History ExecutiveMeddling / Music

10th Jun '17 11:34:05 AM nombretomado
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* Creator/JohannSebastianBach suffered low levels of ExecutiveMeddling for his entire career, generally in the form of his employers requesting that he write simpler music. His preferred tactic for dealing with it was to quit and get a different job in a different town. He did this six times in 20 years, before finally settling in Leipzig in 1723, where he remained for the rest of his life.

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* Creator/JohannSebastianBach Music/JohannSebastianBach suffered low levels of ExecutiveMeddling for his entire career, generally in the form of his employers requesting that he write simpler music. His preferred tactic for dealing with it was to quit and get a different job in a different town. He did this six times in 20 years, before finally settling in Leipzig in 1723, where he remained for the rest of his life.
5th Jun '17 4:11:25 PM MarkLungo
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** Near the end of his tenure with Mercury Records, he was working on a new album, but label execs didn't like it. They chose only two songs off the would-be album, "Getcha Some" and "If a Man Answers", released both as singles off a GreatestHitsAlbum, and asked him to try again. When they didn't like the next songs that he sent, either, Toby demanded out of his contract and took said songs to Creator/DreamWorksRecords. ''That'' label launched him with "When Love Fades", but when it bombed, he asked that it be pulled and replaced with a song that Mercury had rejected titled "How Do You Like Me Now?!" a good move on his part, as that song was a six-week #1 smash, his first Top 40 pop hit, the biggest country hit of 2000, and the start of a huge CareerResurrection that lasted until [=DreamWorks=] Records closed in 2005.

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** Near the end of his tenure with Mercury Records, Creator/MercuryRecords, he was working on a new album, but label execs didn't like it. They chose only two songs off the would-be album, "Getcha Some" and "If a Man Answers", released both as singles off a GreatestHitsAlbum, and asked him to try again. When they didn't like the next songs that he sent, either, Toby demanded out of his contract and took said songs to Creator/DreamWorksRecords. ''That'' label launched him with "When Love Fades", but when it bombed, he asked that it be pulled and replaced with a song that Mercury had rejected titled "How Do You Like Me Now?!" a good move on his part, as that song was a six-week #1 smash, his first Top 40 pop hit, the biggest country hit of 2000, and the start of a huge CareerResurrection that lasted until [=DreamWorks=] Records closed in 2005.
18th May '17 12:25:30 AM AlternativeCola
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** Speaking of Music/{{Aerosmith}}, it's been said that their decision to incorporate outside songwriters after Done With Mirrors was at the insistence of the record label. This new method created a BrokenBase but it certainly made them a lot more accessible and radio-friendly, and some of their biggest hits came out of it and marked their C

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** Speaking of Music/{{Aerosmith}}, it's been said that their decision to incorporate outside songwriters after Done With Mirrors was at the insistence of the record label. This new method created a BrokenBase but it certainly made them a lot more accessible and radio-friendly, and some of their biggest hits came out of it and marked their CCareerResurrection.
18th May '17 12:24:26 AM AlternativeCola
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** Speaking of Music/{{Aerosmith}}, it's been said that their decision to incorporate outside songwriters after Done With Mirrors was at the insistence of the record label. This new method created a BrokenBase but it certainly made them a lot more accessible and radio-friendly, and some of their biggest hits came out of i

to:

** Speaking of Music/{{Aerosmith}}, it's been said that their decision to incorporate outside songwriters after Done With Mirrors was at the insistence of the record label. This new method created a BrokenBase but it certainly made them a lot more accessible and radio-friendly, and some of their biggest hits came out of iit and marked their C
16th May '17 7:16:33 AM Clare
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* Defied by Marc Almond and his then manager, Stevo Pearce, in the infamous office-trashing incident of 1983. Phonogram planned to promote [[Music/SoftCell Soft Cell's]] latest single by giving away free copies of the duo's breakthrough hit "Tainted Love", but Stevo considered this to be "degrading". Marc agreed with him and the pair (who continued to work together for several years after Soft Cell split, though they have since parted company) expressed their disgust by invading Phonogram's offices, where they smashed gold discs, let off a fire extinguisher and stabbed a set of speakers with scissors. Following this, Phonogram backed down. Parts of the video for "Soul Inside", released later the same year, appear to have been inspired by this escapade.

to:

* Defied by Marc Almond and his then manager, Stevo Pearce, in the infamous office-trashing incident of 1983. Phonogram planned to promote [[Music/SoftCell Soft Cell's]] latest single single, "Numbers", by giving away free copies of the duo's breakthrough hit hit, "Tainted Love", but Stevo considered this to be "degrading". Marc agreed with him and the pair (who continued to work together for several years after Soft Cell split, though they have since parted company) expressed their disgust by invading Phonogram's offices, where they smashed gold discs, let off a fire extinguisher and stabbed a set of speakers with scissors. Following this, Phonogram backed down. Parts of the video for "Soul Inside", released later the same year, appear to have been inspired by this escapade.
15th May '17 1:36:35 AM mlsmithca
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* Music/TheBeatles are one of the most notorious and sustained examples of this trope. It's said that the infamous "butcher" cover they did for ''Yesterday... and Today'' was because they (particularly Music/JohnLennon) objected to the way Capitol Records (their U.S. label) "butchered" their albums. (This UrbanLegend has been debunked as it was part of a photo shoot for the cover of "Paperback Winter" ) Capitol's treatment of the ''Film/MagicalMysteryTour'' double-EP (expanding it into an album) was so successful that it has replaced the double-EP version, even in the British market. The "butchering" did affect the Beatles very much, making them sign a contract with Capitol which said that all albums (excluding special cases, like ''Magical Mystery Tour'' and ''Hey Jude'') should be exactly the same as the UK versions.

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* Music/TheBeatles are one of the most notorious and sustained examples of this trope. It's said that the infamous "butcher" cover they did for ''Yesterday... and Today'' was because they (particularly Music/JohnLennon) objected to the way Capitol Records (their U.S. label) "butchered" their albums. (This UrbanLegend has been debunked as it was part of a photo shoot for the cover of "Paperback Winter" Writer".) Capitol's treatment of the ''Film/MagicalMysteryTour'' double-EP (expanding it into an album) was so successful that it has replaced the double-EP version, even in the British market. The "butchering" did affect the Beatles very much, making them sign a contract with Capitol which said that all albums (excluding special cases, like ''Magical Mystery Tour'' and ''Hey Jude'') should be exactly the same as the UK versions.



** In a case of averted meddling, George Martin wanted their first single to be a song called "How Do You Do It?". The boys fought it all the way, insistent that they only wanted to do music they'd written themselves (with the exception of covers). When Martin persuaded them to do a run through of "How Do You Do It?", they did it with such little enthusiasm that Martin (to his credit) agreed to "Love Me Do" as the first single instead. He then tried to convince them to use "How Do You It?" as their ''second'' single, but finally set aside the song for good when he heard their retooled version of "Please Please Me". "How Do You Do It?" did go on to be a number #1 hit for Gerry and the Pacemakers.

to:

** In a case of averted meddling, George Martin wanted their first single to be a song called "How Do You Do It?". The boys fought it all the way, insistent that they only wanted to do music they'd written themselves (with the exception of covers). When Martin persuaded them to do a run through of "How Do You Do It?", they did it with such little enthusiasm that Martin (to his credit) agreed to "Love Me Do" as the first single instead. He then tried to convince them to use "How Do You Do It?" as their ''second'' single, but finally set aside the song for good when he heard their retooled version of "Please Please Me". "How Do You Do It?" did go on to be a number #1 hit for Gerry and the Pacemakers.
30th Apr '17 10:55:27 AM nombretomado
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* Another case of executive meddling gone right: TomPetty was persuaded by his producer Jimmy Iovine to re-record "Don't Do Me Like That," a song he had earlier recorded with his former band Mudcrutch, for his album ''Damn the Torpedoes''. It became one of the biggest singles of his career.

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* Another case of executive meddling gone right: TomPetty Music/TomPetty was persuaded by his producer Jimmy Iovine to re-record "Don't Do Me Like That," a song he had earlier recorded with his former band Mudcrutch, for his album ''Damn the Torpedoes''. It became one of the biggest singles of his career.
20th Apr '17 5:18:31 AM Clare
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* Defied by Marc Almond and his then manager, Stevo, in the infamous office-trashing incident of 1983. Phonogram planned to promote [[Music/SoftCell Soft Cell's]] latest single by giving away free copies of the duo's breakthrough hit "Tainted Love", but Stevo considered this to be "degrading". Marc agreed with him and the pair (who continued to work together for several years after Soft Cell split, though they have since parted company) expressed their disgust by invading Phonogram's offices, where they smashed gold discs, let off a fire extinguisher and stabbed a set of speakers with scissors. Following this, Phonogram backed down. Parts of the video for "Soul Inside", released later the same year, appear to have been inspired by this escapade.

to:

* Defied by Marc Almond and his then manager, Stevo, Stevo Pearce, in the infamous office-trashing incident of 1983. Phonogram planned to promote [[Music/SoftCell Soft Cell's]] latest single by giving away free copies of the duo's breakthrough hit "Tainted Love", but Stevo considered this to be "degrading". Marc agreed with him and the pair (who continued to work together for several years after Soft Cell split, though they have since parted company) expressed their disgust by invading Phonogram's offices, where they smashed gold discs, let off a fire extinguisher and stabbed a set of speakers with scissors. Following this, Phonogram backed down. Parts of the video for "Soul Inside", released later the same year, appear to have been inspired by this escapade.
1st Apr '17 2:57:35 PM MikeK
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Added DiffLines:

* 'Til Tuesday's single "Voices Carry" was originally written from a man's point of view - Aimee Mann's lyrics were inspired by a male friend's troubled relationship, so the subject of the song was addressed with female pronouns. Their label saw potential for a hit, but were wary of the song being read as being about a closeted lesbian relationship, so ultimately male pronouns were used instead.
31st Mar '17 12:52:59 PM Twentington
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* Some stations were spamming Music/RebaMcEntire's "Somebody" late at night just to give it enough spins to get to #1 for a week (knocking Tim [=McGraw=]'s monster hit "Live Like You Were Dying" out of the penthouse it came back). After the same thing happened a few weeks later with Terri Clark's "Girls Lie Too", ''Billboard'' changed its chart methodology to make manipulation harder.
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