History ExecutiveMeddling / LiveActionTV

21st Jan '18 11:12:42 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** Season 11 (1985-1986): Another bad season, only this time, it was LorneMichaels' fault. After his sketch show ''The New Show'' got canned and learning that NBC was going to cancel ''SNL'' after its 10th season due to low ratings and Dick Ebersol deciding to quit after NBC nixed all the ideas he had planned for his vision of ''SNL'', Michaels swooped in to rebuild his show, with a new cast and new writers. With the exception of Creator/DennisMiller, Jon Lovitz, and Nora Dunn, no one cared much for the new cast (which included such now-famous faces as Joan Cusack, Robert Downey Jr., Damon Wayans, and Randy Quaid, along with the first time the show hired homosexual cast members[[note]]Terry Sweeney, an openly gay white man, who was on the show before as one of Jean Doumanian's writers, and Danitra Vance, a black lesbian[[/note]] and the only time the show hired a teenager[[note]]Anthony Michael Hall was 17 and already famous as a star of ''Film/TheBreakfastClub'' when he joined the cast, making him the youngest ever cast member.[[/note]]), and, after the bizarre debacle that was the March 1986 episode hosted by George Wendt with Francis Ford Coppola and musical guest Phillip Glass, NBC rushed in again and decided to shut the show down for good. While the season 11 finale did end with everyone locked in a room with Lorne setting it on fire and saving Jon Lovitz, Lorne begged NBC to give his show another chance, which they did, but only for 13 episodes of season 12 (they later rescinded this after season 12 brought ''SNL'' back from its early 1980s slump). Lorne fired everyone (except for the three aforementioned newcomers who were actually good, along with Al Franken and A. Whitney Brown), brought in people like Dana Carvey, Creator/PhilHartman, Jan Hooks, Victoria Jackson, and Kevin Nealon, and everything about season 11 was written off as a bad dream.

to:

*** Season 11 (1985-1986): Another bad season, only this time, it was LorneMichaels' Creator/LorneMichaels' fault. After his sketch show ''The New Show'' got canned and learning that NBC was going to cancel ''SNL'' after its 10th season due to low ratings and Dick Ebersol deciding to quit after NBC nixed all the ideas he had planned for his vision of ''SNL'', Michaels swooped in to rebuild his show, with a new cast and new writers. With the exception of Creator/DennisMiller, Jon Lovitz, and Nora Dunn, no one cared much for the new cast (which included such now-famous faces as Joan Cusack, Robert Downey Jr., Damon Wayans, and Randy Quaid, along with the first time the show hired homosexual cast members[[note]]Terry Sweeney, an openly gay white man, who was on the show before as one of Jean Doumanian's writers, and Danitra Vance, a black lesbian[[/note]] and the only time the show hired a teenager[[note]]Anthony Michael Hall was 17 and already famous as a star of ''Film/TheBreakfastClub'' when he joined the cast, making him the youngest ever cast member.[[/note]]), and, after the bizarre debacle that was the March 1986 episode hosted by George Wendt with Francis Ford Coppola and musical guest Phillip Glass, NBC rushed in again and decided to shut the show down for good. While the season 11 finale did end with everyone locked in a room with Lorne setting it on fire and saving Jon Lovitz, Lorne begged NBC to give his show another chance, which they did, but only for 13 episodes of season 12 (they later rescinded this after season 12 brought ''SNL'' back from its early 1980s slump). Lorne fired everyone (except for the three aforementioned newcomers who were actually good, along with Al Franken and A. Whitney Brown), brought in people like Dana Carvey, Creator/PhilHartman, Jan Hooks, Victoria Jackson, and Kevin Nealon, and everything about season 11 was written off as a bad dream.
7th Jan '18 9:11:56 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** Season six (1980-1981): The first season without Creator/LorneMichaels. Jean Doumanian was hired as the new showrunner (it would have been Al Franken, but he pissed off Fred Silverman with his "Limo for the Lame-O" segment on Weekend Update, and Creator/HarryShearer even expressed an interest in being showrunner, as he felt the show's current sensibility didn't mesh with his brand of humor), and, with every agonizingly unfunny episode, it became clear that Doumanian was in over her head (though Doumanian claims that she was doing the best she could with a limited budget and NBC staff treating her like crap because she's a woman). Add to the fact that she rejected a lot of potential cast members (JimCarrey being one of them), relegated Creator/EddieMurphy to background roles (which would be her undoing, as Eddie Murphy's stand-up piece on the Ray Sharkey episode would be the guarantee that he'd be the show's next big star), and was accused for setting up Charles Rocket saying "fuck" at the end of the Charlene Tilton episode (though Rocket himself has stated that it wasn't a set-up and he didn't know he said anything wrong until the backlash), and NBC had to be rushed in to save the show with new blood, knowing full well that they would probably have to give it a mercy kill (they didn't, but back then, they were thinking it and jokes were made about how ''Saturday Night Live'' should be called ''Saturday Night Dead'' due to its drop in quality).

to:

*** Season six (1980-1981): The first season without Creator/LorneMichaels. Jean Doumanian was hired as the new showrunner (it would have been Al Franken, but he pissed off Fred Silverman with his "Limo for the Lame-O" segment on Weekend Update, and Creator/HarryShearer even expressed an interest in being showrunner, as he felt the show's current sensibility didn't mesh with his brand of humor), and, with every agonizingly unfunny episode, it became clear that Doumanian was in over her head (though Doumanian claims that she was doing the best she could with a limited budget and NBC staff treating her like crap because she's a woman). Add to the fact that she rejected a lot of potential cast members (JimCarrey (Creator/JimCarrey being one of them), relegated Creator/EddieMurphy to background roles (which would be her undoing, as Eddie Murphy's stand-up piece on the Ray Sharkey episode would be the guarantee that he'd be the show's next big star), and was accused for setting up Charles Rocket saying "fuck" at the end of the Charlene Tilton episode (though Rocket himself has stated that it wasn't a set-up and he didn't know he said anything wrong until the backlash), and NBC had to be rushed in to save the show with new blood, knowing full well that they would probably have to give it a mercy kill (they didn't, but back then, they were thinking it and jokes were made about how ''Saturday Night Live'' should be called ''Saturday Night Dead'' due to its drop in quality).
1st Jan '18 3:07:09 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Vogler arc on ''Series/{{House}}''. [[http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/30/arts/television/30hous.html An article in the New York Times]] described how ratings for the initial episodes were low, which led to executives proposing a "bad guy" who would conflict with House. The writers acceded, but before any of those episodes made it onto the air, the show was moved next to ''Series/AmericanIdol''. Ratings soared, giving the writers enough clout to do away with Vogler. Given that fans generally regard the arc as a low point in the season, it was a fortunate break. And for those keeping score, the show is on (what else) {{FOX}}.

to:

* The Vogler arc on ''Series/{{House}}''. [[http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/30/arts/television/30hous.html An article in the New York Times]] described how ratings for the initial episodes were low, which led to executives proposing a "bad guy" who would conflict with House. The writers acceded, but before any of those episodes made it onto the air, the show was moved next to ''Series/AmericanIdol''. Ratings soared, giving the writers enough clout to do away with Vogler. Given that fans generally regard the arc as a low point in the season, it was a fortunate break. And for those keeping score, the show is on (what else) {{FOX}}.{{Creator/FOX}}.
1st Jan '18 3:05:03 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{Fox}} insisted that ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' have a "space hooker" and required Joss Whedon to write a second pilot because they wanted more action and less drama. They also threatened to pan-and-scan crop, no matter how it was shot, necessitating reshoots. Then they aired the episodes out of order and pre-empted a bunch of them for baseball. The series didn't even get to finish its first season.
* The first season of ''{{Series/Dollhouse}}'' was heavily meddled with. The pilot was reshot because {{Fox}} found it too confusing. They also saw it prudent to make the writers focus on a MonsterOfTheWeek format for the first five episodes. They also decided not to air Episode 13, which is perhaps the most critically acclaimed of the series.
** Arguably, though, Executive Meddling saved ''Dollhouse''. When notice came of ''Dollhouse'''s second season renewal, the press release stated that Dollhouse wasn't axed because {{Fox}} didn't want "floods of emails".

to:

* {{Fox}} Creator/{{Fox}} insisted that ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' have a "space hooker" and required Joss Whedon to write a second pilot because they wanted more action and less drama. They also threatened to pan-and-scan crop, no matter how it was shot, necessitating reshoots. Then they aired the episodes out of order and pre-empted a bunch of them for baseball. The series didn't even get to finish its first season.
* The first season of ''{{Series/Dollhouse}}'' was heavily meddled with. The pilot was reshot because {{Fox}} Fox found it too confusing. They also saw it prudent to make the writers focus on a MonsterOfTheWeek format for the first five episodes. They also decided not to air Episode 13, which is perhaps the most critically acclaimed of the series.
** Arguably, though, Executive Meddling saved ''Dollhouse''. When notice came of ''Dollhouse'''s second season renewal, the press release stated that Dollhouse wasn't axed because {{Fox}} Fox didn't want "floods of emails".
1st Jan '18 12:36:30 PM ooh
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''The New Creator/DickVanDyke Show'' (yes, a SpiritualSuccessor to the "Old" [[Series/TheDickVanDykeShow Van Dyke show]]) didn't set the world on fire ratings-wise, but was modestly successful enough CBS to give it a three-season run. (The only reason that the show was made in the first place was to fulfill Van Dyke's three-season contract with the network.) However, CBS and showrunner Creator/CarlReiner clashed when they refused to air an episode where Van Dyke's young TV daughter runs in to her parents having sex. So heated was this clash that Reiner quit the show in protest, and when that happened, Van Dyke let his contract expire, effectively ending the show. That particular episode was shown when TNT reran the series in the '90s.

to:

* ''The New Creator/DickVanDyke Show'' (yes, a SpiritualSuccessor to the "Old" [[Series/TheDickVanDykeShow Van Dyke show]]) didn't set the world on fire ratings-wise, but was modestly successful enough CBS to give it a three-season run. (The only reason that the show was made in the first place was to fulfill Van Dyke's three-season contract with the network.) However, CBS and showrunner Creator/CarlReiner Carl Reiner clashed when they the network refused to air an episode where Van Dyke's young TV daughter runs in to her parents having sex. So heated was this clash that Reiner quit the show in protest, and when that happened, Van Dyke let his contract expire, effectively ending the show. That particular episode was shown when TNT reran the series in the '90s.
1st Jan '18 12:34:19 PM ooh
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''The New Creator/DickVanDyke Show'' (yes, a SpiritualSuccessor to the "Old" [[Series/TheDickVanDykeShow Van Dyke show]]) didn't set the world on fire ratings-wise, but was modestly successful enough CBS to give it a three-season run. (The only reason that the show was made in the first place was to fulfill Van Dyke's three-season contract with the network.) However, CBS and showrunner Creator/CarlReiner clashed when they refused to air an episode where Van Dyke's young TV daughter runs in to her parents having sex. So heated was this clash that Reiner quit the show in protest, and when that happened, Van Dyke let his contract expire, effectively ending the show. That particular episode was shown when TNT reran the series in the '90s.
12th Dec '17 3:48:03 AM jormis29
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In a blunder reminiscent of the rounding of Spock's ears in early ''Series/{{Star Trek|The Original Series}}'' promotional material, some executives at ABC insisted that ''Series/HappyDays'' dress the character of Fonzie in a red nylon windbreaker and loafers, because they were afraid that Fonzie's black leather jacket and biker boots would make him out to be a greaser (those 1950s thugs who actually did wear leather, ride motorcycles, and basically said, "Fuck you!" to polite society by committing petty crimes and not doing anything considered beneficial to the world at large). After the pilot the network compromised, agreeing to let Fonzie wear the jacket and boots only when he was on or beside the motorcycle, so that they could be perceived as "safety gear". Naturally, this spawned the RunningGag where Fonzie took his motorcycle ''everywhere'', even into living rooms and stores, [[WriterRevolt in order to completely eliminate any moment where they would be forced to put him in the windbreaker and loafers]]. Audiences were just as non-repulsed by the character of Fonzie as they had been by the character of Spock nearly a decade earlier; and once he became the show's breakout character, the leather jacket and boots suddenly, mysteriously, became far less threatening to the executives, to the point that they later demanded that the producers rename the show to ''Fonzie's Happy Days'', or just simply ''Fonzie''. Threatened resignations from the entire cast (including Henry Winkler) nixed this idea.

to:

* In a blunder reminiscent of the rounding of Spock's ears in early ''Series/{{Star Trek|The Original Series}}'' promotional material, some executives at ABC insisted that ''Series/HappyDays'' dress the character of Fonzie in a red nylon windbreaker and loafers, because they were afraid that Fonzie's black leather jacket and biker boots would make him out to be a greaser (those 1950s thugs who actually did wear leather, ride motorcycles, and basically said, "Fuck you!" to polite society by committing petty crimes and not doing anything considered beneficial to the world at large). After the pilot the network compromised, agreeing to let Fonzie wear the jacket and boots only when he was on or beside the motorcycle, so that they could be perceived as "safety gear". Naturally, this spawned the RunningGag where Fonzie took his motorcycle ''everywhere'', even into living rooms and stores, [[WriterRevolt in order to completely eliminate any moment where they would be forced to put him in the windbreaker and loafers]]. Audiences were just as non-repulsed by the character of Fonzie as they had been by the character of Spock nearly a decade earlier; and once he became the show's breakout character, the leather jacket and boots suddenly, mysteriously, became far less threatening to the executives, to the point that they later demanded that the producers rename the show to ''Fonzie's Happy Days'', or just simply ''Fonzie''. Threatened resignations from the entire cast (including Henry Winkler) Creator/HenryWinkler) nixed this idea.
4th Dec '17 6:54:09 PM Twentington
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** This would be subverted for it's Canadian counterpart ''Big Brother Canada'' where the majority of houseguests that have been on the show are die hard fans of ''Big Brother''. Not to mention, ''Big Brother Canada'' host Arisa Cox is a super fan of ''Big Brother'' and has watched the American version it's based off of and many international versions of the show.
*** Obviously in ''Series/{{Survivor}}'', if they picked people who really knew how to play the game, they'd be ''constantly'' trying to one-up one another and it'd turn into ''Manga/DeathNote''and wouldn't be very interesting to watch, especially when players like Brett, Cassandra, and Vecepia wind up in the end despite spending the entire 39 days sitting around the camp with their mouths shut.

to:

*** This would be subverted for it's its Canadian counterpart ''Big Brother Canada'' where the majority of houseguests that have been on the show are die hard fans of ''Big Brother''. Not to mention, ''Big Brother Canada'' host Arisa Cox is a super fan of ''Big Brother'' and has watched the American version it's based off of and many international versions of the show.
*** Obviously in ''Series/{{Survivor}}'', if they picked people who really knew how to play the game, they'd be ''constantly'' trying to one-up one another and it'd turn into ''Manga/DeathNote''and wouldn't be very interesting to watch, especially when players like Brett, Cassandra, and Vecepia wind up in the end despite spending the entire 39 days sitting around the camp with their mouths shut.
show.
30th Oct '17 9:32:16 AM ClintEastwood
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Uhura, the most visible female character, was denied a chance to command the ''Enterprise'' in one episode because an executive flat out told Roddenberry "we don't believe her in charge of anything". Nichelle Nichols got a lot of crap thrown her way by the executives for reasons that today are obviously both racist and sexist; for the first season, she wasn't a regular member of the cast, and her ''fan mail was kept from her''. She almost left the show, until she met Martin Luther King Jr. at a party, who convinced her to stay on and serve as a black role model.

to:

** Uhura, the most visible female character, was denied a chance to command the ''Enterprise'' in one episode because an executive flat out told Roddenberry "we don't believe her in charge of anything". Nichelle Nichols Creator/NichelleNichols got a lot of crap thrown her way by the executives for reasons that today are obviously both racist and sexist; for the first season, she wasn't a regular member of the cast, and her ''fan mail was kept from her''. She almost left the show, until she met Martin Luther King Jr. at a party, who convinced her to stay on and serve as a black role model.



** The original {{pilot}} episode for the original series, "The Cage", was considered "too intellectual" by the executives, so a new one was made. Gene Roddenberry then created the two-parter "The Menagerie" as a FramingDevice in order to utilize footage from "The Cage". "The Menagerie" won a Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation. And in a wonderful bit of serendipity, the story also established the concept of a "Star Trek universe" spanning decades which later became one spanning centuries with later revival series and spinoffs (with the exception of soap operas, TV series of the era rarely established any sort of long-standing history of their fictional universes).
** David Gerrold suggested a subplot for "The Trouble With Tribbles" which would have involved two companies engaging in mutual corporate espionage, even each sabotaging the other's efforts to colonize Sherman's Planet (the tribbles would have been an element of this sabotage). This was rejected with a scrawl of "Big Business angle out" in the margin; in 1967 it was, at least in the eyes of the show's sponsors, utterly unacceptable to suggest that ''any'' corporation -- even centuries in the future -- might ''ever'' engage in behavior less than completely and shiningly ethical.
** The episode "The Cloud Minders" was based on an outline by Gerrold, "Castles in the Sky". In his original outline, the planet's mine workers were rebelling, caught between two different leaders: a [[UsefulNotes/MalcolmX violent militant]] and a [[UsefulNotes/MartinLutherKingJr revolutionary pacifist]]. The story would have culminated with Kirk literally sitting the three leaders -- the militant, the pacifist, and the overlords' leader -- down ''at phaserpoint'' and commanding them to talk to each other; the end would have had Kirk congratulating himself that at least they were now ''talking'' to each other, so given enough time they'd work things out, and [=McCoy=] answering, [[WhamLine "Yes, but how many children will die in the meantime?"]] Gerrold was profoundly disappointed when the final script established that the mine-workers were only acting the way they were because of the pernicious effects of "zeenite gas" in the mines. Or as he put it, "If we can just get them troglytes to wear gas masks, then they'll be happy little darkies and they'll pick all the cotton we need."

to:

** The original {{pilot}} episode for the original series, "The Cage", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E0TheCage}} The Cage]]", was considered "too intellectual" by the executives, so a new one was made. Gene Roddenberry then created the two-parter "The Menagerie" as a FramingDevice in order to utilize footage from "The Cage". "The Menagerie" won a Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation. And in a wonderful bit of serendipity, the story also established the concept of a "Star Trek universe" spanning decades which later became one spanning centuries with later revival series and spinoffs (with the exception of soap operas, TV series of the era rarely established any sort of long-standing history of their fictional universes).
** David Gerrold suggested a subplot for "The "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS2E15TheTroubleWithTribbles}} The Trouble With Tribbles" with Tribbles]]" which would have involved two companies engaging in mutual corporate espionage, even each sabotaging the other's efforts to colonize Sherman's Planet (the tribbles would have been an element of this sabotage). This was rejected with a scrawl of "Big Business angle out" in the margin; in 1967 it was, at least in the eyes of the show's sponsors, utterly unacceptable to suggest that ''any'' corporation -- even centuries in the future -- might ''ever'' engage in behavior less than completely and shiningly ethical.
** The episode "The "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS3E21TheCloudMinders}} The Cloud Minders" Minders]]" was based on an outline by Gerrold, "Castles in the Sky". In his original outline, the planet's mine workers were rebelling, caught between two different leaders: a [[UsefulNotes/MalcolmX violent militant]] and a [[UsefulNotes/MartinLutherKingJr revolutionary pacifist]]. The story would have culminated with Kirk literally sitting the three leaders -- the militant, the pacifist, and the overlords' leader -- down ''at phaserpoint'' and commanding them to talk to each other; the end would have had Kirk congratulating himself that at least they were now ''talking'' to each other, so given enough time they'd work things out, and [=McCoy=] answering, [[WhamLine "Yes, but how many children will die in the meantime?"]] Gerrold was profoundly disappointed when the final script established that the mine-workers were only acting the way they were because of the pernicious effects of "zeenite gas" in the mines. Or as he put it, "If we can just get them troglytes to wear gas masks, then they'll be happy little darkies and they'll pick all the cotton we need."



* In the second season of ''Series/BabylonFive'', TheWB execs insisted on the creation of a hotshot fighter pilot character that they actually called "the Han Solo of ''Babylon 5''", a phrase series creator Creator/JMichaelStraczynski hated due to its implication that [[ViewersAreMorons the viewer would be unfamiliar]] [[SmallReferencePools with any kind of science fiction besides]] ''StarWars''. Since it was the only way the show would survive past its first season, he went along and created Lt. Warren Keffer. However, he got his revenge by giving Keffer as little to do as possible, and at the end of the season, killed him off in a very painful manner. By this point, the executives had completely forgotten that they insisted upon the character in the first place.

to:

* In the second season of ''Series/BabylonFive'', TheWB execs insisted on the creation of a hotshot fighter pilot character that they actually called "the Han Solo of ''Babylon 5''", a phrase series creator Creator/JMichaelStraczynski hated due to its implication that [[ViewersAreMorons the viewer would be unfamiliar]] [[SmallReferencePools with any kind of science fiction besides]] ''StarWars''.''Franchise/StarWars''. Since it was the only way the show would survive past its first season, he went along and created Lt. Warren Keffer. However, he got his revenge by giving Keffer as little to do as possible, and at the end of the season, killed him off in a very painful manner. By this point, the executives had completely forgotten that they insisted upon the character in the first place.



** "E2" is often remembered for ripping off half a dozen episodes. What isn't too well-known is that the writer was specifically asked to make a number of edits for it to [[FollowTheLeader mimic previous ideas]].
** The most egregious example from ''Enterprise'' is the episode "Dear Doctor", in which Doctor Phlox discovers that an apparent pandemic among the Valakian species is actually a widespread genetic disorder. Phlox is able to create a cure, but wants to withhold it because the disorder came about naturally, and the fall of the Valakians will make way for the ascendency of a second intelligent species which are currenly oppressed by the Valakians. In the original version of the script, Phlox refuses a direct order from Captain Archer to give them the cure, ending the episode with tension between the characters. UPN execs, however, were unhappy with the characters holding so strong a disagreement, so the script had to be changed for Archer to agree with Phlox instead. There is still [[BrokenBase significant argument]] over whether or not this counts as [[AMillionIsAStatistic genocide]].
** As part of an "HIV awareness week" the network asked all series to do an AIDS-themed episode, even the one set 150 years in the future ("Stigma"). [[{{Anvilicious}} This turned out as bad as you'd think]], and while HIV did not make an appearance, the series did contract a major PlotTumor.

to:

** "E2" "[[{{Recap/StarTrekEnterpriseS03E21ESquared}} E Squared]]" is often remembered for ripping off half a dozen episodes. What isn't too well-known is that the writer was specifically asked to make a number of edits for it to [[FollowTheLeader mimic previous ideas]].
** The most egregious example from ''Enterprise'' is the episode "Dear Doctor", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekEnterpriseS01E13DearDoctor}} Dear Doctor]]", in which Doctor Phlox discovers that an apparent pandemic among the Valakian species is actually a widespread genetic disorder. Phlox is able to create a cure, but wants to withhold it because the disorder came about naturally, and the fall of the Valakians will make way for the ascendency of a second intelligent species which are currenly oppressed by the Valakians. In the original version of the script, Phlox refuses a direct order from Captain Archer to give them the cure, ending the episode with tension between the characters. UPN execs, however, were unhappy with the characters holding so strong a disagreement, so the script had to be changed for Archer to agree with Phlox instead. There is still [[BrokenBase significant argument]] over whether or not this counts as [[AMillionIsAStatistic genocide]].
** As part of an "HIV awareness week" the network asked all series to do an AIDS-themed episode, even the one set 150 years in the future ("Stigma").("[[{{Recap/StarTrekEnterpriseS02E014Stigma}} Stigma]]"). [[{{Anvilicious}} This turned out as bad as you'd think]], and while HIV did not make an appearance, the series did contract a major PlotTumor.



** Willow's character was the subject of a lot of meddling. In the unaired pilot, she was played by Riff Regan, who actually looked like she could be a geeky social outcast, as opposed to... say... [[HollywoodHomely Alyson Hannigan]]. She wasn't recast for this reason, however -- she frequently flubbed lines and generally played the character as too nervous.

to:

** Willow's character was the subject of a lot of meddling. In the unaired pilot, she was played by Riff Regan, who actually looked like she could be a geeky social outcast, as opposed to... say... [[HollywoodHomely Alyson Hannigan]].Creator/AlysonHannigan. She wasn't recast for this reason, however -- she frequently flubbed lines and generally played the character as too nervous.



*** The WB also postponed the ''Buffy'' episode "Earshot," as the episode involved a plot to mass-murder students (with a RedHerring that it would be by shooting). It was supposed to be the next episode to air following Columbine, so the network instead aired a rerun of "Band Candy". The irony is that Buffy keeps the character Jonathan from killing himself in "Earshot", which makes it all the more significant that he is the one to give her the Class Protector Award in "The Prom", the episode that was originally to air after "Earshot". OutOfOrder like that, it makes little sense.

to:

*** The WB also postponed the ''Buffy'' episode "Earshot," "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS3E18Earshot}} Earshot]]", as the episode involved a plot to mass-murder students (with a RedHerring that it would be by shooting). It was supposed to be the next episode to air following Columbine, so the network instead aired a rerun of "Band Candy". "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS3E6Band Candy}} Band Candy]]". The irony is that Buffy keeps the character Jonathan from killing himself in "Earshot", which makes it all the more significant that he is the one to give her the Class Protector Award in "The Prom", "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS3E20TheProm}} The Prom]]", the episode that was originally to air after "Earshot". OutOfOrder like that, it makes little sense.
20th Oct '17 1:43:29 AM Green_lantern40
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/LawAndOrder'' suffered when the show was forced -- in the name of expanding the demographic reach -- to replace Lt. Cragen and Paul Robinette with Lt. Van Buren and Claire Kincaid, respectively.
** This is arguably a positive example. Claire Kincaid quickly became one of the show's most popular characters (as well as one of the most well-beloved female characters on the show, to the point that the show repeatedly tried to recreate the character after the actress left the show) while Merkerson remained until the end, having stayed for 17 of the show's 20 years. The execs probably were not only right in the ''Law and Order'' case, but actually ahead of their time...
** Plus, it did free Cragen up to go to the spinoff ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'', so it was a win for everyone except Robinette.

to:

* ''Series/LawAndOrder'' suffered A positive example with ''Series/LawAndOrder'', when the show was forced -- in the name of expanding the demographic reach -- to replace Lt. Cragen and Paul Robinette with Lt. Van Buren and Claire Kincaid, respectively.
** This is arguably a positive example. Claire
respectively. Kincaid quickly became one of the show's most popular characters (as well as one of the most well-beloved female characters on the show, to the point that the show repeatedly tried to recreate the character after the actress left the show) while Merkerson remained until the end, having stayed for 17 of the show's 20 years. The Not only were the execs probably right, they were not only right in the ''Law and Order'' case, but actually ''actually ahead of their time...
** Plus, it did free Cragen up
time''. (Cragen, of course, returned to go to the franchise with the spinoff ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'', so it was a win for everyone except Robinette.)
This list shows the last 10 events of 564. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=ExecutiveMeddling.LiveActionTV