History ExecutiveMeddling / LiveActionTV

9th Nov '16 6:42:03 AM FromtheWordsofBR
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* Executive pressure forced David Lynch to reveal Laura Palmer's killer in the second season of ''TwinPeaks'', essentially guaranteeing its decline and fall.
** This is probably one of the ''worst'' examples of this trope. In a lot of these cases, ExecutiveMeddling is merely irritating, ludicrous, confounding, or, on some rare occasions, justified. In this case, however, it was '''''fatal'''''. Concerned by the show's declining ratings (from 34 million viewers to 10 million--although that's still more than ''Game of Thrones'' today), the execs pushed the creators to reveal the identity of Laura's killer -- the central mystery of the series - in the middle of Season 2, thirteen episodes away from the finale. Without the focus provided by the search for the killer, the show quickly ran out of steam; the sub-plots, which before added colour to the story, soon became all ''Series/TwinPeaks'' had to offer. The rationale for this case of ExecutiveMeddling was ludicrous; attempting to end ''Twin Peaks''' ratings slide by revealing the identity of the killer was akin to trying to stop the ''Titanic'' from sinking by blowing a hole through the middle of it.

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* Executive In what is probably one of the ''worst'' examples of this trope, executive pressure regarding the show's declining ratings (from 34 million to 10 million viewers--although that's still more than ''Game of Thrones'' today) forced David Lynch to reveal Laura Palmer's killer in the second season of ''TwinPeaks'', ''Series/TwinPeaks'', essentially guaranteeing its decline and fall.
** This is probably one of the ''worst'' examples of this trope.
fall. In a lot of these cases, ExecutiveMeddling is merely irritating, ludicrous, confounding, or, on some rare occasions, justified. In this case, however, it was '''''fatal'''''. Concerned by the show's declining ratings (from 34 million viewers to 10 million--although that's still more than ''Game of Thrones'' today), the execs pushed the creators to reveal the The identity of Laura's killer -- was the central mystery of the series - and they wound up having to reveal it in the middle of Season 2, thirteen episodes away from the finale. Without the focus provided by the search for the killer, the show quickly ran out of steam; the sub-plots, which before added colour to the story, soon became all ''Series/TwinPeaks'' ''Twin Peaks'' had to offer. The rationale for this case of ExecutiveMeddling was ludicrous; attempting to end ''Twin Peaks''' ratings slide by revealing the identity of the killer was akin to trying to stop the ''Titanic'' from sinking by blowing a hole through the middle of it.
5th Nov '16 6:22:05 PM nombretomado
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* Creator/FoodNetwork viewers, as shown on the network's Facebook page, went up in arms after the second episode of ''The Next IronChef: All Stars.'' There has been violent disagreement with the decision to eliminate Robert Irvine, whose hummus was "a little too thick," as opposed to Geoffrey Zakarian, who broke rules during the competition.

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* Creator/FoodNetwork viewers, as shown on the network's Facebook page, went up in arms after the second episode of ''The Next IronChef: Series/IronChef: All Stars.'' There has been violent disagreement with the decision to eliminate Robert Irvine, whose hummus was "a little too thick," as opposed to Geoffrey Zakarian, who broke rules during the competition.
24th Oct '16 9:35:23 PM nombretomado
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* Spock's pointed ears on ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' were almost the victim of panicky Creator/{{NBC}} executives, who were afraid that superstitious hordes of TV viewers would think he was Satanic. They went so far as to airbrush the points out of a number of promotional photographs. GeneRoddenberry managed to save Spock's ears by promising plastic surgery for the character if audience response was poor. As we know, it was anything ''but'' bad. After Spock's popularity was established, no one at NBC would ever admit to being anything but ''for'' pointed ears.

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* Spock's pointed ears on ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' were almost the victim of panicky Creator/{{NBC}} executives, who were afraid that superstitious hordes of TV viewers would think he was Satanic. They went so far as to airbrush the points out of a number of promotional photographs. GeneRoddenberry Creator/GeneRoddenberry managed to save Spock's ears by promising plastic surgery for the character if audience response was poor. As we know, it was anything ''but'' bad. After Spock's popularity was established, no one at NBC would ever admit to being anything but ''for'' pointed ears.
24th Oct '16 9:27:00 AM Morgenthaler
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* Positive example: When Creator/PennAndTeller did a special for ABC, a trick involving Teller "drowning" in a water tank came in the middle of the show, resulting in an uncommented-on "resurrection". The network suggested that the trick come at the end, leaving Teller "dead". As Teller would later tell TheOnion AV Club, "I was amazed and stunned... I think they were absolutely right [about the water tank trick placement]. This may be the first time I've ever said that sentence in relation to some television activity. They were right."

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* Positive example: When Creator/PennAndTeller did a special for ABC, a trick involving Teller "drowning" in a water tank came in the middle of the show, resulting in an uncommented-on "resurrection". The network suggested that the trick come at the end, leaving Teller "dead". As Teller would later tell TheOnion Website/TheOnion AV Club, "I was amazed and stunned... I think they were absolutely right [about the water tank trick placement]. This may be the first time I've ever said that sentence in relation to some television activity. They were right."
20th Oct '16 8:43:15 PM Berrenta
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** It was so bad that when Ron Moore joined the staff after ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' ended, he wrote one episode, was there three weeks, and left in disgust. When he asked about how to write a character, the response was essentially "[[TheyJustDidntCare We don't know, do what you want]]."

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** It was so bad that when Ron Moore joined the staff after ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' ended, he wrote one episode, was there three weeks, and left in disgust. When he asked about how to write a character, the response was essentially "[[TheyJustDidntCare "[[CreatorsApathy We don't know, do what you want]]."
15th Oct '16 5:59:49 AM Morgenthaler
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* In 1935, Sinclair Lewis published a novel called ''It Can't Happen Here'', about the election of a fascist government in the United States. In 1982, Kenneth Johnson adapted it as a possible TV miniseries called ''Storm Warnings'', but it was rejected as "too cerebral". Eventually it was modified such that the American fascists became extraterrestrial invaders who ate people. The result was ''Series/{{V}}''.

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* In 1935, Sinclair Lewis published a novel called ''It Can't Happen Here'', about the election of a fascist government in the United States. In 1982, Kenneth Johnson adapted it as a possible TV miniseries called ''Storm Warnings'', but it was rejected as "too cerebral". Eventually it was modified such that the American fascists became extraterrestrial invaders who ate people. The result was ''Series/{{V}}''.''Series/{{V 1983}}''.
14th Oct '16 10:48:58 AM TheRealBrooksy
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*** This would be subverted for it's Canadian counterpart ''Big Brother Canada'' where the majority of houseguests that have been on the show are die hard fans of ''Big Brother''. Not to mention, ''Big Brother Canada'' host Arisa Cox is a super fan of ''Big Brother'' and has watched the American version it's based off of and many international versions of the show.
6th Oct '16 8:26:42 AM CumbersomeTercel
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* ''Series/UltimateForce'' can be used as a case study in how executives can end up screwing not just a show but the entire network itself through bungled meddling.
** The show was originally meant to focus on Jamie Dow and how the rookie would grow into becoming a seasoned SAS trooper. The focus quickly shifted to Henno Garvie because ITV had lured Ross Kemp away from the BBC with a record 800,000 pound contract and needed to put him in ''something'' to justify the cost.
** The third series premiere killed off most of the cast and a more politically correct one was brought in (including a woman), with plots now focusing more on over the top action rather than the tension and suspense that can occur during high stakes operations.
** The fourth series switched to a feature-length episode format because someone at ITV thought that they could release them in cinemas in Eastern Europe and Southeast Asia to increase profits. That didn't happen and the series itself never got properly broadcast in the UK.
5th Oct '16 2:59:03 AM Morgenthaler
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*** Season 20 (1994-1995): Unlike seasons 6 and 11, which were bad because of new cast members who were barely experienced with working in sketch comedy and/or as an ensemble and writing that wasn't top shelf, this season was plagued with an overcrowded cast that hated each other, PhilHartman leaving for other projects (mostly ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' and ''News Radio''), and overexposure of Creator/AdamSandler and ChrisFarley. Once again, NBC confronted Lorne Michaels about it and told him that the show was ending due to low ratings and bad reviews -- and LorneMichaels, once again, dodged cancellation by weeding out the bad cast members and writers[[note]]though most of them left on their own accord because they were tired of the show, in the cases of Kevin Nealon and Ellen Cleghorne, or found out how daunting working at ''SNL'' is, in the cases of Morwenna Banks and Chris Elliott[[/note]], keeping in the good ones, and hiring newer, better talent. Lorne Michaels has cited season 20 as the closest he's been to being fired and having his show canceled.

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*** Season 20 (1994-1995): Unlike seasons 6 and 11, which were bad because of new cast members who were barely experienced with working in sketch comedy and/or as an ensemble and writing that wasn't top shelf, this season was plagued with an overcrowded cast that hated each other, PhilHartman leaving for other projects (mostly ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' and ''News Radio''), and overexposure of Creator/AdamSandler and ChrisFarley. Creator/ChrisFarley. Once again, NBC confronted Lorne Michaels about it and told him that the show was ending due to low ratings and bad reviews -- and LorneMichaels, Creator/LorneMichaels, once again, dodged cancellation by weeding out the bad cast members and writers[[note]]though most of them left on their own accord because they were tired of the show, in the cases of Kevin Nealon and Ellen Cleghorne, or found out how daunting working at ''SNL'' is, in the cases of Morwenna Banks and Chris Elliott[[/note]], keeping in the good ones, and hiring newer, better talent. Lorne Michaels has cited season 20 as the closest he's been to being fired and having his show canceled.
27th Sep '16 1:46:13 PM thelivingtoad
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*** Season 11 (1985-1986): Another bad season, only this time, it was LorneMichaels' fault. After his sketch show ''The New Show'' got canned and learning that NBC was going to cancel ''SNL'' after its 10th season due to low ratings and Dick Ebersol deciding to quit after NBC nixed all the ideas he had planned for his vision of ''SNL'', Michaels swooped in to rebuild his show, with a new cast and new writers. With the exception of DennisMiller, Jon Lovitz, and Nora Dunn, no one cared much for the new cast (which included such now-famous faces as Joan Cusack, Robert Downey Jr., Damon Wayans, and Randy Quaid, along with the first time the show hired homosexual cast members[[note]]Terry Sweeney, an openly gay white man, who was on the show before as one of Jean Doumanian's writers, and Danitra Vance, a black lesbian[[/note]] and the only time the show hired a teenager[[note]]Anthony Michael Hall was 17 and already famous as a star of ''Film/TheBreakfastClub'' when he joined the cast, making him the youngest white male cast member. The youngest black male cast member is Eddie Murphy, who was hired as a cast member at 19[[/note]]), and, after the bizarre debacle that was the March 1986 episode hosted by George Wendt with Francis Ford Coppola and musical guest Phillip Glass, NBC rushed in again and decided to shut the show down for good. While the season 11 finale did end with everyone locked in a room with Lorne setting it on fire and saving Jon Lovitz, Lorne begged NBC to give his show another chance, which they did, but only for 13 episodes of season 12 (they later rescinded this after season 12 brought ''SNL'' back from its early 1980s slump). Lorne fired everyone (except for the three aforementioned newcomers who were actually good, along with Al Franken and A. Whitney Brown), brought in people like Dana Carvey, PhilHartman, Jan Hooks, Victoria Jackson, and Kevin Nealon, and everything about season 11 was written off as a bad dream.

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*** Season 11 (1985-1986): Another bad season, only this time, it was LorneMichaels' fault. After his sketch show ''The New Show'' got canned and learning that NBC was going to cancel ''SNL'' after its 10th season due to low ratings and Dick Ebersol deciding to quit after NBC nixed all the ideas he had planned for his vision of ''SNL'', Michaels swooped in to rebuild his show, with a new cast and new writers. With the exception of DennisMiller, Jon Lovitz, and Nora Dunn, no one cared much for the new cast (which included such now-famous faces as Joan Cusack, Robert Downey Jr., Damon Wayans, and Randy Quaid, along with the first time the show hired homosexual cast members[[note]]Terry Sweeney, an openly gay white man, who was on the show before as one of Jean Doumanian's writers, and Danitra Vance, a black lesbian[[/note]] and the only time the show hired a teenager[[note]]Anthony Michael Hall was 17 and already famous as a star of ''Film/TheBreakfastClub'' when he joined the cast, making him the youngest white male ever cast member. The youngest black male cast member is Eddie Murphy, who was hired as a cast member at 19[[/note]]), member.[[/note]]), and, after the bizarre debacle that was the March 1986 episode hosted by George Wendt with Francis Ford Coppola and musical guest Phillip Glass, NBC rushed in again and decided to shut the show down for good. While the season 11 finale did end with everyone locked in a room with Lorne setting it on fire and saving Jon Lovitz, Lorne begged NBC to give his show another chance, which they did, but only for 13 episodes of season 12 (they later rescinded this after season 12 brought ''SNL'' back from its early 1980s slump). Lorne fired everyone (except for the three aforementioned newcomers who were actually good, along with Al Franken and A. Whitney Brown), brought in people like Dana Carvey, PhilHartman, Jan Hooks, Victoria Jackson, and Kevin Nealon, and everything about season 11 was written off as a bad dream.
This list shows the last 10 events of 534. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=ExecutiveMeddling.LiveActionTV