History ExecutiveMeddling / Music

9th Feb '17 10:52:35 AM MikeK
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* In 1992, {{Music/KMFDM}} recorded an album called ''Apart'', where members Sascha Konietzko and En Esch each wrote and recorded one side of the album separately. Their label, Wax Trax!, rejected En Esch's side for not sounding enough like KMFDM, then sent Sascha back to record more songs: As a result, the finished album, re-titled as ''Money'', barely features En Esch at all and includes remixes of previously released songs intended to pad it to album length. A year later, En Esch produced his solo album ''Cheesy'', which was also released on Wax Trax! and included songs that would have appeared on ''Apart''.

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* In 1992, {{Music/KMFDM}} recorded an album called ''Apart'', where members Sascha Konietzko and En Esch each wrote and recorded one side of the album separately. Their label, Wax Trax!, rejected En Esch's side for not sounding enough like KMFDM, then sent Sascha back to record the studio to come up with more songs: As a result, the finished album, re-titled as ''Money'', barely features En Esch at all and includes remixes of previously released songs intended to pad it to album length. A year later, En Esch produced his solo album ''Cheesy'', which was also released on Wax Trax! and included songs that would have appeared on ''Apart''.
9th Feb '17 10:51:46 AM MikeK
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* In 1992, {{Music/KMFDM}} recorded an album called ''Apart'', where members Sascha Konietzko and En Esch each wrote and recorded one side of the album separately. Their label, Wax Trax!, rejected En Esch's side for not sounding enough like KMFDM, then sent Sascha back to record more songs: As a result, the finished album, re-titled as ''Money'', barely features En Esch at all and includes remixes of previously released songs. A year later, En Esch produced his solo album ''Cheesy'', which was also released on Wax Trax! and included songs that would have appeared on ''Apart''.

to:

* In 1992, {{Music/KMFDM}} recorded an album called ''Apart'', where members Sascha Konietzko and En Esch each wrote and recorded one side of the album separately. Their label, Wax Trax!, rejected En Esch's side for not sounding enough like KMFDM, then sent Sascha back to record more songs: As a result, the finished album, re-titled as ''Money'', barely features En Esch at all and includes remixes of previously released songs.songs intended to pad it to album length. A year later, En Esch produced his solo album ''Cheesy'', which was also released on Wax Trax! and included songs that would have appeared on ''Apart''.
9th Feb '17 10:50:47 AM MikeK
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* In 1992, {{Music/KMFDM}} recorded an album called ''Apart'', where members Sascha Konietzko and En Esch each wrote and recorded one side of the album separately. Their label, Wax Trax!, rejected En Esch's side for not sounding enough like KMFDM, then sent Sascha back to record more songs: As a result, the finished album, re-titled as ''Money'', barely features En Esch at all and includes remixes of previously released songs. A year later, En Esch produced his solo album ''Cheesy'', which was also released on Wax Trax! and included songs that would have appeared on ''Apart''.


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* In 1992, {{Music/KMFDM}} recorded an album called ''Apart'', where members Sascha Konietzko and En Esch each wrote and recorded one side of the album separately. Their label, Wax Trax!, rejected En Esch's side for not sounding enough like KMFDM, then sent Sascha back to record more songs: As a result, the finished album, re-titled as ''Money'', barely features En Esch at all and includes remixes of previously released songs. A year later, En Esch produced his solo album ''Cheesy'', which was also released on Wax Trax! and included songs that would have appeared on ''Apart''.
9th Feb '17 10:49:30 AM MikeK
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** ''Vol. 4'' was going to be titled "Snowblind," but also was changed at the last moment due to the title being a cocaine reference. Additionally, the song "Snowblind" had to be re-recorded because of record company objections: In the original recording, every verse ended on a shout of "Cocaine!", but this was toned down to a single whisper of the word after the first verse [[note]] the whole song is about using cocaine, it's just that the rest of the lyrics are a little less blatant than that[[/note]]. On the back cover of ''Vol 4'', they managed to [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar sneak by a thank you to "the great COKE-cola company" though]].

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** ''Vol. 4'' was going to be titled "Snowblind," but also was changed at the last moment due to the title being a cocaine reference. Additionally, the song "Snowblind" had to be re-recorded because of record company objections: In the original recording, every verse ended on a shout of "Cocaine!", but this was toned down to a single whisper of the word after the first verse [[note]] the whole song is about using cocaine, it's just that the rest of the lyrics are a little less blatant than that[[/note]].that[[/note]] - Whenever the band played the song live, they still included the "cocaine!" shouts. On the back cover of ''Vol 4'', they managed to [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar sneak by a thank you to "the great COKE-cola company" though]].



** Speaking of Music/{{Aerosmith}}, it's been said that their decision to incorporate outside songwriters after Done With Mirrors was at the insistence of the record label. This new method created a BrokenBase but it certainly made them a lot more accessible and radio-friendly, and some of their biggest hits came out of it.

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** Speaking of Music/{{Aerosmith}}, it's been said that their decision to incorporate outside songwriters after Done With Mirrors was at the insistence of the record label. This new method created a BrokenBase but it certainly made them a lot more accessible and radio-friendly, and some of their biggest hits came out of it.i
* In 1992, {{Music/KMFDM}} recorded an album called ''Apart'', where members Sascha Konietzko and En Esch each wrote and recorded one side of the album separately. Their label, Wax Trax!, rejected En Esch's side for not sounding enough like KMFDM, then sent Sascha back to record more songs: As a result, the finished album, re-titled as ''Money'', barely features En Esch at all and includes remixes of previously released songs. A year later, En Esch produced his solo album ''Cheesy'', which was also released on Wax Trax! and included songs that would have appeared on ''Apart''.
3rd Feb '17 10:26:26 AM MarkLungo
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* Berry Gordy and Creator/{{Motown}} were infamous for denying artistic freedom to their acts and interfering every step of the way. Two well-known defiance stories: Stevie Wonder threatened to leave Motown when his contract expired unless he got artistic freedom and improved royalties. Gordy initially rejected Music/MarvinGaye's song "What's Going On" as a single, but Marvin went on strike until Gordy agreed to release it. It was a #2 hit and led to demand for a similar album.

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* Berry Gordy and Creator/{{Motown}} were infamous for denying artistic freedom to their acts and interfering every step of the way. Two well-known defiance stories: Stevie Wonder Music/StevieWonder threatened to leave Motown when his contract expired unless he got artistic freedom and improved royalties. Gordy initially rejected Music/MarvinGaye's song "What's Going On" as a single, but Marvin went on strike until Gordy agreed to release it. It was a #2 hit and led to demand for a similar album.
3rd Feb '17 10:25:03 AM MarkLungo
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* Tony Wilson's Factory label became known for a complete lack of Meddling, or sometimes Meddling that made things ''more'' bizarre than the artists would have liked. For instance, the album sleeve for ''Return of the Durutti Column'' by The Durutti Column was made out of sandpaper, "to destroy all your other records from the inside". They also went ahead with releasing Music/JoyDivision's ''Closer'' with the planned tombstone cover, despite the whole [[AuthorExistenceFailure lead singer suicide thing]].

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* Tony Wilson's Factory label Creator/FactoryRecords became known for a complete lack of Meddling, or sometimes Meddling that made things ''more'' bizarre than the artists would have liked. For instance, the album sleeve for ''Return of the Durutti Column'' by The Durutti Column was made out of sandpaper, "to destroy all your other records from the inside". They also went ahead with releasing Music/JoyDivision's ''Closer'' with the planned tombstone cover, despite the whole [[AuthorExistenceFailure lead singer suicide thing]].
3rd Feb '17 10:18:10 AM MarkLungo
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* The Chad Mitchell Trio encountered this when attempting to release their version of Music/BobDylan's "Blowin' In The Wind" as a single. An executive at their record company balked at this, saying that there had [[NeverSayDie never been a hit song with the word 'deaths' in it]]. The song could remain on the album, but a single release was out of the question. Later on, Peter, Paul and Mary's recording of the song became a huge hit. The Chad Mitchell Trio, meanwhile, changed record companies, and their only mainstream hit after this was ''The Marvelous Toy'', which still receives airplay on radio during the Christmas season.

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* The Chad Mitchell Trio encountered this when attempting to release their version of Music/BobDylan's "Blowin' In The Wind" as a single. An executive at their record company balked at this, saying that there had [[NeverSayDie never been a hit song with the word 'deaths' in it]]. The song could remain on the album, but a single release was out of the question. Later on, Peter, Paul and Mary's Music/PeterPaulAndMary's recording of the song became a huge hit. The Chad Mitchell Trio, meanwhile, changed record companies, and their only mainstream hit after this was ''The "The Marvelous Toy'', Toy", which still receives airplay on radio during the Christmas season.



** Near the end of his tenure with Mercury Records, he was working on a new album, but label execs didn't like it. They chose only two songs off the would-be album, "Getcha Some" and "If a Man Answers", released both as singles off a GreatestHitsAlbum, and asked him to try again. When they didn't like the next songs that he sent, either, Toby demanded out of his contract and took said songs to Creator/DreamWorks records. ''That'' label launched him with "When Love Fades", but when it bombed, he asked that it be pulled and replaced with a song that Mercury had rejected titled "How Do You Like Me Now?!" a good move on his part, as that song was a six-week #1 smash, his first Top 40 pop hit, the biggest country hit of 2000, and the start of a huge CareerResurrection that lasted until [=DreamWorks=] Records closed in 2005.
** With his last several albums having all been on Show Dog-Universal Music (which he is president of), has insisted on withdrawing singles around their 15th week on the charts, regardless of position, just so he can get out one album per year. An average run to #1 on the country charts is closer to 25-30 weeks, and the A-listers can take 3 years between albums he's shooting himself in the foot again and again. To be fair, at least his album releases are consistently praised by the critics. This, combined with his decision to keep releasing alcohol-themed singles after the runaway success of "Red Solo Cup", gradually ground his momentum to a complete standstill -- to the point that the singles off ''35 MPH Town'' were by far the worst performing of his career.

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** Near the end of his tenure with Mercury Records, he was working on a new album, but label execs didn't like it. They chose only two songs off the would-be album, "Getcha Some" and "If a Man Answers", released both as singles off a GreatestHitsAlbum, and asked him to try again. When they didn't like the next songs that he sent, either, Toby demanded out of his contract and took said songs to Creator/DreamWorks records.Creator/DreamWorksRecords. ''That'' label launched him with "When Love Fades", but when it bombed, he asked that it be pulled and replaced with a song that Mercury had rejected titled "How Do You Like Me Now?!" a good move on his part, as that song was a six-week #1 smash, his first Top 40 pop hit, the biggest country hit of 2000, and the start of a huge CareerResurrection that lasted until [=DreamWorks=] Records closed in 2005.
** With his last several albums having all been on Show Dog-Universal Music (which he is president of), has he's insisted on withdrawing singles around their 15th week on the charts, regardless of position, just so he can get out one album per year. An average run to #1 on the country charts is closer to 25-30 weeks, and the A-listers can take 3 years between albums he's shooting himself in the foot again and again. To be fair, at least his album releases are consistently praised by the critics. This, combined with his decision to keep releasing alcohol-themed singles after the runaway success of "Red Solo Cup", gradually ground his momentum to a complete standstill -- to the point that the singles off ''35 MPH Town'' were by far the worst performing of his career.



* Self were working on two albums around the same time: ''Gizmodgery'' (1999), a smaller-budget self-produced album performed entirely on toy instruments released on independent label Spongebath, and ''Breakfast With Girls'' (2000), an album featuring a bigger budget and an outside RecordProducer (Hugh Padgham), released on [=DreamWorks=] Records. The involvement of the larger label did affect both releases, but maybe not in the way you'd expect: [=DreamWorks=] liked the songs "Suzy Q Sailaway" and "Uno Song" so much they insisted that they be left off ''Gizmodgery'' and included on ''Breakfast With Girls'' instead - the two songs end up sticking out a bit stylistically on that album as a result, especially because "Suzy Q. Sailaway" was re-recorded with more conventional instrumentation, but "Uno Song" wasn't. The original recording of "Suzy Q Sailaway" featuring toy instruments was later released on ''Selfafornia'', a free digital-only album distributed by the band.

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* Self were working on two albums around the same time: ''Gizmodgery'' (1999), a smaller-budget self-produced album performed entirely on toy instruments released on independent label Spongebath, and ''Breakfast With Girls'' (2000), an album featuring a bigger budget and an outside RecordProducer (Hugh Padgham), released on [=DreamWorks=] Records.Creator/DreamWorksRecords. The involvement of the larger label did affect both releases, but maybe not in the way you'd expect: [=DreamWorks=] liked the songs "Suzy Q Sailaway" and "Uno Song" so much they insisted that they be left off ''Gizmodgery'' and included on ''Breakfast With Girls'' instead - the two songs end up sticking out a bit stylistically on that album as a result, especially because "Suzy Q. Sailaway" was re-recorded with more conventional instrumentation, but "Uno Song" wasn't. The original recording of "Suzy Q Sailaway" featuring toy instruments was later released on ''Selfafornia'', a free digital-only album distributed by the band.



* In a positive example, the name of ''Music/LicensedToIll'' by the Music/BeastieBoys comes from Columbia Records rejecting their first title: ''[[IntentionallyAwkwardTitle Don't Be A Faggot]]''.

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* In a positive example, the name of ''Music/LicensedToIll'' by the Music/BeastieBoys comes from Columbia Def Jam Records rejecting their first title: ''[[IntentionallyAwkwardTitle Don't Be A Faggot]]''.
21st Jan '17 8:00:03 AM Morgenthaler
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* When the independent label Grass Records got sold, the new owners wanted to focus more on bands that would produce hit singles, so they wanted indie rockers The Wrens, their most popular band at the time, to sign a bigger contract and start recording much more commercial material: When they refused, not only were they dropped, but the two albums they'd made for the label were deleted. The Wrens did eventually find a new label and their first two albums would get reissued - Grass Records, meanwhile, turned into Wind-up Records, and did well for themselves by signing {{Creed}}, Seether and Evanescence. A pun-based TakeThat showed up in The Wrens' later single "Everyone Chooses Sides": "Green grasses fade from where you wind up".

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* When the independent label Grass Records got sold, the new owners wanted to focus more on bands that would produce hit singles, so they wanted indie rockers The Wrens, their most popular band at the time, to sign a bigger contract and start recording much more commercial material: When they refused, not only were they dropped, but the two albums they'd made for the label were deleted. The Wrens did eventually find a new label and their first two albums would get reissued - Grass Records, meanwhile, turned into Wind-up Records, and did well for themselves by signing {{Creed}}, Seether Music/{{Creed}}, Music/{{Seether}} and Evanescence.Music/{{Evanescence}}. A pun-based TakeThat showed up in The Wrens' later single "Everyone Chooses Sides": "Green grasses fade from where you wind up".
10th Jan '17 7:37:39 PM CassandraLeo
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* Following their breakthrough ProgressiveMetal albums ''Images and Words'' and ''Awake'', Music/DreamTheater planned to record a massive double-album. The record label, on the other hand, wanted something much more accessible and radio-friendly. The result was ''Falling into Infinity'', which while not a ''bad'' album is still regarded as one of the band's lesser works.

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* Following their breakthrough ProgressiveMetal albums ''Images and Words'' and ''Awake'', Music/DreamTheater planned to record a massive double-album. The record label, on the other hand, wanted something much more accessible and radio-friendly. The result was ''Falling into Infinity'', which while not a ''bad'' album is still regarded as one of the band's lesser works. Erstwhile drummer Mike Portnoy eventually released a two-disc collection of demos from the album's sessions (including most of the material cut from the album) on his label Ytsejam Records, which are closer to the band's intended artistic vision; many people like them more despite their lo-fi sound. After ''Falling into Infinity'' they would renegotiate their contract to ensure they had complete artistic control over their subsequent albums.
** A lesser example is the triggered drum sound on ''Music/ImagesAndWords''.
10th Jan '17 7:33:38 PM CassandraLeo
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** This is common with ProgressiveRock acts because their songs are frequently [[EpicRocking so long]]. It's a major reason that Music/Genesis' "Supper's Ready" (22:54) has seven movements, or Caravan's "Nine Feet Underground" (22:45) has eight.

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** This is common with ProgressiveRock acts because their songs are frequently [[EpicRocking so long]]. It's a major reason that Music/Genesis' "Supper's Ready" Music/{{Genesis}}' "Music/SuppersReady" (22:54) has seven movements, or Caravan's "Nine Feet Underground" (22:45) has eight.
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