History Film / GoneWithTheWind

25th Jun '16 8:48:06 PM shatterstar
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* DefiledForever: Part of the reason why Rhett is not received by any fine family in Charleston is that he refused to marry a girl he had been out with for too long without a chaperone. Nothing actually ''happened'', but the scandal caused by their actions was enough.

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* DefiledForever: Part of May be seen as the reason why case for Cathleen Calvert in the book. While technically she submits to the marriage of her on volition, it's [[DontYouDarePityMe shown]] she resents it greatly; and it destroys her, making her nothing but a piece of sad white trash.
** Also to the unnamed girl whose reputation
Rhett is not received ruined by any fine family in Charleston is that he refused refusing to marry a girl he had been her after being out with for too long without after dark. Even though she didn't have a chaperone. Nothing actually ''happened'', but the scandal caused by their actions was enough.baby, which would imply that they ''didn't'' have sex.



* DeusAngstMachina and TraumaCongaLine: No matter how you feel about Scarlett as the protagonist, you have to admit ''a lot'' of bad stuff happens to her.

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* DeusAngstMachina and / TraumaCongaLine: No matter how you feel about When finally, after walking for days and while starving, Scarlett has finally reach her home, there's a ''lovely'' surprise for her. Her mommy is [[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth dead]]. [[SanitySlippage Daddy's gone mad with grief.]] [[IllGirl Her sisters are sick with typhoid.]] [[SlaveLiberation The slaves have fled]] [[HappinessInSlavery except the ones loyal to the family]], who are very few and also house slaves; generally not good for helping in the fields. [[FromBadToWorse The house was completely pillaged]] [[ArmiesAreEvil by the Yankees]] and now must provide for a large family with two children and three sick women, with the mentally unstable father as the protagonist, you have to admit ''a lot'' only man of bad stuff happens to her.the house. [[DespairEventHorizon In addition, she must cultivate an entire plantation with only three black slaves]] because it's her ''only'' source of income, while before they had hundreds of these.



* FunnyForeigner: Gerald O'Hara is a stereotypical Irishman to the nth degree, while Creole Rene Picard brings it just as hard.

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* FunnyForeigner: Gerald O'Hara is a stereotypical Irishman to the nth degree, while Creole Rene Picard brings it just as hard.hard
* FunWithAcronyms / TakeThat / StealthPun: Rhett's comment about the South only having "'''C'''otton, '''S'''laves and '''A'''rrogance," paralleling the initials of the '''C'''onfederate '''S'''tates of '''A'''merica.
8th Jun '16 9:20:45 PM Jayalaw
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Added DiffLines:

* AdultFear:
** WarIsHell, for both the South and the North in the novel. For Scarlett and her friends, while still teenagers, they find out uncomfortably that the men literally may die for their so-called ideals while the women are left behind, either as widows or spinsters.
** For modern readers, the fact that the book excises the grisly realities of slavery.
** [[spoiler:Bonnie's death]], when Scarlett only realizes too late what is happening and faints.
22nd May '16 4:40:31 PM missjewels
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* ValueDissonance: Racial inequality is never questioned and is continually framed as if it is a natural and just state. Makes sense given that it was written by a white Southern woman. The book is far worse compared to the movie which tones down or omits some of the more noxious narration in regards to race, but both the book and the film are very much products of their time. Also, Rhett's ravishing of Scarlett is uncomfortable to modern audiences.

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* ValueDissonance: ValuesDissonance: Racial inequality is never questioned and is continually framed as if it is a natural and just state. Makes sense given that it was written by a white Southern woman. The book is far worse compared to the movie which tones down or omits some of the more noxious narration in regards to race, but both the book and the film are very much products of their time. Also, Rhett's ravishing of Scarlett is uncomfortable to modern audiences.
22nd May '16 4:39:05 PM missjewels
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Added DiffLines:

* ValueDissonance: Racial inequality is never questioned and is continually framed as if it is a natural and just state. Makes sense given that it was written by a white Southern woman. The book is far worse compared to the movie which tones down or omits some of the more noxious narration in regards to race, but both the book and the film are very much products of their time. Also, Rhett's ravishing of Scarlett is uncomfortable to modern audiences.
21st May '16 12:40:26 PM Jayalaw
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** Scarlett's greatest phobia is of going hungry, after the long ride from

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** Scarlett's greatest phobia is of going hungry, after the long ride from Atlanta to Tara. Even when she earns enough to never starve, she still has nightmares about it.
21st May '16 12:40:00 PM Jayalaw
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The original novel was written by Margaret Mitchell. It was followed by ''Scarlett'', a professional FanFic, which was later adapted into a MiniSeries. A prequel, ''Rhett Butler's People'', has been published, telling the story from Rhett's perspective, and has a different ending than ''Scarlett''. Another sequel by the name of ''Winds of Tara'' has been published. Bear in mind that this has another ending for those who are not happy with ''Scarlett''. More recently, a parody has been written called ''The Wind Done Gone'', which is the entire book written from the point of view of Scarlett's mixed-race half-sister, whom she never notices in the original novel, and whom Rhett himself takes as a lover. No explicit names are used, interestingly.

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The original novel was written by Margaret Mitchell. It was followed by ''Scarlett'', ''Literature/{{Scarlett}}'', a professional FanFic, which was later adapted into a MiniSeries. A prequel, ''Rhett Butler's People'', has been published, telling the story from Rhett's perspective, and has a different ending than ''Scarlett''. Another sequel by the name of ''Winds of Tara'' has been published. Bear in mind that this has another ending for those who are not happy with ''Scarlett''. More recently, a parody has been written called ''The Wind Done Gone'', which is the entire book written from the point of view of Scarlett's mixed-race half-sister, whom she never notices in the original novel, and whom Rhett himself takes as a lover. No explicit names are used, interestingly.



* BewareTheNiceOnes: Melanie's reaction to Scarlett killing a Union deserter was "I'm glad you killed him!" after running down the stairs with her brother's sword. And she pulled out a pistol when she thought Yankee soldiers were about to break into her home.
** This is never shown in the book, but in the movie, when Sue-ellen is sobbing over Scarlett having married her fiancee right under her nose, it sounds like Melanie says something to Sue-ellen like, "Well, she had to do it to save Tara." Which means that either Scarlett told Melanie her reasons for marrying Frank or that Melanie figured it out for herself. Either way, Melanie is completely on board with Scarlett doing this, and is chiding Sue-ellen for feeling the way she does.
*** Although there is a certain ValuesDissonance in that Melanie does say a few things in both the book and the movie that sound horribly callous to a modern day audience but which for the time would have been gentle and sound advice. Particularly when it comes to marriage, which was quite mercenary at the time.

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* BewareTheNiceOnes: BewareTheNiceOnes:
**
Melanie's reaction to Scarlett killing a Union deserter was "I'm glad you killed him!" after running down the stairs with her brother's sword. And she pulled out a pistol when she thought Yankee soldiers were about to break into her home.
** This is never shown in the book, but in the movie, when Sue-ellen is sobbing over Scarlett having married her fiancee right under her nose, it sounds like Melanie says something to Sue-ellen like, "Well, she had to do it to save Tara." Which means that either Scarlett told Melanie her reasons for marrying Frank or that Melanie figured it out for herself. Either way, Melanie is completely on board with Scarlett doing this, and is chiding Sue-ellen for feeling the way she does.
***
does. Although there is a certain ValuesDissonance in that Melanie does say a few things in both the book and the movie that sound horribly callous to a modern day audience but which for the time would have been gentle and sound advice. Particularly when it comes to marriage, which was quite mercenary at the time.



** This is played with quite a bit throughout ''Gone with the Wind'' and ''Scarlett''. Scarlett may be a scheming, lying bitch under her flirtatious and demure exterior, but she can be quite naive and innocent about the really nasty stuff that goes on behind closed doors and in society. E.g., in Charleston, she is actively shocked and sickened when she finds out that adultery is actually really quite common among married people.

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** This is played with quite a bit throughout ''Gone with the Wind'' and ''Scarlett''.''Literature/{{Scarlett}}''. Scarlett may be a scheming, lying bitch under her flirtatious and demure exterior, but she can be quite naive and innocent about the really nasty stuff that goes on behind closed doors and in society. E.g., in Charleston, she is actively shocked and sickened when she finds out that adultery is actually really quite common among married people.



* CharacterDevelopment: "Scarlett" is basically an entire book of just this, where Scarlett finally grows out of being a teenager... in her late twenties. It's very much a case of that {{Determinator}} part of her being used to get past her belle upbringing and her stunted emotional growth to turn her into a proper adult. Well, a semi-decent person at least. It's why this book is [[DoorStopper so long]]. And also one of the reasons why it is... not well liked.

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* CharacterDevelopment: "Scarlett" is basically an entire book of just this, where CharacterDevelopment:
**
Scarlett finally grows out of being a teenager... in her belatedly realizes that [[spoiler:she and Melanie have become FireForgedFriends and that she doesn't really love Ashley]] when it's too late twenties. It's very much a case to do anything about it. She also matures from an ignorant, vapid Southern Belle to the 1800s version of that {{Determinator}} part of her being used a CorruptCorporateExecutive to get past her belle upbringing keep the family land and her stunted emotional growth to family well-fed.
** Rhett realizes in
turn her into a proper adult. Well, a semi-decent person at least. It's why this book is [[DoorStopper so long]]. And also one that WantingIsBetterThanHaving in terms of the reasons why it is... not well liked. his relationship with Scarlett, and knows that his own role in PoorCommunicationKills [[spoiler:ruins their relationship.]]



* DeadpanSnarker: Rhett in regards to nearly everything, from the impossibility of the Confederacy winning the war to the [[ValuesResonance ridiculous expectations put on women in the 1860s]]. Routinely, [[SurroundedByIdiots no one understands his comments/everyone is offended by them]].

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* DeadpanSnarker: DeadpanSnarker:
**
Rhett in regards to nearly everything, from the impossibility of the Confederacy winning the war to the [[ValuesResonance ridiculous expectations put on women in the 1860s]]. Routinely, [[SurroundedByIdiots no one understands his comments/everyone is offended by them]].



* DudeNotFunny: Invoked by Scarlett and Rhett when Scarlett reveals she's pregnant with their second child, a ChildByRape. Rhett jokes, "Cheer up maybe you'll have a miscarriage" after he establishes that [[CannotSpitItOut he doesn't love Scarlett]] and she lashes out at him. When she justifiably attempts to punch him, she misses, falls down the stairs and miscarries for real. In the book while she recuperates, Rhett goes into DrowningMySorrows as a result.

to:

* DudeNotFunny: Invoked by Scarlett and Rhett when Scarlett reveals she's pregnant with their second child, a ChildByRape. Rhett jokes, "Cheer up maybe you'll have a miscarriage" after he establishes that [[CannotSpitItOut he doesn't love Scarlett]] and she lashes out at him.Scarlett]]. When she justifiably attempts to punch him, she misses, falls down the stairs and miscarries for real. In the book while she recuperates, Rhett goes into DrowningMySorrows as a result.



** After Frank is killed and she realizes what a rotten wife she was to him, as well as being genuinely ashamed and sorry that she isn't the kind of person her mother wanted her to be.

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** After Frank is killed and she realizes what a rotten wife she was to him, as well as being genuinely ashamed and sorry that she isn't the kind of person her mother wanted her to be. Though [[NiceJobBreakingItHero Rhett points out that she would have done those things over again]] and is only sorry that she got caught, like a "thief" who regrets going to jail.



* HeroicBSOD: Scarlett undergoes a version of this following her miscarriage.

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* HeroicBSOD: HeroicBSOD:
**
Scarlett undergoes a version of this following her miscarriage. So does Rhett.



** Any of the men who joined the Klan. Even though Scarlett made Frank promise not to join since the Yankees would kill them and ruin her business, not to mention that the Klan is a group of {{Dirty Cowards}}s that attack for {{Revenge}} at night, he has joined and avenges her assault in the shantytown. India has the gall to blame Scarlett for getting attacked and "forcing" Frank to defend her honor.

to:

** Any of the men who joined the Klan. Even though Scarlett made Frank promise not to join since the Yankees would kill them and ruin her business, not to mention that the Klan is a group of {{Dirty Cowards}}s Coward}}s that attack for {{Revenge}} at night, he has joined and avenges her assault in the shantytown. India has the gall to blame Scarlett for getting attacked and "forcing" Frank to defend her honor.



** India's accusations of Scarlett coveting Ashley are very true. She still is bitchy to make them in public, even if Melanie's not around to defend her.

to:

** India's accusations of Scarlett coveting Ashley are very true. She still is bitchy to make them in public, even if Melanie's not around to defend her.Scarlett.



** ''Scarlett'' is from Scarlett's perspective and gives her the chance to grow out of being 16 and become a semi-normal if still manipulative and sociopathic woman, mostly by putting her through the emotional and physical wringer (this takes so much time and effort that the book is incredibly long, and several years have to pass in-story for it to happen). While still giving a faithful reproduction of Scarlett's romanticized world view, extrapolated from where she is at the end of ''Gone With The Wind'', it does provide evidence that this view is grounded in a larger reality that is somewhat harsher and less melodramatic than she believes it is (to her shock and horror). It gives both Rhett and Scarlett's parents' backstories, making sense of both how Rhett came to be who he is and deconstructing the social tragedy of the "belle and beau" idiom. It takes the view that when all is said and done, and both are willing to treat each other with some modicum of respect, Scarlett and Rhett have as much chance of making each other happy as anyone. This was universally panned by critics, who all hated it - criticized as being insanely uneventful, probably because of the amount of time spent examining the different societies of the era through which Scarlett moves and which shape her. Nevertheless, a lot of fans loved it and thought exactly the opposite, so much so that it was a commercial success and is still in print (making it one of the most successful fanfics ever, ''before'' the internet). Yes, this is a LoveItOrHateIt phenomena, and what you think of it is very much up to individual opinion. A mini-series was based on this, but the plot is quite different (time might have been an issue).

to:

** ''Scarlett'' ''Literature/{{Scarlett}}'' is from Scarlett's perspective and gives her the chance to grow out of being 16 and become a semi-normal if still manipulative and sociopathic woman, mostly by putting her through the emotional and physical wringer (this takes so much time and effort that the book is incredibly long, and several years have to pass in-story for it to happen). While still giving a faithful reproduction of Scarlett's romanticized world view, extrapolated from where she is at the end of ''Gone With The Wind'', it does provide evidence that this view is grounded in a larger reality that is somewhat harsher and less melodramatic than she believes it is (to her shock and horror). It gives both Rhett and Scarlett's parents' backstories, making sense of both how Rhett came to be who he is and deconstructing the social tragedy of the "belle and beau" idiom. It takes the view that when all is said and done, and both are willing to treat each other with some modicum of respect, Scarlett and Rhett have as much chance of making each other happy as anyone. This was universally panned by critics, who all hated it - criticized as being insanely uneventful, probably because of the amount of time spent examining the different societies of the era through which Scarlett moves and which shape her. Nevertheless, a lot of fans loved it and thought exactly the opposite, so much so that it was a commercial success and is still in print (making it one of the most successful fanfics ever, ''before'' the internet). Yes, this is a LoveItOrHateIt phenomena, and what you think of it is very much up to individual opinion. A mini-series was based on this, but the plot is quite different (time might have been an issue).
21st May '16 10:40:46 AM Nire
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** Scarlett to Sueellen about having to root out the cotton because they need the money and there's no one else to do it. And part of the reason why [[spoiler:Scarlett steals away Frank is because she correctly deducts that [[GoldDigger Suellen]] wouldn't let Frank lend the money to save Tara, wanting to be a TrophyWife.

to:

** Scarlett to Sueellen about having to root out the cotton because they need the money and there's no one else to do it. And part of the reason why [[spoiler:Scarlett steals away Frank is because she correctly deducts that [[GoldDigger Suellen]] wouldn't let Frank lend the money to save Tara, wanting to be a TrophyWife.]]
18th May '16 1:19:10 PM Jayalaw
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* DudeNotFunny: Invoked by Scarlett and Rhett when Scarlett reveals she's pregnant with their second child, a ChildByRape. Rhett jokes, "Cheer up maybe you'll have a miscarriage" after he establishes that [[CannotSpitOutOut he doesn't love Scarlett]] and she lashes out at him. When she justifiably attempts to punch him, she misses, falls down the stairs and miscarries for real. In the book while she recuperates, Rhett goes into DrowningMySorrows as a result.

to:

* DudeNotFunny: Invoked by Scarlett and Rhett when Scarlett reveals she's pregnant with their second child, a ChildByRape. Rhett jokes, "Cheer up maybe you'll have a miscarriage" after he establishes that [[CannotSpitOutOut [[CannotSpitItOut he doesn't love Scarlett]] and she lashes out at him. When she justifiably attempts to punch him, she misses, falls down the stairs and miscarries for real. In the book while she recuperates, Rhett goes into DrowningMySorrows as a result.
18th May '16 1:10:55 PM Jayalaw
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* AdaptationExplanationExtrication: Scarlett's reasons for [[spoiler:marrying Frank Kennedy by lying about Sue-Ellen marrying someone else instead of asking for a loan]] are excised from the film since we don't see her thought process. As a result, in the film she comes off as a {{Jerkass}} for [[spoiler:stealing Frank and marrying him for his money.
* AdaptationalHeroism: Rhett in the books [[spoiler:messes up two chances to reconcile with Scarlett while they are married by mentioning that he was out with Belle Watling, a prostitute, after the night [[RapeIsLove he raped Scarlett]] while they were both drunk. He also goes missing for days, leaving Scarlett to worry about him]]. In the film he's with her the morning after "that night," and politely announces he's leaving with Bonnie on vacation.

to:

* AdaptationExplanationExtrication: Scarlett's reasons for [[spoiler:marrying Frank Kennedy by lying about Sue-Ellen marrying someone else instead of asking for a loan]] are excised from the film since we don't see her thought process. As a result, in the film she comes off as more of a {{Jerkass}} for [[spoiler:stealing Frank and marrying him for his money.
money.]]
* AdaptationalHeroism: Rhett in the books [[spoiler:messes up two chances to reconcile with Scarlett while they are married by mentioning that he was out with Belle Watling, a prostitute, after the night [[RapeIsLove he raped Scarlett]] Scarlett while they were both drunk. He also goes missing for days, leaving Scarlett to worry about him]]. In the film he's with her the morning after "that night," and politely announces he's leaving with Bonnie on vacation.



** Pity Scarlett's children from her first two marriages. In the book, they exist to be
[[KickTheDog emotionally neglected]] by Scarlett, her son Wade Hamilton is a nervous wreck, her daughter Ella Kennedy is implied to have Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, and the only people who seem to care about them are their aunt [[ThePollyanna omnibenevolent Melanie]] and their stepfather Rhett (who half the time is too busy [[SpoiledBrat spoiling his own child (literally) to death]] to care). Scarlett does try to help them when Rhett chews her out for not realizing that she did to them, by traumatizing Wade and drinking sherry while pregnant with Ella, but she realizes her children have become strangers to her and it's too late to reconcile. They don't even exist in the movie.

to:

** Pity Scarlett's children from her first two marriages. In the book, they exist to be
be [[KickTheDog emotionally neglected]] by Scarlett, her son Wade Hamilton is a nervous wreck, her daughter Ella Kennedy is implied to have Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, and the only people who seem to care about them are their aunt [[ThePollyanna omnibenevolent Melanie]] and their stepfather Rhett (who half the time is too busy [[SpoiledBrat spoiling his own child (literally) to death]] to care). Scarlett does try to help them when Rhett chews her out for not realizing that she did to them, by traumatizing Wade and drinking sherry while pregnant with Ella, but she realizes her children have become strangers to her and it's too late to reconcile. They don't even exist in the movie.
18th May '16 11:43:24 AM Jayalaw
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* AdaptedOut: Pity Scarlett's children from her first two marriages. In the book, they exist to be [[KickTheDog emotionally neglected]] by Scarlett, her son Wade Hamilton is a nervous wreck, her daughter Ella Kennedy is implied to have Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, and the only people who seem to care about them are their aunt [[ThePollyanna omnibenevolent Melanie]] and their stepfather Rhett (who half the time is too busy [[SpoiledBrat spoiling his own child (literally) to death]] to care). They don't even exist in the movie.

to:

* AdaptedOut: AdaptationExplanationExtrication: Scarlett's reasons for [[spoiler:marrying Frank Kennedy by lying about Sue-Ellen marrying someone else instead of asking for a loan]] are excised from the film since we don't see her thought process. As a result, in the film she comes off as a {{Jerkass}} for [[spoiler:stealing Frank and marrying him for his money.
* AdaptationalHeroism: Rhett in the books [[spoiler:messes up two chances to reconcile with Scarlett while they are married by mentioning that he was out with Belle Watling, a prostitute, after the night [[RapeIsLove he raped Scarlett]] while they were both drunk. He also goes missing for days, leaving Scarlett to worry about him]]. In the film he's with her the morning after "that night," and politely announces he's leaving with Bonnie on vacation.
* AdaptedOut:
**
Pity Scarlett's children from her first two marriages. In the book, they exist to be be
[[KickTheDog emotionally neglected]] by Scarlett, her son Wade Hamilton is a nervous wreck, her daughter Ella Kennedy is implied to have Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, and the only people who seem to care about them are their aunt [[ThePollyanna omnibenevolent Melanie]] and their stepfather Rhett (who half the time is too busy [[SpoiledBrat spoiling his own child (literally) to death]] to care).care). Scarlett does try to help them when Rhett chews her out for not realizing that she did to them, by traumatizing Wade and drinking sherry while pregnant with Ella, but she realizes her children have become strangers to her and it's too late to reconcile. They don't even exist in the movie.



'''Rhett:''' They died to the last man at Thermopylae, didn't they, Doctor?
* BabiesMakeEverythingBetter: Melanie is very fond of this idea, and Frank believes that if Scarlett becomes pregnant, she will stop caring about her business and settle into motherhood. He is very mistaken, however.

to:

'''Rhett:''' [[DeadpanSnarker They died to the last man at Thermopylae, didn't they, Doctor?
Doctor?]]
* BabiesMakeEverythingBetter: BabiesMakeEverythingBetter:
**
Melanie is very fond of this idea, and Frank believes that if Scarlett becomes pregnant, she will stop caring about her business and settle into motherhood. He is very mistaken, however.



* BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor: Scarlett's wish to be rid of Melanie.

to:

* BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor: BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor:
** The Southern boys wanting to go to war.
**
Scarlett's wish to be rid of Melanie.Melanie.
** Rhett's desire to have Scarlett.



* BewareTheNiceOnes: Melanie's reaction to Scarlett killing a Union deserter was "I'm glad you killed him!" And she pulled out a pistol when she thought Yankee soldiers were about to break into her home.
** This is never shown in the book, but in the movie, when Suellen is sobbing over Scarlett having married her fiancee right under her nose, it sounds like Melanie says something to Suellen like, "Well, she had to do it to save Tara." Which means that either Scarlett told Melanie her reasons for marrying Frank or that Melanie figured it out for herself. Either way, Melanie is completely on board with Scarlett doing this, and is chiding Suellen for feeling the way she does.

to:

* BewareTheNiceOnes: Melanie's reaction to Scarlett killing a Union deserter was "I'm glad you killed him!" after running down the stairs with her brother's sword. And she pulled out a pistol when she thought Yankee soldiers were about to break into her home.
** This is never shown in the book, but in the movie, when Suellen Sue-ellen is sobbing over Scarlett having married her fiancee right under her nose, it sounds like Melanie says something to Suellen Sue-ellen like, "Well, she had to do it to save Tara." Which means that either Scarlett told Melanie her reasons for marrying Frank or that Melanie figured it out for herself. Either way, Melanie is completely on board with Scarlett doing this, and is chiding Suellen Sue-ellen for feeling the way she does.



* CainAndAbel: Scarlett and Suellen O'Hara, respectively.

to:

* CainAndAbel: Scarlett and Suellen O'Hara, respectively. Averted with their sister Careen, however.



* CassandraTruth: Rhett tells everyone that secession is a really stupid idea that will lead to disaster.

to:

* CassandraTruth: Rhett tells everyone that secession is a really stupid idea that will lead to disaster. Charles Hamilton nearly brawls with him over it.



* CharacterWitness: Despite India and Archie witnessing Ashley embracing Scarlett with their own eyes, Melanie's vouching for Scarlett's innocence sows the seeds to doubt in many peoples' minds. Half the town winds up thinking India is a jealous, crazy old maid.

to:

* CharacterWitness: Despite India and Archie witnessing Ashley embracing Scarlett with their own eyes, Melanie's vouching for Scarlett's innocence sows the seeds to doubt in many peoples' minds. Half the town winds up thinking India is a jealous, crazy old maid. A justified case since the hug really was innocent and Melanie points out that if Scarlett had wanted her gone then the latter wouldn't taken care of the former when Beau was born.



* ConvenientMiscarriage: Scarlett takes a fall down a flight of stairs, and Melanie has a miscarriage which eventually leads to her death.

to:

* ConvenientMiscarriage: Scarlett takes a fall down a flight of stairs, stairs after trying to punch Rhett for joking about it, and Melanie has a miscarriage which eventually leads to her death.



** He drinks when he believes Scarlett is about to die from a miscarriage that he is responsible for.

to:

** He drinks when he believes Scarlett is about to die from a miscarriage that he is responsible for.for, since he not only raped her while drunk but also ''joked'' that if she didn't want the baby then to cheer up in case she miscarries.



* DrunkenSong: When Gerald is drunk, he sings a song called "Peg in a Low-Backed Car". Ashley and Rhett ''pretend'' to be singing drunkenly to fool the Yankee soldiers into thinking they were out getting wasted instead of avenging the attack on Scarlett, for which they could be imprisoned or even hanged.

to:

* DrunkenSong: DrunkenSong:
**
When Gerald is drunk, he sings a song called "Peg in a Low-Backed Car". Ashley and Rhett ''pretend'' to be singing drunkenly to fool the Yankee soldiers into thinking they were out getting wasted instead of avenging the attack on Scarlett, for which they could be imprisoned or even hanged.



* DudeNotFunny: Invoked by Scarlett and Rhett when Scarlett reveals she's pregnant with their second child, a ChildByRape. Rhett jokes, "Cheer up maybe you'll have a miscarriage" after he establishes that [[CannotSpitOutOut he doesn't love Scarlett]] and she lashes out at him. When she justifiably attempts to punch him, she misses, falls down the stairs and miscarries for real. In the book while she recuperates, Rhett goes into DrowningMySorrows as a result.



** Any of the men who joined the Klan. Even though Scarlett made Frank promise not to join since the Yankees would kill them and ruin her business, not to mention that the Klan is a group of {{Dirty Cowards}}s that attack for {{Revenge}} at night, he has joined and avenges her assault in the shantytown. India has the gall to blame Scarlett for getting attacked and "forcing" Frank to defend her honor.



* ImmediateSequel[=/=]SequelGap: "Scarlett" begins with Melanie's funeral, only a few days after the conclusion of Gone With the Wind, despite the 55-year space between the two works (both literature and film).

to:

* ImmediateSequel[=/=]SequelGap: "Scarlett" begins with Melanie's funeral, only a few days after the conclusion of Gone ''Gone With the Wind, Wind'', despite the 55-year space between the two works (both literature and film).



* JerkassHasAPoint: And a lot of them do in this book:
** Scarlett to Sueellen about having to root out the cotton because they need the money and there's no one else to do it. And part of the reason why [[spoiler:Scarlett steals away Frank is because she correctly deducts that [[GoldDigger Suellen]] wouldn't let Frank lend the money to save Tara, wanting to be a TrophyWife.
** Rhett's ThisIsReality take on how the Civil War will go, as well as chewing out Scarlett late in the book for neglecting Wade and Ella.
** India's accusations of Scarlett coveting Ashley are very true. She still is bitchy to make them in public, even if Melanie's not around to defend her.



* KickTheDog: Scarlett does this constantly in both mediums:
** Manipulating two relatively innocent men into marrying her, one of whom is ''engaged to her sister''.
** Spending her second marriage running and ruining the life of her husband.
** Emotionally neglecting her children from her first two marriages.
** Contracting prison labor for her sawmill and enabling an overseer she knows abuses the prisoners.
** And then going straight against ''her beloved Ashley's'' expressed will and manipulating him into working for/with her.
** Heck, in the first chapter she is revealed to have stolen another girl's near-fiancé merely because it irritated her to see a man showing interest in anyone but her. A girl who's neither beautiful nor popular and is said to have no chance getting another man but him.
** Let's not forget her brutally cruel treatment of Rhett after Bonnie's death--she outright calls him a murderer.
*** {{Justified|Trope}} in that she was also grieving after her daughter died, though perhaps not as much as Rhett.

to:

* KickTheDog: KickTheDog:
**
Scarlett does this constantly in both mediums:
** *** Manipulating two relatively innocent men into marrying her, one of whom is ''engaged to her sister''.
** *** Spending her second marriage running and ruining the life of her husband.
** *** Emotionally neglecting her children from her first two marriages.
** *** Contracting prison labor for her sawmill and enabling an overseer she knows abuses the prisoners.
**
prisoners, and his only punishment being wage docking.
***
And then going straight against ''her beloved Ashley's'' expressed will and manipulating him into working for/with her.
** *** Heck, in the first chapter she is revealed to have stolen another girl's near-fiancé merely because it irritated her to see a man showing interest in anyone but her. A girl who's neither beautiful nor popular and is said to have no chance getting another man but him.
** *** Let's not forget her brutally cruel treatment of Rhett after Bonnie's death--she outright calls him a murderer.
***
murderer. {{Justified|Trope}} in that she was also grieving after her daughter died, though perhaps not as much as Rhett.



*** The rape shows up some of the issues with arguing the KickTheDog behaviour that Scarlett and Rhett inflict on each other. On the one hand, Rhett forces himself on her and is guilty of rape. On the other hand, Scarlett doesn't seem traumatised by this after the fact and wants to reconcile - which would be the last thing she would do if she felt genuinely violated or abused, knowing Scarlett. Then the fact that the entire scene plays out like a culmination of all their violent UST for each other, and that although both are incredibly verbally abusive to each other and make terrible threats Rhett has never laid a hand on Scarlett otherwise, makes things even murkier. Was this rough sex that Scarlett was a consenting party to, or was it rape? If she'd violently objected (really kicking, screaming and fighting him like she didn't want it) would he have stopped? Although Rhett is clearly in the wrong - even running along the moral event horizon for some - the nature of their encounter, the degree of non-consent and both parties' degree of involvement is a very murky area which could be debated for a very long time with no clear answer. In that sense, it's a microcosm of their entire relationship; how abusive and KickTheDog ''was'' their interactions with each other and how much of a role did sex have to play?

to:

*** The rape shows up some of the issues with arguing the KickTheDog behaviour that Scarlett and Rhett inflict on each other. On the one hand, Rhett forces himself on her and is guilty of rape. On the other hand, Scarlett doesn't seem traumatised traumatized by this after the fact and wants to reconcile - which would be the last thing she would do if she felt genuinely violated or abused, knowing Scarlett. Then the fact that the entire scene plays out like a culmination of all their violent UST for each other, and that although both are incredibly verbally abusive to each other and make terrible threats Rhett has never laid a hand on Scarlett otherwise, makes things even murkier. Was this rough sex that Scarlett was a consenting party to, or was it rape? If she'd violently objected (really kicking, screaming and fighting him like she didn't want it) would he have stopped? Although Rhett is clearly in the wrong - even running along the moral event horizon for some - the nature of their encounter, the degree of non-consent and both parties' degree of involvement is a very murky area which could be debated for a very long time with no clear answer. In that sense, it's a microcosm of their entire relationship; how abusive and KickTheDog ''was'' their interactions with each other and how much of a role did sex have to play?



* KickTheMoralityPet: For all the dog-kicking that Scarlett does, she drives her lover, Rhett, away from her.

to:

** India after Scarlett is assaulted reveals with scathing glee that Frank, Ashley and the boys are part of the Klan, even though Frank promised he wouldn't join, and says that if Scarlett hadn't ridden to shantytown alone, their men wouldn't be killed. Melanie calls India out for this on seeing how pale Scarlett becomes.
* KickTheMoralityPet: For all the dog-kicking that Scarlett does, she drives her lover, Rhett, away from her. She's also guilty when she can't do this to Melanie after the night she and Ashley are caught hugging, because Melanie thinks too highly of her. As Rhett points out, Scarlett can't admit that she has unrequited love for Ashley without tarnishing Melanie's image of her, which would break Melanie's heart.



* MoralityPet: While she usually treats her peers like trash, she treats her black slaves far more decently, even to the point that Pork, her father's personal servant, told her when she gave him Gerald's watch as a present that if she would have treated white people like that, her life would have been much more pleasant.

to:

* MoralityPet: MoralityPet:
**
While she usually treats her peers like trash, she treats her black slaves far more decently, even to the point that Pork, her father's personal servant, told her when she gave him Gerald's watch as a present that if she would have treated white people like that, her life would have been much more pleasant. pleasant.
** Careen is another one for Scarlett, in part due to being a BrokenBird and SpoiledSweet. She volunteers to cover Suellen's cotton picking duties, which causes Scarlett to put her foot down on Careen's behalf.
** Scarlett's unwilling to admit it, but Melanie becomes one for her. It gets to the point that she saves Melanie's life over a promise made to Ashley, and refuses to confess that she's in love with Ashley so as to not break Melanie's heart after the latter defended her from India's accusations.



* PoorCommunicationKills: there are minor examples in the main novel where this crops up, although Scarlett's emotional compass is so distorted it is difficult to tell whether instances of her not telling important information is this trope, her scheming manipulation, or her fear of letting herself be hurt or vulnerable.
** ''Scarlett'' also has a rather telling instance with this concerning her daughter Cat. Did no one think that telling Scarlett that every person in the entire town of Ballyhara thinks her daughter is a fairy changeling, fear and hate her, and the children have been routinely trying to ''kill'' her? This isn't a secret, but somehow the topic never comes up in all the years of the girl's childhood until there is literally a mob with pitchforks at the doorstep.

to:

* PoorCommunicationKills: there There are minor examples in the main novel where this crops up, although Scarlett's emotional compass is so distorted it is difficult to tell whether instances of her not telling important information is this trope, her scheming manipulation, or her fear of letting herself be hurt or vulnerable.
** ''Scarlett'' also has a rather telling instance with this concerning her daughter Cat. Did no one think that telling Scarlett that every person in the entire town of Ballyhara thinks her daughter is a fairy changeling, fear and hate her, and the children have been routinely trying to ''kill'' her? This isn't a secret, but somehow the topic never comes up in all the years of the girl's childhood until there is literally a mob with pitchforks at the doorstep. When Scarlett wants to go all MamaBear after hearing from Grainne what the townspeople are doing, Grainne tells her to let it go.



* ReallyGetsAround: Rhett ''owns a brothel''.

to:

* ReallyGetsAround: Rhett ''owns a brothel''. This is part of the reason why Scarlett doubts that he really loves her, since he uses Belle Watling as his rebound girl twice when they have serious fights.



* SilkHidingSteel: Briefly implied with Melanie, the most kind-hearted and frail of the family. Midway through the film a Union soldier breaks into the house to rape and steal. He encounters Scarlett, who shoots him with her pistol... and behind her is Melanie, still recovering from having given birth and ''brandishing a sword''.

to:

* SilkHidingSteel: SilkHidingSteel:
**
Briefly implied with Melanie, the most kind-hearted and frail of the family. Midway through the film a Union soldier breaks into the house to rape and steal. He encounters Scarlett, who shoots him with her pistol... and behind her is Melanie, still recovering from having given birth and ''brandishing a sword''.



* SmarterThanYouLook:
** Scarlett. Starting out as a manipulative, BookDumb Southern Belle, she reveals that she can do mathematical calculations in her head for business transactions, engage in XanatosSpeedChess to save her home, and survive whatever the world throws at her.
** Melanie, in all spades. At first she appears oblivious to her sister-in-law hitting on her husband and LovingAShadow, but she sees the pragmatic decisions that Scarlett makes as necessary, like picking the cotton to pay for the taxes on Tara with all the field slaves gone and shooting a Yankee deserter that broke into the house. All of these, she realizes, were a result of Scarlett protecting her loved ones, including Ashley and ''Melanie''. And as Melanie points out when defending Scarlett from the accusations that Ashley is having an affair, that Scarlett saved her and newborn Beau when the Yankees invaded Atlanta and took care of her through her illness when an unfaithful woman would have left her to die and invoke ComfortingTheWidow. Scarlett to herself claims her care of Melanie was IGaveMyWord, but later on when [[spoiler:Melanie is dying she realizes the truth, that they had become FireForgedFriends.]]



* TooDumbToLive:
** People consider Scarlett this for riding to her sawmills without a male escort. However true that may be, she ''did'' have a pistol and only didn't fire it when attacked for fear of killing her horse.
** The two men who assault Scarlett despite the fact that she's of the upper class, is carrying a pistol, and has a reputation through town.
** Melanie having another baby despite the doctor saying that another child would kill her. He wasn't being metaphorical



* WhatTheHellHero: Frequently done by Rhett to Scarlett, with the most famous of these being at the end of the film.

to:

* WhatTheHellHero: WhatTheHellHero:
**
Frequently done by Rhett to Scarlett, with the most famous of these being at the end of the film.film.
** Scarlett also gets in several good ones to Rhett, like leaving her, Melanie and Prissy to fight in the war ''at the last minute'' and to the mercy of Sherman's March all because of some last-minute conscience. She also chews him out for going out with Belle Watling so openly while they're married and in the middle of some rude wake-up calls.
** Melanie to India for disrespecting Scarlett in public; just because Melanie is out of earshot doesn't mean that India has the right to make "wild accusations" about Ashley and Scarlett having an affair since Scarlett is her sister by marriage and Ashley is her husband. What's more, Scarlett ''saved her life'' and gave Ashley a job so that they wouldn't have to leave; whatever the reader thinks of Scarlett's intentions, they meant a lot to Melanie.


Added DiffLines:

* WhyDidItHaveToBeSnakes:
** Scarlett's greatest phobia is of going hungry, after the long ride from
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Film.GoneWithTheWind