History Film / EverAfter

21st Jul '17 9:28:08 AM GGCrono
Is there an issue? Send a Message


->"And while Cinderella and her Prince ''did'' live happily ever after, the point, gentlemen, is that they'' lived.''"

to:

->"And ->''"And while Cinderella and her Prince ''did'' live happily ever after, the point, gentlemen, is that they'' lived.''"''"''
21st Jul '17 9:27:52 AM GGCrono
Is there an issue? Send a Message


->"And while Cinderella and her Prince ''did'' live happily ever after, the point, gentlemen, is that they'' lived."

to:

->"And while Cinderella and her Prince ''did'' live happily ever after, the point, gentlemen, is that they'' lived."''"
28th Jun '17 4:18:46 PM ElatedReynard
Is there an issue? Send a Message


->''"And while Cinderella and her Prince'' did ''live happily ever after, the point, gentlemen, is that they'' lived''."''

to:

->''"And ->"And while Cinderella and her Prince'' did ''live Prince ''did'' live happily ever after, the point, gentlemen, is that they'' lived''."''lived."



* AbusiveParents: Rodmilla de Ghent, who is ''massively'' emotionally abusive to her step-daughter Danielle, and not much kinder to her [[TheUnfavorite unfavorite]] daughter Jacqueline.

to:

* AbusiveParents: Rodmilla de Ghent, who is ''massively'' massively emotionally abusive to her step-daughter Danielle, and not much kinder to her [[TheUnfavorite unfavorite]] daughter Jacqueline.



* ActionGirl: Danielle swims, climbs trees and punches people in the face. [[spoiler: Later frees herself from slavery by ''threatening'' her captor with a sword.]]

to:

* ActionGirl: Danielle swims, climbs trees and punches people in the face. [[spoiler: Later frees herself from slavery by ''threatening'' threatening her captor with a sword.]]



* AmazonChaser: Henry wants to know how "Nicole" lives with that kind of passion. He says to her, "You swim alone, climb rocks, rescue servants. Is there anything you don't do?" Later in the scene she hoists ''him'' over her shoulders to save his life.

to:

* AmazonChaser: Henry wants to know how "Nicole" lives with that kind of passion. He says to her, "You swim alone, climb rocks, rescue servants. Is there anything you don't ''don't'' do?" Later in the scene she hoists ''him'' him over her shoulders to save his life.



-->'''"Nicole":''' Excuse me, sire, but there is nothing natural about [snubbing peasants]. A country's character is defined by its "everyday rustics" as you call them. They are the legs you stand on, and that posisition demands ''respect'', not...\\

to:

-->'''"Nicole":''' Excuse me, sire, but there is nothing natural about [snubbing peasants]. A country's character is defined by its "everyday rustics" as you call them. They are the legs you stand on, and that posisition demands ''respect'', respect, not...\\



* ArrangedMarriage: Defied. Since neither the groom nor bride wants to go through with it, the wedding is canceled ''midway through the ceremony''.
* ArtisticLicenseHistory: This is ''almost'' right, but... the researchers misunderstood. At one point, Henry feeds one of the stepsisters chocolate saying "the Spanish monks keep sending bricks of it." Yes, the Spanish were responsible for bringing chocolate abroad during their missions, and yes, chocolate was popular in France, causing the rise of several "chocolate houses", but there wouldn't be any "bricks" of chocolate. Solid chocolate was developed about two centuries later by the ''British'', and mastered by the Swiss (who made milk chocolate). So, either she would be drinking it (she wasn't) or eating a cocoa bean (which is bigger), or the seed (conceivable, but she wouldn't be finding it "sinful" because the seeds of the bean were rather bitter without sugar). In any case, shipping to France would not have been done by the Spanish, since the Spanish kept it a secret for a century or so. [[http://www.eurococoa.com/en/x/144/cocoa-story More here]].

to:

* ArrangedMarriage: Defied. Since neither the groom nor bride wants to go through with it, the wedding is canceled ''midway midway through the ceremony''.
ceremony.
* ArtisticLicenseHistory: This is ''almost'' right, but... the researchers misunderstood. At one point, Henry feeds one of the stepsisters chocolate saying "the Spanish monks keep sending bricks of it." Yes, the Spanish were responsible for bringing chocolate abroad during their missions, and yes, chocolate was popular in France, causing the rise of several "chocolate houses", but there wouldn't be any "bricks" of chocolate. Solid chocolate was developed about two centuries later by the ''British'', and mastered by the Swiss (who made milk chocolate). So, either she would be drinking it (she wasn't) or eating a cocoa bean (which is bigger), or the seed (conceivable, but she wouldn't be finding it "sinful" because the seeds of the bean were rather bitter without sugar). In any case, shipping to France would not have been done by the Spanish, since the Spanish kept it a secret for a century or so. [[http://www.eurococoa.com/en/x/144/cocoa-story More here]].



* BerserkButton: "I would rather ''die a thousand deaths'' than see [[DeceasedParentsAreTheBest MY MOTHER'S DRESS]] on that [[AlphaBitch SPOILED SELFISH COW]]!"
--> '''Danielle''': (picking up the slippers) These are my mother's!\\
'''Marguerite''': Yes. And she's ''dead''.\\
'''Danielle''': (marches over to Marguerite and socks her in the eye) You HAG! I'LL RIP YOUR HAIR OUT!

to:

* BerserkButton: "I would rather ''die die a thousand deaths'' deaths than see [[DeceasedParentsAreTheBest MY MOTHER'S DRESS]] on that [[AlphaBitch SPOILED SELFISH COW]]!"
--> '''Danielle''': (picking up the slippers) These are my mother's!\\
mother's.\\
'''Marguerite''': Yes. And she's ''dead''.dead.\\
'''Danielle''': (marches over to Marguerite and socks her in the eye) You HAG! I'LL I'M GOING TO RIP YOUR HAIR OUT!



** Her parents' dialogue after Henry [[spoiler:cancels the wedding and sends Gabriella to her beloved's arms]] is pretty funny too, especially the queen repeatedly shouting "''Tu culpa!''" (your fault) at the king.

to:

** Her parents' dialogue after Henry [[spoiler:cancels the wedding and sends Gabriella to her beloved's arms]] is pretty funny too, especially the queen repeatedly shouting "''Tu culpa!''" "Tu culpa!" (your fault) at the king.



'''Paulette:''' We were startled, that's all!\\

to:

'''Paulette:''' We were startled, that's all!\\all.\\



-->'''Henry:''' The apple... that was you?!

to:

-->'''Henry:''' The apple... that was you?!you?



* GreenEyedMonster: Rodmilla will ''never'' forgive Danielle for the fact that her husband loved his daughter more than her, nor for the fact that he turned away from Rodmilla to tell Danielle he loved her with his dying breath. She also becomes jealous of Danielle's success wooing the prince over her own daughter.

to:

* GreenEyedMonster: Rodmilla will ''never'' never forgive Danielle for the fact that her husband loved his daughter more than her, nor for the fact that he turned away from Rodmilla to tell Danielle he loved her with his dying breath. She also becomes jealous of Danielle's success wooing the prince over her own daughter.
14th May '17 4:17:13 PM ElatedReynard
Is there an issue? Send a Message


--> '''Danielle:''' I want you to know that I will forget you after this moment, and never think of you again. But you, I am quite certain, will think of me ''every day and for the rest of your life''.

to:

--> '''Danielle:''' I want you to know that I will forget you after this moment, and never think of you again. But you, I am quite certain, will think of me ''every every day and for the rest of your life''.life.
14th May '17 4:11:57 PM ElatedReynard
Is there an issue? Send a Message


-->'''Baroness Rodmilla de Ghent:''' "Jacqueline, ''darling'', I should hate to think ''you'' had anything to do with this."\\

to:

-->'''Baroness Rodmilla de Ghent:''' "Jacqueline, ''darling'', I should darling, I'd hate to think ''you'' that you had anything to do with this."\\
30th Apr '17 11:44:29 AM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Marguirite is also often shown smirking smugly, even though it's all due to her mother's machinations. [[spoiler:So it's ''very'' satisfying to see that smug grin wiped off her face at the end, when she realizes Danielle is a royal and now holds her life in her hands.]]
* SocietyIsToBlame: What Danielle believes.

to:

** Marguirite Marguerite is also often shown smirking smugly, even though it's all due to her mother's machinations. [[spoiler:So it's ''very'' satisfying to see that smug grin wiped off her face at the end, when she realizes Danielle is a royal and now holds her life in her hands.]]
* SocietyIsToBlame: What Danielle believes.[[note]] For historical context, in the 15th and 16th century it was believed that the lower classes were ''inherently'' morally inferior to the nobility, as reflected by their low stations, coarse mannerisms, and lack of courtly graces. Sir Thomas Moore was a bit ahead of his time to argue that the lower classes weren't ''inherently'' evil or crass, but the product of their raising. Their poor manners due to poor education rather than inherent crassness, and most crimes brought on by miserable poverty created by the inherent inequality of contemporary society. Keep in mind, too, that European peasants lived in ''miserable'' poverty, filled with filth (before indoor plumbing and public garbage disposal services removed dung and garbage from people's doorsteps), squalor, disease (before penicillin and vaccines, plagues were ''very'' common), malnutrition (lower classes had very poor diets, filled with mostly bread, ale, and base vegetables), and near-constant cold and hunger, on top of having to do back-breaking labor from dawn to dusk nearly every day just to put a mouthful of crumby food on the table in shitty little huts. To live in such inescapably miserable conditions while the rich lived in obscene luxury (due to a belief in a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_chain_of_being Great Chain of Being]]) would almost certainly make petty theft excusable by modern standards.[[/note]]



** Although it is difficult to figure out how being poor teaches you to steal. The implication being that if you don't have a lot, it means you have the right to take it?
** This requires some historical context. In the 15th and 16th century it was believed that the lower classes were ''inherently'' morally inferior to the nobility, as reflected by their low stations, coarse mannerisms, and lack of courtly graces. Sir Thomas Moore was a bit ahead of his time to argue that the lower classes weren't ''inherently'' evil or crass, but the product of their raising. Their poor manners due to poor education rather than inherent crassness, and most crimes brought on by miserable poverty created by the inherent inequality of contemporary society. [[note]]Keep in mind, too, that European peasants lived in ''miserable'' poverty, filled with filth (before indoor plumbing and public garbage disposal services removed dung and garbage from people's doorsteps), squalor, disease (before penicillin and vaccines, plagues were ''very'' common), malnutrition (lower classes had very poor diets, filled with mostly bread, ale, and base vegetables), and near-constant cold and hunger, on top of having to do back-breaking labor from dawn to dusk nearly every day just to put a mouthful of crumby food on the table in shitty little huts.[[/note]] To live in such inescapably miserable conditions while the rich lived in obscene luxury (due to a belief in a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_chain_of_being Great Chain of Being]]) would almost certainly make petty theft excusable by modern standards.



** Seeing how very few people believe him to have been homosexual, it could be wishful thinking.



* WhatTheHellHero: Leonardo's speech to Henry after he rejects Danielle is pretty epic.

to:

* WhatTheHellHero: Leonardo's speech to Henry after he rejects Danielle is pretty epic. May also count as a PrecisionFStrike - although the actual f-bomb is not dropped, this is the only real instance of profanity in the movie, and leaves both Henry and the audience somewhat stunned.



** A bit inaccurate. A royal should, and would put the welfare of the country long before his own marital happiness. You pay for what you get when you are royalty by devoting every bit of your personal life to the good of the land.
** May also count as a PrecisionFStrike - although the actual f-bomb is not dropped, this is the only real instance of profanity in the movie, and leaves both Henry and the audience somewhat stunned.
11th Apr '17 3:56:04 PM Andre
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** This requires some historical context. In the 15th and 16th century it was believed that the lower classes were ''inherently'' morally inferior to the nobility, as reflected by their low stations, coarse mannerisms, and lack of courtly graces. Sir Thomas Moore was a bit ahead of his time to argue that the lower classes weren't ''inherently'' evil or crass, but the product of their raising. Their poor manners due to poor education rather than inherent crassness, and most crimes brought on by miserable poverty created by the inherent inequality of contemporary society. [[note]]Keep in mind, too, that European peasants lived in ''miserable'' poverty, filled with filth (before indoor plumbing and public garbage disposal services removed dung and garbage from people's doorsteps), squalor, disease (before penicillin and vaccines, plagues were ''very'' common), malnutrition (lower classes had very poor diets, filled with mostly bread, ale, and base vegetables), and near-constant cold and hunger, on top of having to do back-breaking labor from dawn to dusk nearly every day just to put a mouthful of crumby food on the table in shitty little huts.[[/note]] To live in such inescapably miserable conditions while the rich lived in obscene luxury (due to a belief in a [[Great Chain of Being https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_chain_of_being]] would almost certainly make petty theft excusable by modern standards.

to:

** This requires some historical context. In the 15th and 16th century it was believed that the lower classes were ''inherently'' morally inferior to the nobility, as reflected by their low stations, coarse mannerisms, and lack of courtly graces. Sir Thomas Moore was a bit ahead of his time to argue that the lower classes weren't ''inherently'' evil or crass, but the product of their raising. Their poor manners due to poor education rather than inherent crassness, and most crimes brought on by miserable poverty created by the inherent inequality of contemporary society. [[note]]Keep in mind, too, that European peasants lived in ''miserable'' poverty, filled with filth (before indoor plumbing and public garbage disposal services removed dung and garbage from people's doorsteps), squalor, disease (before penicillin and vaccines, plagues were ''very'' common), malnutrition (lower classes had very poor diets, filled with mostly bread, ale, and base vegetables), and near-constant cold and hunger, on top of having to do back-breaking labor from dawn to dusk nearly every day just to put a mouthful of crumby food on the table in shitty little huts.[[/note]] To live in such inescapably miserable conditions while the rich lived in obscene luxury (due to a belief in a [[Great Chain of Being https://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_chain_of_being]] org/wiki/Great_chain_of_being Great Chain of Being]]) would almost certainly make petty theft excusable by modern standards.
26th Mar '17 3:47:08 PM fruitstripegum
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* InelegantBlubbering: Gabriella, the Spanish Princess, because she's forced to marry someome other than the Spanish courtier she's in love with. Can you really blame the poor girl?



* InelegantBlubbering: Gabriella, the Spanish Princess, because she's forced to marry someome other than the Spanish courtier she's in love with. Can you really blame the poor girl?
24th Mar '17 4:20:26 PM fruitstripegum
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TruthInTelevision: While this movie is infamous for its historical inaccuracies (but then again, this ''is'' a fairy tale they're retelling), they did get a few things right. Francis I was a ''huge'' Italiophile, and spent much of his reign and resources trying to get his hands on the city of Milan. As a result, he incorporated many Italian characteristics into his court, including fashion (which would explain the Italian fashions in the movie, even if they would have been ''at least'' a decade out of style) and art (Leonardo da Vinci really did spend his last few years in France, which is how many of his works ended up in the palace known as the ''Louvre'').



* TruthInTelevision: While this movie is infamous for its historical inaccuracies (but then again, this ''is'' a fairy tale they're retelling), they did get a few things right. Francis I was a ''huge'' Italiophile, and spent much of his reign and resources trying to get his hands on the city of Milan. As a result, he incorporated many Italian characteristics into his court, including fashion (which would explain the Italian fashions in the movie, even if they would have been ''at least'' a decade out of style) and art (Leonardo da Vinci really did spend his last few years in France, which is how many of his works ended up in the palace known as the ''Louvre'').
28th Feb '17 12:27:51 AM Give1Take2
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ArmorPiercingQuestion: Danielle cuts through Prince Henry's snobbish elitism with one well-phased question during their first meeting with her pretending to be a courtier, which kick-starts his CharacterDevelopment.
-->'''"Nicole":''' Excuse me, sire, but there is nothing natural about [snubbing peasants]. A country's character is defined by its "everyday rustics" as you call them. They are the legs you stand on, and that posisition demands ''respect'', not...\\
'''Henry:''' (''somewhat amused'') Am I to understand that you find me arrogant?\\
'''"Nicole:''' Well, you gave one man back his life, but did you even glance at the others?


Added DiffLines:

* {{Gaslighting}}: Danielle and the other de Barbarac servants do this a few times to Prince Henry over the course of the film, but they do so out of necessity to hide Danielle's true status as a servant. Two prominent examples include: Danielle, disguised as "Nicole de Lancret," letting Henry think he's crazy or imagining things by denying they've met before, because she can't let him realize she was the servant who chucked an apple at him earlier that morning. Later, when Henry stumbles across Danielle tending livestock at the market, she throws a chicken in his face before he can register what he's seeing and runs away while Paulette and Louis make a big commotion to cover her retreat, and they pretend afterwards like they were always the only two servants there all along. These are usually PlayedForLaughs.
-->'''Rodmilla:''' What are you two doing?! Trying to scare the prince to death?!\\
'''Paulette:''' We were startled, that's all!\\
'''Henry:''' (''Slowly'') ... Were there just the two of you?\\
'''Louis:''' And the chicken, Your Highness.
** This is PlayedForDrama when [[spoiler:Henry learns Danielle's true identity at the ball, and slowly realizes all the gaslighting she's put him through, and is seriously angry to learn how thoroughly he was deceived.]]
-->'''Henry:''' The apple... that was you?!
This list shows the last 10 events of 233. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Film.EverAfter