History Film / EverAfter

23rd Feb '17 5:33:20 PM Give1Take2
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* ColorCodedForYourConvenience: Most characters have one color scheme that they wear throughout the film, so you can easily spot them. Danielle mostly wears blue and white (when she's not pretending to be a courtier, though even then she often leans toward silver-blues and -greens), Rodmilla and Pierre le Pieu wear mostly black, Marguerite mostly wears bold orange, Jacqueline wears dark blues and greens, and the king and queen often wear golds and oranges. TruthInTelevision as most real-world Medieval and Renaissance Europeans only had a handful of outfits they wore (frequently washing their undergarments so their outer fabrics wouldn't fade in the wash), and they tended to choose colors that complemented their own features and/or social standing rather than whatever was in style that season.
* ColorCodedPatrician: TruthInTelevision, {{Invoked}}, and {{Enforced}}. The king and queen are often shown in [[GoldColoredSuperiority resplendent golds and oranges]]. Prince Henry is seldom seen without his [[PurpleIsPowerful deep purple cape]]. Various courtiers (including Rodmilla and her daughters) often wear bold colors in expensive fabrics to show off their status. Meanwhile, servants (such as Danielle) are often shown in crude, faded blues, browns, beige, and whites. When Danielle decides to pretend to be a courtier, Dustav mentions the (real-life) penalty for servants dressing above their station.

to:

* ColorCodedForYourConvenience: Most characters have one color scheme that they wear throughout the film, so you can easily spot them.
**
Danielle mostly wears blue and white (when she's not pretending to be a courtier, though even then she often leans toward silver-blues and -greens), Rodmilla -greens).
** [[RichBitch Rodmilla]]
and [[StalkerWithACrush Pierre le Pieu Pieu]] wear [[DarkIsEvil mostly black, black]].
**
Marguerite mostly wears bold orange, orange dresses.
**
Jacqueline wears dark blues and greens, and the greens.
** The
king and queen often wear golds and oranges. oranges.
**
TruthInTelevision as most real-world Medieval and Renaissance Europeans only had a handful of outfits they wore (frequently washing their undergarments so their outer fabrics wouldn't fade in the wash), and they tended to choose colors that complemented their own features and/or social standing standing, rather than whatever color was in style that season.
as we do today.
* ColorCodedPatrician: TruthInTelevision, {{Invoked}}, and {{Enforced}}.
**
The king and queen are often shown in [[GoldColoredSuperiority resplendent golds and oranges]]. GoldColoredSuperiority.
**
Prince Henry is seldom seen without his [[PurpleIsPowerful deep purple cape]]. PurpleIsPowerful cape.
**
Various courtiers (including Rodmilla and her daughters) often wear bold colors and patterns in expensive fabrics to show off their status. Meanwhile, status.
** Most
servants (such as Danielle) are often shown in crude, faded blues, browns, beige, and whites. The gypsies also mostly wear brown, tattered clothes.
**
When Danielle decides to pretend to be a courtier, Dustav mentions the (real-life) ([[TruthInTelevision real-life historical]]) penalty for servants dressing above their station.



* DarkIsEvil: Rodmilla de Ghent and Pierre le Pieu both dress primarily in black, and they're both cruel to the bone. Subverted with Jacqueline, who shares her mother's black hair and tendency to dress in dark colors, but is one of the shiest and sweetest characters in the movie.

to:

* DarkIsEvil: Rodmilla de Ghent and Pierre le Pieu Pieu, who both dress primarily in black, and they're both cruel black with hearts to the bone.match. Subverted with Jacqueline, who shares her mother's black hair and tendency to dress in dark colors, but is one of the shiest and sweetest characters in the movie.



* LaboriousLaziness: [[ImpoverishedPatrician Rodmilla de Ghent]] refuses to tend to the manor because it requires too much ''work''; [[RichBitch plus she considers it beneath her as a Baroness]]. So she spends all her time trying to help Marguerite marry up with Prince Henry. She does ''this'' by constantly hawking anything that'll fetch a price to buy eye-catching jewelry and dresses, bribing footmen to spy on the prince for her, stalking the prince's whereabouts, and playing games and intrigues to get the royal family's attention. Imagine how much she could get done if she put a ''fraction'' of that effort into actually running the manor and bringing honest income, so Marguerite wouldn't ''need'' to marry up?

to:

* LaboriousLaziness: [[ImpoverishedPatrician Rodmilla de Ghent]] refuses to tend to the manor because it requires too much ''work''; ''work''. [[RichBitch plus Plus, she considers it beneath her as a Baroness]]. So she spends all her time trying to help set Marguerite marry up with Prince Henry. She does ''this'' by constantly hawking anything that'll fetch a price to buy eye-catching jewelry and dresses, bribing footmen to spy on the prince for her, stalking the prince's whereabouts, and playing games and intrigues to get the royal family's attention. Imagine how much she could get done if she put a ''fraction'' of that effort into actually running the manor and bringing honest income, so Marguerite wouldn't ''need'' to marry up?income.



* MythologyGag: Some of the traditional elements of the Cinderella story show up in different places than usual. For instance, in this version Danielle's trip to the ball doesn't end with her exclaiming at the time and doing a runner, but one of her earlier meetings with Henry does.

to:

* MythologyGag: Some of the traditional elements of the Cinderella story show up in different places than usual. For instance, in this version Danielle's trip to the ball doesn't end with her exclaiming at the time and doing a runner, but one of her earlier meetings with Henry does.



* NeverMyFault: Rodmilla frequently blames (and punishes and sells) her servants for her own poverty and debt, even though her own neglect of the manor (which has the best soil in the providence) and tendency to sell off the servants she needs to work the land (which would bring income) is the reason for her situation.



* NeverMyFault: Rodmilla frequently blames, punishes, and sells her servants for her own poverty and debt, even though her own neglect of the manor (which has the best soil in the providence) and tendency to sell off the servants she needs to work the land (which would bring income) is the reason for her misfortune.
* NiceToTheWaiter: Most nobles aren't, since they believe their station gives them the ''right'' to treat peasants as property. Danielle believes in this, though that's not surprising given her station. Since Prince Henry doesn't know this when they first officially meet, he's ''fascinated'' by the "walking contradiction" of a courtier preaching the importance being nice to the help. As she grows on him, he visibly makes an effort to be nicer to peasants and servants he encounters.



** Marguirite is also often shown smirking smugly whenever things are going poorly for Danielle or well for herself, even though it's all due to her mother's machinations. [[spoiler:So it's ''very'' satisfying to see that smug grin wiped off her face at the end, when she realizes Danielle is a royal and now holds her life in her hands.]]

to:

** Marguirite is also often shown smirking smugly whenever things are going poorly for Danielle or well for herself, smugly, even though it's all due to her mother's machinations. [[spoiler:So it's ''very'' satisfying to see that smug grin wiped off her face at the end, when she realizes Danielle is a royal and now holds her life in her hands.]]



** This requires some historical context. In the 15th and 16th century it was believed that the lower classes were ''inherently'' morally inferior to the nobility, as reflected by their low stations, coarse mannerisms, and lack of courtly graces. Sir Thomas Moore was a bit ahead of his time to argue that the lower classes weren't ''inherently'' evil or crass, but the product of their raising. Their poor manners due to poor education rather than inherent crassness, and most crimes brought on by miserable poverty created by the inherent inequality of contemporary society. [[note]]Keep in mind, too, that European peasants lived in ''miserable'' poverty, filled with filth (before indoor plumbing and public garbage disposal services removed dung and garbage from people's doorsteps), squalor, disease (before penicillin and vaccines, plagues were ''very'' common), malnutrition (lower classes had very poor diets, filled with mostly bread, ale, and base vegetables), and near-constant cold and hunger, on top of having to do back-breaking labor from dawn to dusk nearly every day just to put a mouthful of crumby food on the table in shitty little huts.[[/note]] To live in such inescapably miserable conditions while the rich lived in obscene luxury (due to a belief in a [[Great Chain of Being https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_chain_of_being]] would almost certainly make petty theft excusable by modern standards.



-->'''Danielle:''' I would rather die a thousand deaths than see MY MOTHER'S DRESS ON THAT SPOILED, SELFISH COW!!!

to:

-->'''Danielle:''' I would rather die a thousand deaths than see MY MOTHER'S DRESS ON THAT SPOILED, '''SPOILED, SELFISH COW!!!COW!!!'''
22nd Feb '17 8:30:17 PM Give1Take2
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--'''Danielle:''' What bothers you more, stepmother? That I am ''common,'' or ''competition?''

to:

--'''Danielle:''' -->'''Danielle:''' What bothers you more, stepmother? That I am ''common,'' or ''competition?''
22nd Feb '17 7:50:52 PM Give1Take2
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* AbusiveParents: Rodmilla de Ghent, who is ''massively'' emotionally abusive to her step-daughter Danielle, and not much kinder to her [[TheUnfavorite unfavorite]] daughter Jacqueline.



** Another big one is that Henry saves the Mona Lisa, which is depicted as being painted on canvas rolled up in a tube, when it's actually on wood.

to:

** Another big one is that Henry saves the Mona Lisa, which is depicted as being painted on canvas rolled up in a tube, when it's actually on wood. It's also shown to be a large canvas in the film, whereas the real Mona Lisa is about the size of an average sheet of printer paper.



%%* BaldOfEvil: Pierre Le Pieu.

to:

%%* * BaldOfEvil: Pierre Le Pieu.



--> [[EstablishingCharacterMoment "I wanted four-minute eggs, ''not'' four one-minute eggs, and where in '''God's''' name is our bread?!"]]

to:

--> [[EstablishingCharacterMoment "I said I wanted four-minute eggs, ''not'' ]] ''[[EstablishingCharacterMoment not]]'' [[EstablishingCharacterMoment four one-minute eggs, and where in '''God's''' in]] '''[[EstablishingCharacterMoment God's]]''' [[EstablishingCharacterMoment name is our bread?!"]]



* TheChainOfHarm: August merely looking at his new wife Rodmilla and then turning to say "I love you" to his daughter with his dying breath was pretty cold. It's hard to blame Rodmilla for feeling hurt by that. However, Rodmilla then spends the next ten years making Danielle's life as miserable as she possibly can in retaliation, which is ''not'' all right.



* ColorCodedForYourConvenience: Most characters have one color scheme that they wear throughout the film, so you can easily spot them. Danielle mostly wears blue and white (when she's not pretending to be a courtier, though even then she often leans toward silver-blues and -greens), Rodmilla and Pierre le Pieu wear mostly black, Marguerite mostly wears bold orange, Jacqueline wears dark blues and greens, and the king and queen often wear golds and oranges. TruthInTelevision as most real-world Medieval and Renaissance Europeans only had a handful of outfits they wore (frequently washing their undergarments so their outer fabrics wouldn't fade in the wash), and they tended to choose colors that complemented their own features and/or social standing rather than whatever was in style that season.
* ColorCodedPatrician: TruthInTelevision, {{Invoked}}, and {{Enforced}}. The king and queen are often shown in [[GoldColoredSuperiority resplendent golds and oranges]]. Prince Henry is seldom seen without his [[PurpleIsPowerful deep purple cape]]. Various courtiers (including Rodmilla and her daughters) often wear bold colors in expensive fabrics to show off their status. Meanwhile, servants (such as Danielle) are often shown in crude, faded blues, browns, beige, and whites. When Danielle decides to pretend to be a courtier, Dustav mentions the (real-life) penalty for servants dressing above their station.



* DarkIsEvil: Rodmilla de Ghent and Pierre le Pieu both dress primarily in black, and they're both cruel to the bone. Subverted with Jacqueline, who shares her mother's black hair and tendency to dress in dark colors, but is one of the shiest and sweetest characters in the movie.



* GreenEyedMonster: Rodmilla will ''never'' forgive Danielle for the fact that her husband loved his daughter more than her, nor for the fact that he turned away from Rodmilla to tell Danielle he loved her with his dying breath. She also becomes jealous of Danielle's success wooing the prince over her own daughter.
--'''Danielle:''' What bothers you more, stepmother? That I am ''common,'' or ''competition?''



** King Francis and Queen Marie (despite their periodic snarkiness with each other)



%%**Maurice and Louise, definitely. Just look at how overjoyed Louise is when Danielle brings Maurice back to her.

to:

%%**Maurice ** Maurice and Louise, definitely. Just look at how overjoyed Louise is when Danielle brings Maurice back to her.



* LaboriousLaziness: [[ImpoverishedPatrician Rodmilla de Ghent]] refuses to tend to the manor because it requires too much ''work''; [[RichBitch plus she considers it beneath her as a Baroness]]. So she spends all her time trying to help Marguerite marry up with Prince Henry. She does ''this'' by constantly hawking anything that'll fetch a price to buy eye-catching jewelry and dresses, bribing footmen to spy on the prince for her, stalking the prince's whereabouts, and playing games and intrigues to get the royal family's attention. Imagine how much she could get done if she put a ''fraction'' of that effort into actually running the manor and bringing honest income, so Marguerite wouldn't ''need'' to marry up?



* NeverMyFault: Rodmilla frequently blames (and punishes and sells) her servants for her own poverty and debt, even though her own neglect of the manor (which has the best soil in the providence) and tendency to sell off the servants she needs to work the land (which would bring income) is the reason for her situation.



* ReturningTheHandkerchief: What the girls hope will happen in the badminton scene--Henry has handkerchiefs stuffed into his clothing by hopeful courtiers.

to:

* ReturningTheHandkerchief: What the girls hope will happen in the badminton tennis scene--Henry has handkerchiefs stuffed into his clothing by hopeful courtiers.



* RoyalBrat: Prince Henry is a male version, to some extent. After he gets taken down a peg with an AWESOME speech from Creator/LeonardoDaVinci (yes, that one), he gets better.

to:

* RoyalBrat: Prince Henry is a male version, to some extent.which "Nicole" frequently calls him out on. After he gets taken down a peg with an AWESOME speech from Creator/LeonardoDaVinci (yes, that one), he gets better.


Added DiffLines:

* SmallNameBigEgo: Downplayed. Rodmilla de Ghent is a Baroness, the lowest possible title of nobility (practically gentry), yet often boasts of her "noble blood." [[spoiler:Played dead straight after her title is stripped at the end, when she holds herself above Marguerite and the other castle servants just because she is "of noble blood." The head laundry servant isn't impressed.]]


Added DiffLines:

** Marguirite is also often shown smirking smugly whenever things are going poorly for Danielle or well for herself, even though it's all due to her mother's machinations. [[spoiler:So it's ''very'' satisfying to see that smug grin wiped off her face at the end, when she realizes Danielle is a royal and now holds her life in her hands.]]


Added DiffLines:

* SpoiledBrat: Marguerite, big time. She's even called such by Danielle at one point.
-->'''Danielle:''' I would rather die a thousand deaths than see MY MOTHER'S DRESS ON THAT SPOILED, SELFISH COW!!!
14th Feb '17 10:34:30 AM CarolC
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* WellDoneDaughterGirl: Part of the reason why Danielle puts up with Rodmilla as long as she could is the mere hope of receiving a speckle of affection from her.

to:

* WellDoneDaughterGirl: Part of the reason why Danielle puts up with Rodmilla as long as she could is the mere hope of receiving a speckle of maternal affection from her. Shown best when Danielle lights up a bit when Rodmilla has near PetTheDog moment with her.
5th Feb '17 2:42:18 PM Puterboy1
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Added DiffLines:

** Danielle tells Gustave that Rodmilla acts like she has "money to burn". Not only is it an inappropriately modern expression that seems to go as far back as the 20th century, but it is inaccurate that paper money would not be invented until approximately 250 years later or so. Ironically, the film accurately shows the correct currency of coins made from steels and precious stones, so Danielle's line should have been "money to melt".
1st Feb '17 2:31:47 PM Puterboy1
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Added DiffLines:

** While meeting Henry, Jaqueline places a white feather from her head in-between her breasts, Marguerite also has a brooch in the same position, but it completely sticks out of her dress.
22nd Jan '17 8:33:07 PM Mdumas43073
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Danielle de Barbarac (Creator/DrewBarrymore) is the beloved only child of the widowed Auguste de Barbarac and his late wife, Nicole de Lancret. When she is eight years old, he remarries the Baroness [[WickedStepmother Rodmilla de Ghent]] (portrayed by Creator/AnjelicaHuston), and brings her home along with her two daughters, [[RoyalBrat spoiled and cruel Marguerite]] and [[ShrinkingViolet gentle but weak-willed Jacqueline]]. Shortly thereafter, he dies, leaving Danielle to the care of her stepmother, who already resents the love that he displays to his daughter (especially as he calls for her over his wife in his final moments), and the estate's three devoted servants - the housemaids, Paulette and Louise, and the retainer, Louise's husband Maurice.

to:

Danielle de Barbarac (Creator/DrewBarrymore) is the beloved only child of the widowed Auguste de Barbarac and his late wife, Nicole de Lancret. When she is eight years old, he remarries the Baroness [[WickedStepmother Rodmilla de Ghent]] (portrayed by Creator/AnjelicaHuston), (Creator/AnjelicaHuston), and brings her home along with her two daughters, [[RoyalBrat spoiled and cruel Marguerite]] and [[ShrinkingViolet gentle but weak-willed Jacqueline]]. Shortly thereafter, he dies, leaving Danielle to the care of her stepmother, who already resents the love that he displays to his daughter (especially as he calls for her over his wife in his final moments), and the estate's three devoted servants - the housemaids, Paulette and Louise, and the retainer, Louise's husband Maurice.
22nd Jan '17 8:32:41 PM Mdumas43073
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[[quoteright:200:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/EverAfterPoster_1578.jpg]]

to:

\n[[quoteright:200:http://static.[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/EverAfterPoster_1578.jpg]]org/pmwiki/pub/images/ever_after.jpg]]
8th Jan '17 6:59:51 PM nombretomado
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Danielle and the Prince meet again when Danielle, disguised as a courtier and using her mother's name, goes to the castle to rescue Maurice, whom the Baroness had sold into slavery to pay off some of her debt. The Prince is intrigued by "Nicole's" beliefs and courage, and asks to meet her again. A [[{{Pun}} courtship]] ensues, in which Danielle keeps trying to tell Henry that she is really not a countess and the Baroness gets increasingly suspicious of Danielle's odd appearances and disappearances. The King and Queen, desperate to marry their son off, are delighted that he has found a girl... but are keen to meet her, something Danielle wishes to avoid. Meanwhile, LeonardoDaVinci, who has been invited to court, befriends both Danielle and Henry and everything seems to be going along well, save for Danielle's growing anxiety about maintaining the masquerade.

to:

Danielle and the Prince meet again when Danielle, disguised as a courtier and using her mother's name, goes to the castle to rescue Maurice, whom the Baroness had sold into slavery to pay off some of her debt. The Prince is intrigued by "Nicole's" beliefs and courage, and asks to meet her again. A [[{{Pun}} courtship]] ensues, in which Danielle keeps trying to tell Henry that she is really not a countess and the Baroness gets increasingly suspicious of Danielle's odd appearances and disappearances. The King and Queen, desperate to marry their son off, are delighted that he has found a girl... but are keen to meet her, something Danielle wishes to avoid. Meanwhile, LeonardoDaVinci, Creator/LeonardoDaVinci, who has been invited to court, befriends both Danielle and Henry and everything seems to be going along well, save for Danielle's growing anxiety about maintaining the masquerade.



* RenaissanceMan: The original Renaissance man, ''LeonardoDaVinci himself'', shows up to facilitate the romance.

to:

* RenaissanceMan: The original Renaissance man, ''LeonardoDaVinci ''Creator/LeonardoDaVinci himself'', shows up to facilitate the romance.



* RoyalBrat: Prince Henry is a male version, to some extent. After he gets taken down a peg with an AWESOME speech from LeonardoDaVinci (yes, that one), he gets better.

to:

* RoyalBrat: Prince Henry is a male version, to some extent. After he gets taken down a peg with an AWESOME speech from LeonardoDaVinci Creator/LeonardoDaVinci (yes, that one), he gets better.



* StealthPun: The historically homosexual LeonardoDaVinci is Danielle's Fairy Godmother.

to:

* StealthPun: The historically homosexual LeonardoDaVinci Creator/LeonardoDaVinci is Danielle's Fairy Godmother.



-->'''LeonardoDaVinci:''' [[PunctuatedForEmphasis Horse. Shit.]]

to:

-->'''LeonardoDaVinci:''' -->'''Creator/LeonardoDaVinci:''' [[PunctuatedForEmphasis Horse. Shit.]]
8th Jan '17 6:59:27 PM nombretomado
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* HistoricalDomainCharacter: If this movie is to be believed, Cinderella's fairy godmother was really LeonardoDaVinci.

to:

* HistoricalDomainCharacter: If this movie is to be believed, Cinderella's fairy godmother was really LeonardoDaVinci.Creator/LeonardoDaVinci.
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