History ExecutiveMeddling / LiveActionTV

23rd Mar '17 12:18:11 PM skidoo23
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* The ''Doctor Who'' spin-off series ''Series/Class2016'' was impacted by meddling. As reported in UK media in the summer of 2016, the BBC required the deletion or toning down of sexual content in the made-for-streaming series before allowing the Doctor to make an appearance in the opening episode. This echoed the fact that the BBC famously would not allow the Doctor to appear at all in the other adult-oriented spin-off ''Series/{{Torchwood}}''.
23rd Mar '17 12:15:45 PM skidoo23
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** Modern ''Series/DoctorWho'' isn't necessarily free of this, by all accounts; it has reportedly been mandated from above that every story must feature some kind of monster, regardless of whether it is appropriate to include one. The episode "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E8FathersDay Father's Day]]" was reportedly meant to not include any monsters at all, before this executive degree mandated the inclusion of the ClockRoaches that power the plot.
** Michael Grade, BBC Controller in the mid-eighties, is the king of ExecutiveMeddling. He openly hated ''Doctor Who'' and decided to have the show put on hiatus for 18 months... scrapping pre-production on an entire season of the franchise, including [[MissingEpisode three fully-scripted and partially-cast episodes]]. The series was allowed to come back at a drastically reduced episode count (14 episodes at twenty-five minutes each, compared to the 13 45-minute episodes they had the season before the hiatus, and the 26 25-minute episode count of most earlier seasons) and with a lower budget. For years afterwards he claimed that one of the reasons he hated the show due to the lousy effects, despite the fact he could have allocated more money to the show. Eventually, he fired Creator/ColinBaker from the role of the Doctor (arguing that he'd been on the show for three years, just like all previous Doctors except for Creator/JonPertwee and Creator/TomBaker, but ''counting the hiatus as part of that time'') and forced the producer to recast the role - whilst dating Colin Baker' ex-wife. The series survived to have three more seasons on the air... but Grade placed the show against [[Series/CoronationStreet another network's incredibly-popular series]] without bothering to note it to the general public... and then the series was put on hiatus one more time in 1989 until [[Recap/DoctorWhoTVMTheTVMovie the 1996 movie]] and [[{{Revival}} the 2005 revival series]].

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** Creator/PeterDavison, the Fifth Doctor, is on record as saying the BBC was adamant that there be no indication of "hanky panky" among the occupants of the TARDIS during his time on the show, with them frowning upon the Doctor even so much as hugging anyone. This may have been due to the fact that for most of his time, the Fifth Doctor travelled by himself alongside two sexy (and single) female companions, one of whom was played by an actress about Davison's age and the other supposedly still only a teenager. In the Modern Era, this concern was clearly dropped as the Doctor was allowed to romance (subtly and otherwise) companions and others.
** Modern ''Series/DoctorWho'' isn't necessarily free of this, by all accounts; it has reportedly been mandated from above that every story must feature some kind of monster, regardless of whether it is appropriate to include one. The episode "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E8FathersDay Father's Day]]" was reportedly meant to not include any monsters at all, before this executive degree mandated the inclusion of the ClockRoaches that power the plot.
plot. (If this order ever existed - it is disputed - it appears to no longer be in place, hence the existence of episodes such as "Hell Bent" and "Voyage of the Damned" in which no monsters appear at all.
** Michael Grade, BBC Controller in the mid-eighties, is the king of ExecutiveMeddling. He openly hated ''Doctor Who'' and decided to have the show put on hiatus for 18 months... scrapping pre-production on an entire season of the franchise, including [[MissingEpisode three fully-scripted and partially-cast episodes]].episodes]] (after allegedly ordering an outright cancellation of the series). The series was allowed to come back at a drastically reduced episode count (14 episodes at twenty-five minutes each, compared to the 13 45-minute episodes they had the season before the hiatus, and the 26 25-minute episode count of most earlier seasons) and with a lower budget. For years afterwards he claimed that one of the reasons he hated the show due to the lousy effects, despite the fact he could have allocated more money to the show. Eventually, he fired Creator/ColinBaker from the role of the Doctor (arguing that he'd been on the show for three years, just like all previous Doctors except for Creator/JonPertwee and Creator/TomBaker, but ''counting the hiatus as part of that time'') and forced the producer to recast the role - whilst dating Colin Baker' ex-wife. The series survived to have three more seasons on the air... but Grade placed the show against [[Series/CoronationStreet another network's incredibly-popular series]] without bothering to note it to the general public... and then the series was put on hiatus one more time in 1989 until [[Recap/DoctorWhoTVMTheTVMovie the 1996 movie]] and [[{{Revival}} the 2005 revival series]].



* In 2011, North American broadcasts of ''Doctor Who'' suffered from another form of meddling; feeling viewers needed an explanation about what the show is about, BBC America required that a pre-credits introduction be added to the episodes of Series 6. Narrated by Amy Pond, and using flashbacks from Series 5, the sequence quickly explains what the show is about, even though as written it suggests the Doctor is imaginary! Aside from breaking the rhythm of the opening teasers of each episode (which normally would lead straight into the credits), the intro was not very popular with viewers who wanted to see the same show the Brits saw. Not surprisingly, the intro is omitted from the Region 1 DVD and Blu-ray releases of Series 6, and was dropped altogether when Series 7 aired.
** For whatever reason, these intros also were broadcast in Australia.
** Series 6 episodes on Netflix in North America still display this version of the intro.
** Some Fourth Doctor episodes were broadcast in Japan in the 90s with a similar intro, with the dub voice actor for the Fourth Doctor reading out an introduction to who he is and what he does in character. This was, however, fairly popular with viewers, as there was much less of an existing fanbase due to the language barrier, and it made the show fit the established patterns of {{Toku}} shows (which ''Doctor Who'' is very, very similar to).

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* ** In 2011, North American broadcasts of ''Doctor Who'' suffered from another form of meddling; feeling viewers needed an explanation about what the show is about, BBC America required that a pre-credits introduction be added to the episodes of Series 6. Narrated by Amy Pond, and using flashbacks from Series 5, the sequence quickly explains what the show is about, even though as written it suggests the Doctor is imaginary! Aside from breaking the rhythm of the opening teasers of each episode (which normally would lead straight into the credits), the intro was not very popular with viewers who wanted to see the same show the Brits saw. Not surprisingly, the intro is omitted from the Region 1 DVD and Blu-ray releases of Series 6, and was dropped altogether when Series 7 aired.
** *** For whatever reason, these intros also were broadcast in Australia.
**
Australia. Series 6 episodes on Netflix in North America still display this version of the intro.
**
intro. Some Fourth Doctor episodes were broadcast in Japan in the 90s with a similar intro, with the dub voice actor for the Fourth Doctor reading out an introduction to who he is and what he does in character. This was, however, fairly popular with viewers, as there was much less of an existing fanbase due to the language barrier, and it made the show fit the established patterns of {{Toku}} shows (which ''Doctor Who'' is very, very similar to).
18th Mar '17 12:48:33 AM scooter
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** Later, the executives at ABC cut ''Series/GreysAnatomy'' overall season budget, which led to Eric Dane's departure and [[spoiler: his character being killed off.]]



* The executives at ABC cut ''Series/GreysAnatomy'' budget for the current season leading to Eric Dane's departure and [[spoiler: his character being killed off.]]
12th Mar '17 1:44:40 PM nombretomado
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* The reason the first season of ''Baretta'' in 1975 had an instrumental theme instead of the vocal version heard from season two onwards is because of this; star Robert Blake had gotten the ball rolling for what ultimately became "Keep Your Eye On The Sparrow" by Dave Grusin and Morgan Ames, but it was nixed because (so the powers that be told Ames and company) "the reason was, [[UnfortunateImplications you can't open a white show with a black singer]]." ([[Series/FamilyTies Times have]] [[{{Moonlighting}} changed since then]].) Several high viewing figures later the song got vocals (by Sammy Davis Jr., instead of original singer Jim Gilstrap).

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* The reason the first season of ''Baretta'' in 1975 had an instrumental theme instead of the vocal version heard from season two onwards is because of this; star Robert Blake had gotten the ball rolling for what ultimately became "Keep Your Eye On The Sparrow" by Dave Grusin and Morgan Ames, but it was nixed because (so the powers that be told Ames and company) "the reason was, [[UnfortunateImplications you can't open a white show with a black singer]]." ([[Series/FamilyTies Times have]] [[{{Moonlighting}} [[Series/{{Moonlighting}} changed since then]].) Several high viewing figures later the song got vocals (by Sammy Davis Jr., instead of original singer Jim Gilstrap).
26th Feb '17 9:37:24 AM nombretomado
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* The original ending of HannahMontana was an AllJustADream scenario. The show was [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TFG2iFcdOgI revealed to be the dream]] of a young Miley Cyrus. Thanks to ExecutiveMeddling it was thought to be too confusing for children and the ending was changed to [[spoiler:Miley giving up the movie in Paris to attend college with Lilly]]... The original ending however was later added as a alternate ending in the Final Season DVD set.

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* The original ending of HannahMontana ''Series/HannahMontana'' was an AllJustADream scenario. The show was [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TFG2iFcdOgI revealed to be the dream]] of a young Miley Cyrus. Thanks to ExecutiveMeddling it was thought to be too confusing for children and the ending was changed to [[spoiler:Miley giving up the movie in Paris to attend college with Lilly]]... The original ending however was later added as a alternate ending in the Final Season DVD set.
17th Feb '17 5:57:37 PM Midna
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** Over time, G4 turned into something which, aside from ''X-Play'', bore 'no'' resemblance to either original G4 ''or'' Creator/TechTV, having been {{Retool}}ed into a Spike TV clone with WAAAYYYYY too much ''Series/{{Cops}}''. After cancelling ''X-Play'', parent company Comcast planned to change it to the Esquire Network, but decided it would replace the Style Network instead, leaving G4 in such a living-dead state that Comcast pulled the channel from its cable systems in January 2014.

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** Over time, G4 turned into something which, aside from ''X-Play'', bore 'no'' ''no'' resemblance to either original G4 ''or'' Creator/TechTV, having been {{Retool}}ed into a Spike TV clone with WAAAYYYYY too much ''Series/{{Cops}}''. After cancelling ''X-Play'', parent company Comcast planned to change it to the Esquire Network, but decided it would replace the Style Network instead, leaving G4 in such a living-dead state that Comcast pulled the channel from its cable systems in January 2014.
12th Feb '17 10:18:07 PM kensu
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** The producers had been interested in adding Bruce Wayne to the cast so they could establish the friendship between Batman and Superman that was an important aspect of the comic book. However they never got permission because WarnerBrothers felt it would produce competition with the ChristopherNolan Batman movies that started coming out around that time. (Contrary to popular belief, Adam Knight was never intended to be Batman. The idea of adding Bruce Wayne to the series had been quashed long before they could write any scripts.) The producers ended up using Oliver Queen instead. This lead to the character of GreenArrow becoming more popular than he had ever been before, and he eventually got his own spin-off.
11th Feb '17 10:51:41 AM Morgenthaler
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** Creator/JMichaelStraczynski's experience creating the ''Series/BabylonFive'' sequel series ''Series/{{Crusade}}'' for {{TNT}} was full of meddling; Turner execs reportedly asked him to add more sex and violence, and write a second pilot directly under their oversight. They even forced changes in the color scheme of the sets and uniforms after filming had begun. A [[LampshadeHanging lampshade was hung]] on this in one episode, with a sarcastic comment about interfering higher-ups back on Earth. The series was canceled before it even aired, and to add insult to injury, the episodes were aired out of their intended order.

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** Creator/JMichaelStraczynski's experience creating the ''Series/BabylonFive'' sequel series ''Series/{{Crusade}}'' for {{TNT}} Creator/{{TNT}} was full of meddling; Turner execs reportedly asked him to add more sex and violence, and write a second pilot directly under their oversight. They even forced changes in the color scheme of the sets and uniforms after filming had begun. A [[LampshadeHanging lampshade was hung]] on this in one episode, with a sarcastic comment about interfering higher-ups back on Earth. The series was canceled before it even aired, and to add insult to injury, the episodes were aired out of their intended order.
6th Jan '17 3:35:20 AM JamesAustin
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*** Season 11 (1985-1986): Another bad season, only this time, it was LorneMichaels' fault. After his sketch show ''The New Show'' got canned and learning that NBC was going to cancel ''SNL'' after its 10th season due to low ratings and Dick Ebersol deciding to quit after NBC nixed all the ideas he had planned for his vision of ''SNL'', Michaels swooped in to rebuild his show, with a new cast and new writers. With the exception of DennisMiller, Jon Lovitz, and Nora Dunn, no one cared much for the new cast (which included such now-famous faces as Joan Cusack, Robert Downey Jr., Damon Wayans, and Randy Quaid, along with the first time the show hired homosexual cast members[[note]]Terry Sweeney, an openly gay white man, who was on the show before as one of Jean Doumanian's writers, and Danitra Vance, a black lesbian[[/note]] and the only time the show hired a teenager[[note]]Anthony Michael Hall was 17 and already famous as a star of ''Film/TheBreakfastClub'' when he joined the cast, making him the youngest ever cast member.[[/note]]), and, after the bizarre debacle that was the March 1986 episode hosted by George Wendt with Francis Ford Coppola and musical guest Phillip Glass, NBC rushed in again and decided to shut the show down for good. While the season 11 finale did end with everyone locked in a room with Lorne setting it on fire and saving Jon Lovitz, Lorne begged NBC to give his show another chance, which they did, but only for 13 episodes of season 12 (they later rescinded this after season 12 brought ''SNL'' back from its early 1980s slump). Lorne fired everyone (except for the three aforementioned newcomers who were actually good, along with Al Franken and A. Whitney Brown), brought in people like Dana Carvey, PhilHartman, Jan Hooks, Victoria Jackson, and Kevin Nealon, and everything about season 11 was written off as a bad dream.
*** Season 20 (1994-1995): Unlike seasons 6 and 11, which were bad because of new cast members who were barely experienced with working in sketch comedy and/or as an ensemble and writing that wasn't top shelf, this season was plagued with an overcrowded cast that hated each other, PhilHartman leaving for other projects (mostly ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' and ''News Radio''), and overexposure of Creator/AdamSandler and Creator/ChrisFarley. Once again, NBC confronted Lorne Michaels about it and told him that the show was ending due to low ratings and bad reviews -- and Creator/LorneMichaels, once again, dodged cancellation by weeding out the bad cast members and writers[[note]]though most of them left on their own accord because they were tired of the show, in the cases of Kevin Nealon and Ellen Cleghorne, or found out how daunting working at ''SNL'' is, in the cases of Morwenna Banks and Chris Elliott[[/note]], keeping in the good ones, and hiring newer, better talent. Lorne Michaels has cited season 20 as the closest he's been to being fired and having his show canceled.

to:

*** Season 11 (1985-1986): Another bad season, only this time, it was LorneMichaels' fault. After his sketch show ''The New Show'' got canned and learning that NBC was going to cancel ''SNL'' after its 10th season due to low ratings and Dick Ebersol deciding to quit after NBC nixed all the ideas he had planned for his vision of ''SNL'', Michaels swooped in to rebuild his show, with a new cast and new writers. With the exception of DennisMiller, Jon Lovitz, and Nora Dunn, no one cared much for the new cast (which included such now-famous faces as Joan Cusack, Robert Downey Jr., Damon Wayans, and Randy Quaid, along with the first time the show hired homosexual cast members[[note]]Terry Sweeney, an openly gay white man, who was on the show before as one of Jean Doumanian's writers, and Danitra Vance, a black lesbian[[/note]] and the only time the show hired a teenager[[note]]Anthony Michael Hall was 17 and already famous as a star of ''Film/TheBreakfastClub'' when he joined the cast, making him the youngest ever cast member.[[/note]]), and, after the bizarre debacle that was the March 1986 episode hosted by George Wendt with Francis Ford Coppola and musical guest Phillip Glass, NBC rushed in again and decided to shut the show down for good. While the season 11 finale did end with everyone locked in a room with Lorne setting it on fire and saving Jon Lovitz, Lorne begged NBC to give his show another chance, which they did, but only for 13 episodes of season 12 (they later rescinded this after season 12 brought ''SNL'' back from its early 1980s slump). Lorne fired everyone (except for the three aforementioned newcomers who were actually good, along with Al Franken and A. Whitney Brown), brought in people like Dana Carvey, PhilHartman, Creator/PhilHartman, Jan Hooks, Victoria Jackson, and Kevin Nealon, and everything about season 11 was written off as a bad dream.
*** Season 20 (1994-1995): Unlike seasons 6 and 11, which were bad because of new cast members who were barely experienced with working in sketch comedy and/or as an ensemble and writing that wasn't top shelf, this season was plagued with an overcrowded cast that hated each other, PhilHartman Phil Hartman leaving for other projects (mostly ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' and ''News Radio''), and overexposure of Creator/AdamSandler and Creator/ChrisFarley. Once again, NBC confronted Lorne Michaels about it and told him that the show was ending due to low ratings and bad reviews -- and Creator/LorneMichaels, once again, dodged cancellation by weeding out the bad cast members and writers[[note]]though most of them left on their own accord because they were tired of the show, in the cases of Kevin Nealon and Ellen Cleghorne, or found out how daunting working at ''SNL'' is, in the cases of Morwenna Banks and Chris Elliott[[/note]], keeping in the good ones, and hiring newer, better talent. Lorne Michaels has cited season 20 as the closest he's been to being fired and having his show canceled.
9th Nov '16 6:42:03 AM FromtheWordsofBR
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* Executive pressure forced David Lynch to reveal Laura Palmer's killer in the second season of ''TwinPeaks'', essentially guaranteeing its decline and fall.
** This is probably one of the ''worst'' examples of this trope. In a lot of these cases, ExecutiveMeddling is merely irritating, ludicrous, confounding, or, on some rare occasions, justified. In this case, however, it was '''''fatal'''''. Concerned by the show's declining ratings (from 34 million viewers to 10 million--although that's still more than ''Game of Thrones'' today), the execs pushed the creators to reveal the identity of Laura's killer -- the central mystery of the series - in the middle of Season 2, thirteen episodes away from the finale. Without the focus provided by the search for the killer, the show quickly ran out of steam; the sub-plots, which before added colour to the story, soon became all ''Series/TwinPeaks'' had to offer. The rationale for this case of ExecutiveMeddling was ludicrous; attempting to end ''Twin Peaks''' ratings slide by revealing the identity of the killer was akin to trying to stop the ''Titanic'' from sinking by blowing a hole through the middle of it.

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* Executive In what is probably one of the ''worst'' examples of this trope, executive pressure regarding the show's declining ratings (from 34 million to 10 million viewers--although that's still more than ''Game of Thrones'' today) forced David Lynch to reveal Laura Palmer's killer in the second season of ''TwinPeaks'', ''Series/TwinPeaks'', essentially guaranteeing its decline and fall.
** This is probably one of the ''worst'' examples of this trope.
fall. In a lot of these cases, ExecutiveMeddling is merely irritating, ludicrous, confounding, or, on some rare occasions, justified. In this case, however, it was '''''fatal'''''. Concerned by the show's declining ratings (from 34 million viewers to 10 million--although that's still more than ''Game of Thrones'' today), the execs pushed the creators to reveal the The identity of Laura's killer -- was the central mystery of the series - and they wound up having to reveal it in the middle of Season 2, thirteen episodes away from the finale. Without the focus provided by the search for the killer, the show quickly ran out of steam; the sub-plots, which before added colour to the story, soon became all ''Series/TwinPeaks'' ''Twin Peaks'' had to offer. The rationale for this case of ExecutiveMeddling was ludicrous; attempting to end ''Twin Peaks''' ratings slide by revealing the identity of the killer was akin to trying to stop the ''Titanic'' from sinking by blowing a hole through the middle of it.
This list shows the last 10 events of 543. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=ExecutiveMeddling.LiveActionTV