History ExecutiveMeddling / Music

23rd Apr '16 11:13:07 AM Twentington
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* Fresh off his #1 hit "A Guy Walks Into a Bar", Tyler Farr released the ballad "Withdrawals", which was positively received by fans, but moved slowly up the charts (not unusual for Farr's singles). Creator/ColumbiaRecords panicked and pulled it after only three weeks, replacing it with "Better in Boots", because they wanted an up-tempo summery song that would sound good live and appeal to a female demographic better. The ads for the song in radio trade publications smack of desperation with their hammering home the fact that the song is "fun" and has "tempo". The song has been derided for being a pandering ClicheStorm, but it has at least made the top 30.

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* Fresh off his #1 hit "A Guy Walks Into a Bar", Tyler Farr released the ballad "Withdrawals", which was positively received by fans, but moved slowly up the charts (not unusual for Farr's singles). Creator/ColumbiaRecords panicked and pulled it after only three weeks, replacing it with "Better in Boots", because they wanted an up-tempo summery song that would sound good live and appeal to a female demographic better. The ads for the song in radio trade publications smack of desperation with their hammering home the fact that the song is "fun" and has "tempo". The song has been derided for being a pandering ClicheStorm, but it has and stalled out at least made the top 30.#26.
20th Apr '16 6:21:40 PM MikeK
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* Self were working on two albums around the same time: ''Gizmodgery'' (1999), a smaller-budget self-produced album performed entirely on toy instruments released on independent label Spongebath, and ''Breakfast With Girls'' (2000), an album featuring a bigger budget and an outside RecordProducer (Hugh Padgham), released on [=DreamWorks=] Records. The involvement of the larger label did affect both releases, but maybe not in the way you'd expect: [=DreamWorks=] liked the songs "Suzy Q Sailaway" and "Uno Song" so much they insisted that they be left off ''Gizmodgery'' and re-recorded for ''Breakfast With Girls''. The original recording of "Suzy Q Sailaway" featuring toy instruments was later released on ''Selfafornia'', a free digital-only album distributed by the band.

to:

* Self were working on two albums around the same time: ''Gizmodgery'' (1999), a smaller-budget self-produced album performed entirely on toy instruments released on independent label Spongebath, and ''Breakfast With Girls'' (2000), an album featuring a bigger budget and an outside RecordProducer (Hugh Padgham), released on [=DreamWorks=] Records. The involvement of the larger label did affect both releases, but maybe not in the way you'd expect: [=DreamWorks=] liked the songs "Suzy Q Sailaway" and "Uno Song" so much they insisted that they be left off ''Gizmodgery'' and re-recorded for included on ''Breakfast With Girls''.Girls'' instead - the two songs end up sticking out a bit stylistically on that album as a result, especially because "Suzy Q. Sailaway" was re-recorded with more conventional instrumentation, but "Uno Song" wasn't. The original recording of "Suzy Q Sailaway" featuring toy instruments was later released on ''Selfafornia'', a free digital-only album distributed by the band.
9th Apr '16 6:22:51 PM aye_amber
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** In yet another example of Executive Meddling winding up to have positive endpoint, James Blunt gave 'Weird' Al permission to do a parody of "You're Beautiful". But after "You're Pitiful" was recorded, the executives at Atlantic Records -- Blunt's label -- told Al he couldn't release the song on his next album because they feared it would turn Blunt into "a one hit wonder" (Ironically, he has not had a Billboard Top 40 appearance in the US since). So instead he released it for free online, and performs it in concert. Part of said performance is wearing an "Atlantic Records Sucks" t-shirt. Yet, this still left his next record a bit short. Al went back to the recording studio and recorded "Do I Creep You Out" and "White and Nerdy". When released as a single, the latter song became the biggest hit in Al's three-decade-long career (and its video also takes a shot at the case, when he edits {{Wikipedia}}'s entry for Atlantic Records...).

to:

** In yet another example of Executive Meddling winding up to have positive endpoint, James Blunt gave 'Weird' Al permission to do a parody of "You're Beautiful". But after "You're Pitiful" was recorded, the executives at Atlantic Records -- Blunt's label -- told Al he couldn't release the song on his next album because they feared it would turn Blunt into "a one hit wonder" (Ironically, he has not had a Billboard Top 40 appearance in the US since). So instead he released it for free online, and performs it in concert. Part of said performance is wearing an "Atlantic Records Sucks" t-shirt. Yet, this still left his next record a bit short. Al went back to the recording studio and recorded "Do I Creep You Out" and "White and Nerdy". When released as a single, the latter song became the biggest hit in Al's three-decade-long career (and its video also takes a shot at the case, when he edits {{Wikipedia}}'s Wiki/{{Wikipedia}}'s entry for Atlantic Records...).



* After the success of their 1999 pop-crossover megahit ballad "Amazed", Country music band Music/{{Lonestar}} had big hits in the early 2000s with family-friendly, TastesLikeDiabetes songs such as "I'm Already There" and "My Front Porch Looking In", and were essentially forced to record more of the same. Whenever they tried something different, such as "Class Reunion", it tanked. After their last two albums for the label both failed to produce a hit, lead guitarist Michael Britt told {{CMT}}, "They started putting out a bunch of family-type songs. I think that really pigeonholed us. The majority of the band didn't really want to continue doing that same thing." BNA Records dropped them just before lead singer Richie [=McDonald=] went solo in 2007 only to put out the same diabetes-inducing material for three years before returning in 2011.

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* After the success of their 1999 pop-crossover megahit ballad "Amazed", Country music band Music/{{Lonestar}} had big hits in the early 2000s with family-friendly, TastesLikeDiabetes songs such as "I'm Already There" and "My Front Porch Looking In", and were essentially forced to record more of the same. Whenever they tried something different, such as "Class Reunion", it tanked. After their last two albums for the label both failed to produce a hit, lead guitarist Michael Britt told {{CMT}}, Creator/{{CMT}}, "They started putting out a bunch of family-type songs. I think that really pigeonholed us. The majority of the band didn't really want to continue doing that same thing." BNA Records dropped them just before lead singer Richie [=McDonald=] went solo in 2007 only to put out the same diabetes-inducing material for three years before returning in 2011.



* Big Boi of {{Outkast}} fame was to release his first solo album ''Sir Lucius Leftfoot: The Son of Chico Dusty'' as early as late 2008; however, Jive Records wasn't so sure the album would be able to sell. After having Big Boi rework the album once, and setting a 2009 release date, Jive once again decided they didn't like the album, telling Big Boi that his album was a "piece of art, and we don't know how to market that." Things took a turn for the worst when the executives suggested to Big Boi that he should make his own version of LilWayne's "Lollipop" so that they could sell the album. Big Boi packed up his things and left for Def Jam. To make things worse, Jive decided they won't let him carry over any tracks he did with group-member Andre 3000 to put on the album....so he's leaking them.

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* Big Boi of {{Outkast}} Music/{{Outkast}} fame was to release his first solo album ''Sir Lucius Leftfoot: The Son of Chico Dusty'' as early as late 2008; however, Jive Records wasn't so sure the album would be able to sell. After having Big Boi rework the album once, and setting a 2009 release date, Jive once again decided they didn't like the album, telling Big Boi that his album was a "piece of art, and we don't know how to market that." Things took a turn for the worst when the executives suggested to Big Boi that he should make his own version of LilWayne's "Lollipop" so that they could sell the album. Big Boi packed up his things and left for Def Jam. To make things worse, Jive decided they won't let him carry over any tracks he did with group-member Andre 3000 to put on the album....so he's leaking them.



* Capitol Records meddled in Music/TheBeachBoys albums at least twice. The group was told that PetSounds needed an obvious hit, leading to the addition of "Sloop John B.," the only cover on the album, and the only track to break from the overall introspective mood. The Boys were later told to add "Good Vibrations" to SmileySmile, despite the fact that it was already past its prime as a hit by that point, and it bore no relation to the stripped-down style of the album.

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* Capitol Records meddled in Music/TheBeachBoys albums at least twice. The group was told that PetSounds Music/PetSounds needed an obvious hit, leading to the addition of "Sloop John B.," the only cover on the album, and the only track to break from the overall introspective mood. The Boys were later told to add "Good Vibrations" to SmileySmile, despite the fact that it was already past its prime as a hit by that point, and it bore no relation to the stripped-down style of the album.
5th Apr '16 7:37:40 AM Willbyr
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* Cat Stevens almost gave up his career after the lukewarm reception of ''Numbers'', but his contract for Island Records required two more albums. The first of them, ''Izitso'', proved to be a CareerResurrection for him. Shortly thereafter he converted to Islam, still with one album remaining in his contract. But once he was done recording ''Back to Earth'' he subsequently quit the music business -- for the time being.

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* Cat Stevens Music/CatStevens almost gave up his career after the lukewarm reception of ''Numbers'', but his contract for Island Records required two more albums. The first of them, ''Izitso'', proved to be a CareerResurrection for him. Shortly thereafter he converted to Islam, still with one album remaining in his contract. But once he was done recording ''Back to Earth'' he subsequently quit the music business -- for the time being.



* The label pressured {{Music/CultOfLuna}} to include a remixed song on "Vertikal II". Johaness Persson thought remixes were a "waste of time" but picked the hardest song on Vertikal to remix, "Vicarious Redemption", a sprawling sludge metal epic. Justin Broadrick was the only person he could trust to do a good remix.

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* The label pressured {{Music/CultOfLuna}} Music/CultOfLuna to include a remixed song on "Vertikal II". Johaness Persson thought remixes were a "waste of time" but picked the hardest song on Vertikal to remix, "Vicarious Redemption", a sprawling sludge metal epic. Justin Broadrick was the only person he could trust to do a good remix.
5th Apr '16 7:37:19 AM Willbyr
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* ''Seventh Star'' was supposed to be Music/BlackSabbath guitarist Tony Iommi's first solo album, but pressure from his record label forced him to bill it as an album by "Black Sabbath featuring Tony Iommi."

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* Music/BlackSabbath:
**
''Seventh Star'' was supposed to be Music/BlackSabbath be guitarist Tony Iommi's first solo album, but pressure from his record label forced him to bill it as an album by "Black Sabbath featuring Tony Iommi."



* Music/FrankZappa suffered this during his early Mothers of Invention days. First of all, their name was changed from "The Mothers" because it was a slang term for "motherfuckers". ''Music/WereOnlyInItForTheMoney'' suffered the most: the ''Music/SgtPeppersLonelyHeartsClubBand''-parodying cover was relegated to the inner sleeve, even though Zappa had called Music/TheBeatles beforehand and gotten their approval. "Harry You're a Beast" had the verse "don't come in me" censored, as was the line "I will love the police as they kick the shit out of me" from "Who Needs the Peace Corps?". "Hot Poop" was their way of GettingCrapPastTheRadar: taking the verse "Better look around before you say you don't care/Shut your fucking mouth 'bout the length of my hair/how would you survive/if you were alive/shitty little person?" from "Mother People" and backmasking it.
** Even then, some editions have edited versions of "Hot Poop", in which the word "fucking" is snipped out entirely.

to:

* Music/FrankZappa suffered this during his early Mothers of Invention days. First of all, their name was changed from "The Mothers" because it was a slang term for "motherfuckers". ''Music/WereOnlyInItForTheMoney'' suffered the most: the ''Music/SgtPeppersLonelyHeartsClubBand''-parodying cover was relegated to the inner sleeve, even though Zappa had called Music/TheBeatles beforehand and gotten their approval. "Harry You're a Beast" had the verse "don't come in me" censored, as was the line "I will love the police as they kick the shit out of me" from "Who Needs the Peace Corps?". "Hot Poop" was their way of GettingCrapPastTheRadar: taking the verse "Better look around before you say you don't care/Shut your fucking mouth 'bout the length of my hair/how would you survive/if you were alive/shitty little person?" from "Mother People" and backmasking it.
**
it. Even then, some editions have edited versions of "Hot Poop", in which the word "fucking" is snipped out entirely.



* Like many musicians, Trent Reznor (Music/NineInchNails) has had his share of disagreements with his record label, but the release of ''Year Zero'' brought with it new and exciting forms of ExecutiveMeddling. Trent's viral marketing/Alternate Reality Game promoting the album was largely an independent effort between him and 42 Entertainment (yes, the company that made the ARG/ILoveBees ARG for ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}''), where he purposely leaked tracks to the public; the RIAA reacted by prosecuting some of the people who posted these online. Additionally, Trent wanted to surprise the fans by pressing the CD with special thermal material that would make the disc a different color when it was removed from a heat-producing CD player; unfortunately, the marketing team got word of this and decided to advertise it as a special feature of the album, which spoiled the surprise. "Thermally reactive disc that changes color when you touch it!"
** The thermal material has a bit more executive meddling to it, as they also hiked up the overseas price of the album $10 because of it, despite the fact that it cost almost nothing, and Trent paid the money for it out of his own pocket. This is commonly accepted to have been the final straw leading up to his going independent.

to:

* Like many musicians, Trent Reznor (Music/NineInchNails) has had his share of disagreements with his record label, but the release of ''Year Zero'' brought with it new and exciting forms of ExecutiveMeddling. Trent's viral marketing/Alternate Reality Game promoting the album was largely an independent effort between him and 42 Entertainment (yes, the company that made the ARG/ILoveBees ARG for ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}''), where he purposely leaked tracks to the public; the RIAA reacted by prosecuting some of the people who posted these online. Additionally, Trent wanted to surprise the fans by pressing the CD with special thermal material that would make the disc a different color when it was removed from a heat-producing CD player; unfortunately, the marketing team got word of this and decided to advertise it as a special feature of the album, which spoiled the surprise. "Thermally reactive disc that changes color when you touch it!"
**
it!" The thermal material has a bit more executive meddling to it, as they also hiked up the overseas price of the album $10 because of it, despite the fact that it cost almost nothing, and Trent paid the money for it out of his own pocket. This is commonly accepted to have been the final straw leading up to his going independent.



* Upon hearing Music/TheClash's debut self-titled album, the suits at their American record label decided it had too much filler, and decided to remove 5 songs and replace them with some of the band's British singles like "Complete Control" and "(White Man) In Hammersmith Palais". It is almost universally agreed by critics that this actually vastly improved the album, though some also note that adding in the mostly mid-tempo and more polished singles dilutes the UK version's ThreeChordsAndTheTruth feel a bit.
** Another reason was because the execs decided said songs were too controversial, as there was a big panic over whether punk would make people rebel against the government, and obviously songs like "Cheat" and "Deny" were not really in keeping with what they wanted people to think of them, they probably considered "48 Hours" and "Protex Blue" to be drug references, and the single version of "White Riot" replaces the album version to be more marketable. It is puzzling that "Jail Guitar Doors" was included as the band reluctantly recorded it as a B Side. It also annoys people that that "I Fought The Law" is included because it was recorded after their second album, by which time their style was starting to change.

to:

* Music/TheClash:
**
Upon hearing Music/TheClash's their debut self-titled album, the suits at their American record label decided it had too much filler, and decided to remove 5 songs and replace them with some of the band's British singles like "Complete Control" and "(White Man) In Hammersmith Palais". It is almost universally agreed by critics that this actually vastly improved the album, though some also note that adding in the mostly mid-tempo and more polished singles dilutes the UK version's ThreeChordsAndTheTruth feel a bit.
**
bit. Another reason was because the execs decided said songs were too controversial, as there was a big panic over whether punk would make people rebel against the government, and obviously songs like "Cheat" and "Deny" were not really in keeping with what they wanted people to think of them, they probably considered "48 Hours" and "Protex Blue" to be drug references, and the single version of "White Riot" replaces the album version to be more marketable. It is puzzling that "Jail Guitar Doors" was included as the band reluctantly recorded it as a B Side. It also annoys people that that "I Fought The Law" is included because it was recorded after their second album, by which time their style was starting to change.



* Music/{{Blur}}'s single "Popscene" -- now recognized as one of the first true Britpop singles -- failed so poorly on the UK single charts that their label, Food Records, told the band to scrap their entire second album and write new songs including one surefire hit single. Upon hearing ''this'' version, the label told them to go back ''again'' and write another single-worthy song, this time targeted to American audiences. The resulting album was the critically adored ''Modern Life Is Rubbish'' and the two singles were "For Tomorrow" and "Chemical World", which remain two of their most critically acclaimed and popular songs.

to:

* Music/{{Blur}}'s Music/{{Blur}}:
** Their
single "Popscene" -- now recognized as one of the first true Britpop singles -- failed so poorly on the UK single charts that their label, Food Records, told the band to scrap their entire second album and write new songs including one surefire hit single. Upon hearing ''this'' version, the label told them to go back ''again'' and write another single-worthy song, this time targeted to American audiences. The resulting album was the critically adored ''Modern Life Is Rubbish'' and the two singles were "For Tomorrow" and "Chemical World", which remain two of their most critically acclaimed and popular songs.



* In yet another example of Executive Meddling winding up to have positive endpoint, James Blunt gave [[Music/WeirdAlYankovic 'Weird' Al]] permission to do a parody of "You're Beautiful". But after "You're Pitiful" was recorded, the executives at Atlantic Records -- Blunt's label -- told Al he couldn't release the song on his next album because they feared it would turn Blunt into "a one hit wonder" (Ironically, he has not had a Billboard Top 40 appearance in the US since). So instead he released it for free online, and performs it in concert. Part of said performance is wearing an "Atlantic Records Sucks" t-shirt. Yet, this still left his next record a bit short. Al went back to the recording studio and recorded "Do I Creep You Out" and "White and Nerdy". When released as a single, the latter song became the biggest hit in Al's three-decade-long career (and its video also takes a shot at the case, when he edits {{Wikipedia}}'s entry for Atlantic Records...).
** A less positive example of Executive Meddling in Weird Al's career was his label's insistence that ''Dare to Be Stupid'' have a Cyndi Lauper parody. Al disliked the resulting song ("Girls Just Want to Have Lunch"), and decided against including it on ''The Food Album''.
*** In fact, one obvious factor about "Girls Just Want to Have Lunch" is that Al sings it as gratingly and sarcastically as possible.
*** ''The Food Album'' (along with ''The TV Album'') were also both the result of executives wanting compilation albums. Although Weird Al didn't like the idea of ''The Food Album'', he preferred it to the executive's original idea, ''Al Unplugged'', which would have been a compilation of his songs, remixed to remove the electric instruments.

to:

* Music/WeirdAlYankovic:
**
In yet another example of Executive Meddling winding up to have positive endpoint, James Blunt gave [[Music/WeirdAlYankovic 'Weird' Al]] Al permission to do a parody of "You're Beautiful". But after "You're Pitiful" was recorded, the executives at Atlantic Records -- Blunt's label -- told Al he couldn't release the song on his next album because they feared it would turn Blunt into "a one hit wonder" (Ironically, he has not had a Billboard Top 40 appearance in the US since). So instead he released it for free online, and performs it in concert. Part of said performance is wearing an "Atlantic Records Sucks" t-shirt. Yet, this still left his next record a bit short. Al went back to the recording studio and recorded "Do I Creep You Out" and "White and Nerdy". When released as a single, the latter song became the biggest hit in Al's three-decade-long career (and its video also takes a shot at the case, when he edits {{Wikipedia}}'s entry for Atlantic Records...).
** A less positive example of Executive Meddling in Weird was Al's career was his label's insistence that ''Dare to Be Stupid'' have a Cyndi Lauper Music/CyndiLauper parody. Al disliked the resulting song ("Girls Just Want to Have Lunch"), and decided against including it on ''The Food Album''.
*** In fact, one
Album''. One obvious factor about "Girls Just Want to Have Lunch" is that Al sings it as gratingly and sarcastically as possible.
*** ** ''The Food Album'' (along with ''The TV Album'') were also both the result of executives wanting compilation albums. Although Weird Al didn't like the idea of ''The Food Album'', he preferred it to the executive's original idea, ''Al Unplugged'', which would have been a compilation of his songs, remixed to remove the electric instruments.



* Kmart and Walmart refused to sell the {{Music/Nirvana}} album ''In Utero'' until new packaging that listed the track "Rape Me" as "Waif Me" was created. The cover art, which features anatomical drawings of a naked woman, was also changed. The only reason Kurt Cobain agreed to the changes was because when he was a kid, his family was poor and he was only able to buy music from K-Mart or Wal-Mart since there wasn't a record store in his hometown, and he empathised with kids in the same situation.
** {{Averted}} on Nevermind. Executives wanted to censor the cover famously featuring a naked baby, but the only form of censorship Cobain would agree to was a [[CrowningMomentofAwesome sticker covering the penis that read "if you are offended by this you must be a pedophile"]]. The executives backed down.
* Eels were forced by their record label into licensing "Mr E's Beautiful Blues" for ''Road Trip'', as well as doing a video for it that alternated between [[VideoFullOfFilmClips clips from the movie]] and scenes of vocalist E driving a van with most of the main cast as passengers. In his autobiography ''Things the Grandchlidren Should Know'', E stated that while he'd already licensed songs for movies in the past, he was none too happy to have his music associated with "a frat boy movie" - for him the only enjoyable part of making the video was a brief scene where he pretended to beat up the cast members.
** Not only that, they also forced him to include the track on the album "Daisies of the Galaxy." E felt like the song didn't fit the tone of the album, so he got his revenge by including it only as a hidden bonus track at the end.

to:

* {{Music/Nirvana}}:
**
Kmart and Walmart refused to sell the {{Music/Nirvana}} album ''In Utero'' until new packaging that listed the track "Rape Me" as "Waif Me" was created. The cover art, which features anatomical drawings of a naked woman, was also changed. The only reason Kurt Cobain agreed to the changes was because when he was a kid, his family was poor and he was only able to buy music from K-Mart or Wal-Mart since there wasn't a record store in his hometown, and he empathised with kids in the same situation.
** {{Averted}} on Nevermind.''Nevermind''. Executives wanted to censor the cover famously featuring a naked baby, but the only form of censorship Cobain would agree to was a [[CrowningMomentofAwesome sticker covering the penis that read "if you are offended by this you must be a pedophile"]]. The executives backed down.
* Eels were forced by their record label into licensing "Mr E's Beautiful Blues" for ''Road Trip'', as well as doing a video for it that alternated between [[VideoFullOfFilmClips clips from the movie]] and scenes of vocalist E driving a van with most of the main cast as passengers. In his autobiography ''Things the Grandchlidren Should Know'', E stated that while he'd already licensed songs for movies in the past, he was none too happy to have his music associated with "a frat boy movie" - for him the only enjoyable part of making the video was a brief scene where he pretended to beat up the cast members.
** Not only that, they
members. They also forced him to include the track on the album "Daisies of the Galaxy." E felt like the song didn't fit the tone of the album, so he got his revenge by including it only as a hidden bonus track at the end.


Added DiffLines:

17th Mar '16 10:41:33 AM MikeK
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* Self were working on two albums around the same time: ''Gizmodgery'' (1999), a smaller-budget self-produced album performed entirely on toy instruments released on independent label Spongebath, and ''Breakfast With Girls'' (2000), an album featuring a bigger budget, an outside RecordProducer (Hugh Padgham), released on [=DreamWorks=] Records. The involvement of the larger label did affect both releases, but maybe not in the way you'd expect: [=DreamWorks=] liked the songs "Suzy Q Sailaway" and "Uno Song" so much they insisted that they be left off ''Gizmodgery'' and re-recorded for ''Breakfast With Girls''. The original recording of "Suzy Q Sailaway" featuring toy instruments was later released on ''Selfafornia'', a free digital-only album distributed by the band.

to:

* Self were working on two albums around the same time: ''Gizmodgery'' (1999), a smaller-budget self-produced album performed entirely on toy instruments released on independent label Spongebath, and ''Breakfast With Girls'' (2000), an album featuring a bigger budget, budget and an outside RecordProducer (Hugh Padgham), released on [=DreamWorks=] Records. The involvement of the larger label did affect both releases, but maybe not in the way you'd expect: [=DreamWorks=] liked the songs "Suzy Q Sailaway" and "Uno Song" so much they insisted that they be left off ''Gizmodgery'' and re-recorded for ''Breakfast With Girls''. The original recording of "Suzy Q Sailaway" featuring toy instruments was later released on ''Selfafornia'', a free digital-only album distributed by the band.
17th Mar '16 10:40:16 AM MikeK
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* Self were working on two albums around the same time: ''Gizmodgery'' (1999), a smaller-budget self-produced album performed entirely on toy instruments released on independent label Spongebath, and ''Breakfast With Girls'' (2000), an album featuring a bigger budget, an outside RecordProducer (Hugh Padgham), and released on [=DreamWorks=] Records. The involvement of the larger label did affect both releases, but maybe not in the way you'd expect: [=DreamWorks=] liked the songs "Suzy Q Sailaway" and "Uno Song" so much they insisted that they be left off ''Gizmodgery'' and re-recorded for ''Breakfast With Girls''. The original recording of "Suzy Q Sailaway" featuring toy instruments was later released on ''Selfafornia'', a free digital-only album distributed by the band.

to:

* Self were working on two albums around the same time: ''Gizmodgery'' (1999), a smaller-budget self-produced album performed entirely on toy instruments released on independent label Spongebath, and ''Breakfast With Girls'' (2000), an album featuring a bigger budget, an outside RecordProducer (Hugh Padgham), and released on [=DreamWorks=] Records. The involvement of the larger label did affect both releases, but maybe not in the way you'd expect: [=DreamWorks=] liked the songs "Suzy Q Sailaway" and "Uno Song" so much they insisted that they be left off ''Gizmodgery'' and re-recorded for ''Breakfast With Girls''. The original recording of "Suzy Q Sailaway" featuring toy instruments was later released on ''Selfafornia'', a free digital-only album distributed by the band.
17th Mar '16 10:39:39 AM MikeK
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Added DiffLines:

* Self were working on two albums around the same time: ''Gizmodgery'' (1999), a smaller-budget self-produced album performed entirely on toy instruments released on independent label Spongebath, and ''Breakfast With Girls'' (2000), an album featuring a bigger budget, an outside RecordProducer (Hugh Padgham), and released on [=DreamWorks=] Records. The involvement of the larger label did affect both releases, but maybe not in the way you'd expect: [=DreamWorks=] liked the songs "Suzy Q Sailaway" and "Uno Song" so much they insisted that they be left off ''Gizmodgery'' and re-recorded for ''Breakfast With Girls''. The original recording of "Suzy Q Sailaway" featuring toy instruments was later released on ''Selfafornia'', a free digital-only album distributed by the band.
11th Mar '16 5:05:58 PM KoopaKid17
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** Executive Meddling was the reason Al wrote "Christmas at Ground Zero". They kept insisting he write a "Christmas-y" song for the holiday season. They eventually regretted it.

to:

** Executive Meddling was the reason Al wrote "Christmas at Ground Zero". They kept insisting he write a "Christmas-y" song for the holiday season. [[BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor They eventually regretted it.it]].
11th Mar '16 1:36:06 PM MarkLungo
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** Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe's proposed second album (with backing vocals by bassist Chris Squire), recorded in Montserrat in 1990-91, was incorporated with tracks recorded by the UsefulNotes/LosAngeles-based Yes (whose recordings would feature Jon Anderson's vocals), including unfinished demos by Yes guitarist/keyboardist/vocalist Music/TrevorRabin, and a Chris Squire/Billy Sherwood collaboration to form an eight-man Yes lineup, so that Creator/AristaRecords could sell more copies than an ABWH album could. A home-recorded acoustic guitar instrumental by Steve Howe and a Stick bass/electronic drum duet by Tony Levin and Bill Bruford were added to the album. With producer Johnathan Elias computer-editing the tracks and adding parts recorded by LA session musicians (unfortunately witout the input of YesWest or ABWH) in order to rush the album's release. The finished product was released as ''Union''. It remains a controversial album and an album disliked by critics and [[CreatorBacklash Yes' members themselves]].
** Following ''Union'' 's failure, Yes' new label tried to reunite the YesWest lineup for ''Talk'', hoping for ''90125''-type sales, but the label did not promote the album as it was folding at the time.

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** Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe's proposed second album (with backing vocals by bassist Chris Squire), recorded in Montserrat in 1990-91, was incorporated with tracks recorded by the UsefulNotes/LosAngeles-based Yes (whose recordings would feature Jon Anderson's vocals), including unfinished demos by Yes guitarist/keyboardist/vocalist Music/TrevorRabin, and a Chris Squire/Billy Sherwood collaboration to form an eight-man Yes lineup, so that Creator/AristaRecords could sell more copies than an ABWH album could. A home-recorded acoustic guitar instrumental by Steve Howe and a Stick bass/electronic drum duet by Tony Levin and Bill Bruford were added to the album. With producer Johnathan Elias computer-editing the tracks and adding parts recorded by LA session musicians (unfortunately witout without the input of YesWest [=YesWest=] or ABWH) in order to rush the album's release. The finished product was released as ''Union''. It remains a controversial album and an album disliked by critics and [[CreatorBacklash Yes' members themselves]].
** Following ''Union'' 's failure, Yes' new label tried to reunite the YesWest [=YesWest=] lineup for ''Talk'', hoping for ''90125''-type sales, but the label did not promote the album as it was folding at the time.
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