History ExecutiveMeddling / Music

10th Dec '17 3:05:04 AM kasperow
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* Mabel, a Danish Pop-Rock OneHitWonder Band, had such terrible management that when they released their third album, the band literally had nothing to do with it. The management had hired songwriters, session musicians, producer and even a singer who sounded vaguely like the band's own singer, and just released the album the management wanted, not the album the band and fans actually wanted. This resulted in Mabel's career effectively ending.
8th Dec '17 12:53:16 PM MikeK
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* In 1992, {{Music/KMFDM}} recorded an album called ''Apart'', where members Sascha Konietzko and En Esch each wrote and recorded one side of the album separately. Their label, Wax Trax!, rejected En Esch's side for not sounding enough like KMFDM, then sent Sascha back to the studio to come up with more songs: As a result, the finished album, re-titled as ''Money'', barely features En Esch at all and includes remixes of previously released songs intended to pad it to album length. A year later, En Esch produced his solo album ''Cheesy'', which was also released on Wax Trax! and included songs that would have appeared on ''Apart''.

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* In 1992, {{Music/KMFDM}} recorded an album called ''Apart'', where members Sascha Konietzko and En Esch each wrote and recorded one side of the album separately.separately (using the same recording studio and working with the same guitarist, Günter Schulz). Their label, Wax Trax!, rejected En Esch's side for not sounding enough like KMFDM, then sent Sascha back to the studio to come up with more songs: As a result, the finished album, re-titled as ''Money'', barely features En Esch at all and includes remixes of previously released songs intended to pad it to album length. A year later, En Esch produced his solo album ''Cheesy'', which was also released on Wax Trax! and included songs that would have appeared on ''Apart''.
8th Dec '17 10:07:53 AM MikeK
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* Stabbing Westward were primarily an IndustrialMetal / AlternativeMetal band, but their 2001 SelfTitledAlbum, which ended up being their last, [[NewSoundAlbum did away with most of the heavier and more "industrial" elements]] in favor of melodic, mid-tempo AlternativeRock. Lead vocalist Christopher Hall would later say this was due to the band being under new management - the original demos for the album were darker and heavier, but their manager rallied the band to a poppier sound to sell more records (against the majority of members' wishes), had their guitarist replaced with a new member who had much more of a BritPop / GlamRock playing style, and even kicked Hall out of the recording studio for two weeks. Ironically, it ended up being one of their worst-selling albums.
4th Dec '17 6:41:42 PM Twentington
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* Big Machine Records generally has a policy that albums are only released on the second single. This ended up backfiring a few times:

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* CountryMusic label Big Machine Records generally has a policy that albums are only released on the second single. This ended up backfiring a few times:



* Love and Theft managed to survive two things that can usually kill a band's momentum: their original label Lyric Street Records had gone out of business, and member Brian Bandas quit, reducing them to a duo consisting of Stephen Barker Liles and Eric Gunderson. But when they signed to Creator/RCARecords Nashville, things were looking up. Their first single for RCA, "Angel Eyes", became their very first #1 hit on the country charts, while also breaching Top 40 on the Hot 100. But for some reason, it took over four months for the label to announce a followup. The resulting gap sapped all their momentum, and the other two singles failed to make it past #35. According to [[https://www.billboard.com/articles/news/6480328/love-and-theft-talk-being-dropped-by-their-label the duo themselves]], a second RCA album was nearly completed, but they were abruptly dropped instead (although a single titled "Night That You'll Never Forget" was issued). Love and Theft also revealed that the unreleased album had "Going Out Like That" on it, which ended up being recorded by Music/RebaMcEntire. The duo had to resort to self-releasing their next single, "Whiskey on My Breath" and, while Curb Records later picked up distribution of the single, it still failed to go anywhere. Then-CEO of Sony Music Nashville, Gary Overton, stated that "They were making some great new music, but there was no excitement for them at radio or with the listeners" -- even though "Angel Eyes" was a #1 airplay hit and got a digital platinum certification. Plus, it's hard to gather excitement when you wait four whole months before following up...

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* Country duo Love and Theft managed to survive two things that can usually kill a band's momentum: their original label Lyric (Lyric Street Records Records) had gone out of business, and member Brian Bandas quit, reducing them to a duo consisting of Stephen Barker Liles and Eric Gunderson. But when they signed to Creator/RCARecords Nashville, things were looking up. Their first inaugural RCA single for RCA, "Angel Eyes", Eyes" became their very first #1 hit on the country charts, while also breaching bringing them to the Top 40 on of the Hot 100. 100 for the first time. But for some reason, it took over four months for the label to announce dragged its heels for ''four months'' without announcing a followup. The resulting gap sapped all their momentum, and the other two singles failed to make it past #35. According to [[https://www.billboard.com/articles/news/6480328/love-and-theft-talk-being-dropped-by-their-label the duo themselves]], a second RCA album was nearly completed, but they were abruptly dropped instead (although a single titled "Night That You'll Never Forget" was issued). Love and Theft also revealed that issued, it made absolutely no noise). One of the songs for the unreleased album had album, "Going Out Like That" on it, which That", later ended up being recorded by Music/RebaMcEntire. The duo had to resort to self-releasing their next single, "Whiskey on My Breath" and, while Curb Records later picked up distribution of the single, it still failed to go anywhere. Then-CEO of Sony Music Nashville, Nashville Gary Overton, Overton stated that "They were making some great new music, but there was no excitement for them at radio or with the listeners" -- even though "Angel Eyes" was sold well enough to get a #1 airplay hit and got a digital platinum certification. Plus, digital certification, and it's hard to gather excitement maintain a career when you wait have literally nothing out for a solid four whole months before following up...after your first big hit...
4th Dec '17 6:35:59 PM Twentington
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* Gary Overton was supposedly also the champion behind Jerrod Niemann's third Creator/AristaRecords album. The lead single "Drink to That All Night" was a #1 smash, but was widely derided for its AutoTune and "bro-country" theming (not helping matters was that the song got a remix with Music/{{Pitbull}}), which seemed a radical departure from the GenreRoulette of his last two albums. The followup single was "Donkey", a ''very'' audacious novelty song with innuendos that seemed to hint at sodomy... but apparently Overton really liked the song. Obviously, the notoriously conservative country music audiences rejected it wholesale, and his momentum faded overnight. The lead single to a fourth Arista album stalled out, and he left the label. He has not had a hit since, although he did manage to get out two more albums (one an independent release of some songs he had done prior to signing with Arista; the other, a fresh release on Curb Records in 2017).

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* Gary Overton was supposedly also the champion mastermind behind the bad decisions surrounding Jerrod Niemann's third Creator/AristaRecords album. The lead single "Drink to That All Night" was a #1 smash, but smash on the country charts. Although it seemed to pull him out of his SophomoreSlump, the song was widely derided for largely panned due to its AutoTune electronic AutoTune-driven sound and "bro-country" theming lyrics (not helping matters was that the song it got a remix with featuring Music/{{Pitbull}}), which seemed like a radical departure from the GenreRoulette interesting, thoughtful, and funny material of his last previous two albums. The followup single was "Donkey", a ''very'' audacious novelty song with innuendos that seemed to hint at sodomy... but apparently it was sent as a single because Overton really liked the song. loved it. Obviously, the notoriously conservative country music audiences rejected it wholesale, and his momentum faded overnight. collapsed instantly. The third single, "Buzz Back Girl", fared no better, and promotional material surrounding it even called it the "second" single, effectively throwing "Donkey" into the CanonDiscontinuity bin. The lead single to a fourth Arista album stalled out, out as well, and he left the label. He has not had a hit since, although he did manage to get out two more albums (one an independent release of some songs he had done prior to signing with Arista; the other, a fresh release on Curb Records in 2017).2017) with no promotion whatsoever.
25th Nov '17 2:01:38 PM Twentington
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** One of the first backfires was for ''Series/CanYouDuet'' winners Steel Magnolia, who had a big Top 5 hit on the country charts in 2009 with "Keep On Lovin' You". The second single "Just by Being You (Halo and Wings)" bombed, so the album got further delayed. It was ultimately released on the heels of its third single "Last Night Again", but since that single wasn't going anywhere, neither did the album. Steel Magnolia later broke up (literally, as members Joshua Scott Jones and Meghan Linsey happened to be boyfriend and girlfriend), and Linsey later finished second on a season of ''Series/TheVoice''.

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** One of the first backfires was for ''Series/CanYouDuet'' ''Can You Duet'' winners Steel Magnolia, who had a big Top 5 hit on the country charts in 2009 with "Keep On Lovin' You". The second single "Just by Being You (Halo and Wings)" bombed, so the album got further delayed. It was ultimately released on the heels of its third single "Last Night Again", but since that single wasn't going anywhere, neither did the album. Steel Magnolia later broke up (literally, as members Joshua Scott Jones and Meghan Linsey happened to be boyfriend and girlfriend), and Linsey later finished second on a season of ''Series/TheVoice''.
25th Nov '17 2:00:21 PM Twentington
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** One of the first backfires was for Steel Magnolia, who had a big Top 5 hit on the country charts in 2009 with "Keep On Lovin' You". The second single "Just by Being You" bombed, so the album got further delayed. It was ultimately released on the heels of its third single "Last Night Again", but since that single wasn't going anywhere, neither did the album. Steel Magnolia later broke up.

to:

** One of the first backfires was for ''Series/CanYouDuet'' winners Steel Magnolia, who had a big Top 5 hit on the country charts in 2009 with "Keep On Lovin' You". The second single "Just by Being You" You (Halo and Wings)" bombed, so the album got further delayed. It was ultimately released on the heels of its third single "Last Night Again", but since that single wasn't going anywhere, neither did the album. Steel Magnolia later broke up.up (literally, as members Joshua Scott Jones and Meghan Linsey happened to be boyfriend and girlfriend), and Linsey later finished second on a season of ''Series/TheVoice''.



** Tucker Beathard got to #2 with his debut single "Rock On". But the second single fell short of Top 40, and Big Machine closed the branch that he was signed to (an InNameOnly revival of the Dot Records name).
* Love and Theft managed to survive two things that can usually kill a band's momentum: their original label, Lyric Street Records, had gone out of business, and vocalist Brian Bandas had just quit, reducing them to a duo. But when they signed to RCA, things were looking up. They had just achieved their first #1 country hit with their first RCA single "Angel Eyes". But for some reason, it took over four months for the label to announce a followup. The resulting gap sapped all their momentum, and the other two singles failed to make it past #35. According to [[https://www.billboard.com/articles/news/6480328/love-and-theft-talk-being-dropped-by-their-label the duo themselves]], a second RCA album was nearly completed, but they were abruptly dropped instead (although a single titled "Night That You'll Never Forget" was issued). Love and Theft also revealed that the unreleased album had "Going Out Like That" on it, but Music/RebaMcEntire ended up recording it instead. The songs from the unreleased album were left in the vaults for five years, and Love and Theft had to resort to independent releases ever since. Then-CEO of Sony Music Nashville, Gary Overton, stated that "They were making some great new music, but there was no excitement for them at radio or with the listeners." -- even though "Angel Eyes" was a #1 airplay hit and the single was certified platinum. Plus, it's hard to gather excitement when you wait four whole months before following up...
* Gary Overton was supposedly also the champion behind Jerrod Niemann's third Creator/AristaRecords album. The lead single "Drink to That All Night" was a #1 smash, but was widely derided for its AutoTune and "bro-country" theming, which seemed a radical departure from the GenreRoulette of his last two albums. The followup single was "Donkey", a ''very'' audacious novelty song with innuendos that seemed to hint at sodomy... but apparently Overton really liked the song. Obviously, the notoriously conservative country music audiences rejected it wholesale, and his momentum faded overnight. The lead single to a fourth Arista album sank, and he left the label. He has not had a hit since, although he did manage to get out two more albums (one an independent release of some songs he had done prior to signing with Arista; the other, a fresh release on Curb Records in 2017).

to:

** Tucker Beathard got to #2 with his debut single "Rock On". But the second single "Momma and Jesus" fell short of Top 40, and Big Machine closed the branch that he was signed to (an InNameOnly revival of the Dot Records name).
* Love and Theft managed to survive two things that can usually kill a band's momentum: their original label, label Lyric Street Records, Records had gone out of business, and vocalist member Brian Bandas had just quit, reducing them to a duo. duo consisting of Stephen Barker Liles and Eric Gunderson. But when they signed to RCA, Creator/RCARecords Nashville, things were looking up. They had just achieved their Their first #1 country hit with their first RCA single for RCA, "Angel Eyes".Eyes", became their very first #1 hit on the country charts, while also breaching Top 40 on the Hot 100. But for some reason, it took over four months for the label to announce a followup. The resulting gap sapped all their momentum, and the other two singles failed to make it past #35. According to [[https://www.billboard.com/articles/news/6480328/love-and-theft-talk-being-dropped-by-their-label the duo themselves]], a second RCA album was nearly completed, but they were abruptly dropped instead (although a single titled "Night That You'll Never Forget" was issued). Love and Theft also revealed that the unreleased album had "Going Out Like That" on it, but Music/RebaMcEntire which ended up recording it instead. being recorded by Music/RebaMcEntire. The songs from the unreleased album were left in the vaults for five years, and Love and Theft duo had to resort to independent releases ever since. self-releasing their next single, "Whiskey on My Breath" and, while Curb Records later picked up distribution of the single, it still failed to go anywhere. Then-CEO of Sony Music Nashville, Gary Overton, stated that "They were making some great new music, but there was no excitement for them at radio or with the listeners." listeners" -- even though "Angel Eyes" was a #1 airplay hit and the single was certified platinum.got a digital platinum certification. Plus, it's hard to gather excitement when you wait four whole months before following up...
* Gary Overton was supposedly also the champion behind Jerrod Niemann's third Creator/AristaRecords album. The lead single "Drink to That All Night" was a #1 smash, but was widely derided for its AutoTune and "bro-country" theming, theming (not helping matters was that the song got a remix with Music/{{Pitbull}}), which seemed a radical departure from the GenreRoulette of his last two albums. The followup single was "Donkey", a ''very'' audacious novelty song with innuendos that seemed to hint at sodomy... but apparently Overton really liked the song. Obviously, the notoriously conservative country music audiences rejected it wholesale, and his momentum faded overnight. The lead single to a fourth Arista album sank, stalled out, and he left the label. He has not had a hit since, although he did manage to get out two more albums (one an independent release of some songs he had done prior to signing with Arista; the other, a fresh release on Curb Records in 2017).
24th Nov '17 6:50:46 AM Twentington
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* According to [[http://www.louisvillemusicnews.net/webmanager/index.php?WEB_CAT_ID=50&storyid=11324&headline=Doug_Supernaw this interview]], Doug Supernaw's second album, ''Deep Thoughts from a Shallow Mind'', was handled this way by BNA Records. The album's lead single was "State Fair", but according to him some stations started playing his cover of Music/DavidAllanCoe's "You Never Even Called Me by My Name" instead, so "State Fair" was prematurely withdrawn in favor of that song -- however, other stations continued to play "State Fair", and thus refused to add the Coe cover, thus killing the momentum of both singles at the same time.

to:

* According to [[http://www.louisvillemusicnews.net/webmanager/index.php?WEB_CAT_ID=50&storyid=11324&headline=Doug_Supernaw this interview]], Doug Supernaw's second album, ''Deep Thoughts from a Shallow Mind'', was handled this way by BNA Records. The album's lead single was "State Fair", but according to him some stations started playing his cover of Music/DavidAllanCoe's "You Never Even Called Me by My Name" instead, so instead. The label then chose to axe "State Fair" was prematurely withdrawn in favor of that song -- however, other and officially push the Coe cover as a single, but the stations continued to play that actually ''were'' playing "State Fair", and thus refused Fair" failed to add "Name", so the Coe cover, thus killing the momentum of ensuing confusion blunted both singles at the same time.singles. The album finally got back on track with its third and final single, a cover of Music/RandyTravis's "What'll You Do About Me".
24th Nov '17 6:42:51 AM Twentington
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* Love and Theft managed to survive two things that can usually kill a band's momentum: their original label, Lyric Street Records, had gone out of business, and vocalist Brian Bandas had just quit, reducing them to a duo. But when they signed to RCA, things were looking up. They had just achieved their first #1 country hit with their first RCA single "Angel Eyes". But for some reason, it took over four months for the label to announce a followup. The resulting gap sapped all their momentum, and the other two singles failed to make it past #35. According to [[https://www.billboard.com/articles/news/6480328/love-and-theft-talk-being-dropped-by-their-label the duo themselves]], a second RCA album was nearly completed, but they were abruptly dropped instead (although a single titled "Night That You'll Never Forget" was issued). Love and Theft also revealed that the unreleased album had "Going Out Like That" on it, but Music/RebaMcEntire ended up recording it instead. The songs from the unreleased album were left in the vaults for five years, and Love and Theft had to resort to independent releases ever since. Then-CEO of Sony Music Nashville, Gary Overton, stated that "They were making some great new music, but there was no excitement for them at radio or with the listeners." -- even though "Angel Eyes" was a #1 airplay hit and the single was certified platinum. Plus, it's hard to gather excitement when you wait four whole months before following up...
* Gary Overton was supposedly also the champion behind Jerrod Niemann's third Creator/AristaRecords album. The lead single "Drink to That All Night" was a #1 smash, but was widely derided for its AutoTune and "bro-country" theming, which seemed a radical departure from the GenreRoulette of his last two albums. The followup single was "Donkey", a ''very'' audacious novelty song with innuendos that seemed to hint at sodomy... but apparently Overton really liked the song. Obviously, the notoriously conservative country music audiences rejected it wholesale, and his momentum faded overnight. The lead single to a fourth Arista album sank, and he left the label. He has not had a hit since, although he did manage to get out two more albums (one an independent release of some songs he had done prior to signing with Arista; the other, a fresh release on Curb Records in 2017).
24th Nov '17 6:25:21 AM Twentington
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* CountryMusic singer James Bonamy had his debut single "Dog on a Toolbox" withdrawn after only a couple weeks because label execs believed that there were "too many dog songs", even though country songs about dogs are pretty much a DeadUnicornTrope. As a result, there was some confusion over what his single was at the time, so a lot of stations were slow to add the followup "She's Got a Mind of Her Own", thus crippling ''its'' chart run.

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* CountryMusic singer James Bonamy had his debut single "Dog on a Toolbox" withdrawn after only a couple weeks because label execs believed that there were "too many dog songs", even though country songs about dogs are pretty much a DeadUnicornTrope. As a result, there was some confusion over what his single was at the time, so a lot of stations were slow to add the followup They swapped it out with its B-side, "She's Got a Mind of Her Own", Own". The switch confused a lot of program directors, thus crippling ''its'' chart run.undercutting "Mind"'s performance on the charts.



** ''Cryptic Writing'''s sessions involved producers Dan Huff and Bud Prager. Prager did not like the lyrics of "Bullprick", "Evil That's Within" and "Vortex", and made Mustaine change them. The former two were changed to "FFF" and "Sin" respectively, and the latter retained its name but had slightly different lyrics. Prager also convinced Mustaine to rework "I'll Get Even" into a far less angry song than originally planned. Prager also included strings on "A Secret Place".
** ''Risk'' was largely the result of Executive Meddling, and is considered a failure because of it, again involving Prager. The inclusion of strings on "Insomnia", the recording of "Crush 'Em" (which Prager thought would become a sports anthem), and the remixed version of "Breadline" are just three reasons. After this, Mustaine resolved never to work with Prager again.

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** The ''Cryptic Writing'''s Writings'' sessions involved producers Dan Huff were produced by Dann Huff, a CountryMusic session guitarist whose only other production credits at that point were a couple obscure CountryMusic albums (although he would later be famous for his work with Music/{{Lonestar}}, Music/RascalFlatts, and Music/KeithUrban). Their then-new manager, Bud Prager. Prager Prager, did not like the lyrics of "Bullprick", "Evil That's Within" and "Vortex", and made Mustaine change them. The former two were changed to "FFF" and "Sin" respectively, and the latter retained its name but had slightly different lyrics. Prager also convinced Mustaine to rework "I'll Get Even" into a far less angry song than originally planned. Prager also included strings on "A Secret Place".
** ''Risk'' was largely the result of Executive Meddling, and is considered a failure because of it, again involving Huff and Prager. The inclusion of strings on "Insomnia", the recording of "Crush 'Em" (which Prager thought would become a sports anthem), and the remixed version of "Breadline" are just three reasons. After this, Mustaine resolved never to work with Prager again.



* Fresh off his #1 hit "A Guy Walks Into a Bar", Tyler Farr released the ballad "Withdrawals", which was positively received by fans, but moved slowly up the charts (not unusual for Farr's singles). Creator/ColumbiaRecords panicked and pulled it after only three weeks, replacing it with "Better in Boots", because they wanted an up-tempo summery song that would sound good live and appeal to a female demographic better. The ads for the song in radio trade publications smack of desperation with their hammering home the fact that the song is "fun" and has "tempo". The song has been derided for being a pandering ClicheStorm, and stalled out at #26. This decision seems to have killed his career entirely, as the intended lead singles to his third album both stalled out in the 50s.

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* Fresh off his #1 hit "A Guy Walks Into a Bar", Tyler Farr released the ballad "Withdrawals", which was positively received by fans, but moved slowly up the charts (not unusual for Farr's singles). Creator/ColumbiaRecords panicked and pulled it after only three weeks, replacing weeks and replaced it with "Better in Boots", because they wanted an up-tempo summery song that would sound good live and appeal to a female demographic better. The ads for the song in radio trade publications smack of desperation with their hammering home the fact that the song is "fun" and has "tempo". The song has been derided for being a pandering ClicheStorm, and stalled out at #26. This decision seems to have killed his career entirely, as the intended lead singles to his third album both stalled out in the 50s.
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