History Film / AChristmasCarol1984

23rd Jan '18 3:41:13 PM lalalei2001
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* AdaptationalVillainy: This version of Scrooge comes across as a great deal colder than most. Rather than his usual indifferent self he seems to find the suffering of others darkly amusing. He also makes more efforts to defend himself from the spirits than in most versions.

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* AdaptationalVillainy: This version of Scrooge comes across as a great deal colder than most. Rather than his usual being indifferent self he seems to find the suffering of others darkly amusing. He also makes more efforts to defend himself from the spirits than in most versions.



* CobwebOfDisuse: The ringer on Scrooge's doorbell is covered in cobwebs, implying that 1) no one ever calls and 2) Scrooge is too cheap to hire a maid.

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* CobwebOfDisuse: The ringer on Scrooge's doorbell is covered in cobwebs, implying that 1) no one ever calls and 2) Scrooge is too cheap to hire a maid.
18th Jan '18 3:03:09 AM lalalei2001
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* CobwebOfDisuse: The ringer on Scrooge's doorbell is covered in this, implying that 1) no one ever calls and 2) Scrooge is too cheap to hire a maid.

to:

* CobwebOfDisuse: The ringer on Scrooge's doorbell is covered in this, cobwebs, implying that 1) no one ever calls and 2) Scrooge is too cheap to hire a maid.
18th Jan '18 1:25:28 AM PaulA
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Creator/DavidWarner, who spent most of his career playing villains and psychos, has a major PlayingAgainstType moment as gentle, kindly Bob Cratchit. Creator/EdwardWoodward goes from avuncular to terrifying as the Ghost of Christmas Present. Roger Rees plays Fred. A young Joanne Whalley appears in one scene as Scrooge's sister Fan, and Frank Finlay gives what is said to be the definitive Jacob Marley performance.

to:

Creator/DavidWarner, who spent most of his career playing villains and psychos, has a major PlayingAgainstType moment as gentle, kindly Bob Cratchit. Creator/EdwardWoodward goes from avuncular to terrifying as the Ghost of Christmas Present. Roger Rees plays Fred. A young Joanne Whalley appears in one scene as Scrooge's sister Fan, and Frank Finlay gives what is said to be the definitive appears as Jacob Marley performance.
Marley.
17th Jan '18 11:12:34 PM lalalei2001
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Added DiffLines:

* TruerToTheText: Scrooge remembering the storybook characters he loved in the Past sequence is usually left out for brevity's sake, with this version being one of the few that keeps it.
17th Jan '18 8:14:40 PM lalalei2001
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Creator/DavidWarner, who spent most of his career playing villains and psychos, has a major PlayingAgainstType moment as gentle, kindly Bob Cratchit. Creator/EdwardWoodward goes from avuncular to terrifying as the Ghost of Christmas Present. Roger Rees plays Fred. A young Joanne Whalley appears in one scene as Scrooge's sister Fan, and Frank Finney gives what is said to be the definitive Jacob Marley performance.

to:

Creator/DavidWarner, who spent most of his career playing villains and psychos, has a major PlayingAgainstType moment as gentle, kindly Bob Cratchit. Creator/EdwardWoodward goes from avuncular to terrifying as the Ghost of Christmas Present. Roger Rees plays Fred. A young Joanne Whalley appears in one scene as Scrooge's sister Fan, and Frank Finney Finlay gives what is said to be the definitive Jacob Marley performance.
17th Jan '18 8:03:07 PM lalalei2001
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Creator/DavidWarner, who spent most of his career playing villains and psychos, has a major PlayingAgainstType moment as gentle, kindly Bob Cratchit. Creator/EdwardWoodward goes from avuncular to terrifying as the Ghost of Christmas Present. Roger Rees plays Fred. A young Joanne Whalley appears in one scene as Scrooge's sister Fan, and Frank Finney gives what it said to be the definitive Jacob Marley performance.

to:

Creator/DavidWarner, who spent most of his career playing villains and psychos, has a major PlayingAgainstType moment as gentle, kindly Bob Cratchit. Creator/EdwardWoodward goes from avuncular to terrifying as the Ghost of Christmas Present. Roger Rees plays Fred. A young Joanne Whalley appears in one scene as Scrooge's sister Fan, and Frank Finney gives what it is said to be the definitive Jacob Marley performance.



* AbusiveParents: Scrooge's father might be his FreudianExcuse, even though to his credit, Scrooge never relies on it to justify his behavior.

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* AbusiveParents: Scrooge's father might be his FreudianExcuse, even though to his credit, Scrooge never relies on it to justify his behavior.



* TheAloner: Scott's interpretation of Scrooge.

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* TheAloner: Scott's interpretation of Scrooge.Scrooge, which is consistent with the novel's descriptions of him and his house.
17th Jan '18 7:58:59 PM lalalei2001
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Creator/DavidWarner, who spent most of his career playing villains and psychos, has a major PlayingAgainstType moment as gentle, kindly Bob Cratchit. Creator/EdwardWoodward goes from avuncular to terrifying as the Ghost of Christmas Present. Roger Rees plays Fred. A young Joanne Whalley appears in one scene as Scrooge's sister Fan.

to:

Creator/DavidWarner, who spent most of his career playing villains and psychos, has a major PlayingAgainstType moment as gentle, kindly Bob Cratchit. Creator/EdwardWoodward goes from avuncular to terrifying as the Ghost of Christmas Present. Roger Rees plays Fred. A young Joanne Whalley appears in one scene as Scrooge's sister Fan.
Fan, and Frank Finney gives what it said to be the definitive Jacob Marley performance.


Added DiffLines:

* PragmaticVillainy: Scrooge's reasoning for not putting more coal on the fire is pure business, as clothes are practical, cheap, and made for warming oneself while coal burns, is finite, and expensive.
8th Jan '18 10:35:32 PM jamespolk
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* OhCrap: This reaction is clear in Bob Cratchit's expression when he realizes he's late to work on the 26th and Scrooge is in the counting house waiting for him.

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* OhCrap: OhCrap:
**
This reaction is clear in Bob Cratchit's expression when he realizes he's late to work on the 26th and Scrooge is in the counting house waiting for him. him.
** Done subtly with Scrooge. When he sees the old lady selling the stuff she took from the dead man's room, he indignantly says "Those are my things!" Moments later, after the implications of that fact hit home, he backtracks, saying that they just ''look'' like his things.
4th Jan '18 3:13:02 PM Bense
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* KickTheSonOfABitch: The Ghosts of Christmas Past and Present do not waste a single opportunity to blast Scrooge for his cruelty, delusions or stupidity. Past especially seems to especially enjoy taking the piss out of him.

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* KickTheSonOfABitch: The Ghosts of Christmas Past and Present do not waste a single opportunity to blast Scrooge for his cruelty, delusions or stupidity. Past especially seems alien enough that she really might not be doing it on purpose, but Present seems to especially enjoy taking the piss out of him.



* OhCrap: This reaction is clear in Bob Cratchit's expression when he realizes he's late on the 26th.

to:

* OhCrap: This reaction is clear in Bob Cratchit's expression when he realizes he's late to work on the 26th.26th and Scrooge is in the counting house waiting for him.



* ParlorGames: The guests at Fred's Christmas party are playing "Similes". Fred would say the first part of a common expression, such as "Quiet as..." or "Tight as...", which the player would then have to fill in (in these examples, 'a mouse' and 'a drum', respectively). The answer given, though, "As tight as your Uncle Ebenezer's pockets."

to:

* ParlorGames: The guests at Fred's Christmas party are playing "Similes". Fred would say says the first part of a common expression, such as "Quiet as..." or "Tight as...", which the player would then have has to fill in (in these examples, 'a ('a mouse' and 'a drum', respectively). The answer given, though, "As tight as your Uncle Ebenezer's pockets."



* UnableToSupportAWife: In this adaptation, Scrooge starts out in his pursuit of business success because he doesn't think he has enough money to support Belle.

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* UnableToSupportAWife: In this adaptation, Scrooge starts out in his pursuit of business success because he doesn't didn't think he has had enough money to support Belle.
4th Jan '18 3:07:56 PM Bense
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* DontYouDarePityMe: When Belle's husband tells her about Scrooge working alone and miserable, she's quite saddened by the life he made for himself. Ebenezer snaps that he doesn't need her pity before Christmas Past helpfully reminds him that she can't hear.

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* DontYouDarePityMe: When Belle's husband tells her about Scrooge working alone and miserable, she's quite saddened by the life he has made for himself. Ebenezer snaps that he doesn't need her pity before Christmas Past helpfully reminds him that she Belle can't hear.hear him.
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