-, not to mention a different ''protagonist'' (Rob Roy is more of a FamedInStory supporting character whom the story revolves around).

to:

* VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: For one, the character of Archibald Cunningham never existed and is an invention of the novel; movie; Montrose does exist, but he was a Duke, not Marquess, at the time this film is set, and of course is given a bit of a HistoricalVillainUpgrade for the movie, just as Roy is given a HistoricalHeroUpgrade (the real Roy was a cattle thief and a murderer; the former is only vaguely referenced). Incidentally, it has nothing to do with the 1817 novel by Walter Scott, which has a different plot entirely- being based around the Jacobite rebellion-, not to mention a different ''protagonist'' (Rob Roy is more of a FamedInStory supporting character whom the story revolves around).
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