History Film / CitizenKane

3rd Jul '17 3:48:20 PM DustSnitch
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--->'''Emily:''' Your Mr. Bernstein sent junior the most incredible atrocity yesterday, Charles. I simply can't have it in the nursery.

to:

--->'''Emily:''' -->'''Emily:''' Your Mr. Bernstein sent junior the most incredible atrocity yesterday, Charles. I simply can't have it in the nursery.
28th Jun '17 1:30:35 PM DustSnitch
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* {{Biopic}}: It's a biopic of an entirely fictional character (albeit one inspired by real-life figures) but ''Citizen Kane'' more or less invented and codified many of the tropes of the Biopic genre and actively inspired many later works on real-life figures.
** This has to do with the fact that the film's narrative actively tries to dramatize, as the newsreel colleague says, "70 years in a man's life". A major problem with any film biography is telescoping the key incidents and shaping a proper dramatic arc to a life. Kane's approach, using the CharacterDeath as an ExcusePlot inspired later films, such as ''Film/LawrenceOfArabia'' and others, which managed to avoid the ForegoneConclusion nature of the story while still finding room for dramatic possibilities.
** Welles putting on aging makeup and other aspects to show Kane in different times, paved the way for other actors in later films to portray characters in different stages of life, for instance, Creator/LeonardoDiCaprio in Film/JEdgar. Likewise, the film's focus on Kane's interior struggle and ambitions as a way to make the character somewhat relatable often led to many films using a MacGuffin to tell the story.

to:

* {{Biopic}}: It's a biopic of an entirely fictional character (albeit one inspired by real-life figures) but ''Citizen Kane'' more or less invented and codified many of the tropes of the Biopic genre and actively inspired many later works on real-life figures. \n** \\\
This has to do with the fact that the film's narrative actively tries to dramatize, as the newsreel colleague says, "70 years in a man's life". A major problem with any film biography is telescoping the key incidents and shaping a proper dramatic arc to a life. Kane's approach, using the CharacterDeath as an ExcusePlot inspired later films, such as ''Film/LawrenceOfArabia'' and others, which managed to avoid the ForegoneConclusion nature of the story while still finding room for dramatic possibilities. \n** \\\
Welles putting on aging makeup and other aspects to show Kane in different times, paved the way for other actors in later films to portray characters in different stages of life, for instance, Creator/LeonardoDiCaprio in Film/JEdgar. Likewise, the film's focus on Kane's interior struggle and ambitions as a way to make the character somewhat relatable often led to many films using a MacGuffin to tell the story.
19th Jun '17 9:15:03 PM n0321
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* Classical Antihero: The titular character, albeit one PlayedForDrama.

to:

* Classical Antihero: ClassicalAntihero: The titular character, albeit one PlayedForDrama.
19th Jun '17 9:14:31 PM n0321
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Added DiffLines:

* Classical Antihero: The titular character, albeit one PlayedForDrama.
17th Jun '17 1:40:19 PM BobSaget9
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* BurnBabyBurn: [[spoiler:The last shot is of Kane's childhood sled burning. Ultra close up on the sled's name, which is Rosebud but come on, [[ItWasHisSled you should know this already.]] ]]

to:

* BurnBabyBurn: [[spoiler:The The last shot is of Kane's childhood sled burning. Ultra close up on the sled's name, which is Rosebud but come on, [[ItWasHisSled you should know this already.]] ]]



** Money can't buy love or happiness. Even the most powerful people in the world often truly desire simple things--like [[spoiler: having a real childhood]].

to:

** Money can't buy love or happiness. Even the most powerful people in the world often truly desire simple things--like [[spoiler: having a real childhood]].childhood.



--> ''(cut to newspaper headline: "KANE BUILDS OPERA HOUSE")''

to:

--> ''(cut -->''(cut to newspaper headline: "KANE BUILDS OPERA HOUSE")''



--> '''Thompson''': Mr. Kane was a man who got everything he wanted and then lost it. Maybe Rosebud was something he couldn't get, or something he lost. Anyway, it wouldn't have explained anything... I don't think any word can explain a man's life. No, I guess Rosebud is just a... piece in a jigsaw puzzle... a missing piece.

to:

--> '''Thompson''': -->'''Thompson''': Mr. Kane was a man who got everything he wanted and then lost it. Maybe Rosebud was something he couldn't get, or something he lost. Anyway, it wouldn't have explained anything... I don't think any word can explain a man's life. No, I guess Rosebud is just a... piece in a jigsaw puzzle... a missing piece.



--> '''Kane:''' [pleading] Don't go, Susan. You mustn't go. You can't do this to me.
--> '''Susan:''' I see. So it's you who this is being done to. It's not me at all. Not how I feel. Not what it means to me.'' [laughs] ''I can't do this to you? [odd smile] [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome Oh, yes I can.]]

to:

--> '''Kane:''' -->'''Kane:''' [pleading] Don't go, Susan. You mustn't go. You can't do this to me.
--> '''Susan:''' -->'''Susan:''' I see. So it's you who this is being done to. It's not me at all. Not how I feel. Not what it means to me.'' [laughs] ''I can't do this to you? [odd smile] [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome Oh, yes I can.]]



* JekyllAndHyde: Kane tells Thatcher early on, "The trouble is, you don't realize that you're talking to two people," referring to himself as both a man of wealth and as a man of the people. One of the main points of the movie is the internal war between those two sides. [[spoiler: It can be argued that both sides lose by the end of the movie.]]
%%* {{Jerkass}}: Charles Foster Kane.

to:

* JekyllAndHyde: Kane tells Thatcher early on, "The trouble is, you don't realize that you're talking to two people," referring to himself as both a man of wealth and as a man of the people. One of the main points of the movie is the internal war between those two sides. [[spoiler: It can be argued that both sides lose by the end of the movie.]]
%%*
movie.
*
{{Jerkass}}: The whole entire movie basically boils down to showing how Charles Foster Kane.Kane turned into a big piece of shit, lost childhood or not.



* {{MacGuffin}}: The identity of "Rosebud".

to:

* {{MacGuffin}}: The identity of "Rosebud". It never gets obtained... by the ''characters'', that is...



* TheReveal: "Rosebud" [[spoiler:was Kane's sled]].

to:

* TheReveal: "Rosebud" [[spoiler:was was Kane's sled]].sled.
10th Jun '17 12:49:10 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: InUniverse with the opening newsreel in which Kane is denounced as both a communist and a fascist.

to:

* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: InUniverse with the opening newsreel in which Kane is denounced as both a communist and a fascist.
9th Jun '17 8:27:19 AM system
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9th Jun '17 8:04:37 AM ChainsawOfRedemption
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%%Zero Context Examples are not permitted on the Wiki, so don't uncomment them unless you provide proper context.

[[quoteright:320:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/citizen_kane_welles.jpeg]]
[[caption-width-right:320:Hey, have you seen ''Citizen Kane''? You probably should; it's practically the ''Citizen Kane'' [[ShapedLikeItself of film.]]]]

->''"Rosebud..."''
-->-- '''Charles Foster Kane'''

''Citizen Kane'' is a 1941 film, produced by Creator/RKOPictures and Mercury Films. It is Creator/OrsonWelles' first feature, and he produced, co-wrote (with Herman J. Mankiewicz), directed and played the leading role as Charles Foster Kane.

Inside his unfinished [[BigFancyHouse palatial mansion]], media mogul Charles Foster Kane lies DyingAlone, having lived in seclusion from the world for many years. [[FamousLastWords With his final breath]], he utters the word "Rosebud!". The movie unfolds in flashback as IntrepidReporter Jerry Thompson tries to unravel the significance of Kane's dying declaration through interviewing those who knew him. However, no one he talks to knows just who or what Rosebud was, the closest answer he gets is from Kane's butler who concludes he was just saying a nonsense word. Thompson never does solve the mystery, though [[ItWasHisSled the answer]] is shown to the audience in the final scene. [[AnAesop The conclusion?]] It is indeed LonelyAtTheTop.

Welles' debut film was the product of a unique contract that gave him full AuteurLicense and "final cut" approval[[note]]A really rare privilege and unheard-of for a first-time director back then, and even today[[/note]]. An avant-garde theatre director and radio star, his first film as a director was a technical breakthrough in cinematic storytelling and pioneered several achievements in cinematography, set design and special effects. The film was also controversial for its protagonist's thinly-veiled resemblance to real-life media mogul William Randolph Hearst, who subsequently [[https://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/mar/28/scale-of-hearst-plot-to-discredit-orson-welles-and-citizen-kane-revealed moved to sabotage its release]]. The film became the quintessential AcclaimedFlop though it would recoup its losses in its vastly more successful anniversary and repertory screenings.

Revered as one of the greatest films ever made (if not ''the'' greatest), it is also the TropeCodifier and [[WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy indirect]] TropeNamer for ItWasHisSled.

to:

%%Zero Context Examples are not permitted on the Wiki, so don't uncomment them unless you provide proper context.

[[quoteright:320:http://static.
[[quoteright:200:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/citizen_kane_welles.jpeg]]
[[caption-width-right:320:Hey, have you seen ''Citizen Kane''? You probably should; it's practically the ''Citizen Kane'' [[ShapedLikeItself of film.]]]]

->''"Rosebud...
org/pmwiki/pub/images/trucos_Fossil_Fighters_DS-825_9874.jpg]]
->''"Awaken an era.
"''
-->-- '''Charles Foster Kane'''

''Citizen Kane''
[[caption-width-right:200:Can you dig it?]]

A {{Mons}} series from Creator/{{Nintendo}} and Creator/RedEntertainment, ''Fossil Fighters'' (''Kaseki Horider'', or "Fossil Hunters", in Japan)
is a 1941 film, produced by Creator/RKOPictures collection Mon RPG/paleontology sim series for the DS and Mercury Films. It is Creator/OrsonWelles' first feature, and he produced, co-wrote (with Herman J. Mankiewicz), directed and played 3DS.

On
the leading role as Charles Foster Kane.

Inside his unfinished [[BigFancyHouse palatial mansion]], media mogul Charles Foster Kane lies DyingAlone, having lived in seclusion
tropical Vivosaur island, the Richmond archaeological foundation has built a fantastic resort. Using the brilliance of Dr. Diggins, they have developed a process to revive dead animals from fossil fragments. ([[Film/JurassicPark Sound familiar?]]) As a side-effect of this process, the world dead animals are not complete copies of the creatures they originally were in life--they gain unusual appearances and best of all--superpowers. Vivosaur Island has become a playground for many years. [[FamousLastWords With his final breath]], he utters the word "Rosebud!". The movie unfolds in flashback as IntrepidReporter Jerry Thompson tries to unravel the significance of Kane's dying declaration through interviewing those who knew him. However, no one he talks to knows just who or what Rosebud was, the closest answer he gets is from Kane's butler who concludes he was just saying a nonsense word. Thompson never does solve the mystery, though [[ItWasHisSled the answer]] is shown to the audience rich where wealthy young dinosaur fanatics can revive extinct animals in the final scene. [[AnAesop form of superpowered monsters and fight them against each other for glory and fame.

Like most games, this one stars a [[KidHero young boy]] (or girl, starting with the second game) who aspires ToBeAMaster. You hunt fossils, battle other fans, and raise in the ranks, with the help of his friends. But the island is lousy with groups of fossil thieves and general schemers who, naturally, want to TakeOverTheWorld.

Games in the series:
* ''Fossil Fighters'' (''Bokura wa Kaseki Horider'', or "We Are Fossil Hunters", in Japan), 2008 JP/2009 US Nintendo DS
* ''Fossil Fighters: Champions'' (''Super Kaseki Horider'', or "Super Fossil Hunters" in Japan), 2010 JP/2011 US Nintendo DS: This game features improved, [[CelShaded cel-shaded graphics]] (with FMV cutscenes), a female player character, a revamped movement system, new islands, new villains, and the ability to Super Revive certain Vivosaurs into evolved forms.
* ''Fossil Fighters: Frontier'' (''Kaseki Horider Mugengear'', or "Fossil Hunters Infinite Gear" in Japan), 2014 JP/2015 US Nintendo 3DS:
The conclusion?]] It new feature for this title is indeed LonelyAtTheTop.

Welles' debut film was
the product of a unique contract that gave him full AuteurLicense ability to fight wild Vivosaurs and "final cut" approval[[note]]A really rare privilege and unheard-of for a first-time director back then, and even today[[/note]]. An avant-garde theatre director and radio star, his first film as a director was a technical breakthrough to drive around in cinematic storytelling and pioneered several achievements in cinematography, set design and special effects. customizable vehicles. The film was combat system has also controversial for its protagonist's thinly-veiled resemblance to real-life media mogul William Randolph Hearst, who subsequently [[https://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/mar/28/scale-of-hearst-plot-to-discredit-orson-welles-and-citizen-kane-revealed moved to sabotage its release]]. The film became the quintessential AcclaimedFlop though it would recoup its losses in its vastly more successful anniversary and repertory screenings.

Revered as one of the greatest films ever made (if not ''the'' greatest), it is also the TropeCodifier and [[WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy indirect]] TropeNamer for ItWasHisSled.
been entirely overhauled.



!!This film provides examples of:

* AbusiveParents:
** Mr. Thatcher seems to be very distant from his young ward.
** Emotionally, Mrs. Kane towards her son as she wants to insure that he has wealth and "proper" upbringing at the cost of being raised by his parents.
** Kane's father, physically speaking, which is partly why his mother sends him away in the first place. Although in his defense the one time he threatens to strike his son, is after Charles violently pushed Thatcher down with his sled.
* AchievementsInIgnorance: According to [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oQYazeJA-Oo&t=4m55s an interview with Orson Welles]], the technical advances of the film had a lot to do with this trope.
-->'''Interviewer:''' What I'd like to know is where did you get the confidence from to make a film with such--
-->'''Welles:''' Ignorance. Ignorance. Sheer ignorance. You know there's no confidence to equal it. It's only when you ''know'' something about a profession, I think, that you're timid, or careful, or...
-->'''Interviewer:''' How did this ignorance show itself?
-->'''Welles:''' I thought you could do anything with a camera that the eye could do, or the imagination could do. And if you come up from the bottom in the film business, you're taught all the things that the cameraman doesn't want to attempt for fear he will be criticized for having failed. And in this case I had a cameraman who didn't care if he was criticized if he failed, and I didn't know that there were things you couldn't do, so anything I could think up in my dreams, I attempted to photograph.
-->'''Interviewer:''' You got away with enormous technical advances, didn't you?
-->'''Welles:''' Simply by not knowing that they were impossible. Well, theoretically impossible.
* ActuallyPrettyFunny: Leland writes a scathing review of Susan's opera performance, passing out from drink afterwards. Kane reads it over his shoulder and can't help laughing.
* ActuallyThatsMyAssistant: When Kane is buying the Inquirer, the editor of the paper mistakes Leland for Kane.
* AgeCut: "Merry Christmas" [cut forward about 15 years] "and a Happy New Year".
* AllInTheEyes: Kane's eyes are lit at the opera house during Susan's disastrous debut. It shows his monomania and disconnection from the audience reaction.
* AllTakeAndNoGive: Kane's main problem. He wants everyone to love him, but he doesn't have any love to give in return.
* AllThereIsToKnowAboutTheCryingGame: It's pretty much guaranteed that the only thing people who've never seen the movie know about it is that ItWasHisSled.
* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: InUniverse with the opening newsreel in which Kane is denounced as both a communist and a fascist.
* AmbiguouslyGay: Leland the "Broadway critic" is coded as gay (couldn't be stated outright under UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode) and was possibly infatuated with Kane in his early years.
* AmbiguouslyJewish: Mr. Bernstein. In fact, it's implied in one scene that Kane's first wife feels uncomfortable around Bernstein for precisely that reason. [[note]]Mr. Bernstein was played by a Jewish actor, Everett Sloane[[/note]] Emily also complains about a NoodleIncident with Bernstein.
--->'''Emily:''' Your Mr. Bernstein sent junior the most incredible atrocity yesterday, Charles. I simply can't have it in the nursery.
** The atrocity in question is a mezuzah, a box containing sacred Hebrew texts (usually the Ten Commandments), affixed to a doorpost, often believed to act as a warding or protection (and thus a protection over the child). Additionally, if "Mr. Bernstein is apt to pay a visit to the nursery now and then", he'd kiss his fingers and then touch the mezuzah upon entering and leaving the room.
* AnachronicOrder: The film starts with the title character's death, gives us a brief newsreel outline of his life, then fills in the details of his life with a series of flashbacks. The flashbacks are not in chronological order; their order depends on the order in which a reporter interviews people.
* AndIMustScream: How Susan feels about Xanadu.
* AndStarring: The final image of the credits, after all the secondary characters have had clips shown of them with their actors' names, is a list of the bit part actors. Then at the bottom it says "Creator/OrsonWelles as Kane". Creator/RogerEbert stated it was a blatant example of false modesty on Welles' part. He adds that listing Gregg Toland's cinematography credit alongside his directorial credit on the same card was true modesty.
* AngerMontage: The room trashing sequence. The movie commentary tracks note that this scene was a bit of "method acting" that got out of control. Welles broke his hand very early in the sequence; you can see him favoring it at the end. Also different from the typical example in that it is shown in a couple of long master shots, rather than an actual montage of closeups: this is because they could only do one take.
* ArbitrarilyLargeBankAccount: Given that he was based on William Randolph Hearst, Kane qualifies.
* ArcWords: "Rosebud." is a possible UrExample. Of course, [[ItWasHisSled it's not really enigmatic anymore.]]
* ArchEnemy: Walter Parks Thatcher and Jim W. Gettys to Charles Foster Kane.
* AsideGlance:
-->'''Thatcher:''' "I think it would be fun to run a newspaper." Hmmph!
* BadassBoast:
-->'''Kane:''' You're right, I did lose a million dollars last year. I expect to lose a million dollars this year. I expect to lose a million dollars ''next'' year. You know, Mr. Thatcher, at the rate of a million dollars a year, I'll have to close this place in... ''(smirking)'' 60 years.
* BecameTheirOwnAntithesis: Kane starts out with a declaration of principles, championing the Inquirer and himself as a tireless seeker of truth and justice and the defender of "the common man", until he slowly becomes a power-hungry controller of information who wants the common man to love him but who has none to give back, exemplified when he loudly proclaims that the people will think ''"what I tell them to think"''.
%%* BettyAndVeronica: Kane's wives, Emily and Susan, respectively.
%%* BigBad: James W. Gettys and Walter Parks Thatcher.
* BigEater: Kane, as evidenced by this early exchange:
-->'''Jedidiah:''' Are you ''still'' eating?\\
'''Kane:''' [[FunnyAneurysmMoment I'm still hungry]].
* BigFancyHouse: Xanadu, which is cited as the largest private estate in the world, the cost of which to maintain quote "No man can say".
* {{Biopic}}: It's a biopic of an entirely fictional character (albeit one inspired by real-life figures) but ''Citizen Kane'' more or less invented and codified many of the tropes of the Biopic genre and actively inspired many later works on real-life figures.
** This has to do with the fact that the film's narrative actively tries to dramatize, as the newsreel colleague says, "70 years in a man's life". A major problem with any film biography is telescoping the key incidents and shaping a proper dramatic arc to a life. Kane's approach, using the CharacterDeath as an ExcusePlot inspired later films, such as ''Film/LawrenceOfArabia'' and others, which managed to avoid the ForegoneConclusion nature of the story while still finding room for dramatic possibilities.
** Welles putting on aging makeup and other aspects to show Kane in different times, paved the way for other actors in later films to portray characters in different stages of life, for instance, Creator/LeonardoDiCaprio in Film/JEdgar. Likewise, the film's focus on Kane's interior struggle and ambitions as a way to make the character somewhat relatable often led to many films using a MacGuffin to tell the story.
* BladeOfGrassCut: Rosebud does not apply, but the snowglobe possibly does.
* BluntYes:
-->'''Leland:''' Bernstein, am I a stuffed shirt? Am I a horse-faced hypocrite? Am I a New England school marm?
-->'''Bernstein:''' Yes. If you thought I'd answer you any differently than what Mr. Kane tells you...
* BookEnds: The same shot of Kane's house and the fence in front with a sign reading "No Trespassing".
* TheBrainlessBeauty: Susan Alexander Kane is more naive than stupid, really. It's just that her voice has "bimbo" connotations.
* BrokenAce: Under all his wealth and prestige, Kane is a broken man who can't hold down a relationship with anyone and desperately longs for his stolen childhood.
* BurnBabyBurn: [[spoiler:The last shot is of Kane's childhood sled burning. Ultra close up on the sled's name, which is Rosebud but come on, [[ItWasHisSled you should know this already.]] ]]
* ByronicHero: Kane is an archetypal example. As a little boy, he gets snatched from his family and introduced into the cold, ruthless world of media, politics, and business. By rising to the top of that ruthless world through cutthroat cunning, he becomes an internationally famous media tycoon and one of the richest men of all time. But under all that wealth, he's a broken man who can't hold down a relationship with anyone and desperately longs for his stolen childhood.
* BusCrash: Thanks to the MoralGuardians, Kane's first wife and son had to be killed in a car crash so Kane could marry Susan.
* CallingTheOldManOut:
** Kane delivers one to his adoptive guardian, Mr. Thatcher:
--->'''Kane:''' You know, Mr. Bernstein, if I hadn't been very rich, I might have been a really great man.\\
'''Thatcher:''' Don't you think you are?\\
'''Kane:''' I think I did pretty well, under the circumstances.\\
'''Thatcher:''' What would you like to have been?\\
'''Kane:''' Everything you hate.
** This is displacement. Kane's really angry at his ''mother,'' for sending Kane away when he was young, and putting him into Thatcher's hands. Implicitly, Thatcher is a decent (if very conservative) middle-aged banker who did his best while (ahem) raising Kane.
* TheCameo: Pretty much every male in the cast plays also one of the reporters in the opening projection room scene. That is one of the reasons why [[{{Chiaroscuro}} it was shot so dark and shadowy]], even compared to the rest of the film. Joseph Cotten is still clearly visible in the corner, however, when the editor is asking "What were his last words?".
* CapitalismIsBad: The film is often seen as an attack on TheAmericanDream, featuring a highly unsympathetic, though not one-dimensional or caricatured, portrayal of the American tycoon. It apparently struck a nerve with William Randolph Hearst, one of its inspirations, who managed to upset its distribution and make it a box-office flop.
** This wasn't just a "feud" as it has been portrayed. Harlan Lebo in his book ''Citizen Kane, A Filmmaker's Journey'' reveals the massive scope of Hearst's plot to destroy Welles and his film. They even smuggled [[JailBait an underage girl]] into Welles' hotel room and had two photographers standing ready. Fortunately, a police investigator warned Welles in time.
* CensorDecoy: The birthday/song scene originally took place in a brothel. Welles knew he'd never be able to get away with that, but he kept it in the screenplay so the execs at RKO wouldn't notice the jabs he was taking at Hearst.
* CentralTheme:
** How will the world remember you when you are gone?
** Money can't buy love or happiness. Even the most powerful people in the world often truly desire simple things--like [[spoiler: having a real childhood]].
** Even in a world of mass information, it's sometimes impossible to truly "know" the people around us.
* ChekhovsGun:
** The now legendary sled.
** Also the Declaration of Principles, which Leland sends back to Kane after Kane has betrayed those principles.
* {{Chiaroscuro}}: Like many tropes, the usage of Chiaroscuro in film was widely popularized by ''Citizen Kane'', although it was already common in [[GermanExpressionism German expressionist]] cinema. This ties into the film's use of "Deep Focus" (one of the techniques cinematographers rave about in the movie). The way they managed to bring foreground and background objects into focus in the same shot required the more distant objects to be extremely brightly lit, encouraging the heavy-shadow Chiaroscuro compositions. Which is why Welles put Gregg Toland's name on the same card as him.
* ClassicalMusicIsBoring: The audience that attends the premiere of the opera Kane commissioned for his wife Susan are seen growing more bored by the minute. One man entertains himself by tearing his program into strips, and is eventually seen asleep. Since this is likely the type of audience who would go to the opera on a regular basis, it suggests the lack of quality of this particular work, made just for the sake of making a rich man's wife a star.
* CollectorOfTheStrange: Kane is one. He collects so many things - animals and plants, everything he had in his life - that after his death, a lot of his collection is not catalogued nor even unpacked, and has to be sold off or destroyed:
--> '''Newsreel Narrator:''' [at beginning of news reel on Charles Foster Kane's death] ''Legendary was Xanadu where Kublai Khan decreed his stately pleasure dome. Today, almost as legendary is Florida's Xanadu, world's largest private pleasure ground. Here, on the deserts of the Gulf Coast, a private mountain was commissioned and successfully built. One hundred thousand trees, twenty thousand tons of marble are the ingredients of Xanadu's mountain. Contents of Xanadu's palace: paintings, pictures, statues, the very stones of many another palace — a collection of everything so big it can never be catalogued or appraised, enough for ten museums — the loot of the world. Xanadu's livestock: the fowl of the air, the fish of the sea, the beast of the field and jungle. Two of each, the biggest private zoo since Noah. Like the pharaohs, Xanadu's landlord leaves many stones to mark his grave. Since the pyramids, Xanadu is the costliest monument a man has built to himself. Here in Xanadu last week, Xanadu's landlord was laid to rest, a potent figure of our century, America's Kubla Khan — Charles Foster Kane.''
* {{Corpsing}}: Joseph Cotton stayed up 24 hours so that he could be believably drunk in one scene. When he says "film crimiticism", Creator/OrsonWelles can't help but grin at the unplanned if realistic flub of the line.
* CreatorCameo: No, not Welles. Cinematographer Gregg Toland appears as a reporter in a brief scene in the opening montage.
* DarkReprise: As Kane is embarking on his political career, he brings a marching band and a line of chorus girls into his conference room to sing a very upbeat rendition of "There Is a Man, A Certain Man" to the assembled businessmen and politicians at the conference table. ("Who is this man? It's Charlie Kane! He doesn't like that 'Mister'; he likes good old 'Charlie Kane'!") Much later, after Kane has lost the race for New York governor under extremely humiliating circumstances, a much slower and even dirge-like version of "There Is a Man" is played as an instrumental tune as Kane's campaign workers clean all the confetti off of the stage.
* DeadHandShot: At the beginning, with the snowglobe.
%%* DeadpanSnarker: Young Kane had his moments.
* DeadSparks: Kane and the first Mrs. Kane.
* {{Deconstruction}}: In the context of the '40s, and even today to some extent, ''Citizen Kane'' radically subverts the conventional Hollywood narrative.
** ''Film/CitizenKane'' was in many ways an attack on the narrative style of UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfHollywood as well as several American types like the SelfMadeMan and UsefulNotes/TheAmericanDream. Namely that the idea of defining life in terms of social success and wealth ultimately makes you value people less and makes you desire to control and buy people around you.
** The theme of the story, that of an antihero DyingAlone, unredeemed, an unpleasant, manipulative {{Jerkass}} who never learns his lesson even in his old age and who leaves behind several disappointed friends and broken loved ones was fairly harsh, in terms of absence of easy conflict resolution, putting across the futility of life and the passage of time. Likewise the characters are not consistent or slaves to type. Rather than being marked by a single trait and attribute, they have multiple traits and attributes. Kane goes from an idealistic, flamboyant young man to a reclusive, paranoid hermit, the CharacterDevelopment isn't drastic or cordoned to a single transforming event.
** The opening newsreel montage also parodies the glib, cheery newsreel style reportage at the time, pointing out that even if the information is objectively correct, the tone, the interpretation and drastic editing only gives a shallow, superficial idea of the subject. The multiple-narrators approach, which is still quite revolutionary, directly puts across the problem of objectivity, since there's always one part of the story that's missing and ultimately the reporter, William Alland decides that the full mystery of Kane or his motivations cannot really be known and gives up on finding out what Rosebud is. Even if the film supplies TheReveal and gives viewers a resolution to the DrivingQuestion of "What is Rosebud?", the idea that it can explain Kane any more than the other stories we see remains up in the air.
* DecoyProtagonist: The film is a double subversion. Even though Kane is the title character, he's actually the person we learn about through multiple third-person perspectives of him, since he died at the beginning. The real protagonist is Jerry Thompson, whose goal throughout the film is to find out what "Rosebud" meant.
* DeniedParody:
** Creator/OrsonWelles denied that Kane was based on William Randolph Hearst. It's unclear whether Welles was telling the truth, but Hearst certainly went out of his way to make sure everyone would think Kane was based off him. [[HypocriticalHumor How very Charles Foster Kane of him.]]
** Hearst: "Please remain. You furnish the pictures, and I'll furnish the war." Kane: "Dear Wheeler, You provide the prose poems. I'll provide the war." Completely different!
** Welles actually tried to get around this by including a line in the film in which a journalist makes a reference to both Kane and Hearst, thus indicating that Hearst actually exists as a separate entity in the ''Film/CitizenKane'' universe. In later interviews, Welles stated that Hearst along with Howard Hughes and other industrialists were certainly influences on Kane, but that Kane was never intended as a parody/critique/insult to Hearst specifically or other industrialists, it was meant as a serious exploration of an American mythical hero, the tycoon and capitalist.
* DepthDeception: The film used this subtly:
** In one scene, a window turns out to both be much larger and much higher up than it initially appears, which means that when Kane approaches it, he suddenly appears a lot smaller and less significant. This, of course, is used for symbolic effect.
** Also done with the fireplace in Xanadu, which is revealed to be large enough to burn whole trees when Kane goes back to it.
* {{Determinator}}: One of Kane's {{Fatal Flaw}}s, such as forcing the world to accept Susan as an opera singer, which [[DrivenToSuicide drives her into a suicide attempt]].
* DigitalDestruction: The film got an accidental taste of this. In one scene, out the window there was supposed to be rain; the person in charge of the film's restoration thought it was excessive film grain, so it was digitally edited out of the restored print. Later, the Blu-ray boasted a new restoration, which brought back such details as the aforementioned rain.
* DownerBeginning: Kane dies in the first scene of the film.
* DownerEnding: By the end of the movie, the viewer realizes that, despite being on top of the world, Kane was tremendously unhappy and what he wanted above all else in his life was to be loved. Kane dies alone, as the movie opens, as he remembers the last time in his life when he was truly happy; when he was playing with his beloved sled, Rosebud. Plus the fact that the reporter and the rest of the world never do find out what "Rosebud" is. The only way the viewer finds out is when it's too late; when the sled is being burned, along with some of Kane's other belongings. The real tragedy is that he had the sled as part of his property throughout his whole life. Still, owning it didn't change a thing - the past is the past.
** This also means that Kane died with [[HeartwarmingMoments one cherished secret]] only he knew. The press and the populace could never get their hands on what was closest to his heart. And the snowglobe, which Kane held until he died, had belonged to Susan, who had loved him for himself. He was thinking of her, too.
* DramaticDrop: The snowglobe that's dropped as Kane dies.
* DramaticShattering: The snow globe at the beginning.
* DrivenToSuicide: Susan eventually decides that she's done with the opera singing and all the scathing critiques it brings and tries to overdose. She survives however, but nonetheless stops singing.
* DrivingQuestion: What the hell is this "Rosebud" thing?
* DrosteImage: This effect is shown when Kane passes between two mirrors.
* DugInDeeper: A variant occurs, only without hilarity ensuing. Subverted by the fact that Susan knows that, while she's not completely untalented, she's nowhere near good enough to carry an opera all on her own. It's only Kane using all his wealth and influence to push her into the spotlight against her wishes.
* DungeonmastersGirlfriend: Kane funds an elaborate opera show for the sole purpose of casting his girlfriend in the lead role.
* DuringTheWar: Kane manipulates the public sentiment to incite the war. Bear in mind that the film came out before America entered WWII.
* DyingAlone: Kane at the beginning. The rest of the movie is devoted to showing [[HowWeGotHere why he was alone]].
* DyingCandle:
** Throughout the opening montage showing Kane's vast Xanadu estate, a single lit window is visible on the upper right hand corner of every shot, getting closer all the time. At the end, the light goes out, leading to the memorable scene of Kane uttering his dying word.
** Susan's failed opera career is shown through a chaotic montage punctuated by a flashing lightbulb (supposedly the one used to cue the actors backstage). The montage ends abruptly with the bulb burning out, followed by Susan in bed with some sleeping pills next to her bed, implied to be a suicide attempt. Subverted in that Susan survives, although the burned out bulb can also symbolize the death of her opera singing career.
* EpicTrackingShot: Both the tracking shot into El Rancho, and the tracking up the ladder during Susan's opera performance - and yes, it used a visual effect (miniature ladder).
* EstablishingCharacterMoment: The first major scene with Welles as a 24-year-old Kane has him arguing with Thatcher over how he was running The Inquirer. It does extremely well with establishing how money was simply not a concern of his in any way, shape or form.
* ExtyYearsFromNow: The present year is 1941, young Kane was taken from his parents in 1871 (70 years ago) and he ran for governor in 1916 (25 years ago).
* FaceFramedInShadow: The film has a few shots of Kane's face framed in shadow and stepping into light, or the other way around.
* TheFaceless: The reporter Jerry Thompson (William Alland) is always shown from behind, or from a long distance, or with his face hidden in shadow, along with all of his reporter colleagues. According to Welles, it was a tribute to the hardworking reporters behind those film reels that were never seen. Creator/RogerEbert called Alland's performance the most thankless, since he's the character who is the AudienceSurrogate, yet he never got due credit because no one saw his face.
* FamousLastWords: Or one, anyway: Kane's final word is "Rosebud".
* FatalFlaw: Kane [[IJustWantToBeLoved wanted to be loved]], but [[ItsAllAboutMe on his own terms]].
* FatSuit: Welles wore one to play the older Kane. Back in the days when he didn't need one.
* FictionFiveHundred:
** Kane is a media tycoon who has more than enough money to spend on constructing [[BigFancyHouse Xanadu]] (which is described in-universe as "the world's largest private pleasure ground") and [[CollectorOfTheStrange filling it with exotic animals and priceless art from around the world.]] One early scene has his adoptive father Mr. Thatcher argue with him over how much money he's losing on running a newspaper and Kane's response?
-->''We did lose a million dollars last year. I expect to lose a million dollars this year. I expect to lose a million dollars next year. You know, Mr. Thatcher, at the rate of a million dollars a year, I'll have to close this place in... sixty years.''
** The above quote is said when he is still ''just starting out'', and he's currently #5 on the Forbes Fictional 15. $1 million at the time is approximately $27 million today; thus, "starting out" and thanks to his family's gold holdings (and his mother's management), Mr. Kane is worth at least $1.6 billion.
* FilmNoir: Although there's no crime involved, the movie has a lot of tropes associated with the genre.
* FirstNameBasis: "He doesn't like that 'Mister' / He likes good old 'Charlie Kane'!"
* {{Flashback}}: Lots of them.
* ForcedPerspective: Used on multiple occasions. Maybe most notable in the early scene where Thatcher and Bernstein are sitting at a desk signing papers, in front of some ordinary-looking bay windows. Kane enters the frame, and then walks away from the desk--and walks quite a bit further than one might have guessed, revealing that the far wall is actually further away than it looked and that those bay windows are some seven feet off the ground. This also has the effect of making Kane look tiny in a scene where he is being humiliated by having to sign away much of his media holdings.
* ForegoneConclusion: The fake newsreel spells out the whole plot, minus "Rosebud".
* ForgottenFallenFriend: The newsreel reveals that Kane's first ex-wife and their son die in a car crash. They are never again mentioned in any scene that takes place after they died. Nobody suggests that among Kane's many personal problems, [[OutlivingOnesOffspring losing his only child]] might be one of them.
* FramingDevice: The story is told mostly via interviews of people who were close with Kane with a reporter.
* FreudianExcuse:
** Kane's parents forfeited custody of their son to an emotionally distant banker. Yeah he's gone turn out A-OK in adulthood.
** On the sled symbolism in ''Citizen Kane'', Orson Welles remarked: "It's a gimmick, really, and rather dollar-book Freud."
* GaveUpTooSoon: Thompson, after spending all the movie looking for the answer to the DrivingQuestion gives up precisely in the very room the answer lies.
* TheGayNineties: A good chunk of the film takes place in the 1890s, when Kane is at his height as a media mogul.
* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: Legend has it that this is the real story behind Rosebud [[http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/1989/aug/17/rosebud/]].
* GilliganCut: When Kane announces his intention to make Susan Alexander an opera star, a reporter asks if she'll sing at the Met:
-->'''Susan:''' Charlie said if I didn't, he'd build me an opera house.
-->'''Kane:''' That won't be necessary.
--> ''(cut to newspaper headline: "KANE BUILDS OPERA HOUSE")''
* TheGreatestStoryNeverTold: No one, except the audience, will ever know what Rosebud really means or signifies. It becomes a missing piece of a jigsaw puzzle and a RiddleForTheAges. Thompson hangs a {{Lampshade}} on it at the end:
--> '''Thompson''': Mr. Kane was a man who got everything he wanted and then lost it. Maybe Rosebud was something he couldn't get, or something he lost. Anyway, it wouldn't have explained anything... I don't think any word can explain a man's life. No, I guess Rosebud is just a... piece in a jigsaw puzzle... a missing piece.
* GreedyJew: Subverted. It's Kane's very Jewish business associate Mr. Bernstein who says that there's more to life than money.
* HesDeadJim: The film opens with Kane's hand falling and dropping the snow globe.
* HeWhoFightsMonsters: Kane, who envisions himself as a crusader for the little guy against corruption, becomes a cynic and a reactionary.
* HighHopesZeroTalent: Susan Alexander gets put out on a huge opera debut by Kane. While her voice may be pleasant for something singing in the shower, she is not cut out for opera in any way.[[note]]Specifically, she's way out of her range. She's a contralto (low register) trained/forced to sing as a soprano (very high register). This could ruin any vocal potential she did have.[[/note]] Her vocal teacher loudly proclaims she is unteachable and more or less facepalms every time she sings. Kane won't listen to Susan, the instructor, or every newspaper critic in America and insists she keeps going on stage.
** Welles later regretted this part of the film, as people assumed she was based on screen actress and William Randolph Hearst's paramour Marion Davies, who Welles (and many others) felt was actually a fairly talented actress and a nice person. Marion Davies was well-suited to romantic comedies— unfortunately, Hearst saw her as the second coming of Mary Pickford and kept putting her in lavish, sentimental dramas that didn't take advantage of her talents.
* HitlerCam: Orson Welles was the trope namer. Refers to the practice of shooting a solitary figure from a slightly lower angle. This magnifies the figure's height and presence in the mind of the viewer. Greatly popularized by the film.
* HollywoodToneDeaf: Averted with Susan Alexander. To get the effect of a realistically overmatched singer, Welles got a professional ''alto'' opera singer and had her sing a soprano part, so yes, the actress who played Susan Alexander can sing, but doesn't have much range.
* HowWeGotHere: The film starts with Kane's death. Thompson's investigation then serves as the framework for telling Kane's life story, which is then told in roughly chronological order.
* ICouldaBeenAContender: InvertedTrope by Kane, when he is forced to give up the control of his empire. Hardly a nobody. Very disillusioned, he reflects that it was his ''advantages'' that stole him his chance at true greatness:
-->'''Charles Foster Kane:''' You know, Mr. Bernstein, if I hadn't been very rich, I might have been a really great man.
-->'''Thatcher:''' Don't you think you are?
-->'''Charles Foster Kane:''' I think I did pretty well under the circumstances.
-->'''[[CorruptCorporateExecutive Thatcher:]]''' What would you like to have been?
-->'''Charles Foster Kane:''' ''[DeathGlare]'' [[TheReasonYouSuckSpeech Everything you hate.]]
* IJustWantToBeLoved: This is Kane's main motivation. {{Deconstructed}}, as, despite how innocuous a motivation it seems, it causes him to be a {{Jerkass}} -- he wants to be loved, but [[LoveHungry on his own terms]], and he doesn't understand that it just doesn't work that way.
-->'''Leland:''' ''He married for love. Love. That's why he did everything. That's why he went into politics. It seems we weren't enough, he wanted all the voters to love him too. Guess all he really wanted out of life was love.'' [[CentralTheme That's Charlie's story, how he lost it]]. You see, [[ItsAllAboutMe he just didn't have any to give. Well, he loved Charlie Kane of course, very dearly]], and his mother, I guess he always loved her.
* IJustWantToHaveFriends: Kane []ultimately drives away all his friends with his egotistical personality and self-centeredness, becoming Lonely at the Top.
* ITakeOffenseToThatLastOne:
-->'''Charles Foster Kane:''' You long-faced, overdressed anarchist.
-->'''Leland:''' I am ''not'' overdressed!
* ImpoverishedPatrician: Leland is described as coming from an old, rich family where one day the old man shoots himself and they discover they have nothing.
* IntrepidReporter: Jerry Thompson, the reporter who tries to find out the meaning of "Rosebud". And Kane himself during his younger years.
* ItsAllAboutMe: Kane’s mission in life is ''to be loved on his own terms''. Lampshaded spectacularly:
--> '''Kane:''' [pleading] Don't go, Susan. You mustn't go. You can't do this to me.
--> '''Susan:''' I see. So it's you who this is being done to. It's not me at all. Not how I feel. Not what it means to me.'' [laughs] ''I can't do this to you? [odd smile] [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome Oh, yes I can.]]
* ItsAllJunk: Kane is an obsessive collector of everything, who then treats people like objects and dies a lonely old man, surrounded by glorified junk in a ridiculously opulent estate. The last line of the film is, in fact, "Toss that junk."
** And ironically, the only piece of "junk" that meant something really important to Kane is burned up because it can't be sold.
* ItWasHisSled: [[invoked]] Despite being the TropeNamer, the sled is a MacGuffin. As Jerry muses over a box of jigsaw puzzle pieces, "Rosebud" is only a piece of the puzzle. (In addition, there were ''two'' sleds, each representing a time in his life. The second sled was "Crusader".)
* ItWillNeverCatchOn: Kane didn't believe, in 1935, that there would be a war. UsefulNotes/WorldWarII started 4 years after that.
* IvyLeagueForEveryone: Kane is said to have attended and been thrown out of Harvard, Yale, Princeton, and Cornell.
* JekyllAndHyde: Kane tells Thatcher early on, "The trouble is, you don't realize that you're talking to two people," referring to himself as both a man of wealth and as a man of the people. One of the main points of the movie is the internal war between those two sides. [[spoiler: It can be argued that both sides lose by the end of the movie.]]
%%* {{Jerkass}}: Charles Foster Kane.
* JumpScare: The screeching cockatoo near the climax of the film. Quite possibly the best ''non''-horror example in cinema history.
* LargeHam: "Siiiiing Siiiiiing!". [[TropesAreNotBad It works, though.]]
** MrExposition during the introductory voice-over could count, as well.
* TheLawOfConservationOfDetail: Playing with this trope is arguably the main conceit: it's a movie about the impossibility of finding the right details. "Rosebud" is an example, as is the famous "girl in the white dress" speech.
* LetThePastBurn: The ending is a loose example, differing only in that the whole house isn't burnt.
* LonelyAtTheTop: As a core theme. One of the reasons why he tries to desperately cling to his wife, and eventually comes true when she leaves him. It's also the meaning behind 'Rosebud'- his life, though successful, was so unhappy that the greatest time in his life was when he was a child and playing with his sled.
* LoveHungry: As desperate as Kane is for love, he is too selfish to understand that one cannot force others to love them. It just doesn't work that way.
* {{MacGuffin}}: The identity of "Rosebud".
* MalevolentMugshot: Regardless of whether one views the titular character as a VillainProtagonist, [[http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_Pn5WEpjsar8/S7g0iT9EGoI/AAAAAAAAArA/vyL2k9dYGKQ/s1600/Kane1.jpg this image]] certainly counts as the TropeMaker in film, beating out ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'' by seven years. Since the point of the film is to tell Kane's story and let the audience decide if he is a hero or villain (or both), it is also an UnbuiltTrope.
* TheManIsStickingItToTheMan: A subversion. Orson Welles made this film for a Hollywood Studio and the film was a general satire of UsefulNotes/TheAmericanDream, yellow journalism, the Hollywood style and narrative, and it states that CapitalismIsBad. This was made at the invitation of the studios themselves but as a result of Hearst's interference on account of "percieved" libel, the film's release was sabotaged, Welles' reputation was smeared and Hollywood learnt its lesson from "The Man."
* MatchCut: the entire opening sequence. Watch how the light never moves.
** Also after slapping Susan. Her left eye matches with an eye decoration in the next scene. Hard one to see.
* MathematiciansAnswer:
--> '''Reporter:''' Mr. Kane, How did you find business conditions in Europe?
--> '''Kane:''' With great difficulty!
* MatteShot: The outside of Xanadu is mostly a series of matte paintings.
* MementoMacGuffin: "Rosebud", which partially drives the plot.
* AMinorKidroduction: Sort of--we get a glimpse of Kane as he dies and then we see him again in the newsreel, but the story proper starts with Kane at age 8.
* TheMistress: Susan Alexander, before Kane marries her.
* {{Mockumentary}}: Early in the film. Welles [[Radio/TheWarOfTheWorlds was good at these]]. Kind of an example of AluminumChristmasTrees. People in the 1940s who were used to seeing the "March of Time" newsreels regularly would have been much more amused by the satire. Possibly the earliest example of an in-movie fake newsreel.
* {{Mouthscreen}}: One of the most iconic examples in film history. The first we see of the title character is a close up of his lips as he says his last words: "Rosebud"
* MusicalPastiche: ''Salammbô'', the [[ShowWithinAShow opera in which Susan Alexander stars]], is Creator/BernardHerrmann's pastiche of French [[{{Opera}} grand opéra]] à la Jules Massenet. Pauline Kael suggested that it was originally supposed to be a real Massenet opera ''Thaïs'' but Herrmann angrily refuted it when Kael said it was a compromise because they couldn't get the rights:
--> '''[[http://www.wellesnet.com/bernard-herrmann-on-working-with-orson-welles-and-citizen-kane/ Bernard Herrmann]]''': Pauline Kael has written in The Citizen Kane Book (1971), that the production wanted to use Massenet's "Thais" but could not afford the fee. But Miss Kael never wrote or approached me to ask about the music. We could easily have afforded the fee. The point is that its lovely little strings would not have served the emotional purpose of the film. I wrote the piece in a very high tessitura, so that a girl with a modest voice would be completely hopeless in it.
* MythologyGag: Also a ShoutOut. In one scene dated 1935, Kane tells a reporter not to believe everything he hears on the radio. Considering who is playing [[Creator/OrsonWelles Kane]] [[Radio/WarOfTheWorlds that is true]].
* NameOfCain: Charles ''Kane''.
* {{Newsreel}}: This has one of the earliest (if not the earliest) examples of an in-movie fake newsreel. Furthermore, Welles had RKO use their own newsreel department to create it to make it look authentic.
* NoAntagonist: Kane brought his miserable life upon himself.
* NoCelebritiesWereHarmed: Kane was probably based on William Randolph Hearst, though Hearst was not pleased with the allusion.
* NoPartyGiven: [[JustifiedTrope Justified]]; Kane is presumably running for Governor as an Independent. Boss Gettys' political affiliation isn't mentioned.
* OhCrap: Kane displays a very subtle one when his first wife Emily tells him she is going to investigate the house of Kane's mistress, Susan Alexander, after receiving an anonymous tip about it.
* OldDarkHouse: Xanadu is often presented this way.
* OldMediaAreEvil: The film is one of the earliest criticisms of Old Media.
** NewMediaAreEvil: The film is also very critical of newer forms of media. Especially newsreels which are shown to be just as constructed, story driven and as biased as anything else and certainly not objective.
* TheOner: Long shots zooming into Susan's cafe through a skylight and up a ladder at the opera.
* TheOneThatGotAway:
-->'''Mr. Bernstein''': A fellow will remember a lot of things you wouldn't think he'd remember. You take me. One day back in 1896, I was crossing over to Jersey on the ferry and as we pulled out there was another ferry pulling in and on it there was a girl waiting to get off. A white dress she had on. She was carrying a white parasol. I only saw her for one second. She didn't see me at all, but I'll bet a month hasn't gone by since that I haven't thought of that girl.
* OneTrueLove: Charles and Susan really were meant for each other. She loved him for who he is, but Charles was incapable of understanding that he didn't need to buy her love, nor should he seclude themselves away from society. She leaves him because he doesn't know how to return her love. In fact, if Charles ever admitted that love is a two way street, she'd return in a heartbeat. As one of her friends said, any other day but Charlie's death, she enjoyed talking about him.
* ParentsAsPeople: Kane's mother seems like she truly thought she was doing what was best for her son by sending him away to be raised in wealth and prosperity (and away from his implied physically abusive father) even if it meant she couldn't be close to him anymore, not realizing that she set him down [[LonelyAtTheTop a very lonely path]] that ended with him DyingAlone.
* PatrioticFervor: "I am, have been, and will always be, an American."
* PercussiveTherapy: After Susan leaves him Kane tears her room apart.
* PlotHole: Legend has it that someone once asked Welles how anyone could have known Kane's FamousLastWords if he died alone. Welles supposedly paused for a long time and then said, "Don't you ever tell anyone of this." However, Raymond the butler later says he heard the word, implying that the scene was shot from his [[POVCam point of view]].
* PlotTriggeringDeath: The plot is kick-started by Kane's death.
* PopculturalOsmosisFailure: When many films are said to be "the Citizen Kane of horror/comedy/action" or someone says "Bad Movie is Citizen Kane compared to Worse Movie," folks get the idea that ''Citizen Kane'' is a great movie. Many people stop there.
* PosthumousCharacter: Charles Foster Kane, his wife and son.
* PowerfulAndHelpless: All of Charles Foster Kane's wealth and power can't stop the world from finding out about his adultery, which kills his political career. In fact one of the overarching themes of the film is that all of Kane's wealth and power fail to gain him the love of others, which is the one thing he truly wants and never really gets.
* PrettyInMink: His two wives naturally wore a few furs.
* ProtagonistJourneyToVillain: Charles Foster Kane, obviously. He turns from an idealistic muckraker to a mogul whose life is slowly spiraling out of control.
* ProtagonistTitle
* PunctuatedForEmphasis: While Kane is finishing Leland's review:
-->'''Kane:''' Hello, Jedediah.\\
'''Leland:''' Hello, Charlie. I didn't know we were speaking...\\
'''Kane:''' Sure, we're speaking, Jedediah... ''(forcefully hits carriage return on his typewriter, ka-CHUNK)'' ...you're fired.
* RashomonStyle: An UnbuiltTrope since it preceded Kurosawa's film by several years (and Kurosawa adapted a Japanese short story that was published years before Kane's release). Essentially, each narrator has a view of Kane based on their experiences and relationships with him. Notably Bernstein dismisses Thatcher as an UnreliableNarrator, but later Jed Leland says that Bernstein's story is a RoseTintedNarrative.
* RealAfterAll: After Thompson GaveUpTooSoon to find what Rosebud is, the audience gets TheReveal: ItWasHisSled
* RealisticDictionIsUnrealistic: Averted. Characters regularly talk over one another.
* RealityisUnrealistic: In FForFake, Welles says that Kane was originally supposed to be based on HowardHughes, but he and his crew decided to change Kane to a newspaper mogul because Hughes was so strange that people wouldn't believe his life story if it were presented on film.
* TheReasonYouSuckSpeech: Kane gets the same lecture three times from Leland, Susan and Boss Gettys: IJustWantToBeLoved is a TragicDream if you truly believe ItsAllAboutMe. Does Kane understand or accept it? No.
** Kane himself gets off a very short and sweet zinger at Thatcher's expense (see ICouldaBeenAContender above).
* RedScare: Thatcher accused Kane of being a communist near the beginning of the movie. A politician addressing a crowd of workers however accuses Kane of being ''fascist'', and we see Kane hanging out with Hitler and Mussolini while stating "there's be no war". Essentially Kane is a demagogue who uses politics to her advantage and ego.
* {{Retraux}}: Editor Creator/RobertWise scratched the "newsreel" with sandpaper to make the "old" footage look old.
* TheReveal: "Rosebud" [[spoiler:was Kane's sled]].
* RoadsideWave: This is how Kane meets Susan Alexander.
* RomanAClef: Welles denies this, but Hearst, who Kane was supposedly based off of, believed this.
** The film actually attempts to avert this by having Hearst mentioned by name in an early scene (the reporters discussing the newsreel), establishing Kane as a different individual.
** But also shoots itself in the foot in the first scene with Kane as played by Orson Welles, in which he says: "You provide the prose poems, I'll provide the war". Substitute "pictures" for "prose poems", and this is a word-for-word quote of something Hearst himself said to a photographer.
** Herman Mankiewicz, who came up with the story, was a frequent guest at San Simeon (aka Hearst Castle). As much as Welles sometimes denied it, much of the story clearly was based on Hearst's life. Some similarities between the real and fictional men:
*** Both were muckracking newspaper publishers who egged on the Spanish-American War, as noted above.
*** Both had a family fortune that came from mining precious metals (Hearst's father George struck it rich with the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comstock_Lode Comstock Lode]]).
*** Both had huge media empires, which wound up getting downsized to some extent in the Great Depression.
*** Both had estates of staggering size (San Simeon/Xanadu).
*** Both were failed independent candidates for Governor of New York (Hearst actually ran for office several times and served two terms as a Congressman from New York).
*** Marion Davies and Susan Alexander were both alcoholics with a fondness for crossword puzzles. Furthermore, both are considered reasonably talented in light entertainment, but were shoehorned into more serious artistic fields that were considered seriously out of their depth.
*** Of course there were many differences between Kane and Hearst as well, which helped Welles maintain PlausibleDeniability. Hearst was never abandoned by his parents (in fact this more closely resembles Welles, who was orphaned at the age of 15). He never married Davies; instead she remained TheMistress and stayed with Hearst until his death.
*** Herman Mankiewicz's original script, ''American'', included even more overt parallels to Hearst's life, showing that Kane's opponents stole the gubernatorial election by dumping ballots in the East River and a scene modeled after the death of Thomas Ince. [[note]]Ince, a film director-turned-studio boss, died aboard Hearst's yacht in November 1924. No inquest was held for Ince's death, leading to long-standing rumors that Hearst, or someone in his employ murdered Ince. Peter Bogdanovich's 2001 film ''Film/TheCatsMeow'' fictionalizes this incident.[[/note]] Welles removed these scenes after one of Hearst's biographers sued the filmmakers for copying the incidents from his book.
* RuleOfSymbolism: Some critics think ''Kane'' stretches the WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief in order to include symbolic elements. It certainly is packed with symbols.
* SceneryPorn: The sets (the political rally, the newspaper office, the library, Xanadu) are all lavish, grandiose... and empty like the main character.
* ShaggyDogStory: The FramingDevice ends with Thompson not only giving up to find what ''Rosebud'' means, but admiting that knowing it will not explain Kane.
** Kane's dream was a TragicDream and so, it was never achieved.
* SingleIssuePsychology: All of Kane's problems result from him not knowing how to love due to being taken from his parents as a child. At his mother's urging, because his father was abusive towards him. [[ParentalAbandonment This does not make it better, however.]] Welles's when dismissing the story's gimmick as "Dollar Book Freud" regretted it because of this implication, he didn't believe in SingleIssuePsychology, and used "Rosebud" as a deliberate ShaggyDogStory to hook the movie around.
* {{Slimeball}}: In one sense, Kane is revealed to be something of a slimeball by his best friend after Kane's failed election campaign, who observes that: "''you just want to persuade people that you love 'em so much that they oughta love you back!''".
* SlowClap: After the disastrous operatic debut of his wife Susan, Kane stubbornly stands up and does a SlowClap; the rest of the audience begrudgingly follows suit.
* SnowMeansDeath: Not a straight example, but the snow globe should get an honorable mention.
* SoundtrackDissonance: This is a pretty sad film but don't worry, the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkcLjAg17bk end credits]] should pick you right up.
* SpinningPaper: A standard trope of early 1930s "B" movies, especially in films dealing with organized crime. It went out of style at around the time UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode was adopted; any use after the mid 1930's is a deliberate invocation of the trope as tribute and parody. ''Citizen Kane'' is one of these. Making later parodies parody parodies.
* StageMom: At their first meeting Susan tells Kane it was really her mother's ambition for her to be an opera singer.
* StartsWithTheirFuneral: The film start with Kane's death, and then moves onto a newsreel about his life, before diving right into the flashbacks.
* StockFootage: The film contains a lot of this. For example, the newsreel has a scene where a man speaks to a political rally, denouncing Kane as a fascist. The crowd was simply stock footage and the man was an actor, filmed in a low-angle shot to hide the fact that no crowd was present. The background jungle footage for the picnic scene was lifted from ''Film/TheSonOfKong'' and, in an infamous case of StockFootageFailure, you can plainly see pterodactyls.
* StrawmanNewsMedia: Not at first but the Inquirer eventually becomes a Type 1, serving as a propaganda machine for Kane himself.
* TableSpace: A very clever use of this trope to illustrate the deterioration of Kane's first marriage in a brief montage. The Kanes are shown at a small breakfast table being intimate and affectionate. We see snippets of arguments at other breakfasts. Then the scene ends with the Kanes dining in silence at opposite ends of a long table.
** In an in-universe TakeThat, Emily is reading ''The Chronicle'', Kane's biggest rival newspaper.
* TakeThat:
** Screenwriter Herman J. Mankiewicz was a regular invitee to Heart's San Simeon until he earned their disfavor and was kicked out. A lot of the satirical details of Kane comes from his own resentment and desire to mock Hearst.
** In-universe example: Kane finishes the bad review Leland began, and instead of cleaning it up (as Leland assumed he would), he keeps the same vitriolic negativity. Bernstein snarks, "That'll show you."[[note]]Kane fires Leland while continuing to write the review.[[/note]]
* TantrumThrowing: Upon his wife leaving him, Kane goes in a room and smashes/throws everything he sees. He stops at the crystal ball that Susan owned (and reminded him of his mother), making him utter, "Rosebud".
* ThirdPersonPerson:
-->'''Kane:''' Don't worry about me, Gettys! Don't worry about me! I'm Charles Foster Kane! I'm no cheap, crooked politician, trying to save himself from the consequences of his crimes! Gettys! I'm going to send you to Sing Sing! Sing Sing, Gettys! Sing Sing!
* ThisCannotBe:
-->'''Kane:''' Susan. Please don't go. No. Please, Susan. From now on, everything will be exactly the way you want it to be, not the way I think you want it, but -- your way. You mustn't go. You can't do this to me!
-->'''Susan:''' I see. It's ''you'' that this is being done to! It's not me at all. Not what it means to me. I can't do this to you? ''Oh, yes I can.''
* TimePassesMontage: One of the most famous: Kane and his first wife sitting at breakfast. Each shift into the future has their conversation becoming more and more hostile, til the final scene in which they don't say a word - he reads his newspaper, and she reads a ''rival'' newspaper.
* TimeshiftedActor: Being a fictionalized biopic, the film presents Kane in all ages. All of them are Orson Welles in makeup, except for eight-year-old Kane, played by Buddy Swan.
* TradeYourPassionForGlory: Kane, a young crusading newspaper owner, becomes TheMan in his later life.
* {{Tragedy}}: Kane ends up dying alone and unloved thanks to his narcissism.
* TragicDream: Kane's dream is to be loved. Unfortunately, that dream is available to everyone but him: given the way he was raised, Charlie is used to paying for everything with money, and the idea of investing time and sacrificing his own interests for a relationship is absolutely beyond his comprehension.
* TragicHero: Kane, lampshaded by Leland.
--> '''Leland:''' That's all he ever wanted out of life... [[TragicDream was love. That's the tragedy of Charles Foster Kane.]] You see, [[JerkassWoobie he just didn't have any to give]].
* UnbuiltTrope: ItWasHisSled is a {{Trope Namer|s}}, but the sled is actually the unbuilt trope of the MacGuffin, long before Creator/AlfredHitchcock coined the term.
* {{Understatement}}:
--> '''Kane:''' (to Susan) I run a couple of newspapers, what do you do?
* UnrequitedLove: Susan to Charlie. She never stopped loving him, ever. She left simply because it was the only way she could express her own feelings. Had Charlie said the right words, she'd have returned to him in a heartbeat.
-->'''Manager:''' Why, until he died, she'd just as soon talk about Mr. Kane as about anybody.
* VideoCredits: A clip of each major character is shown in the credits, except Kane himself.
* VocalRangeExceeded: Susan Alexander can't hack being an opera singer. Instead of HollywoodToneDeaf, Welles got a professional alto to sing a soprano part.
* WarForFunAndProfit: Kane does this in order to sell newspapers. Based on the manipulations of real-life media mogul William Randolph Hearst:
-->"Dear Wheeler: You provide the prose poems. I'll provide the war."
* WhamShot: The shot near the end showing the name "Rosebud" on Kane's old sled.
* WhipPan: These are used in the breakfast table montage showing the deterioration of Kane's first marriage.
* WhiteDwarfStarlet: Susan Alexander is a bit out of the ordinary: ''Now'' she's running on the fumes of her former notoriety, but initially she was pushed into the limelight somewhat against her will and found stardom humiliating.
* WideEyedIdealist: Kane started off as one, and was moderately successful as such, exposing corruption successfully and ascending the ranks in journalism.
* TheWildWest: Eight-year-old Kane grew up in 1871 Colorado; seen in a brief {{Flashback}}
* WomanInWhite: Not seen but remembered by Bernstein.
* WorthlessTreasureTwist: "Rosebud" is a "Lost Heirloom". And it gets tossed into the incinerator along with the wealthy protagonist's other worldly possessions. Nobody in the story ever finds out what his lost love/lost treasure "Rosebud" meant, though the audience gets the reveal.
* WouldHitAGirl
--> '''Susan''': Don't tell me you're sorry.
--> '''Kane''': I'm not sorry.

%%* YesMan: Bernstein.

to:

!!This film !! This game provides examples of:

* AbusiveParents:
** Mr. Thatcher seems to be very distant from his young ward.
** Emotionally, Mrs. Kane towards her son as she wants to insure that he has wealth and "proper" upbringing at the cost of being raised by his parents.
** Kane's father, physically speaking, which is partly why his mother sends him away
AbsentMindedProfessor: Dr. Diggins in the first place. Although game, Professor Scatterly in his defense ''Champions''.
* AbsurdlyLowLevelCap: In
the one time he threatens to strike his son, is after Charles violently pushed Thatcher down with his sled.
* AchievementsInIgnorance: According to [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oQYazeJA-Oo&t=4m55s an interview with Orson Welles]], the technical advances of the film had a lot to do with this trope.
-->'''Interviewer:''' What I'd like to know is where did you get the confidence from to make a film with such--
-->'''Welles:''' Ignorance. Ignorance. Sheer ignorance. You know there's no confidence to equal it. It's only when you ''know'' something about a profession, I think, that you're timid, or careful, or...
-->'''Interviewer:''' How did this ignorance show itself?
-->'''Welles:''' I thought you could do anything with a camera that the eye could do, or the imagination could do. And if you come up from the bottom in the film business, you're taught all the things that the cameraman doesn't want to attempt for fear he will be criticized for having failed. And in this case I had a cameraman who didn't care if he was criticized if he failed, and I didn't know that there were things you couldn't do, so anything I could think up in my dreams, I attempted to photograph.
-->'''Interviewer:''' You got away with enormous technical advances, didn't you?
-->'''Welles:''' Simply by not knowing that they were impossible. Well, theoretically impossible.
* ActuallyPrettyFunny: Leland writes a scathing review of Susan's opera performance, passing out from drink afterwards. Kane reads it over his shoulder and can't help laughing.
* ActuallyThatsMyAssistant: When Kane is buying the Inquirer, the editor of the paper mistakes Leland for Kane.
* AgeCut: "Merry Christmas" [cut forward about 15 years] "and a Happy New Year".
* AllInTheEyes: Kane's eyes are lit at the opera house during Susan's disastrous debut. It shows his monomania and disconnection from the audience reaction.
* AllTakeAndNoGive: Kane's main problem. He wants everyone to love him, but he doesn't have any love to give in return.
* AllThereIsToKnowAboutTheCryingGame: It's pretty much guaranteed that the only thing people who've never seen the movie know about it is that ItWasHisSled.
* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: InUniverse with the opening newsreel in which Kane is denounced as both a communist and a fascist.
* AmbiguouslyGay: Leland the "Broadway critic" is coded as gay (couldn't be stated outright under UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode) and was possibly infatuated with Kane in his early years.
* AmbiguouslyJewish: Mr. Bernstein. In fact,
first game, it's implied in one scene that Kane's first wife feels uncomfortable around Bernstein for precisely that reason. [[note]]Mr. Bernstein was played set surprisingly low at just twelve, and you can get as high as rank eight by fossil cleaning alone (''ten'' if you get a Jewish actor, Everett Sloane[[/note]] Emily also complains about a NoodleIncident full set of rare red fossils). The second game ups the cap to 20, though viviosaurs gain stats more slowly to go with Bernstein.
--->'''Emily:''' Your Mr. Bernstein sent junior the most incredible atrocity yesterday, Charles. I simply can't have it in the nursery.
it.
** * AcceptableHobbyTargets: InUniverse. The atrocity in question is a mezuzah, a box containing sacred Hebrew texts (usually three commanders of the Ten Commandments), affixed to Barebones Brigade? They're a doorpost, often believed to act as hipster, a warding or protection (and thus hippie, and a protection over metalhead. The game especially has fun taking potshots at Cole, the child). Additionally, if "Mr. Bernstein is apt hipster, and Todd remarks that it's no wonder everyone was so terrified of him.
** [[spoiler: It's later {{deconstructed}}. The fact that they were such acceptable targets meant [[FriendlessBackground no one wanted
to pay a visit have anything to do with them]], meaning they desperately attached themselves to the nursery now first charismatic figure who appeared to them and then", he'd kiss his fingers had no trouble [[WhosLaughingNow turning on those who mocked them]]. But it's also why, despite the fact that they were used, they can't stay mad at said figure--they know he tried to do what he thought was right, and then touch they were ecstatic that they'd been shown ''any'' [[BecauseYouWereNiceToMe kindness at all]].]]
* AdventurerArchaeologist: Nevada Montecarlo, who is a DarkSkinnedRedhead version of [[Franchise/TombRaider Lara Croft]] (with Franchise/IndianaJones' whip).
** ''Champions'' has an even more direct CaptainErsatz of Franchise/IndianaJones called Joe Wildwest.
* AllNaturalGemPolish: Everything you find in
the mezuzah upon entering and leaving the room.Jewel Rocks.
* AnachronicOrder: The film starts with the title character's death, gives us a brief newsreel outline of his life, then fills in the details of his life with a series of flashbacks. The flashbacks are not in chronological order; their order depends on the order in which a reporter interviews people.
* AndIMustScream: How Susan feels about Xanadu.
* AndStarring: The final image of the credits, after all the secondary characters have had clips shown of them with their actors' names, is a list of the bit part actors. Then at the bottom it says "Creator/OrsonWelles as Kane". Creator/RogerEbert stated it was a blatant example of false modesty on Welles' part. He adds that listing Gregg Toland's cinematography credit alongside his directorial credit on the same card was true modesty.
* AngerMontage: The room trashing sequence. The movie commentary tracks note that this scene was a bit of "method acting" that got out of control. Welles broke his hand very early in the sequence; you can see him favoring it at the end. Also different from the typical example in that it is shown in a couple of long master shots, rather than an actual montage of closeups: this is because they could only do one take.
* ArbitrarilyLargeBankAccount: Given that he was based on William Randolph Hearst, Kane qualifies.
* ArcWords: "Rosebud." is a possible UrExample. Of course, [[ItWasHisSled it's not really enigmatic anymore.
AncientAstronauts: [[spoiler:The dinaurians.]]
* ArchEnemy: Walter Parks Thatcher AndYourRewardIsClothes: The first two games include a series of masks that your character can collect and Jim W. Gettys to Charles Foster Kane.
wear.
* AsideGlance:
-->'''Thatcher:''' "I think it would be fun to run a newspaper." Hmmph!
* BadassBoast:
-->'''Kane:''' You're right, I did lose a million dollars last year. I expect to lose a million dollars this year. I expect to lose a million dollars ''next'' year. You know, Mr. Thatcher, at
AgentPeacock: Ryne from the rate ''Champions'' DLC. He wears the only pink Brigade suit in the game and draws attention to himself because of a million dollars a year, I'll have it. But he is also the first character in the franchise to close this place in... ''(smirking)'' 60 years.actually make his own Vivosaur, discounting [[spoiler: Zongazonga and his [[PurpleIsTheNewBlack purple evil]] zombiesaurs. [[WordSchmord Magic shmagic.]] [[MemeticMutation Booo!]]]]
* AmbiguouslyGay: Cole in ''Champions''. It's hard to tell which parts of his campness just come from his obsession with fashion, and which parts come from... somewhere else.

* BecameTheirOwnAntithesis: Kane starts out AnnouncerChatter: In the first two games, the two announcers like to prattle on with a declaration of principles, championing each other about nonsensical things only tangentially related to the Inquirer battles taking place.
* AntiFrustrationFeatures: ''Frontier'' cleans up some of the issues with finding fossils in the field; identifying fossils on sight
and himself as allowing immediate excavations, rather than requiring the player to haul an entire inventory back to base before they even know what they have. Vivosaurs can also be revived from any fossils, not just the heads.
* ArtEvolution: ''Champions'' featured
a tireless seeker of truth much more detailed, and justice more {{Animesque}}, art style than the original's more cartoony look.
** ArtShift: [[spoiler: Rosie's icon in ''Champions'' is in the same style as the first game, making her stand out next to the anime-style characters from the second game.]]
** ''Fossil Fighters: Frontier'' seems to have significant change in the design of... just about everything, really.
* ArtisticLicensePaleontology: Fully justified by the fact that vivosaurs are explicitly stated to be dinosaur-''like'' creatures and not actual dinosaurs. Beyond that, it's generally averted since the creators have ShownTheirWork and keep their data as accurate as possible.
* AuthorAvatar: The first game's announcers are the game's two creators,
and the defender idea of "the common man", until he slowly becomes a power-hungry controller of information who wants putting them in the common man to love him game started out as a joke.
* AwesomeButImpractical: Many high-level vivosaurs with really high Attack or LP are devastating from the Attack Zone...
but who if they end up in the Support Zone somehow, they'll turn your attacker into a quivering pile of useless mush. T-Rex is a perfect example--he has none to give back, exemplified when the highest attack in the game and can attack all of your enemies at once, but, if he loudly proclaims ends up in the support zone, he reduces all your attacker's stats by ''30%!''
** Zino and Centro. Every hit from them will be a critical-but their accuracy is so terrible
that the people will think ''"what I tell rest of the team needs to be focused around buffing accuracy/evasion stats to get them to think"''.
%%* BettyAndVeronica: Kane's wives, Emily
even land a hit. In other words: CriticalHitClass meets ATeamFiring.
* AwesomeMcCoolname: Joe Wildwest in ''Champions''
and Susan, respectively.
%%* BigBad: James W. Gettys
Captain Stryker in ''Frontier''.
* [[BadJobWorseUniform Bad Sidequest, Worse Costume]]: So... how 'bout that Hare Club? Y'know, the one where you have to wear a bunny mask, then clean 100 fossils to 80 points or higher?
* BagOfHolding: We really have ''no'' idea how a twelve-year-old can lug around up to ''64'' fossils as long as his entire body
and Walter Parks Thatcher.
* BigEater: Kane, as evidenced by this early exchange:
-->'''Jedidiah:''' Are
not get sore, esecially when some of those rocks contain an ''entire skeleton''. Justified and averted in ''Frontier'', where A) you ''still'' eating?\\
'''Kane:''' [[FunnyAneurysmMoment I'm still hungry]].
* BigFancyHouse: Xanadu,
travel by car, which is cited as can much more easily accommodate the largest private estate size and weight, and B) fossils are processed automatically, so you're not even carrying them around in the first place.
* BigOlEyebrows: The samurai, with a BigOlUnibrow chaser.
* BittersweetEnding: Subverted in the first game. [[spoiler:Guhnash]] is defeated, but your partner didn't quite make it out of [[spoiler:stone sleep]]. You've saved
the world, at a cost, and that's how it has to be... [[spoiler:and then the cost of which to maintain quote "No man can say".
* {{Biopic}}: It's a biopic of an entirely fictional character (albeit one inspired by real-life figures) but ''Citizen Kane'' more or less invented
Digadig chieftain shows up and codified many of tells you to use the tropes of hip-shaker dance!!]]
* BlackAndNerdy: Dr. Diggins in
the Biopic genre first game is a professional-grade [[Series/{{Scrubs}} blerd]]. Who's dorky enough to wear shorts and actively inspired many later works on real-life figures.a Hawaiian shirt beneath his lab coat, no less.
** * BluntMetaphorsTrauma: It's no wonder Nick Nack mangles foreign languages so bad--he barely gets ''English!'' "I can have my snacks and feet them too!"
* BodySurf:
This has to do with the fact that the film's narrative actively tries to dramatize, as the newsreel colleague says, "70 years is how [[spoiler:Zongazonga's immortality spell]] works in a man's life". A major problem with any film biography ''Champions''. His latest victim is telescoping the key incidents and shaping a proper dramatic arc to a life. Kane's approach, using the CharacterDeath as an ExcusePlot inspired later films, such as ''Film/LawrenceOfArabia'' and others, which managed to avoid the ForegoneConclusion nature actually [[spoiler:the owner of the story while still finding room for dramatic possibilities.
** Welles putting on aging makeup and other aspects to show Kane in different times, paved
Fossil Park, Joe Wildwest.]]
* BonusBoss: After you beat
the way for other actors in later films to portray characters in different stages final boss of life, for instance, Creator/LeonardoDiCaprio in Film/JEdgar. Likewise, the film's focus on Kane's interior struggle and ambitions as a way to make the first game, almost ''every character somewhat relatable often led you've fought before becomes a BonusBoss.'' Almost all of them have maxed-out teams, some of them you have to many films using a MacGuffin to tell fight one right after the story.
* BladeOfGrassCut: Rosebud does not apply, but the snowglobe possibly does.
* BluntYes:
-->'''Leland:''' Bernstein, am I a stuffed shirt? Am I a horse-faced hypocrite? Am I a New England school marm?
-->'''Bernstein:''' Yes. If you thought I'd answer you any differently than what Mr. Kane tells you...
* BookEnds: The same shot of Kane's house
other, and the fence in front with a sign reading "No Trespassing".
* TheBrainlessBeauty: Susan Alexander Kane is more naive than stupid, really. It's just that her voice has "bimbo" connotations.
* BrokenAce: Under all his wealth and prestige, Kane is a broken man who can't hold down a relationship with anyone and desperately longs
prizes for his stolen childhood.
* BurnBabyBurn: [[spoiler:The last shot is of Kane's childhood sled burning. Ultra close up
beating them range from "BraggingRightsReward" to "OlympusMons." You can even take on the sled's name, which is Rosebud but come on, [[ItWasHisSled FinalBoss again as often as you should know this already.]] ]]
* ByronicHero: Kane is an archetypal example. As a little boy, he gets snatched from his family and introduced into the cold, ruthless world of media, politics, and business. By rising to the top of that ruthless world through cutthroat cunning, he becomes an internationally famous media tycoon and one of the richest men of all time. But under all that wealth, he's a broken man who can't hold down a relationship with anyone and desperately longs for his stolen childhood.
* BusCrash: Thanks to the MoralGuardians, Kane's first wife and son had to be killed in a car crash so Kane could marry Susan.
* CallingTheOldManOut:
** Kane delivers one to his adoptive guardian, Mr. Thatcher:
--->'''Kane:''' You know, Mr. Bernstein, if I hadn't been very rich, I might have been a really great man.\\
'''Thatcher:''' Don't you think you are?\\
'''Kane:''' I think I did pretty well, under the circumstances.\\
'''Thatcher:''' What would you like to have been?\\
'''Kane:''' Everything you hate.
** This is displacement. Kane's really angry at his ''mother,'' for sending Kane away when he was young, and putting him into Thatcher's hands. Implicitly, Thatcher is a decent (if very conservative) middle-aged banker who did his best while (ahem) raising Kane.
* TheCameo: Pretty much every male in the cast plays also one of the reporters in the opening projection room scene. That is one of the reasons why [[{{Chiaroscuro}} it was shot so dark and shadowy]], even compared to the rest of the film. Joseph Cotten is still clearly visible in the corner,
like! The most difficult BonusBoss fight, however, when the editor is asking "What were his last words?".
* CapitalismIsBad: The film is often seen as an attack on TheAmericanDream, featuring a highly unsympathetic, though not one-dimensional or caricatured, portrayal of the American tycoon. It apparently struck a nerve with William Randolph Hearst, one of its inspirations, who managed to upset its distribution and make it a box-office flop.
** This wasn't just a "feud" as it has been portrayed. Harlan Lebo in his book ''Citizen Kane, A Filmmaker's Journey'' reveals the massive scope of Hearst's plot to destroy Welles and his film. They even smuggled [[JailBait an underage girl]] into Welles' hotel room and had two photographers standing ready. Fortunately, a police investigator warned Welles in time.
* CensorDecoy: The birthday/song scene originally took place in a brothel. Welles knew he'd never be able to get away with that, but he kept it in the screenplay so the execs at RKO wouldn't notice the jabs he was taking at Hearst.
* CentralTheme:
** How will the world remember you when you are gone?
** Money can't buy love or happiness. Even the most powerful people in the world often truly desire simple things--like
probably against [[spoiler: having a real childhood]].
** Even in a world of mass information, it's sometimes impossible to truly "know" the people around us.
* ChekhovsGun:
** The now legendary sled.
** Also the Declaration of Principles, which Leland sends back to Kane after Kane has betrayed those principles.
* {{Chiaroscuro}}: Like many tropes, the usage of Chiaroscuro in film was widely popularized by ''Citizen Kane'', although it was already common in [[GermanExpressionism German expressionist]] cinema. This ties into the film's use of "Deep Focus" (one of the techniques cinematographers rave about in the movie). The way they managed to bring foreground
Dynal, Duna, and background objects into focus in the same shot required the more distant objects to be extremely brightly lit, encouraging the heavy-shadow Chiaroscuro compositions. Which is why Welles put Gregg Toland's name on the same card as him.
* ClassicalMusicIsBoring: The audience that attends the premiere of the opera Kane commissioned for his wife Susan are seen growing more bored by the minute. One man entertains himself by tearing his program into strips, and is eventually seen asleep. Since this is likely the type of audience who would go to the opera on a regular basis, it suggests the lack of quality of this particular work, made just for the sake of making a rich man's wife a star.
* CollectorOfTheStrange: Kane is one. He collects so many things - animals and plants, everything he had in his life - that after his death, a lot of his collection is not catalogued nor even unpacked, and has to be sold off or destroyed:
--> '''Newsreel Narrator:''' [at beginning of news reel on Charles Foster Kane's death] ''Legendary was Xanadu where Kublai Khan decreed his stately pleasure dome. Today, almost as legendary is Florida's Xanadu, world's largest private pleasure ground. Here, on the deserts of the Gulf Coast, a private mountain was commissioned and successfully built. One hundred thousand trees, twenty thousand tons of marble are the ingredients of Xanadu's mountain. Contents of Xanadu's palace: paintings, pictures, statues, the very stones of many another palace — a collection of everything so big it can never be catalogued or appraised, enough for ten museums — the loot of the world. Xanadu's livestock: the fowl of the air, the fish of the sea, the beast of the field and jungle. Two of each, the biggest private zoo since Noah. Like the pharaohs, Xanadu's landlord leaves many stones to mark his grave. Since the pyramids, Xanadu is the costliest monument a man has built to himself. Here in Xanadu last week, Xanadu's landlord was laid to rest, a potent figure of our century, America's Kubla Khan — Charles Foster Kane.
Raptin]] ''all at once.''
* {{Corpsing}}: Joseph Cotton stayed up 24 hours so that he could be believably drunk in one scene. When he says "film crimiticism", Creator/OrsonWelles can't help but grin at ** There's also an {{Early Bird|Boss}} BonusBoss named Petey, who requires you fight him with three very specific vivosaurs. If you take the unplanned if realistic flub time to max out said three and wait until you're near the end of the line.
* CreatorCameo: No,
game, he's not Welles. Cinematographer Gregg Toland appears as a reporter in a brief scene in so tough... But try him ''without'' copius LevelGrinding, and he proves to be quite the opening montage.
* DarkReprise: As Kane is embarking on his political career, he brings a marching band and a line of chorus girls into his conference room to sing a very upbeat rendition of "There Is a Man, A Certain Man" to the assembled businessmen and politicians at the conference table. ("Who is this man? It's Charlie Kane! He doesn't like that 'Mister'; he likes good old 'Charlie Kane'!") Much later, after Kane has lost the race for New York governor under extremely humiliating circumstances, a much slower and even dirge-like version of "There Is a Man" is played as an instrumental tune as Kane's campaign workers clean all the confetti off of the stage.
* DeadHandShot: At the beginning, with the snowglobe.
%%* DeadpanSnarker: Young Kane had his moments.
* DeadSparks: Kane and the first Mrs. Kane.
* {{Deconstruction}}: In the context of the '40s, and even today to some extent, ''Citizen Kane'' radically subverts the conventional Hollywood narrative.
KillerRabbit.
** ''Film/CitizenKane'' was in many ways an attack on * ABoyAndHisX: Thanks to the narrative style of UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfHollywood as well as several American types like player getting a sidekick, ''Frontier'' is a "Boy/Girl and his/her dinosaur" story.
* ButtBiter: A RunningGag in ''Frontier'' involves your little vivosaur sidekick chomping down on Nate's butt. In
the SelfMadeMan little guy's defense, Nate is usually literally asking for it by sticking his butt out and UsefulNotes/TheAmericanDream. Namely taunting him.
* ButtMonkey: Rosie.
* CallARabbitASmeerp: The names have been changed to emphasize
that Vivosaurs aren't really dinosaurs, and to trim down the idea of defining life in terms of social success and wealth ultimately makes you value people less and makes you desire to control and buy people around you.
** The theme of the story,
{{Overly Long Name}}s that of an antihero DyingAlone, unredeemed, an unpleasant, manipulative {{Jerkass}} who never learns his lesson even in his old age and who leaves behind several disappointed friends and broken loved ones was fairly harsh, in terms of absence of easy conflict resolution, putting across the futility of life and the passage of time. Likewise the characters are not consistent or slaves to type. Rather than being marked by real dinos often have. There's a single trait and attribute, they have multiple traits and attributes. Kane goes from an idealistic, flamboyant young man to a reclusive, paranoid hermit, the CharacterDevelopment isn't drastic or cordoned to a single transforming event.
** The opening newsreel montage also parodies the glib, cheery newsreel style reportage at the time, pointing out
mode that even if the gives detailed information is objectively correct, on the tone, the interpretation and drastic editing only gives a shallow, superficial idea animals that inspired each dinosaur.
* CanonName: The main character
of the subject. The multiple-narrators approach, which is still quite revolutionary, directly puts across the problem of objectivity, since there's always one part of the story that's missing and ultimately the reporter, William Alland decides that the full mystery of Kane or his motivations cannot first doesn't really be known and have one, but Nintendo's guide suggests "Buckland", after an early paleontologist. The official mini-manga gives up on finding out what Rosebud is. Even if the film supplies TheReveal his name as "Hunter." The second game's protagonists, though, are [[AnimalThemeNaming Dino and gives viewers a resolution to the DrivingQuestion of "What Dina]].
** ''Frontier'' has nameable protagonists "Jura" and "Tria". The puns just don't stop. The canonical name for their little dino sidekick
is Rosebud?", the idea that it can explain Kane any more than the other stories we see remains up "Nibbles".
* CardboardPrison: Only
in the air.
* DecoyProtagonist: The film is a double subversion. Even though Kane is the title character, he's actually the person we learn about through multiple third-person perspectives of him, since he died at the beginning. The real protagonist is Jerry Thompson, whose goal throughout the film is to find out what "Rosebud" meant.
* DeniedParody:
** Creator/OrsonWelles denied
first game, but it's exaggerated. [[PoliceAreUseless What happens in that Kane was based on William Randolph Hearst. It's unclear whether Welles was telling the truth, but Hearst certainly went out of his way to make sure everyone would think Kane was based off him. [[HypocriticalHumor How very Charles Foster Kane of him.police station is anybody's guess.]]
** Hearst: "Please remain. You furnish the pictures, and I'll furnish the war." Kane: "Dear Wheeler, You provide the prose poems. I'll provide the war." Completely different!
** Welles actually tried to get around this by including a line
* CelShading: ''Champions'' uses cel-shaded graphics, as well as more detailed graphics in the film in which a journalist makes a reference to both Kane and Hearst, thus indicating that Hearst actually exists as a separate entity in the ''Film/CitizenKane'' universe. In later interviews, Welles stated that Hearst along with Howard Hughes and other industrialists were certainly influences on Kane, but that Kane was never intended as a parody/critique/insult to Hearst specifically or other industrialists, it was meant as a serious exploration of an American mythical hero, the tycoon and capitalist.general.
* DepthDeception: The film ChekhovsSkill: [[spoiler:The hip-shaking dance, used this subtly:
** In one scene, a window turns out
to both be much larger and much higher up than it initially appears, which means that when Kane approaches it, he suddenly appears a lot smaller and less significant. This, of course, is used for symbolic effect.
** Also done with the fireplace in Xanadu, which is revealed to be large enough to burn whole trees when Kane goes back to it.
revive Rosie/Duna from tainted stone sleep.]]
* {{Determinator}}: One of Kane's {{Fatal Flaw}}s, such as forcing the world to accept Susan as an opera singer, which [[DrivenToSuicide drives her into a suicide attempt]].
* DigitalDestruction:
[[TheChiefsDaughter The film got an accidental taste of this. In one scene, out the window there was supposed to be rain; the person in charge of the film's restoration thought it was excessive film grain, so it was digitally edited out of the restored print. Later, the Blu-ray boasted a new restoration, which brought back such details as the aforementioned rain.
Chief's Granddaughter]]: [[spoiler:Pauleen.]]
* DownerBeginning: Kane dies {{Cloudcuckoolander}}: Trip Cera in the second game. His first scene of the film.
* DownerEnding: By the end of the movie, the viewer realizes that, despite being on top of the world, Kane was tremendously unhappy and what he wanted above all else in his life was to be loved. Kane dies alone, as the movie opens, as he remembers the last time in his life when he was truly happy; when he was playing with his beloved sled, Rosebud. Plus the fact that the reporter and the rest of the world never do find out what "Rosebud" is. The only way the viewer finds out is when it's too late; when the sled is being burned, along with some of Kane's other belongings. The real tragedy is that he had the sled as part of his property throughout his whole life. Still, owning it didn't change a thing - the past is the past.
name [[WhatDoYouMeanItWasntMadeOnDrugs seems appropriate]].
** This also means that Kane died * ChuckCunninghamSyndrome: The vast majority of Vivosaurs are absent in ''Frontier'', in particular nearly all of the non-dinosaur Vivosaurs are gone, with [[HeartwarmingMoments one cherished secret]] only he knew. The press and the populace could never get their hands on what was closest exception of a few pterosaurs.
* CollectorOfTheStrange: Since you can't use them
to his heart. And revive vivosaurs, nobody wants dropping fossils. Except Nick Nack...
** John Guano replaces him in
the snowglobe, which Kane held until he died, had belonged to Susan, who had loved him for himself. He was thinking of her, too.
* DramaticDrop: The snowglobe
sequel. John's even ''weirder,'' if that's dropped as Kane dies.
* DramaticShattering:
possible. He's standing not three feet away from a lady who offers dropping fossils in exchange for fossil cleaning. The snow globe at only catch is, he'd have to wear the beginning.
Hare Mask to join the club to do so. EveryoneHasStandards?
* DrivenToSuicide: Susan eventually decides that she's done CombatCommentator: In ''Fossil Fighters'', they're {{Author Avatar}}s. In ''Champions'' we have a two talking Vivosaurs. ''Frontier'' doesn't have any announcers.
* ContinuityNod:
** In ''Champions'', Pauleen is a throwback to the first game's Digadig tribe. [[spoiler:You also get to fight Rosie in the post-game.]] [[spoiler:Duna, Raptin, and Dynal]] also make appearances in some bonus content.
** In ''Frontier'', the Vivosaur Island and Caliosteo Fossil Parks from the first two games get mentioned occasionally. Characters from ''Champions'' (or at least people
with the opera singing same names) can show up in the in-game tournaments; one such team is Joanie, Pooch, and Tonzilla and another is Todd, Rupert, and Pauline.
* ConvectionSchmonvection: Mt. Lavaflow in the first game, and Mt. Krakanak in the second.
* CowardlyLion: Todd in ''Champions''.
* CrooksAreBetterArmed: Wanted vivosaur thief Blambeau carries around a shotgun. The [[PoliceAreUseless unarmed and largely ineffective police force]] send [[KidHero Hunter]] after him. Thrice.
* DarkSkinnedRedhead: Nevada Montecarlo, who also likes to WhipItGood.
* {{Deconstruction}}: Rosie can be seen as a deconstruction of TheLoad[=/=]DamselInDistress. She is those things, but realizes it, and is sorry for the times when you have to save her. After one instance she even asks if you hate her.
* DefiedTrope: The final boss of ''Fossil Fighters Champions'':
-->''"Yes, well, [[BondVillainStupidity let's not waste any more time with empty threats]] or [[JustBetweenYouAndMe the revealing of plans]], mmm?"''
* DemBones: The [=BareBones=] Brigade's boneysaurs in ''Champions''.
* DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu: Averted. When the bad guy pulls out an {{Olympus Mon|s}}, you need to get your own before you can properly challenge him. (Unfortunately, you can't keep it - see NoPlansNoPrototypeNoBackup below)
** However, it's later played straight with [[spoiler:Guhnash--apparently, all you have to do is destroy his brains. Easy-peasy.]]
** In ''Champions'' [[spoiler:The FinalBoss, Zongazonga, is pretty much exactly this. A body-snatching skull that turns into a literally on fire zombie T-Rex with giant, bloody skeleton arms coming out of it? Just send some kid with his pet dinosaurs to beat it up.]]
* DinosaursAreDragons: The Fire-type Vivosaurs breathe fire, but remember - they're no longer Dinosaurs, they're ''[[CallARabbitASmeerp Vivosaurs]]''.
** In ''Champions'', the Super Revive function in the sequel plays this to the hilt, essentially morphing your Vivosaurs from dinosaur-like creatures into more draconic monsters. Also, [[spoiler:the BigBad Zongazonga literally refers to the dinosaurs as dragons in his magic chant in the penultimate battle.]]
* [[AnimalMotif Dinosaur Motif]]: In ''Champions,'' the male PC has a T-Rex motif, while the female PC has a triceratops motif.
* DiscOneFinalBoss: Frigisaur, and the leader of the BB Bandits with him.
* DiscOneFinalDungeon: Boy, isn't Mt. Lavaflow climactic! The lava! The HeelFaceTurn! The impending epic battle between the opposing forces of Frigisaur and Ignosaur! ...Wait, whaddiya ''mean'' half the plot threads still haven't been followed up on?
* DiscOneNuke: The Spinax you're given at the beginning of the first game is strong enough to last you until endgame.
** In ''Champions'' the starters are powerful enough to last you the entire game, particularly Dimetro.
** The 'Donation Point' dinosaurs also count, particularly Compso in the first game. There's nothing to stop you from grinding all the way to him the moment you get access to your first dig-site, and his support-effects will make you basically unstoppable for the rest of the game. To a lesser degree, Stego - being the cheapest of the DP-dinosaurs, you can, again, fairly easily get all 4 parts of him, in [[RareRandomDrop 'red' quality]], for an instantly high-level 'Tank' who can solo practically anything up to late-mid-game if needs be.
** Giga Raja in Champions, which is created by evolving Raja (available in the first area) with a gold fossil (can be found early with some dedication). Giga Raja's already powerful attacks can be bolstered by his ability to Charge-Up for a turn, causing him to hit like a meteor and deal damage exceeding the highest possible Life Points for anything in the game!
* DoWellButNotPerfect: In ''Champions,'' there's a man who wants your help making hard-boiled eggs in the hot springs. They need to be in there for 10 seconds ''exactly,'' and hardly a millisecond longer. However, boiling the eggs for ''9.9 seconds exactly'' is the only way to get the [[spoiler: elemental chick]] fossils. Better bring a stopwatch. Or learn how to count to 7-1.
* DownloadableContent:
** The original game briefly featured four of the five Mysterious Egg fossils available for download on the Nintendo Channel, but they were taken down eventually. (They're still available in-game, though; it just takes longer.)
** ''Champions'' features [[OlympusMons Frigisaur and Ignosaur]] from the first game, along with sidequests from a... ''strange'' character named Ryne, and downloadable fights with [[spoiler: Duna, Raptin, and Dynal.]]
** ''Frontier'' distributed its bonus content through AR cards rather than actual downloads; including some Bone Buggys, versions of Yutie in all four elements, the villains' dark vivosaurs, and some ''actual'' dinosaurs.
* DudeWheresMyRespect: Averted. The [=NPC=]s' dialogue changes to praise you as you progress through the story and ranks.
* {{Eagleland}}: The Fossil Park America in ''Frontier''. The whole place is lit up like Las Vegas, the Warden in charge is TotallyRadical and [[AmericansAreCowboys dresses like a cowboy]], and the first dig site is in a southwest canyon. To its' credit, the Starry Falls dig site is a South American jungle instead of being a US stereotype. Fossil Parks Asia and Europe aren't all that much better when it comes to cultural stereotypes.
* ElementalPowers: It turns out that the cloning process gives these to animals as a [[CursedWithAwesome side-effect]].
** BlowYouAway
** DishingOutDirt
** MakingASplash
** PlayingWithFire
** NonElemental
** InfinityPlusOneElement: "Legendary" in the first two games, though in practice these vivosaurs are treated as Neutral; they just have better stats. The first game has [[spoiler:Frigisaur, Ignosaur,
and all the scathing critiques it brings parts of Guhnash]] and tries to overdose. She survives however, but nonetheless stops singing.
* DrivingQuestion: What
''Champions'' has [[spoiler:Zombie Tricera, Zombie Ptera, Zombie Rex, Zombie Plesio, and Zongazonga; plust the hell return of Frigi and Igno]]. ''Frontier'' drops the designation.
* ElementalRockPaperScissors: Fire beats Air, which beats Earth, which beats Water, which beats Fire. Neutral has no advantages or disadvantages.
* ElvisImpersonator: Rockin' Billy from ''Champions.'' Did you catch the PunnyName?
* EverythingsBetterWithDinosaurs: Duh!
* [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses Everything's Better With Princessaurs]]: Maia (Maiasaurus)
is this "Rosebud" thing?
a pink dinosaur with a feminine face and a princess-crown. She's also a support-skill powerhouse, the only one in the game to have both healing and anti-status-ailment skills.
* DrosteImage: This effect EvolutionaryLevels: [[spoiler:The Dinaurians have a devolution beam. It turns humans into "triconodonta", a ratlike mammal ancestor.]]
** The three "Transformation-Class" Vivosaurs also transform into later descendants of theirs: Guan turns into T-Rex, and Proto turns into Tricera. Aoptryx
is shown somewhat more confusing--it can turn into ''any'' neutral-type Vivosaur. Even those that technically came before it. And even those it ''could not possibly be related to'' (Apato isn't even a ''theropod!'').
** In ''Champions'', some vivosaurs can "Super Evolve" into stronger forms.
* {{Expy}}: Pauleen in ''Champions'' has a lot in common with Rosie from the first game. In addition to being your designated female hanger-on and being surprisingly powerful for such a young age, both have bright pink TwinTails... and the same (accidental, in Rosie's case) VerbalTic.
* FeatheredFiend: Aopteryx. It can semi-reliably steal FP with Thieving Talons, recover LP with Life Drain and as mentioned above, transform into any Neutral vivosaur. [[JokeCharacter Unfortunately, it needs significant support to dish out and/or take damage...]]
* FetchQuest: AND HOW. The first game is loaded with these. Thankfully, most of them go by quickly enough to keep the story rolling.
* FireWaterJuxtaposition: Frigisaur and Ignosaur in the first game represent the Fire/Ice version.
* FlyingSeafoodSpecial: And [[WaterIsAir inverted]]
when Kane passes between two mirrors.
fighting in [[UnderTheSea Bottomsup Bay]].
* DugInDeeper: A variant occurs, only without hilarity ensuing. Subverted by FossilRevival: ...It's the backbone of the series.
* GeniusSweetTooth: Dr. Diggins has a weakness for Dino Cakes.
* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: Professor Scatterly in the second game manages to slip a [[DidNotDoTheBloodyResearch "Sod it"]] past the radar. Similarly, the game goes to absolutely ''zero'' lengths to disguise
the fact that Susan knows that, while Pauleen has a [[HoYay girl crush]] on the female protagonist. She grabs the female PC's hands, stares deeply into her eyes, and then admits she has no idea why she's not completely untalented, she's nowhere near good enough to carry an opera all on her own. It's only Kane using all his wealth and influence to push her into the spotlight against her wishes.
blushing.
* DungeonmastersGirlfriend: Kane funds an elaborate opera show for the sole purpose of casting his girlfriend in the lead role.
* DuringTheWar: Kane manipulates the public sentiment to incite the war. Bear in mind that the film came out before America entered WWII.
* DyingAlone: Kane at the beginning. The rest of the movie is devoted to showing [[HowWeGotHere why he was alone]].
* DyingCandle:
** Throughout the opening montage showing Kane's vast Xanadu estate, a single lit window is visible on the upper right hand corner of every shot, getting closer all the time. At the end, the light goes out, leading
GlobalCurrencyException: Redundant fossils are donated to the memorable scene of Kane uttering museum, which gives you donation points based on how good they are. These points are the only currency the cleaning station store accepts. Averted in ''Frontier'', where you just get cash for extra fossils.
* {{Gonk}}: Baron von Blackraven, especially compared to
his dying word.
** Susan's failed opera career is shown through a chaotic montage punctuated by a flashing lightbulb (supposedly the one used to cue the actors backstage). The montage ends abruptly with the bulb burning out, followed by Susan in bed with some sleeping pills next to her bed, implied to be a suicide attempt. Subverted in that Susan survives, although the burned out bulb can also symbolize the death of her opera singing career.
two PrettyBoy associates.
* EpicTrackingShot: Both the tracking shot into El Rancho, GoodAllAlong: [[spoiler:Don Boneyard and the tracking up [=BareBones=] Brigade, trying to stop the ladder during Susan's opera performance - and yes, it used a visual effect (miniature ladder).
* EstablishingCharacterMoment: The first major scene with Welles as a 24-year-old Kane has him arguing with Thatcher over how he was running The Inquirer. It does extremely well with establishing how money was simply not a concern of his
Caliosteo Cup in any way, shape or form.
* ExtyYearsFromNow: The present year is 1941, young Kane was taken from his parents in 1871 (70 years ago) and he ran for governor in 1916 (25 years ago).
* FaceFramedInShadow: The film has a few shots of Kane's face framed in shadow and stepping into light, or
order to stop Zongazonga's scheme. Well, the other way around.
* TheFaceless: The reporter Jerry Thompson (William Alland) is always shown from behind, or from a long distance, or with his face hidden in shadow, along with all of his reporter colleagues. According to Welles, it was a tribute to the hardworking reporters behind those film reels that were never seen. Creator/RogerEbert called Alland's performance the most thankless, since he's the character who is the AudienceSurrogate, yet he never got due credit because no one saw his face.
* FamousLastWords: Or one, anyway: Kane's final word is "Rosebud".
* FatalFlaw: Kane [[IJustWantToBeLoved wanted to be loved]], but [[ItsAllAboutMe on his own terms]].
* FatSuit: Welles wore one to play the older Kane. Back in the days when he
Brigade didn't need one.
know Don Boneyard was a good guy, but they don't have a problem with it when they find out.]]
* FictionFiveHundred:
GottaCatchEmAll
* GreenHillZone: Greenhorn Plains in the first game, Treasure Lake in ''Champions'', and Paradise Beach in ''Frontier''.
* HarmlessFreezing: Frigisaur freezes you and Rosie completely after your first fight with it. But you're still OK.
* HarmlessVillain: The Barebones Brigade aren't exactly what you'd call menacing at first. Their eeeeevil plans involve such plots as "Pampering girls so they forget to participate in a tournament," and "Fill the hot springs up with powdered gelatin so people get stuck and can't participate."
** Kane NotSoHarmlessVillain: [[spoiler: Their fourth plan, the one Don comes up with, is a media tycoon who has more than to destroy the ''entire Caliosteo island system''. Egads.]]
** [[spoiler: It's later {{justified|Trope}} when you learn that Don Boneyard is, in fact, the real Joe Wildwest in disguise. He didn't want to hurt anybody. When he [=OKed=] the third plan, things were getting ''extremely'' desperate, and it went slowly
enough money to spend on constructing [[BigFancyHouse Xanadu]] (which is described in-universe as "the world's largest private pleasure ground") and [[CollectorOfTheStrange filling it with exotic animals and priceless art from give the people plenty of time to evacuate.]]
* HeelFaceTurn: [[spoiler: The BB Bandits - well, the TerribleTrio team, anyway; the {{Mooks}} don't seem to turn.]]
** [[spoiler: The entire [=BareBones=] Brigade.]]
* HelloInsertNameHere: All games actually allow you to change your main character's name at any time! The first game doesn't allow you to name your {{Mon}}s, strangely, though this was changed in the second.
* HopelessBossFight: [[spoiler: Round one against Frigisaurus.]]
* HotSpringsEpisode: In the second game, there's a hot spring-themed dig site called Hot Spring Heights. Not surprisingly, most of the plot in that area revolves
around the world.]] One early scene has his adoptive father Mr. Thatcher argue hot springs.
* HumansAreSpecial [[spoiler: Not only do they have the sci-fi standard "pluck," but the dinaurians are impressed by their capacity for both compassion and forgiveness.]]
* HypnotizeThePrincess: Comes into play late in Champions. [[spoiler: It's Todd.]]
* InconsistentDub: ''Frontier'' changes a couple names from previous games. The coin-like items vivosaurs are stored in were "Dino Medals" but are now "Dino Gears", and Becklespinax's vivosaur name goes from "Spinax" to "Beckles" - of course, the first two games identified it as an Altispinax, and its Japanese name was "Altis", which would explain the change.
* InfinityPlusOneSword: T-Rex in the first game, natch. Also, [[KillerRabbit Compso, who debuffs the enemy's attack power by 90%]]. Even moreso are [[spoiler:Duna, Dynal, and Raptin]],
with him over their ridiculous support effects, and crazy abilities.
* InterspeciesRomance: [[spoiler:Before the final battle with Guhnash, you can choose to bring either Rosie or Duna with you. Choosing Duna leads to this. And considering that little mishap with the devolution ray, Rosie technically counts for this too.]]
* ItemGet: Every last fossil is one of these in the first two games. The hero bends over, picks up the rock, faces the camera and thrusts it above his/her head triumphantly. The fanfare plays, and a blurb appears stating the nature of the rock found. It's a thing of beauty.
* JokeCharacter: In the first game, Anato. Its expression can only be described as "derpy," and even the ''game'' goes out of its way to point out
how stupid it looks. It's a vivosaur who tries to sell itself based ''solely on'' the fact that it looks ridiculous. From a gameplay perspective, it also tries to lay claim to having a 100% effective [[StandardStatusEffects Confusion skill]], but said skill also does no damage and costs ''240 FP.'' Similar skills on other vivosaurs not only do damage, they also cost ''over 100 FP less.''
** LethalJokeCharacter in ''Champions '' It gets an [[TookALevelInBadass upgrade]] to gold confusion which means that the vivosaur inflicted has a chance of attacking itself or any of its allies. In addition its super evolver form Papygon, is widely accepted as one of the best in the game.[[note]]However, it's worth nothing that Papygon's PaletteSwap brother Teffla is
much money he's losing on running a newspaper more the fan favorite of the two, and Kane's response?
-->''We did lose a million dollars last year. I expect
can deal heavier direct damage.[[/note]]
* JustifiedTrope: The game goes out of their way
to lose a million dollars this year. I expect to lose a million dollars next year. You know, Mr. Thatcher, at the rate of a million dollars a year, I'll emphasize that Dinosaurs didn't really have to close this place in... sixty years.superpowers, and a great deal of the Vivosaurs aren't even really revived from Dinosaurs, per se, but are rather other forms of prehistoric life.
** Driven home in ''Frontier'', where [[spoiler:you travel back in time and encounter ''real'' dinosaurs. Unlike vivosaurs, dinosaurs are all Neutral-type, [[RealIsBrown have brown skin]], and are identified by their full names (like "Triceratops" instead of "Tricera")]].
* KatanasAreJustBetter: Mihu, a ceratopsian found in Japan, has ''katanas for horns.
''
** * KidHero: The above quote is said when he is still ''just starting out'', main characters.
* KingIncognito: During ''Champions'', you're tasked with finding the Princess of Nomadistan, who has quietly entered the tournament;
and he's currently #5 are shown a picture of a girl and her dog that you ran into earlier. [[spoiler:The Princess turns out to be ''the dog''; the girl's her retainer. Both the fact that this would have been good to know earlier and the absurdity of [[CaligulasHorse appointing dogs as royalty]] is lampshaded.]]
* LampshadeHanging: The {{Combat Commentator}}s sometimes do this.
-->'''P.A. Leon''': I was wondering, why do we talk through every fight?
-->'''Slate Johnson''': I'm wondering how we can ''see'' every fight happening!
-->'''P.A. Leon''': Excellent point, Slate.
* LargeHamAnnouncer: All the announcers, but special mention must be given to Trip Cera. A couple choice quotes:
-->Not as excited as me! BOOYAH, GRANDMA!

-->'''Trip:''' Just like my wife with a credit card! Zing!\\
'''Ty:''' You're not married, Trip.\\
'''Trip:''' I'M SO LONELY!

-->There is a literal river of sweat running over my laptop! Seriously, I may electrocute myself before the day is over!
* LastLousyPoint: The five elemental [[spoiler:baby birds]] in the first game, who can only be obtained by getting every other vivosaur in the game and then ''maxing their levels.'' Yikes! They used to be downloadable from the Nintendo Channel
on the Forbes Fictional 15. $1 million at Wii, but have since disappeared, as the time aforementioned channel is approximately $27 million today; thus, "starting out" and thanks to his family's gold holdings (and his mother's management), Mr. Kane is no longer supported.
** More generally, you may find yourself gritting your teeth over the last lousy point of every single fossil you can clean. Properly-cleaned fossils are
worth a ton of experience points, way more than you can reasonably give any specific vivosaur through combat. It's not ''mandatory'' to get everything perfect, but for perfectionists...
* LeakedExperience: Three vivosaurs participate in each fight, but all five that you're carrying (including defeated ones) get the experience. Averted in ''Frontier'', where all vivosaurs are available to use
at least $1.6 billion.
all times but only the one used in battle gets experience.
* FilmNoir: Although LizardFolk: In the second half of the game [[spoiler:a race of dromaeosauridae that evolved into hyper intelligent humanoids become the main antagonists after the BB Bandits are defeated. They want to KillAllHumans, naturally.]]
* [[GratuitousForeignLanguage Gratuitous Foreign]] {{Malaproper}}: Nick Nack does this. Airy cat oh! Donkey shine!
* MaskedLuchador: There seems to be a thriving masked-battler community, since each game involves some:
** Saurhead in the first game, who wears [[RefugeInAudacity no less than]] ''[[RefugeInAudacity thirty]]'' full-head dinosaur masks at any given time. [[TheUnreveal Can't risk]] [[DramaticUnmask being unmasked]], after all.
** Pauleen from ''Champions'' also wears a mask. [[spoiler: She wears it because it's shy, and it helps her feel more confident--but the mask is enchanted to bestow confidence, and ''evil,'' so it takes over the wearer's body in a rather literal case of BecomingTheMask.]]
** In ''Frontier'', it's Dino Gigante. You have to find his old rival, the Flying Smile Kid, and draw him out of retirement to try and win his belt in order to get the piece of MacGuffin on it.
* MetalDetectorPuzzle: This is your entire means of finding {{Mons}}--you have sonar and need to search the ground for stuff.
* MisterMuffykins: Joannie and Madame Pooch in ''Champions''. [[spoiler:Joannie's pampering is justified as Madame Pooch is legitimately royalty as "Princess Pooch"; see KingIncognito above.]]
* {{Mon}}: It's a dinosaur-collecting and battling game.
* MythologyGag: Many visual details of the Vivosaurs are based on facts about their dinos:
** Some are [[PunnyName name puns]] (Krona is covered in clock-like Roman numerals, and Coatlus was made to look like its namesake, Quetzalcoatl.)
** Others are based on the location of their discovery (U-Raptor (''Utahraptor'') has feathers that look like a Native American headdress, Carchar has Egyptian details, Chinese Shanshan is designed to look like a ChineseGirl crossed with an Asian dragon.)
*** The fact that Breme (''Bradycneme draculae'') is vampiric is both a name and location reference, as it was discovered in Transylvania and and consequently named after {{Dracula}}.
** And more have their own fun facts (M-Raptor was exceptionally bird-like and so resembles a parrot; Megalo was one of the first discoveries ever, so according to the graphic designer "[[http://www.fossilfighters.com/html/making-of/5/ I deliberately used the design of a dinosaur as it was conceived by people long ago.]]")
* {{Nerf}}: Support effects were nerfed quite heavily in ''Champions.'' In the first game, vivosaurs had their full support effects regardless of their level, making things like [[GameBreaker Compso]] incredibly dangerous. In the sequel, support effects grow when your levels do... meaning the game gives you a Compso in the ''very beginning of the game,'' and feels no remorse.
** But
there's no crime involved, also an inversion, as some game mechanics got stronger in the movie has a lot of tropes associated with transition from the genre.
* FirstNameBasis: "He
original game to ''Champions''. In the original game, only the vivosaur in the Attack Zone could have a negative status effect put on them, and switching zones got rid of status effects. This made attacks whose only purpose was to cause a status effect somewhat weak, but this hurt poison attacks especially--you would need to use a chain of either knockback or [[StandardStatusEffect excite]] skills to get a poison attack to work, and the extra damage frequently wasn't that spectacular. In the sequel, however, all zones can have status effects and rotating doesn't like that 'Mister' / He likes good old 'Charlie Kane'!"
* {{Flashback}}: Lots
get rid of them.
them, meaning the extra damage from poison is more likely to stick around.
** A similar inversion applies to counterattacks. In the first game, counterattacks only had a 40% chance of working, making them a rather weak and luck-based strategy. In the sequel, counterattacks were upped to a 70% success rate, making them far more dangerous.
* ForcedPerspective: Used on multiple occasions. Maybe most notable NinjaPirateZombieRobot: The Dinomatons are robot dinosaurs, and the aforementioned Breme is a vampire dinosaur.
** And the sequel brings us skeleton [[spoiler:and zombie]] dinosaurs.
* NoPlansNoPrototypeNoBackup: A rare living example in [[OlympusMons Frigi(saur) and Igno(saur)]]. As soon as you defeat the former, the latter vanishes as well due to them cancelling each other's powers out. Still, it removes a god-like power from your party to prevent a Game Breaker. [[spoiler:Until you can win them from post-game {{Bonus Boss}}es, anyway.]]
* NothingIsScarier: When [[spoiler: the BB Bandits take over Vivosaur Island]], no music plays even in friendly areas.
* NotQuiteBackToNormal: Poor Rosie. The other girl's ending shows she hasn't fully thrown off the effects of the Digadig charm ''or'' the [[spoiler: deevolution ray]].
* OddNameOut: Three of Holt's V-Raptors
in the early scene mini-manga are Odin, Thor, and Steve.
* OlympusMons: Frigisaur and Ignosaur.
* OneWingedAngel: [[spoiler:The main villains of both ''Champions'' and ''Frontier'' turn themselves into monstrous dino-beasts for the final battle.]]
* OverlyLongName: Avoided. Many dinos have these, but their Vivosaur counterparts have them cut short.
* PaletteSwap: In ''Frontier,'' certain dinos have variants (based off famous specimens) that are colored differently. They sometimes differ in elements and skills, too--Hypsi comes in Air, Water, and Fire versions.
* {{Panspermia}}: Subverted. [[spoiler: The Dinaurians seeded the planet with life, but it was Earth's own species that survived instead.]]
* PeninsulaOfPowerLeveling: There's a bonus boss post-game that most people have trouble with. However, with the right team (ex. Seismo, Hoplo, and Compso) you can consistently defeat said bonus boss over and over again in about 6 turns each time by abusing a team skill and how long-range attacks work, making leveling up all your vivosaurs to rank 12 easy.
** In the second game, there's the three Barebones Brigade officials. They use teams made up entirely of Boneysaurs; although Boneys have powerful support effects, they're also extreme {{Glass Cannon}}s, meaning vivosaurs several levels lower of them can take them out with some decent planning. They grant a full 30 points (in a game
where Thatcher level-ups come every 50 points) on defeat, making them great for grinding.
** Also in the second game, after you beat the game, you can talk to Prof. Scatterly to "reenact" the final battle with Zongazonga. By thee end of the game your vivosaurs will probably be strong enough to take him out no problem,
and Bernstein are sitting at a desk signing papers, he gives you 50 points, so any dinosaurs can be leveled up just by being put in front the support group.
* PlanetEater: [[spoiler:Guhnash.]]
* PlayableEpilogue: A whole crop
of stuff opens up after you beat the game. UnusableEnemyEquipment becomes [[InfinityPlusOneSword usable]], new areas open up, everyone becomes a BonusBoss, you get ''both'' the OlympusMons...
* PhlebotinumKilledTheDinosaurs: [[spoiler:Inverted; Dinosaurs were introduced on Earth by the Dinaurians.]]
* PopQuiz: The second go through the Secret Tunnels has you correctly answering dinosaur trivia to advance in the maze.
** In ''Champions'' there's a roaming quiz show sidequest run by Tess Score.
* PowerTrio: Hunter, Rosie, and Holt become one of these in the mini-manga. In ''Champions'', it's the player, Todd, and Pauleen; with Rupert as SixthRanger.
* PowerupLetdown: Getting the upgrade for Dark Fossils lets you find red fossils, which you could already find anyway, jewels, which you could find anyway, and dino droppings, which you ''couldn't''. Also, dark fossils have an outer shell that can only be broken with a hammer. If there's a speck of outer shell covering that perfect red fossil, expect to lose
some ordinary-looking bay windows. Kane enters points smashing it.
** Yes, but you don't get challenged for finding Dark Fossils in
the frame, original. Meaning you don't have to fight tooth-and-nail for every [[VendorTrash Emerald and then walks away Diamond]] that you dig up. In addition, the best jewels are available in Dark Fossils, meaning you can now get those all-important case, sonar, and cleaning tool upgrades without running around swinging a pickaxe like a maniac for hours on end. BoringButPractical.
* PunnyName / MeaningfulName: Where to start? We've got name changer Ty Tull, advice giver Tipper, Sam Inaro who teaches seminars... And these are just
from the desk--and walks quite ''first'' game.
** Gets lampshaded:
--->'''Rosie:''' Oh, I can't believe I didn't make the connection before... Knickknacks... ''Nick Nack''. Ugh. Waa ha ha! To think we're out looking for knickknacks for
a bit further guy named Nick Nack... It's like some awful joke!
** NeverHeardThatOneBefore: Even the [=NPC=]s warn you that "We've heard all the jokes" about Bea Ginner (who teaches novices).
* PurelyAestheticGender: Your gender has no effect on the plot in ''Champions'' or ''Frontier''.
* QuintessentialBritishGentleman: In ''Champions,'' both Professor Scatterly and Rupert show signs of it. Rupert is more of a nascent one, though he certainly shows signs of Britishness.
* RandomlyDrops: Some fossils are ''much'' rarer
than one might others, and you'll have guessed, revealing to go back and forth between the main town and the area where they're found if you want to complete your fossil collection. Averted in ''Frontier'', where fossils for a specific vivosaur can be counted on to show up near each other and always in the same areas; plus they're identified on sight and you no longer need to go back to town to excavate them.
* TheReptilians: [[spoiler:The dinaurians in the original game.]]
* RibcageRidge: Treasure Lake in the second game has a gigantic skull of some variety, smack dab in the middle of the lake.
** Could also be a parody DesertSkull. Food for thought.
* RichBitch: Bling sisters Ruby and Sapphire, aka "the Posh Pair", in ''Frontier'''s postgame; who consider the player a commoner and recruit him/her in a few schemes to get rare jewels. Averted with [[spoiler:Penny]], who is only revealed to come from a rich family in the postgame and is SpoiledSweet.
* RichIdiotWithNoDayJob: A great deal of the Fossil Fighters are implied to be this.
* RoadApples: Yes, you can dig up fossilized dino dung. Nick Nack and John Guano are the only ones who want it for whatever reason (the shop will ''accept'' it, but will pay next to nothing).
* RobotBuddy: [=KL-33N=], the cleaning robot. Rupert has a prototype digging robot called [=Di66-R=]. In ''Frontier'', the Bone Buggies have an onboard AI called [=VR-00M=] (whose picture looks like the robots from the prior games).
* RoseHairedSweetie: Nate from ''Frontier'' is a RareMaleExample, in {{Adorkable}} flavor.
* RuleOfCool: Dinosaurs battling it out is cool enough, but the sequels give them even more powerful, awesome-looking forms.
* RunningGag: In ''Champions'', every time [[spoiler: someone's skull jumps into your pocket]], it is always described as "lumpy."
* SamusIsAGirl: In ''Frontier,'' it's revealed
that the far wall is actually further away than it looked MascotMook T-Rex--the big red, yellow, and black one that those bay windows are some seven feet off appears on the ground. This also has box art of every game--is specifically a female version (named [[GeniusBonus Sue]]). The male version is a [[RealMenWearPink purple]] variant named [[FluffyTheTerrible Stan.]]
* SaveScumming: If you save before you talk to
the effect of making Kane look tiny cleaning robot, you can reload the save until he gives satisfactory results. No longer the case in a scene ''Frontier'', where he is being humiliated by having to sign away much of his media holdings.
you do all the cleaning out in the field where you ''can't'' save.
* ForegoneConclusion: SchmuckBait: The fake newsreel spells out Secret Tunnels of the whole plot, minus "Rosebud".
* ForgottenFallenFriend: The newsreel reveals
Mole Brothers contain several treasure chests, but a nearby plaque warns you that Kane's "greed is its own setback." Opening them keeps you from advancing in the maze. It's later confirmed that opening these chests is why Lemo and O'Mel got separated in the first ex-wife and their son die in a car crash. They are never again mentioned in any scene that takes place after they died. Nobody suggests that among Kane's many personal problems, [[OutlivingOnesOffspring losing his only child]] might be one of them.
place.
* FramingDevice: The story is told mostly via interviews of people who were close SetBonus: Putting three vivosaurs with Kane something in common on the field can unlock a special attack for each.
* ShoutOut:
** One poor nameless NPC is tasked
with standing guard over a reporter.
* FreudianExcuse:
** Kane's parents forfeited custody of their son
warehouse, and nothing else. Keep talking to an emotionally distant banker. Yeah him, and he'll eventually reveal the "deep, philosophical" thoughts he's gone turn out A-OK in adulthood.
been having: "'''What is a man''''s life worth? Nothing but guarding '''a miserable pile of secrets?'''"
** On The cleaning robots resemble Japanese emoticons.
** A cinematic from
the sled symbolism in ''Citizen Kane'', Orson Welles remarked: sequel shows [[Film/JurassicPark a helicopter transporting new people to the island.]]
** In ''Champions'', one park staffer is trying to come up with new ideas:
-->Fast cars are exciting, right? Maybe we could [[Anime/YuGiOh5Ds have people battle while driving around a racetrack]]! [[TakeThat No, you're right. That's a dumb idea.]]
** Stella, Staff leader of Ribular Island informs the Hero(ine) that "[[VideoGame/SuperMarioBros1 Your dig site is on another island!]]" once they progress past Round 2 of the Cup. She then wonders why that sounds familiar.
** ''Champions'' also features a fisherman who became lost at sea. His name is [[Literature/RobinsonCrusoe Robinson,]] and he also talks to [[Film/CastAway a ball, whom he calls his best friend]].
** When its programming goes haywire, Rupert's robot says things such as "[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZelda I AM ERROR.]]" and "[[Videogame/ProWrestling A WINNER IS YOU.]]"
** In ''Frontier'', if you talk to a shopkeeper about cleaning a daily random fossil, they'll say [[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZelda
"It's a gimmick, really, secret to everybody."]] During a tournament during one of the postgame quests, one character will also reference [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem "playing with power"]].
* ShownTheirWork: The information on the extinct animals, also see MythologyGag above.
* SignificantAnagram: The Mole Brothers' names are Lemo
and rather dollar-book Freud.O'Mel. Hm. I wonder what ''those'' [[SarcasmMode are anagrams of]]?
* SinisterSchnoz: Snivels, no question.
* SkullForAHead: Don Boneyard [[spoiler:and anyone else who became a victim of Zongazonga]].
* SlasherSmile: [[spoiler: Guhweep]] has one, but it's not immediately obvious until it [[spoiler: uses Tears of Dark Light... and turns upside down]].
* SlippySlideyIceWorld: The Glacier dig site from the first game, though it doesn't open up until the endgame.
** All of the Ilium Island digsites in ''Champions'' apply. Ilium isn't called "The island where warmth goes to die" for nothing!
* TheSlowPath:
** In the first game, [[spoiler:Dr. Diggins after he's sent back to the Jurassic. Thank goodness he manages to find the Stone Sleep device!]]
** Also seen in ''Frontier''. [[spoiler:While time-traveling, your vivosaur partner gets left behind in the late Cretaceous in order to make sure you get home safely. Eventually, you realize that a fossilized Dino Gear-like artifact you'd found earlier in the game really ''is'' your partner's Dino Gear.]]
* StanceSystem: Used in ''Frontier''. While previous games had tactical systems based on a vivosaur's placement on the field, ''Frontier'' instead focuses on how your vivosaur is standing: straight ahead, rearing up, ducking down, or turned around and baring its tail. Each vivosaur has a different set of strong and weak stances, and different attacks can change your or your opponents' stances (though a vivosaur's stance is always reset when it takes its turn).
* StarterMon: Each game in the series does it differently:
** ''Fossil Fighters:'' You start the game with a Spinax who, while common, is decently powerful. However, at the game start, you also get a free bonus fossil of a dinosaur based on how you answer some questions about what you like in your dinos.
** ''Champions:'' Joe Wildwest lets you pick between dinos of the four basic elements, which are hard to get until late game. All can [[MagikarpPower Super Evolve.]] Plus, boys get a T-rex and girls get a Tricera.
** ''Frontier:'' You befriend Chomp, the most traditionally mons-like dino in the series. He's no recognizable dinosaur species, he's quite powerful, and he evolves at certain points in the game. Plus, he's your TeamPet and your close friend.
* StatGrinding: A mild case in the first game; most stat gains are at levelups but vivosaurs also gain HP gradually between levels. ''Champions'' removes this.
* StockDinosaurs: But also includes any new prehistoric mammals and dinosaurs discovered during the creation of the game.
** The sequel appears to be continuing this, including many other prehistoric creatures from before and after the age of dinosaurs.
* StopHavingFunGuys: [[{{In-Universe}} Rupert]] in ''Champions''. After witnessing Todd take his loss to you in stride, he's baffled as to why Todd's not upset about losing. Though it turns out it's less arrogance that his way is the right one and more ignorance that there are other ways in the first place.
** Turns out it comes from his dad, who tried to drive the "have fun" mentality out of him and wanted him to bail out when facing even a 50% chance of failure. [[spoiler:This game being high on the idealistic end of the scale, this was just dad trying to protect Rupert from the pain of losing. [[ManipulativeBastard Or so he says...]]]]
* StrangelyEffectiveDisguise: [[spoiler: Somehow, the majority of the Dinaurians are fooled by yours and Dr. Diggins' masks.]]
** See also ''Champions'', where the hero(ine) receives a Ty Ranno mask for disguise purposes. No other mask keeps [=NPC=]s from immediately knowing who he/she is; how is this mask different?
* SummonBiggerFish: Calling up Ignosaur to fight Frigisaur.
* TakeThat: After completing the main quest and all the sidequests of ''Frontier'', you'll take a group photo with the main cast; to which Dahlia comments "And it's a PICTURE, got it? Not a selfie. That word is so overused these days.
"
* GaveUpTooSoon: Thompson, after spending all the movie looking TakenForGranite: [[spoiler:The [[LizardFolk dinaurians]] have technology that can do this. The technology that un-stones them is also responsible for the answer to the DrivingQuestion gives up precisely how you can revive dinosaurs in the very room the answer lies.
* TheGayNineties: A good chunk of the film takes place in the 1890s, when Kane is at his height as a media mogul.
* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: Legend has it that this is the real story behind Rosebud [[http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/1989/aug/17/rosebud/]].
* GilliganCut: When Kane announces his intention to make Susan Alexander an opera star, a reporter asks if she'll sing at the Met:
-->'''Susan:''' Charlie said if I didn't, he'd build me an opera house.
-->'''Kane:''' That won't be necessary.
--> ''(cut to newspaper headline: "KANE BUILDS OPERA HOUSE")''
* TheGreatestStoryNeverTold: No one, except the audience, will ever know what Rosebud really means or signifies. It becomes a missing piece of a jigsaw puzzle and a RiddleForTheAges. Thompson hangs a {{Lampshade}} on it at the end:
--> '''Thompson''': Mr. Kane was a man who got everything he wanted and then lost it. Maybe Rosebud was something he couldn't get, or something he lost. Anyway, it wouldn't have explained anything... I don't think any word can explain a man's life. No, I guess Rosebud is just a... piece in a jigsaw puzzle... a missing piece.
* GreedyJew: Subverted. It's Kane's very Jewish business associate Mr. Bernstein who says that there's more to life than money.
* HesDeadJim: The film opens with Kane's hand falling and dropping the snow globe.
* HeWhoFightsMonsters: Kane, who envisions himself as a crusader for the little guy against corruption, becomes a cynic and a reactionary.
* HighHopesZeroTalent: Susan Alexander gets put out on a huge opera debut by Kane. While her voice may be pleasant for something singing in the shower, she is not cut out for opera in any way.[[note]]Specifically, she's way out of her range. She's a contralto (low register) trained/forced to sing as a soprano (very high register). This could ruin any vocal potential she did have.[[/note]] Her vocal teacher loudly proclaims she is unteachable and more or less facepalms every time she sings. Kane won't listen to Susan, the instructor, or every newspaper critic in America and insists she keeps going on stage.
** Welles later regretted this part of the film, as people assumed she was based on screen actress and William Randolph Hearst's paramour Marion Davies, who Welles (and many others) felt was actually a fairly talented actress and a nice person. Marion Davies was well-suited to romantic comedies— unfortunately, Hearst saw her as the second coming of Mary Pickford and kept putting her in lavish, sentimental dramas that didn't take advantage of her talents.
* HitlerCam: Orson Welles was the trope namer. Refers to the practice of shooting a solitary figure from a slightly lower angle. This magnifies the figure's height and presence in the mind of the viewer. Greatly popularized by the film.
* HollywoodToneDeaf: Averted with Susan Alexander. To get the effect of a realistically overmatched singer, Welles got a professional ''alto'' opera singer and had her sing a soprano part, so yes, the actress who played Susan Alexander can sing, but doesn't have much range.
* HowWeGotHere: The film starts with Kane's death. Thompson's investigation then serves as the framework for telling Kane's life story, which is then told in roughly chronological order.
* ICouldaBeenAContender: InvertedTrope by Kane, when he is forced to give up the control of his empire. Hardly a nobody. Very disillusioned, he reflects that it was his ''advantages'' that stole him his chance at true greatness:
-->'''Charles Foster Kane:''' You know, Mr. Bernstein, if I hadn't been very rich, I might have been a really great man.
-->'''Thatcher:''' Don't you think you are?
-->'''Charles Foster Kane:''' I think I did pretty well under the circumstances.
-->'''[[CorruptCorporateExecutive Thatcher:]]''' What would you like to have been?
-->'''Charles Foster Kane:''' ''[DeathGlare]'' [[TheReasonYouSuckSpeech Everything you hate.
first place.]]
* IJustWantToBeLoved: This is Kane's main motivation. {{Deconstructed}}, as, despite how innocuous a motivation it seems, it causes him ATasteOfPower: Do you go straight to be a {{Jerkass}} -- he wants to be loved, but [[LoveHungry on his own terms]], and he doesn't understand that it just doesn't work that way.
-->'''Leland:''' ''He married for love. Love. That's why he did everything. That's why he went into politics. It seems we weren't enough, he wanted all
the voters to love him too. Guess all he really wanted out of life was love.'' [[CentralTheme That's Charlie's story, how he lost it]]. You see, [[ItsAllAboutMe he just didn't confrontation with [[spoiler: Ignosaur]] in your party... or do you have any to give. Well, he loved Charlie Kane of course, very dearly]], and his mother, I guess he always loved her.
* IJustWantToHaveFriends: Kane []ultimately drives away all his friends
some fun with his egotistical personality and self-centeredness, becoming Lonely at the Top.
[[OlympusMons godlike beast]] beforehand?
* ITakeOffenseToThatLastOne:
-->'''Charles Foster Kane:''' You long-faced, overdressed anarchist.
-->'''Leland:''' I am ''not'' overdressed!
* ImpoverishedPatrician: Leland is described
TerribleTrio: The BB Gang. Also counts as coming from an old, rich family where one day the old man shoots himself and they discover they have nothing.
* IntrepidReporter: Jerry Thompson,
GoldfishPoopGang for the reporter who tries to find out first half of the meaning of "Rosebud". And Kane himself during his younger years.
* ItsAllAboutMe: Kane’s mission in life is ''to be loved on his own terms''. Lampshaded spectacularly:
--> '''Kane:''' [pleading] Don't go, Susan. You mustn't go. You can't do this to me.
--> '''Susan:''' I see. So
game. In the sequel, it's the Barebones Brigade. ''Frontier'' has Baron von Blackraven and his gang.
* TheTetrisEffect: Expect to see fossils in various states of cleaning every time
you who this close your eyes.
* TyrannosaurusRex: The game's mascot, and somewhat of the InfinityPlusOneSword. One NPC ensures the player near the end of the game that "all the hype you've ever heard about it
is being done to. It's not me at all. Not how I feel. Not what it means to me.'' [laughs] ''I can't do this to you? [odd smile] [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome Oh, yes I can.true!"
* TheUnintelligible: Rex of the BB Bandits.
** EloquentInMyNativeTongue: [[spoiler:His true speech patterns tend toward SesquipedalianLoquaciousness. Those kooky English bulldogs...
]]
* ItsAllJunk: Kane is an obsessive collector of everything, who then treats people like objects UnknownItemIdentification: In the first two games, fossils had to be brought back to base and dies a lonely old man, surrounded by glorified junk in a ridiculously opulent estate. The last line of excavated before they could be identified. In ''Frontier'', fossils are "unknown" the film is, in fact, "Toss that junk."
** And ironically, the only piece of "junk" that meant something really important to Kane is burned up because it can't be sold.
* ItWasHisSled: [[invoked]] Despite being the TropeNamer, the sled is a MacGuffin. As Jerry muses over a box of jigsaw puzzle pieces, "Rosebud" is only a piece of the puzzle. (In addition, there were ''two'' sleds, each representing a
first time in his life. The second sled was "Crusader".)
* ItWillNeverCatchOn: Kane didn't believe, in 1935, that there would
they're excavated but the sonar will be a war. UsefulNotes/WorldWarII started 4 years after that.
* IvyLeagueForEveryone: Kane is said
able to have attended and been thrown out of Harvard, Yale, Princeton, and Cornell.
ID them afterward.
* JekyllAndHyde: Kane tells Thatcher early on, "The trouble is, you UnusableEnemyEquipment: Boy, the Dinatomatons sure are cool, aren't they? Who wouldn't want a [[VideoGame/RobotDinosaursThatShootBeamsWhenTheyRoar Robot Dinosaur That Shoots Beams When It Roars?]] Well, sorry, but ''you don't realize get none.'' And you'll have to keep your paws off [[spoiler:Duna, Dynal, and Raptin]] too... [[spoiler:until they all become available in the postgame, that you're talking to two people," referring to himself as both a man of wealth and as a man of the people. One of the main points of the movie is the internal war between those two sides. [[spoiler: It can be argued that both sides lose by the end of the movie.is.]]
%%* {{Jerkass}}: Charles Foster Kane.
* JumpScare: The screeching cockatoo near the climax of the film. Quite possibly the best ''non''-horror example in cinema history.
* LargeHam: "Siiiiing Siiiiiing!". [[TropesAreNotBad It works, though.]]
** MrExposition during the introductory voice-over could count, as well.
* TheLawOfConservationOfDetail: Playing with this trope is arguably the main conceit: it's a movie about the impossibility of finding the right details. "Rosebud" is an example, as
VendorTrash: Digging up and cleaning gemstones is the famous "girl in the white dress" speech.
* LetThePastBurn: The ending is a loose example, differing
only in that way to make money. The better the whole house isn't burnt.
* LonelyAtTheTop: As a core theme. One of
gem, the reasons why he tries to desperately cling to his wife, and eventually comes true more money.
* VerbalTic: The Digadigs, including Pauleen in ''Champions''. Rosie [[GotMeDoingIt picks it up]]
when she leaves him. It's also the meaning behind 'Rosebud'- his life, though successful, was so unhappy that the greatest time in his life was when he was a child and playing with his sled.
* LoveHungry: As desperate as Kane
is for love, he is too selfish to understand that one cannot force others to love them. It just doesn't work that way.
* {{MacGuffin}}: The identity of "Rosebud".
* MalevolentMugshot: Regardless of whether one views the titular character as a VillainProtagonist, [[http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_Pn5WEpjsar8/S7g0iT9EGoI/AAAAAAAAArA/vyL2k9dYGKQ/s1600/Kane1.jpg this image]] certainly counts as the TropeMaker in film, beating out ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'' by seven years. Since the point
mystically made part of the film is to tell Kane's story tribe, and let the audience decide if he she is a hero or villain (or both), it is also an UnbuiltTrope.
* TheManIsStickingItToTheMan: A subversion. Orson Welles made this film for a Hollywood Studio and the film was a general satire of UsefulNotes/TheAmericanDream, yellow journalism, the Hollywood style and narrative, and it states that CapitalismIsBad. This was made at the invitation of the studios themselves but as a result of Hearst's interference on account of "percieved" libel, the film's release was sabotaged, Welles' reputation was smeared and Hollywood learnt its lesson from "The Man."
* MatchCut: the entire opening sequence. Watch how the light never moves.
** Also after slapping Susan. Her left eye matches with an eye decoration in the next scene. Hard one to see.
* MathematiciansAnswer:
--> '''Reporter:''' Mr. Kane, How did you find business conditions in Europe?
--> '''Kane:''' With great difficulty!
* MatteShot: The outside of Xanadu is mostly a series of matte paintings.
* MementoMacGuffin: "Rosebud", which partially drives the plot.
* AMinorKidroduction: Sort of--we get a glimpse of Kane as he dies and then we see him again in the newsreel, but the story proper starts with Kane at age 8.
* TheMistress: Susan Alexander, before Kane marries her.
* {{Mockumentary}}: Early in the film. Welles [[Radio/TheWarOfTheWorlds was good at these]]. Kind of an example of AluminumChristmasTrees. People in the 1940s who were used to seeing the "March of Time" newsreels regularly would have been much more amused by the satire. Possibly the earliest example of an in-movie fake newsreel.
* {{Mouthscreen}}: One of the most iconic examples in film history. The first we see of the title character is a close up of his lips as he says his last words: "Rosebud"
* MusicalPastiche: ''Salammbô'', the [[ShowWithinAShow opera in which Susan Alexander stars]], is Creator/BernardHerrmann's pastiche of French [[{{Opera}} grand opéra]] à la Jules Massenet. Pauline Kael suggested that it was originally supposed to be a real Massenet opera ''Thaïs'' but Herrmann angrily refuted it when Kael said it was a compromise because they couldn't get the rights:
--> '''[[http://www.wellesnet.com/bernard-herrmann-on-working-with-orson-welles-and-citizen-kane/ Bernard Herrmann]]''': Pauline Kael has written in The Citizen Kane Book (1971), that the production wanted to use Massenet's "Thais" but could not afford the fee. But Miss Kael never wrote or approached me to ask about the music. We could easily have afforded the fee. The point is that its lovely little strings would not have served the emotional purpose of the film. I wrote the piece in a
very high tessitura, so that a girl with a modest voice would be completely hopeless in it.''diga-''displeased.
* VideoGameCrueltyPotential: Roise asks "you probably hate me now, don't you?". You actually are ABLE to say "yes".

* MythologyGag: Also a ShoutOut. ** In one scene dated 1935, Kane tells a reporter not to believe everything he hears on the radio. Considering who is playing [[Creator/OrsonWelles Kane]] [[Radio/WarOfTheWorlds that is true]].
* NameOfCain: Charles ''Kane''.
* {{Newsreel}}: This has one of the earliest (if not the earliest) examples of an in-movie fake newsreel. Furthermore, Welles had RKO use their own newsreel department to create it to make it look authentic.
* NoAntagonist: Kane brought his miserable life upon himself.
* NoCelebritiesWereHarmed: Kane was probably based on William Randolph Hearst, though Hearst was not pleased with the allusion.
* NoPartyGiven: [[JustifiedTrope Justified]]; Kane is presumably running for Governor as an Independent. Boss Gettys' political affiliation isn't mentioned.
* OhCrap: Kane displays a very subtle one
''Frontier,'' when his you [[spoiler: travel back in time]], you can encounter dino nests. You can cheerfully drive your Bone Buggy over them and shatter them to pieces, for no other reason than they're there. (Though they magically reform themselves if you wait.)
* XMeetsY: ''Franchise/JurassicPark'' meets {{Mon}}s. (''Magazine/NintendoPower'' said "meets ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}''", but "meets ''VideoGame/{{Spectrobes}}''" is much more apt.)
* WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou: In the
first wife Emily tells him she is going to investigate game's Master-rank Level-Up Battles, losing even one vivosaur makes you lose the house of Kane's mistress, Susan Alexander, after receiving an anonymous tip about it.
* OldDarkHouse: Xanadu is often presented this way.
* OldMediaAreEvil: The film is one of the earliest criticisms of Old Media.
whole fight.
** NewMediaAreEvil: The film is also very critical of newer forms of media. Especially newsreels which are shown * WellDoneSonGuy: Rupert's father is... difficult to be just as constructed, story driven and as biased as anything else and certainly not objective.
* TheOner: Long shots zooming into Susan's cafe through a skylight and up a ladder at the opera.
* TheOneThatGotAway:
-->'''Mr. Bernstein''': A fellow will remember a lot of things you wouldn't think he'd remember. You take me. One day back in 1896, I was crossing over to Jersey on the ferry and as
please, shall we pulled out there was another ferry pulling in and on it there was a girl waiting to get off. A white dress she had on. She was carrying a white parasol. I only saw her for one second. She didn't see me at all, but I'll bet a month hasn't gone by since that I haven't thought of that girl.
* OneTrueLove: Charles and Susan really were meant for each other. She loved him for who he is, but Charles was incapable of understanding that he didn't need to buy her love, nor should he seclude themselves away from society. She leaves him because he doesn't know how to return her love. In fact, if Charles ever admitted that love is a two way street, she'd return in a heartbeat. As one of her friends said, any other day but Charlie's death, she enjoyed talking about him.
* ParentsAsPeople: Kane's mother seems like she truly thought she was doing what was best for her son by sending him away to be raised in wealth and prosperity (and away from his implied physically abusive father) even if it meant she couldn't be close to him anymore, not realizing that she set him down [[LonelyAtTheTop a very lonely path]] that ended with him DyingAlone.
* PatrioticFervor: "I am, have been, and will always be, an American."
* PercussiveTherapy: After Susan leaves him Kane tears her room apart.
* PlotHole: Legend has it that someone once asked Welles how anyone could have known Kane's FamousLastWords if he died alone. Welles supposedly paused for a long time and then said, "Don't you ever tell anyone of this." However, Raymond the butler later says he heard the word, implying that the scene was shot from his [[POVCam point of view]].
* PlotTriggeringDeath: The plot is kick-started by Kane's death.
* PopculturalOsmosisFailure: When many films are said to be "the Citizen Kane of horror/comedy/action" or someone says "Bad Movie is Citizen Kane compared to Worse Movie," folks get the idea that ''Citizen Kane'' is a great movie. Many people stop there.
* PosthumousCharacter: Charles Foster Kane, his wife and son.
* PowerfulAndHelpless: All of Charles Foster Kane's wealth and power can't stop the world from finding out about his adultery, which kills his political career. In fact one of the overarching themes of the film is that all of Kane's wealth and power fail to gain him the love of others, which is the one thing he truly wants and never really gets.
say.
* PrettyInMink: His two wives naturally wore a few furs.
* ProtagonistJourneyToVillain: Charles Foster Kane, obviously. He turns from an idealistic muckraker to a mogul whose life is slowly spiraling out of control.
* ProtagonistTitle
* PunctuatedForEmphasis: While Kane is finishing Leland's review:
-->'''Kane:''' Hello, Jedediah.\\
'''Leland:''' Hello, Charlie. I didn't know we were speaking...\\
'''Kane:''' Sure, we're speaking, Jedediah... ''(forcefully hits carriage return on his typewriter, ka-CHUNK)'' ...you're fired.
* RashomonStyle: An UnbuiltTrope since it preceded Kurosawa's film by several years (and Kurosawa adapted a Japanese short story that was published years before Kane's release). Essentially, each narrator has a view of Kane based on their experiences and relationships with him. Notably Bernstein dismisses Thatcher as an UnreliableNarrator, but later Jed Leland says that Bernstein's story is a RoseTintedNarrative.
* RealAfterAll: After Thompson GaveUpTooSoon to find what Rosebud is, the audience gets TheReveal: ItWasHisSled
* RealisticDictionIsUnrealistic: Averted. Characters regularly talk over one another.
* RealityisUnrealistic: In FForFake, Welles says that Kane was originally supposed to be based on HowardHughes, but he and his crew decided to change Kane to a newspaper mogul because Hughes was so strange that people wouldn't believe his life story if it were presented on film.
* TheReasonYouSuckSpeech: Kane gets the same lecture three times from Leland, Susan and Boss Gettys: IJustWantToBeLoved is a TragicDream if you truly believe ItsAllAboutMe. Does Kane understand or accept it? No.
** Kane himself gets off a very short and sweet zinger at Thatcher's expense (see ICouldaBeenAContender above).
* RedScare: Thatcher accused Kane of being a communist near the beginning of the movie. A politician addressing a crowd of workers however accuses Kane of being ''fascist'', and we see Kane hanging out with Hitler and Mussolini while stating "there's be no war". Essentially Kane is a demagogue who uses politics to her advantage and ego.
* {{Retraux}}: Editor Creator/RobertWise scratched the "newsreel" with sandpaper to make the "old" footage look old.
* TheReveal: "Rosebud" [[spoiler:was Kane's sled]].
* RoadsideWave: This is how Kane meets Susan Alexander.
* RomanAClef: Welles denies this, but Hearst, who Kane was supposedly based off of, believed this.
** The film actually attempts to avert this by having Hearst mentioned by name in an early scene (the reporters discussing the newsreel), establishing Kane as a different individual.
** But also shoots itself in the foot in the first scene with Kane as played by Orson Welles, in which he says: "You provide the prose poems, I'll provide the war". Substitute "pictures" for "prose poems", and this is a word-for-word quote of something Hearst himself said to a photographer.
** Herman Mankiewicz, who came up
{{Whateversaurus}}: Along with the story, was a frequent guest at San Simeon (aka Hearst Castle). As much as Welles sometimes denied it, much of the story clearly was based on Hearst's life. Some similarities between the real and fictional men:
*** Both were muckracking newspaper publishers who egged on the Spanish-American War, as noted above.
*** Both had a family fortune that came from mining precious metals (Hearst's father George struck it rich with the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comstock_Lode Comstock Lode]]).
*** Both had huge media empires, which wound up getting downsized to some extent in the Great Depression.
*** Both had estates of staggering size (San Simeon/Xanadu).
*** Both were failed independent candidates for Governor of New York (Hearst actually ran for office several times and served two terms as a Congressman from New York).
*** Marion Davies and Susan Alexander were both alcoholics with a fondness for crossword puzzles. Furthermore, both are considered reasonably talented in light entertainment, but were shoehorned into more serious artistic fields that were considered seriously out of their depth.
*** Of course there were many differences between Kane and Hearst as well, which helped Welles maintain PlausibleDeniability. Hearst was never abandoned by his parents (in fact
term "vivosaur" itself, this more closely resembles Welles, who was orphaned at the age of 15). He never married Davies; instead she remained TheMistress and stayed with Hearst until his death.
*** Herman Mankiewicz's original script, ''American'', included even more overt parallels to Hearst's life, showing that Kane's opponents stole the gubernatorial election by dumping ballots in the East River and a scene modeled after the death of Thomas Ince. [[note]]Ince, a film director-turned-studio boss, died aboard Hearst's yacht in November 1924. No inquest was held for Ince's death, leading to long-standing rumors that Hearst, or someone in his employ murdered Ince. Peter Bogdanovich's 2001 film ''Film/TheCatsMeow'' fictionalizes this incident.[[/note]] Welles removed these scenes after one of Hearst's biographers sued the filmmakers for copying the incidents from his book.
* RuleOfSymbolism: Some critics think ''Kane'' stretches the WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief in order to include symbolic elements. It certainly
is packed with symbols.
* SceneryPorn: The sets (the political rally, the newspaper office, the library, Xanadu) are all lavish, grandiose... and empty like the main character.
* ShaggyDogStory: The FramingDevice ends with Thompson not only giving up to find what ''Rosebud'' means, but admiting that knowing it will not explain Kane.
** Kane's dream was a TragicDream and so, it was never achieved.
* SingleIssuePsychology: All of Kane's problems result from him not knowing how to love due to being taken from his parents as a child. At his mother's urging, because his father was abusive towards him. [[ParentalAbandonment This does not make it better, however.]] Welles's when dismissing the story's gimmick as "Dollar Book Freud" regretted it because of this implication, he didn't believe in SingleIssuePsychology, and
used "Rosebud" as a deliberate ShaggyDogStory to hook the movie around.
* {{Slimeball}}: In one sense, Kane is revealed to be something of a slimeball by his best friend after Kane's failed election campaign, who observes that: "''you just want to persuade people that you love 'em so much that they oughta love you back!''".
* SlowClap: After the disastrous operatic debut of his wife Susan, Kane stubbornly stands up and does a SlowClap; the rest of the audience begrudgingly follows suit.
* SnowMeansDeath: Not a straight example, but the snow globe should get an honorable mention.
* SoundtrackDissonance: This is a pretty sad film but don't worry, the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkcLjAg17bk end credits]] should pick you right up.
* SpinningPaper: A standard trope of early 1930s "B" movies, especially in films dealing with organized crime. It went out of style at around the time UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode was adopted; any use after the mid 1930's is a deliberate invocation of the trope as tribute and parody. ''Citizen Kane'' is one of these. Making later parodies parody parodies.
* StageMom: At their first meeting Susan tells Kane it was really her mother's ambition for her to be an opera singer.
* StartsWithTheirFuneral: The film start with Kane's death, and then moves onto a newsreel about his life, before diving right into the flashbacks.
* StockFootage: The film contains a lot of this. For example, the newsreel has a scene where a man speaks to a political rally, denouncing Kane as a fascist. The crowd was simply stock footage and the man was an actor, filmed in a low-angle shot to hide the fact that no crowd was present. The background jungle footage
liberally for the picnic scene was lifted various made-up species.
* WindIsGreen: Air-type Viviosaurs are revived
from ''Film/TheSonOfKong'' and, in an infamous case of StockFootageFailure, you can plainly see pterodactyls.
green fossils.
* StrawmanNewsMedia: Not at first but the Inquirer eventually becomes a Type 1, serving as a propaganda machine for Kane himself.
* TableSpace: A very clever use of this trope to illustrate the deterioration of Kane's first marriage in a brief montage.
WombLevel: The Kanes are shown at a small breakfast table being intimate and affectionate. We see snippets of arguments at other breakfasts. Then the scene ends with the Kanes dining Bonehemoth in silence at opposite ends of a long table.
** In an in-universe TakeThat, Emily is reading ''The Chronicle'', Kane's biggest rival newspaper.
* TakeThat:
** Screenwriter Herman J. Mankiewicz was a regular invitee to Heart's San Simeon until he earned their disfavor and was kicked out. A lot of the satirical details of Kane comes from his own resentment and desire to mock Hearst.
** In-universe example: Kane finishes the bad review Leland began, and instead of cleaning it up (as Leland assumed he would), he keeps the same vitriolic negativity. Bernstein snarks, "That'll show you."[[note]]Kane fires Leland while continuing to write the review.[[/note]]
* TantrumThrowing: Upon his wife leaving him, Kane goes in a room and smashes/throws everything he sees. He stops at the crystal ball that Susan owned (and reminded him of his mother), making him utter, "Rosebud".
* ThirdPersonPerson:
-->'''Kane:''' Don't worry about me, Gettys! Don't worry about me! I'm Charles Foster Kane! I'm no cheap, crooked politician, trying to save himself from the consequences of his crimes! Gettys! I'm going to send you to Sing Sing! Sing Sing, Gettys! Sing Sing!
* ThisCannotBe:
-->'''Kane:''' Susan. Please don't go. No. Please, Susan. From now on, everything will be exactly the way you want it to be, not the way I think you want it, but -- your way. You mustn't go. You can't do this to me!
-->'''Susan:''' I see. It's ''you'' that this is being done to! It's not me at all. Not what it means to me. I can't do this to you? ''Oh, yes I can.
''Champions.''
* TimePassesMontage: One of WordSaladTitle: In ''Champions,'' all the most famous: Kane and his first wife sitting at breakfast. Each shift into songs in the future has their conversation becoming more and more hostile, til the final scene in which they don't say a word - he reads his newspaper, and she reads a ''rival'' newspaper.
* TimeshiftedActor: Being a fictionalized biopic, the film presents Kane in all ages. All of them are Orson Welles in makeup, except for eight-year-old Kane, played by Buddy Swan.
* TradeYourPassionForGlory: Kane, a young crusading newspaper owner, becomes TheMan in his later life.
* {{Tragedy}}: Kane ends up dying alone and unloved thanks to his narcissism.
* TragicDream: Kane's dream is to be loved. Unfortunately, that dream is available to everyone but him: given the way he was raised, Charlie is used to paying for everything with money, and the idea of investing time and sacrificing his own interests for a relationship is absolutely beyond his comprehension.
* TragicHero: Kane, lampshaded by Leland.
--> '''Leland:''' That's all he ever wanted out of life... [[TragicDream was love. That's the tragedy of Charles Foster Kane.]] You see, [[JerkassWoobie he just didn't
sound test have any to give]].
silly and non-indicative names, like "Sleepy Robin," "Chocolate Soiree," or "Raspberry Bell."
* UnbuiltTrope: ItWasHisSled is YouGottaHaveBlueHair: Rosie's pink hair could be passed off as an [[LiteraryAgentHypothesis artistic rendtion]] of a {{Trope Namer|s}}, strawberry blonde, but the sled there's ''really'' no explaining why Dr. Diggins' hair is ''green.''
** Siamo
actually the unbuilt trope of the MacGuffin, long before Creator/AlfredHitchcock coined the term.
* {{Understatement}}:
--> '''Kane:''' (to Susan) I run a couple of newspapers, what do you do?
* UnrequitedLove: Susan to Charlie. She never stopped loving him, ever. She left simply because it was the only way she could express her own feelings. Had Charlie said the right words, she'd have returned to him in a heartbeat.
-->'''Manager:''' Why, until he died, she'd just as soon talk about Mr. Kane as about anybody.
* VideoCredits: A clip of each major character is shown in the credits, except Kane himself.
* VocalRangeExceeded: Susan Alexander can't hack
has blue hair, despite being an opera singer. Instead of HollywoodToneDeaf, Welles got a professional alto to sing a soprano part.
* WarForFunAndProfit: Kane does this in order to sell newspapers. Based on the manipulations of real-life media mogul William Randolph Hearst:
-->"Dear Wheeler: You provide the prose poems. I'll provide the war."
* WhamShot: The shot near the end showing the name "Rosebud" on Kane's old sled.
* WhipPan: These are used in the breakfast table montage showing the deterioration of Kane's first marriage.
* WhiteDwarfStarlet: Susan Alexander is a bit out of the ordinary: ''Now'' she's running on the fumes of her former notoriety, but initially she was pushed into the limelight somewhat against her will and found stardom humiliating.
* WideEyedIdealist: Kane started off as one, and was moderately successful as such, exposing corruption successfully and ascending the ranks in journalism.
* TheWildWest: Eight-year-old Kane grew up in 1871 Colorado; seen in a brief {{Flashback}}
* WomanInWhite: Not seen but remembered by Bernstein.
* WorthlessTreasureTwist: "Rosebud" is a "Lost Heirloom". And it gets tossed into the incinerator along with the wealthy protagonist's other worldly possessions. Nobody in the story ever finds out what his lost love/lost treasure "Rosebud" meant, though the audience gets the reveal.
* WouldHitAGirl
--> '''Susan''': Don't tell me you're sorry.
--> '''Kane''': I'm not sorry.

%%* YesMan: Bernstein.
dinosaur.
13th May '17 11:08:23 PM TheAmazingBlachman
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* ForgottenFallenFriend: The newsreel reveals that Kane's first ex-wife and their son die in a car crash. They are never again mentioned in any scene that takes place after they died. Nobody suggests that among Kane's many personal problems, losing his only son might be one of them.

to:

* ForgottenFallenFriend: The newsreel reveals that Kane's first ex-wife and their son die in a car crash. They are never again mentioned in any scene that takes place after they died. Nobody suggests that among Kane's many personal problems, [[OutlivingOnesOffspring losing his only son child]] might be one of them.
15th Apr '17 9:59:26 AM Jurgan
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* RealityisUnrealistic: In FforFake, Welles says that Kane was originally supposed to be based on HowardHughes, but decided to change to a newspaper mogul because Hughes was so strange that people wouldn't believe his life story if it were presented on film.

to:

* RealityisUnrealistic: In FforFake, FForFake, Welles says that Kane was originally supposed to be based on HowardHughes, but he and his crew decided to change Kane to a newspaper mogul because Hughes was so strange that people wouldn't believe his life story if it were presented on film.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Film.CitizenKane