History DethroningMoment / Film

21st Jul '17 9:04:32 PM alienhunter
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* alienhunter: While I wasn't enjoying ''Film/TheABCsOfDeath'' all that much, it was a fun film to watch with some friends and riff on the strangeness. But after P [[spoiler: is for Pressure]], I just couldn't watch anymore. It was just depressing with a woman prostituting herself out to raise money for a bike for her daughter and if that wasn't bad enough, the segment ends with [[spoiler: the woman recording a video of her stepping on these adorable animals for this guy to get off to.]] After that, I just left the room and I don't care about the next segments, I'm never watching this movie ever again.
18th Jul '17 8:15:42 PM Loekman3
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** Tropers/DrZulu2010: For me, it has to be how Maleficent (or [[InNameOnly MINO]] as I like to call her) is the one who awakens Aurora from her sleep. Not only does it cement Prince Phillip, the first proactive prince in the history of the animated canon, as a waste of space, not only does it rip off ''WesternAnimation/{{Frozen}}'' only replacing sisterly love with motherly love, it cements MINO's BadassDecay and CharacterDerailment from the mistress of all evil and the greatest villain of the canon into a lame shadow of her former self. Not only that, but they gave her an unambugiously happy ending?! Did Disney hate the original movie or what?

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** Tropers/DrZulu2010: For me, it has to be how Maleficent (or [[InNameOnly MINO]] as I like to call her) is the one who awakens Aurora from her sleep. Not only does it cement Prince Phillip, the first proactive prince in the history of the animated canon, as a waste of space, not only does it rip off ''WesternAnimation/{{Frozen}}'' ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' only replacing sisterly love with motherly love, it cements MINO's BadassDecay and CharacterDerailment from the mistress of all evil and the greatest villain of the canon into a lame shadow of her former self. Not only that, but they gave her an unambugiously happy ending?! Did Disney hate the original movie or what?
2nd Jul '17 8:37:16 AM Isaac_Heller
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* JEFFWONTLEAVE: Coming from a person who considers the first [[Film/SpiderManTrilogy 2 Spider-Man films]] as extremely Important to comic book movie’s and are a wonderful homage to the original run in the 60s and 70s, I can not understand why anybody would defend ''Film/TheAmazingSpiderman2'' or be shocked that Sony decided to reboot the character. While the [[Film/TheAmazingSpiderMan First film]] was a flawed and predictable film, it at the very least gave me some great versions of Spider-Man and Gwen Stacey and a story arc about peter’s parents that would build up in future installments. Not only does the sequel [[Main/TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodPlot fail to do anything cool with that arc]], not only does it [[Main/TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodCharacter ruin those versions I loved in the first]] and made them almost complete idiots, not only did it fail to give me the most laughably awful villains since ''Film/BatmanAndRobin'', but it also flat-out stop the movie with no reason whatsoever to poorly hint at potential film sequels and spin-offs. Take for a scene that happens 38 minutes in, where harry just drops a conversation where he acts like a smug little brat to the suits at Oscorp[[note]] Which makes me not care that Oscorp stabs him in the back later[[/note]] to just say randomly chat to a girl named Felicia who just happens to be his father’s assistant[[note]] How the hell does he know this information by the way?[[/note]] and that everybody now must work for her because she works for him. There are 2 reasons this scene doesn't work at all.

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* JEFFWONTLEAVE: Coming from a person who considers the first [[Film/SpiderManTrilogy 2 Spider-Man films]] as extremely Important to comic book movie’s and are a wonderful homage to the original run in the 60s and 70s, I can not understand why anybody would defend ''Film/TheAmazingSpiderman2'' or be shocked that Sony decided to reboot the character. While the [[Film/TheAmazingSpiderMan First film]] was a flawed and predictable film, it at the very least gave me some great versions of Spider-Man and Gwen Stacey Stacy and a story arc about peter’s Peter’s parents that would build up in future installments. Not only does the sequel [[Main/TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodPlot fail to do anything cool with that arc]], not only does it [[Main/TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodCharacter ruin those versions I loved in the first]] and made them almost complete idiots, not only did it fail to give me the most laughably awful villains since ''Film/BatmanAndRobin'', but it also flat-out stop the movie with no reason whatsoever to poorly hint at potential film sequels and spin-offs. Take for a scene that happens 38 minutes in, where harry just drops a conversation where he acts like a smug little brat to the suits at Oscorp[[note]] Which makes me not care that Oscorp stabs him in the back later[[/note]] to just say randomly chat to a girl named Felicia who just happens to be his father’s assistant[[note]] How the hell does he know this information by the way?[[/note]] and that everybody now must work for her because she works for him. There are 2 reasons this scene doesn't work at all.
2nd Jul '17 7:46:50 AM ManEFaces
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* Tropers/{{ManEFaces}}: ''Film/BigFish'' is quite possibly the worst goddamn film Tim Burton has ever directed, and I'm taking' 'Film/PlanetOfTheApes2001'' and ''Film/DarkShadows'' into account in making that assessment. We're introduced to Edward Bloom, an old man who is slowly dying, and so his son Will returns to learn the true story about his father’s life because he has felt let down by a lifetime of tall tales and long absences. Instead, we must suffer through Edward’s egomaniacal rants that are assumedly supposed to be cute and charming. He bullies his listeners (and us) into accepting his demented worldview, when the only proper label for this man is that of a congenital liar. Edward’s journey through life, as he tells it, is strikingly similar to Forrest Gump’s; full of wartime heroics, small town eccentrics, and blind love for a vapid woman. Edward’s love story is arguably the most repulsive of the lot, as he falls in love at first sight, announces that will marry this woman even before speaking one word to her, and keeps her in his mind for three years until he can find her again. After he tracks her down at college, he shows up at her door and proposes marriage (again, he has never said one word to the woman). The woman, Sandra, tells him that she is already engaged, which prompts the self-absorbed ass-fucker to increase his obsessive behavior. He buys her thousands of flowers, hires a sky writer, and shouts at her window that he will indeed marry her. Some of the less sophisticated viewers might find this stalker-like behavior romantic, but what I see is a man so self-obsessed that he will not accept rejection. Everyone and everything must be caught, stripped, and placed in his ever-expanding trophy case. Another example of Edward’s ego occurs when Will’s wife is discussing her recently published photos at the dinner table. Rather than ask the young woman to elaborate, Edward uses this as a springboard to bore the family further with another tale that they have heard hundreds of times. Edward simply cannot listen to someone else talk for more than five seconds without having to add his own bullshit, and simply tunes out if other egos intrude on his party. It is conceivable to spend a lifetime with this man without getting to know the real person, or having him know the real you. I have no doubt that many people watching it found a familiar point of reference, as we all know a relative who believes the dinner doesn’t truly begin until he or she enters the goddamn room. Common sense dictates that Edward is just one of those people who likes to add color to life and is merely a harmless clown, but by the end we are meant to take his stories seriously at least partially. My sympathy was with poor Will, who never knew his father because the man was too busy constructing an image to distract from the real prick beneath the lies. And my disgust also extended to Edward’s wife Sandra, as her only lines consist of enabling Edward to be such a bastard. Apparently it doesn’t bother her that Edward hasn’t uttered one word that wasn’t in service of cock-eyed fantasy. If Edward Bloom reminds you of that slightly kooky uncle you haven’t seen in years, then maybe you should give it a shot. But I’m not about to enjoy the sort of behavior from a relative that would cause me to leave the room, simply because it takes place in a movie. Ironically, this film made me think of one of Tim Burton's true masterpieces, ''Film/EdWood'', because the titular character of that film is so much like Edward Bloom. They are both avatars for Burton himself, who is quite content to indulge his own fantasies, yet seems to have no regard for his audience.

to:

* Tropers/{{ManEFaces}}: ''Film/BigFish'' is quite possibly the worst goddamn film Tim Burton has ever directed, and I'm taking' 'Film/PlanetOfTheApes2001'' taking ''Film/PlanetOfTheApes2001'' and ''Film/DarkShadows'' into account in making that assessment. We're introduced to Edward Bloom, an old man who is slowly dying, and so his son Will returns to learn the true story about his father’s life because he has felt let down by a lifetime of tall tales and long absences. Instead, we must suffer through Edward’s egomaniacal rants that are assumedly supposed to be cute and charming. He bullies his listeners (and us) into accepting his demented worldview, when the only proper label for this man is that of a congenital liar. Edward’s journey through life, as he tells it, is strikingly similar to Forrest Gump’s; full of wartime heroics, small town eccentrics, and blind love for a vapid woman. Edward’s love story is arguably the most repulsive of the lot, as he falls in love at first sight, announces that will marry this woman even before speaking one word to her, and keeps her in his mind for three years until he can find her again. After he tracks her down at college, he shows up at her door and proposes marriage (again, he has never said one word to the woman). The woman, Sandra, tells him that she is already engaged, which prompts the self-absorbed ass-fucker to increase his obsessive behavior. He buys her thousands of flowers, hires a sky writer, and shouts at her window that he will indeed marry her. Some of the less sophisticated viewers might find this stalker-like behavior romantic, but what I see is a man so self-obsessed that he will not accept rejection. Everyone and everything must be caught, stripped, and placed in his ever-expanding trophy case. Another example of Edward’s ego occurs when Will’s wife is discussing her recently published photos at the dinner table. Rather than ask the young woman to elaborate, Edward uses this as a springboard to bore the family further with another tale that they have heard hundreds of times. Edward simply cannot listen to someone else talk for more than five seconds without having to add his own bullshit, and simply tunes out if other egos intrude on his party. It is conceivable to spend a lifetime with this man without getting to know the real person, or having him know the real you. I have no doubt that many people watching it found a familiar point of reference, as we all know a relative who believes the dinner doesn’t truly begin until he or she enters the goddamn room. Common sense dictates that Edward is just one of those people who likes to add color to life and is merely a harmless clown, but by the end we are meant to take his stories seriously at least partially. My sympathy was with poor Will, who never knew his father because the man was too busy constructing an image to distract from the real prick beneath the lies. And my disgust also extended to Edward’s wife Sandra, as her only lines consist of enabling Edward to be such a bastard. Apparently it doesn’t bother her that Edward hasn’t uttered one word that wasn’t in service of cock-eyed fantasy. If Edward Bloom reminds you of that slightly kooky uncle you haven’t seen in years, then maybe you should give it a shot. But I’m not about to enjoy the sort of behavior from a relative that would cause me to leave the room, simply because it takes place in a movie. Ironically, this film made me think of one of Tim Burton's true masterpieces, ''Film/EdWood'', because the titular character of that film is so much like Edward Bloom. They are both avatars for Burton himself, who is quite content to indulge his own fantasies, yet seems to have no regard for his audience.
2nd Jul '17 7:46:19 AM ManEFaces
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** What makes it worse is that immortality couldn't be the fallback excuse for Ra not dying because ''he was going to appoint Set as his successor''. You don't need your son to replace you if you can't die.
* Tropers/{{ManEFaces}}: ''Film/BigFish'' is quite possibly the worst goddamn film Tim Burton has ever directed, and I'm taking''Film/PlanetOfTheApes2001'' and ''Film/DarkShadows'' into account in making that assessment. Watching (or should I say enduring) Big Fish is like spending two hours with that obnoxious drunk at the end of the bar who simply won’t shut the fuck up. One Edward Bloom yammers endlessly about utter nonsense that could interest only himself, yet smiles and winks in the expectation that you’ll be as fascinated as he is. The old man is slowly dying, and so his son Will returns to learn the true story about his father’s life because he has felt let down by a lifetime of tall tales and long absences. Instead, we must suffer through Edward’s egomaniacal rants that are assumedly supposed to be cute and charming. He bullies his listeners (and us) into accepting his demented worldview, when the only proper label for this man is that of a congenital liar. Edward’s journey through life, as he tells it, is strikingly similar to Forrest Gump’s; full of wartime heroics, small town eccentrics, and blind love for a vapid woman. Edward’s love story is arguably the most repulsive of the lot, as he falls in love at first sight, announces that will marry this woman even before speaking one word to her, and keeps her in his mind for three years until he can find her again. After he tracks her down at college, he shows up at her door and proposes marriage (again, he has never said one word to the woman). The woman, Sandra, tells him that she is already engaged, which prompts the self-absorbed ass-fucker to increase his obsessive behavior. He buys her thousands of flowers, hires a sky writer, and shouts at her window that he will indeed marry her. Some of the less sophisticated viewers might find this stalker-like behavior romantic, but what I see is a man so self-obsessed that he will not accept rejection. Everyone and everything must be caught, stripped, and placed in his ever-expanding trophy case. Another example of Edward’s ego occurs when Will’s wife is discussing her recently published photos at the dinner table. Rather than ask the young woman to elaborate, Edward uses this as a springboard to bore the family further with another tale that they have heard hundreds of times. Edward simply cannot listen to someone else talk for more than five seconds without having to add his own bullshit, and simply tunes out if other egos intrude on his party. It is conceivable to spend a lifetime with this man without getting to know the real person, or having him know the real you. I have no doubt that many people watching it found a familiar point of reference, as we all know a relative who believes the dinner doesn’t truly begin until he or she enters the goddamn room. Common sense dictates that Edward is just one of those people who likes to add color to life and is merely a harmless clown, but by the end we are meant to take his stories seriously at least partially. My sympathy was with poor Will, who never knew his father because the man was too busy constructing an image to distract from the real prick beneath the lies. And my disgust also extended to Edward’s wife Sandra, as her only lines consist of enabling Edward to be such a bastard. Apparently it doesn’t bother her that Edward hasn’t uttered one word that wasn’t in service of cock-eyed fantasy. If Edward Bloom reminds you of that slightly kooky uncle you haven’t seen in years, then maybe you should give it a shot. But I’m not about to enjoy the sort of behavior from a relative that would cause me to leave the room, simply because it takes place in a movie. Ironically, this film made me think of one of Tim Burton's true masterpieces, ''Film/EdWood'', because the titular character of that film is so much like Edward Bloom. They are both avatars for Burton himself, who is quite content to indulge his own fantasies, yet seems to have no regard for his audience.

to:

** Tropers/{{ManEFaces}}: What makes it worse is that immortality couldn't be the fallback excuse for Ra not dying because ''he was going to appoint Set as his successor''. You don't need your son to replace you if you can't die.
* Tropers/{{ManEFaces}}: ''Film/BigFish'' is quite possibly the worst goddamn film Tim Burton has ever directed, and I'm taking''Film/PlanetOfTheApes2001'' taking' 'Film/PlanetOfTheApes2001'' and ''Film/DarkShadows'' into account in making that assessment. Watching (or should I say enduring) Big Fish is like spending two hours with that obnoxious drunk at the end of the bar who simply won’t shut the fuck up. One We're introduced to Edward Bloom yammers endlessly about utter nonsense that could interest only himself, yet smiles and winks in the expectation that you’ll be as fascinated as he is. The Bloom, an old man who is slowly dying, and so his son Will returns to learn the true story about his father’s life because he has felt let down by a lifetime of tall tales and long absences. Instead, we must suffer through Edward’s egomaniacal rants that are assumedly supposed to be cute and charming. He bullies his listeners (and us) into accepting his demented worldview, when the only proper label for this man is that of a congenital liar. Edward’s journey through life, as he tells it, is strikingly similar to Forrest Gump’s; full of wartime heroics, small town eccentrics, and blind love for a vapid woman. Edward’s love story is arguably the most repulsive of the lot, as he falls in love at first sight, announces that will marry this woman even before speaking one word to her, and keeps her in his mind for three years until he can find her again. After he tracks her down at college, he shows up at her door and proposes marriage (again, he has never said one word to the woman). The woman, Sandra, tells him that she is already engaged, which prompts the self-absorbed ass-fucker to increase his obsessive behavior. He buys her thousands of flowers, hires a sky writer, and shouts at her window that he will indeed marry her. Some of the less sophisticated viewers might find this stalker-like behavior romantic, but what I see is a man so self-obsessed that he will not accept rejection. Everyone and everything must be caught, stripped, and placed in his ever-expanding trophy case. Another example of Edward’s ego occurs when Will’s wife is discussing her recently published photos at the dinner table. Rather than ask the young woman to elaborate, Edward uses this as a springboard to bore the family further with another tale that they have heard hundreds of times. Edward simply cannot listen to someone else talk for more than five seconds without having to add his own bullshit, and simply tunes out if other egos intrude on his party. It is conceivable to spend a lifetime with this man without getting to know the real person, or having him know the real you. I have no doubt that many people watching it found a familiar point of reference, as we all know a relative who believes the dinner doesn’t truly begin until he or she enters the goddamn room. Common sense dictates that Edward is just one of those people who likes to add color to life and is merely a harmless clown, but by the end we are meant to take his stories seriously at least partially. My sympathy was with poor Will, who never knew his father because the man was too busy constructing an image to distract from the real prick beneath the lies. And my disgust also extended to Edward’s wife Sandra, as her only lines consist of enabling Edward to be such a bastard. Apparently it doesn’t bother her that Edward hasn’t uttered one word that wasn’t in service of cock-eyed fantasy. If Edward Bloom reminds you of that slightly kooky uncle you haven’t seen in years, then maybe you should give it a shot. But I’m not about to enjoy the sort of behavior from a relative that would cause me to leave the room, simply because it takes place in a movie. Ironically, this film made me think of one of Tim Burton's true masterpieces, ''Film/EdWood'', because the titular character of that film is so much like Edward Bloom. They are both avatars for Burton himself, who is quite content to indulge his own fantasies, yet seems to have no regard for his audience.
2nd Jul '17 7:43:19 AM ManEFaces
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Added DiffLines:

** What makes it worse is that immortality couldn't be the fallback excuse for Ra not dying because ''he was going to appoint Set as his successor''. You don't need your son to replace you if you can't die.
2nd Jul '17 7:39:08 AM ManEFaces
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* Tropers/{{ManEFaces}}: ''Film/BigFish'' is quite possibly the worst goddamn film Tim Burton has ever directed, and I'm taking''Film/PlanetOfTheApes2001'' and ''Film/DarkShadows'' into account in making that assessment. Watching (or should I say enduring) Big Fish is like spending two hours with that obnoxious drunk at the end of the bar who simply won’t shut the fuck up. One Edward Bloom yammers endlessly about utter nonsense that could interest only himself, yet smiles and winks in the expectation that you’ll be as fascinated as he is. The old man is slowly dying, and so his son Will returns to learn the true story about his father’s life because he has felt let down by a lifetime of tall tales and long absences. Instead, we must suffer through Edward’s egomaniacal rants that are assumedly supposed to be cute and charming. He bullies his listeners (and us) into accepting his demented worldview, when the only proper label for this man is that of a congenital liar. Edward’s journey through life, as he tells it, is strikingly similar to Forrest Gump’s; full of wartime heroics, small town eccentrics, and blind love for a vapid woman. Edward’s love story is arguably the most repulsive of the lot, as he falls in love at first sight, announces that will marry this woman even before speaking one word to her, and keeps her in his mind for three years until he can find her again. After he tracks her down at college, he shows up at her door and proposes marriage (again, he has never said one word to the woman). The woman, Sandra, tells him that she is already engaged, which prompts the self-absorbed ass-fucker to increase his obsessive behavior. He buys her thousands of flowers, hires a sky writer, and shouts at her window that he will indeed marry her. Some of the less sophisticated viewers might find this stalker-like behavior romantic, but what I see is a man so self-obsessed that he will not accept rejection. Everyone and everything must be caught, stripped, and placed in his ever-expanding trophy case. Another example of Edward’s ego occurs when Will’s wife is discussing her recently published photos at the dinner table. Rather than ask the young woman to elaborate, Edward uses this as a springboard to bore the family further with another tale that they have heard hundreds of times. Edward simply cannot listen to someone else talk for more than five seconds without having to add his own bullshit, and simply tunes out if other egos intrude on his party. It is conceivable to spend a lifetime with this man without getting to know the real person, or having him know the real you. I have no doubt that many people watching it found a familiar point of reference, as we all know a relative who believes the dinner doesn’t truly begin until he or she enters the goddamn room. Common sense dictates that Edward is just one of those people who likes to add color to life and is merely a harmless clown, but by the end we are meant to take his stories seriously at least partially. My sympathy was with poor Will, who never knew his father because the man was too busy constructing an image to distract us from the real prick beneath the lies. And my disgust also extended to Edward’s wife Sandra, as her only lines consist of enabling Edward to be such a bastard. Apparently it doesn’t bother her that Edward hasn’t uttered one word that wasn’t in service of cock-eyed fantasy. If Edward Bloom reminds you of that slightly kooky uncle you haven’t seen in years, then maybe you should give it a shot. But I’m not about to enjoy the sort of behavior from a relative that would cause me to leave the room, simply because it takes place in a movie. Ironically, this film made me think of one of Tim Burton's true masterpieces, ''Film/EdWood'', because the titular character of that film is so much like Edward Bloom. They are both avatars for Burton himself, who is quite content to indulge his own fantasies, yet seems to have no regard for his audience.

to:

* Tropers/{{ManEFaces}}: ''Film/BigFish'' is quite possibly the worst goddamn film Tim Burton has ever directed, and I'm taking''Film/PlanetOfTheApes2001'' and ''Film/DarkShadows'' into account in making that assessment. Watching (or should I say enduring) Big Fish is like spending two hours with that obnoxious drunk at the end of the bar who simply won’t shut the fuck up. One Edward Bloom yammers endlessly about utter nonsense that could interest only himself, yet smiles and winks in the expectation that you’ll be as fascinated as he is. The old man is slowly dying, and so his son Will returns to learn the true story about his father’s life because he has felt let down by a lifetime of tall tales and long absences. Instead, we must suffer through Edward’s egomaniacal rants that are assumedly supposed to be cute and charming. He bullies his listeners (and us) into accepting his demented worldview, when the only proper label for this man is that of a congenital liar. Edward’s journey through life, as he tells it, is strikingly similar to Forrest Gump’s; full of wartime heroics, small town eccentrics, and blind love for a vapid woman. Edward’s love story is arguably the most repulsive of the lot, as he falls in love at first sight, announces that will marry this woman even before speaking one word to her, and keeps her in his mind for three years until he can find her again. After he tracks her down at college, he shows up at her door and proposes marriage (again, he has never said one word to the woman). The woman, Sandra, tells him that she is already engaged, which prompts the self-absorbed ass-fucker to increase his obsessive behavior. He buys her thousands of flowers, hires a sky writer, and shouts at her window that he will indeed marry her. Some of the less sophisticated viewers might find this stalker-like behavior romantic, but what I see is a man so self-obsessed that he will not accept rejection. Everyone and everything must be caught, stripped, and placed in his ever-expanding trophy case. Another example of Edward’s ego occurs when Will’s wife is discussing her recently published photos at the dinner table. Rather than ask the young woman to elaborate, Edward uses this as a springboard to bore the family further with another tale that they have heard hundreds of times. Edward simply cannot listen to someone else talk for more than five seconds without having to add his own bullshit, and simply tunes out if other egos intrude on his party. It is conceivable to spend a lifetime with this man without getting to know the real person, or having him know the real you. I have no doubt that many people watching it found a familiar point of reference, as we all know a relative who believes the dinner doesn’t truly begin until he or she enters the goddamn room. Common sense dictates that Edward is just one of those people who likes to add color to life and is merely a harmless clown, but by the end we are meant to take his stories seriously at least partially. My sympathy was with poor Will, who never knew his father because the man was too busy constructing an image to distract us from the real prick beneath the lies. And my disgust also extended to Edward’s wife Sandra, as her only lines consist of enabling Edward to be such a bastard. Apparently it doesn’t bother her that Edward hasn’t uttered one word that wasn’t in service of cock-eyed fantasy. If Edward Bloom reminds you of that slightly kooky uncle you haven’t seen in years, then maybe you should give it a shot. But I’m not about to enjoy the sort of behavior from a relative that would cause me to leave the room, simply because it takes place in a movie. Ironically, this film made me think of one of Tim Burton's true masterpieces, ''Film/EdWood'', because the titular character of that film is so much like Edward Bloom. They are both avatars for Burton himself, who is quite content to indulge his own fantasies, yet seems to have no regard for his audience.
2nd Jul '17 7:37:42 AM ManEFaces
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* Tropers/{{ManEFaces}}: ''Film/BigFish'' is quite possibly the worst goddamn film Tim Burton has ever directed, and I'm taking''Film/PlanetOfTheApes2001'' and ''Film/DarkShadows'' into account in making that assessment. Watching (or should I say enduring) Big Fish is like spending two hours with that obnoxious drunk at the end of the bar who simply won’t shut the fuck up. One Edward Bloom yammers endlessly about utter nonsense that could interest only himself, yet smiles and winks in the expectation that you’ll be as fascinated as he is. The old man is slowly dying, and so his son Will returns to learn the true story about his father’s life because he has felt let down by a lifetime of tall tales and long absences. Instead, we must suffer through Edward’s egomaniacal rants that are assumedly supposed to be cute and charming. He bullies his listeners (and us) into accepting his demented worldview, when the only proper label for this man is that of a congenital liar. Edward’s journey through life, as he tells it, is strikingly similar to Forrest Gump’s; full of wartime heroics, small town eccentrics, and blind love for a vapid woman. Edward’s love story is arguably the most repulsive of the lot, as he falls in love at first sight, announces that will marry this woman even before speaking one word to her, and keeps her in his mind for three years until he can find her again. After he tracks her down at college, he shows up at her door and proposes marriage (again, he has never said one word to the woman). The woman, Sandra, tells him that she is already engaged, which prompts the self-absorbed ass-fucker to increase his obsessive behavior. He buys her thousands of flowers, hires a sky writer, and shouts at her window that he will indeed marry her. Some of the less sophisticated viewers might find this stalker-like behavior romantic, but what I see is a man so self-obsessed that he will not accept rejection. Everyone and everything must be caught, stripped, and placed in his ever-expanding trophy case. Another example of Edward’s ego occurs when Will’s wife is discussing her recently published photos at the dinner table. Rather than ask the young woman to elaborate, Edward uses this as a springboard to bore the family further with another tale that they have heard hundreds of times. Edward simply cannot listen to someone else talk for more than five seconds without having to add his own bullshit. A life force this big and this self-important does not have time for other people and simply tunes out if other egos intrude on his party. It is conceivable to spend a lifetime with this man without getting to know the real person, or having him know the real you. He will talk over you, through you, and without regard for other opinions until he literally beats you into submission. I have no doubt that many people watching it found a familiar point of reference, as we all know a relative who believes the dinner doesn’t truly begin until he or she enters the goddamn room. Common sense dictates that Edward is just one of those people who likes to add color to life and is merely a harmless clown, but by the end we are meant to take his stories seriously at least partially. My sympathy was with poor Will, who never knew his father because the man was too busy constructing an image to distract us from the real prick beneath the lies. And my disgust also extended to Edward’s wife Sandra, as her only lines consist of enabling Edward to be such a bastard. Apparently it doesn’t bother her that Edward hasn’t uttered one word that wasn’t in service of cock-eyed fantasy. If Edward Bloom reminds you of that slightly kooky uncle you haven’t seen in years, then maybe you should give it a shot. But I’m not about to enjoy the sort of behavior from a relative that would cause me to leave the room, simply because it takes place in a movie. Ironically, this film made me think of one of Tim Burton's true masterpieces, ''Film/EdWood'', because the titular character of that film is so much like Edward Bloom. They are both avatars for Burton himself, who is quite content to indulge his own fantasies, yet seems to have no regard for his audience.

to:

* Tropers/{{ManEFaces}}: ''Film/BigFish'' is quite possibly the worst goddamn film Tim Burton has ever directed, and I'm taking''Film/PlanetOfTheApes2001'' and ''Film/DarkShadows'' into account in making that assessment. Watching (or should I say enduring) Big Fish is like spending two hours with that obnoxious drunk at the end of the bar who simply won’t shut the fuck up. One Edward Bloom yammers endlessly about utter nonsense that could interest only himself, yet smiles and winks in the expectation that you’ll be as fascinated as he is. The old man is slowly dying, and so his son Will returns to learn the true story about his father’s life because he has felt let down by a lifetime of tall tales and long absences. Instead, we must suffer through Edward’s egomaniacal rants that are assumedly supposed to be cute and charming. He bullies his listeners (and us) into accepting his demented worldview, when the only proper label for this man is that of a congenital liar. Edward’s journey through life, as he tells it, is strikingly similar to Forrest Gump’s; full of wartime heroics, small town eccentrics, and blind love for a vapid woman. Edward’s love story is arguably the most repulsive of the lot, as he falls in love at first sight, announces that will marry this woman even before speaking one word to her, and keeps her in his mind for three years until he can find her again. After he tracks her down at college, he shows up at her door and proposes marriage (again, he has never said one word to the woman). The woman, Sandra, tells him that she is already engaged, which prompts the self-absorbed ass-fucker to increase his obsessive behavior. He buys her thousands of flowers, hires a sky writer, and shouts at her window that he will indeed marry her. Some of the less sophisticated viewers might find this stalker-like behavior romantic, but what I see is a man so self-obsessed that he will not accept rejection. Everyone and everything must be caught, stripped, and placed in his ever-expanding trophy case. Another example of Edward’s ego occurs when Will’s wife is discussing her recently published photos at the dinner table. Rather than ask the young woman to elaborate, Edward uses this as a springboard to bore the family further with another tale that they have heard hundreds of times. Edward simply cannot listen to someone else talk for more than five seconds without having to add his own bullshit. A life force this big and this self-important does not have time for other people bullshit, and simply tunes out if other egos intrude on his party. It is conceivable to spend a lifetime with this man without getting to know the real person, or having him know the real you. He will talk over you, through you, and without regard for other opinions until he literally beats you into submission. I have no doubt that many people watching it found a familiar point of reference, as we all know a relative who believes the dinner doesn’t truly begin until he or she enters the goddamn room. Common sense dictates that Edward is just one of those people who likes to add color to life and is merely a harmless clown, but by the end we are meant to take his stories seriously at least partially. My sympathy was with poor Will, who never knew his father because the man was too busy constructing an image to distract us from the real prick beneath the lies. And my disgust also extended to Edward’s wife Sandra, as her only lines consist of enabling Edward to be such a bastard. Apparently it doesn’t bother her that Edward hasn’t uttered one word that wasn’t in service of cock-eyed fantasy. If Edward Bloom reminds you of that slightly kooky uncle you haven’t seen in years, then maybe you should give it a shot. But I’m not about to enjoy the sort of behavior from a relative that would cause me to leave the room, simply because it takes place in a movie. Ironically, this film made me think of one of Tim Burton's true masterpieces, ''Film/EdWood'', because the titular character of that film is so much like Edward Bloom. They are both avatars for Burton himself, who is quite content to indulge his own fantasies, yet seems to have no regard for his audience.
2nd Jul '17 7:36:17 AM ManEFaces
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* Tropers/{{ManEFaces}}: ''Film/BigFish'' is quite possibly the worst goddamn film Tim Burton has ever directed, and I'm taking''Film/PlanetOfTheApes2001'' and ''Film/DarkShadows'' into account in making that assessment. Watching (or should I say enduring) Big Fish is like spending two hours with that obnoxious drunk at the end of the bar who simply won’t shut the fuck up. One Edward Bloom yammers endlessly about utter nonsense that could interest only himself, yet smiles and winks in the expectation that you’ll be as fascinated as he is. The old man is slowly dying, and so his son Will returns to learn the true story about his father’s life because he has felt let down by a lifetime of tall tales and long absences. Instead, we must suffer through Edward’s egomaniacal rants that are assumedly supposed to be cute and charming. He bullies his listeners (and us) into accepting his demented worldview, when the only proper label for this man is that of a congenital liar. Edward’s journey through life, as he tells it, is strikingly similar to Forrest Gump’s; full of wartime heroics, small town eccentrics, and blind love for a vapid woman. Edward’s love story is arguably the most repulsive of the lot, as he falls in love at first sight, announces that will marry this woman even before speaking one word to her, and keeps her in his mind for three years until he can find her again. After he tracks her down at college, he shows up at her door and proposes marriage (again, he has never said one word to the woman). The woman, Sandra, tells him that she is already engaged, which prompts the self-absorbed ass-fucker to increase his obsessive behavior. He buys her thousands of flowers, hires a sky writer, and shouts at her window that he will indeed marry her. Some of the less sophisticated members of the audience might find this stalker-like behavior romantic, but as it was yet another example of Edward’s puffed up vanity, I couldn’t help but vomit throughout. This isn’t an old softie we are watching here, but a man so self-obsessed that he will not accept rejection. Everyone and everything must be caught, stripped, and placed in his ever-expanding trophy case. Another example of Edward’s ego occurs when Will’s wife is discussing her recently published photos at the dinner table. Rather than ask the young woman to elaborate, Edward uses this as a springboard to bore the family further with another tale that they have heard hundreds of times. Edward simply cannot listen to someone else talk for more than five seconds without having to add his own bullshit. A life force this big and this self-important does not have time for other people and simply tunes out if other egos intrude on his party. It is conceivable to spend a lifetime with this man without getting to know the real person, or having him know the real you. He will talk over you, through you, and without regard for other opinions until he literally beats you into submission. I have no doubt that many people watching it found a familiar point of reference, as we all know a relative who believes the dinner doesn’t truly begin until he or she enters the goddamn room. Common sense dictates that Edward is just one of those people who likes to add color to life and is merely a harmless clown. But at bottom, what that kind of "people person" really wants is absolute control. He wants to be talked about when he’s not around, and whenever he arrives, he wants to be the first person consulted. By intruding on the lives of everyone and talking without interruption, he doesn’t want others to forget that without him, their lives just wouldn’t be as spirited. My sympathy was with poor Will, who never knew his father because the man was too busy constructing an image to distract us from the real prick beneath the lies. And my disgust also extended to Edward’s wife Sandra, as her only lines consist of enabling Edward to be such a bastard. Apparently it doesn’t bother her that Edward hasn’t uttered one word that wasn’t in service of cock-eyed fantasy. If Edward Bloom reminds you of that slightly kooky uncle you haven’t seen in years, then maybe you should give it a shot. But I’m not about to enjoy the sort of behavior from a relative that would cause me to leave the room, simply because it takes place in a movie. Ironically, this film made me think of one of Tim Burton's true masterpieces, ''Film/EdWood'', because the titular character of that film is so much like Edward Bloom. They are both avatars for Burton himself, who is quite content to indulge his own fantasies, yet seems to have no regard for his audience.

to:

* Tropers/{{ManEFaces}}: ''Film/BigFish'' is quite possibly the worst goddamn film Tim Burton has ever directed, and I'm taking''Film/PlanetOfTheApes2001'' and ''Film/DarkShadows'' into account in making that assessment. Watching (or should I say enduring) Big Fish is like spending two hours with that obnoxious drunk at the end of the bar who simply won’t shut the fuck up. One Edward Bloom yammers endlessly about utter nonsense that could interest only himself, yet smiles and winks in the expectation that you’ll be as fascinated as he is. The old man is slowly dying, and so his son Will returns to learn the true story about his father’s life because he has felt let down by a lifetime of tall tales and long absences. Instead, we must suffer through Edward’s egomaniacal rants that are assumedly supposed to be cute and charming. He bullies his listeners (and us) into accepting his demented worldview, when the only proper label for this man is that of a congenital liar. Edward’s journey through life, as he tells it, is strikingly similar to Forrest Gump’s; full of wartime heroics, small town eccentrics, and blind love for a vapid woman. Edward’s love story is arguably the most repulsive of the lot, as he falls in love at first sight, announces that will marry this woman even before speaking one word to her, and keeps her in his mind for three years until he can find her again. After he tracks her down at college, he shows up at her door and proposes marriage (again, he has never said one word to the woman). The woman, Sandra, tells him that she is already engaged, which prompts the self-absorbed ass-fucker to increase his obsessive behavior. He buys her thousands of flowers, hires a sky writer, and shouts at her window that he will indeed marry her. Some of the less sophisticated members of the audience viewers might find this stalker-like behavior romantic, but as it was yet another example of Edward’s puffed up vanity, what I couldn’t help but vomit throughout. This isn’t an old softie we are watching here, but see is a man so self-obsessed that he will not accept rejection. Everyone and everything must be caught, stripped, and placed in his ever-expanding trophy case. Another example of Edward’s ego occurs when Will’s wife is discussing her recently published photos at the dinner table. Rather than ask the young woman to elaborate, Edward uses this as a springboard to bore the family further with another tale that they have heard hundreds of times. Edward simply cannot listen to someone else talk for more than five seconds without having to add his own bullshit. A life force this big and this self-important does not have time for other people and simply tunes out if other egos intrude on his party. It is conceivable to spend a lifetime with this man without getting to know the real person, or having him know the real you. He will talk over you, through you, and without regard for other opinions until he literally beats you into submission. I have no doubt that many people watching it found a familiar point of reference, as we all know a relative who believes the dinner doesn’t truly begin until he or she enters the goddamn room. Common sense dictates that Edward is just one of those people who likes to add color to life and is merely a harmless clown. But at bottom, what that kind of "people person" really wants is absolute control. He wants to be talked about when he’s not around, and whenever he arrives, he wants to be clown, but by the first person consulted. By intruding on the lives of everyone and talking without interruption, he doesn’t want others end we are meant to forget that without him, their lives just wouldn’t be as spirited.take his stories seriously at least partially. My sympathy was with poor Will, who never knew his father because the man was too busy constructing an image to distract us from the real prick beneath the lies. And my disgust also extended to Edward’s wife Sandra, as her only lines consist of enabling Edward to be such a bastard. Apparently it doesn’t bother her that Edward hasn’t uttered one word that wasn’t in service of cock-eyed fantasy. If Edward Bloom reminds you of that slightly kooky uncle you haven’t seen in years, then maybe you should give it a shot. But I’m not about to enjoy the sort of behavior from a relative that would cause me to leave the room, simply because it takes place in a movie. Ironically, this film made me think of one of Tim Burton's true masterpieces, ''Film/EdWood'', because the titular character of that film is so much like Edward Bloom. They are both avatars for Burton himself, who is quite content to indulge his own fantasies, yet seems to have no regard for his audience.
2nd Jul '17 7:31:22 AM ManEFaces
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* Tropers/{{ManEFaces}}: ''Film/BigFish'' is quite possibly the worst goddamn film Tim Burton has ever directed, and I'm taking''Film/PlanetOfTheApes2001'' and ''Film/DarkShadows'' into account in making that assessment. Watching (or should I say enduring) Big Fish is like spending two hours with that obnoxious drunk at the end of the bar who simply won’t shut the fuck up. One Edward Bloom yammers endlessly about utter nonsense that could interest only himself, yet smiles and winks in the expectation that you’ll be as fascinated as he is. The old man is slowly dying, and so his son Will returns to learn the true story about his father’s life because he has felt let down by a lifetime of tall tales and long absences. Instead, we must suffer through Edward’s egomaniacal rants that are assumedly supposed to be cute and charming. He bullies his listeners (and us) into accepting his demented worldview, when the only proper label for this man is that of a congenital liar. Edward’s journey through life, as he tells it, is strikingly similar to Forrest Gump’s; full of wartime heroics, small town eccentrics, and blind love for a vapid woman. Edward’s love story is arguably the most repulsive of the lot, as he falls in love at first sight, announces that will marry this woman even before speaking one word to her, and keeps her in his mind for three years until he can find her again. After he tracks her down at college, he shows up at her door and proposes marriage (again, he has never said one word to the woman). The woman, Sandra, tells him that she is already engaged, which prompts the self-absorbed ass-fucker to increase his obsessive behavior. He buys her thousands of flowers, hires a sky writer, and shouts at her window that he will indeed marry her. Some of the less sophisticated members of the audience might find this stalker-like behavior romantic, but as it was yet another example of Edward’s puffed up vanity, I couldn’t help but vomit throughout. This isn’t an old softie we are watching here, but a man so self-obsessed that he will not accept rejection. Everyone and everything must be caught, stripped, and placed in his ever-expanding trophy case. Another example of Edward’s ego occurs when Will’s wife is discussing her recently published photos at the dinner table. Rather than ask the young woman to elaborate, Edward uses this as a springboard to bore the family further with another tale that they have heard hundreds of times. Edward simply cannot listen to someone else talk for more than five seconds without having to add his own bullshit. A life force this big and this self-important does not have time for other people and simply tunes out if other egos intrude on his party. It is conceivable to spend a lifetime with this man without getting to know the real person, or having him know the real you. He will talk over you, through you, and without regard for other opinions until he literally beats you into submission. I have no doubt that many people watching it found a familiar point of reference, as we all know a relative who believes the dinner doesn’t truly begin until he or she enters the goddamn room. Common sense dictates that Edward is just one of those people who likes to add color to life and is merely a harmless clown. But the “people person” — the back-slapper and the hand-shaker — is not at all harmless, for at bottom, what he really wants is absolute control. He wants to be talked about when he’s not around, and whenever he arrives, he wants to be the first person consulted. By intruding on the lives of everyone and talking without interruption, he doesn’t want others to forget that without him, their lives just wouldn’t be as spirited. My sympathy was with poor Will, who never knew his father because the man was too busy constructing an image to distract us from the real prick beneath the lies. And my disgust also extended to Edward’s wife Sandra, as her only lines consist of enabling Edward to be such a bastard. Apparently it doesn’t bother her that Edward hasn’t uttered one word that wasn’t in service of cock-eyed fantasy. If Edward Bloom reminds you of that slightly kooky uncle you haven’t seen in years, then maybe you should give it a shot. But I’m not about to enjoy the sort of behavior from a relative that would cause me to leave the room, simply because it takes place in a movie. Ironically, this film made me think of one of Tim Burton's true masterpieces, ''Film/EdWood'', because the titular character of that film is so much like Edward Bloom. They are both avatars for Burton himself, who is quite content to indulge his own fantasies, yet seems to have no regard for his audience.

to:

* Tropers/{{ManEFaces}}: ''Film/BigFish'' is quite possibly the worst goddamn film Tim Burton has ever directed, and I'm taking''Film/PlanetOfTheApes2001'' and ''Film/DarkShadows'' into account in making that assessment. Watching (or should I say enduring) Big Fish is like spending two hours with that obnoxious drunk at the end of the bar who simply won’t shut the fuck up. One Edward Bloom yammers endlessly about utter nonsense that could interest only himself, yet smiles and winks in the expectation that you’ll be as fascinated as he is. The old man is slowly dying, and so his son Will returns to learn the true story about his father’s life because he has felt let down by a lifetime of tall tales and long absences. Instead, we must suffer through Edward’s egomaniacal rants that are assumedly supposed to be cute and charming. He bullies his listeners (and us) into accepting his demented worldview, when the only proper label for this man is that of a congenital liar. Edward’s journey through life, as he tells it, is strikingly similar to Forrest Gump’s; full of wartime heroics, small town eccentrics, and blind love for a vapid woman. Edward’s love story is arguably the most repulsive of the lot, as he falls in love at first sight, announces that will marry this woman even before speaking one word to her, and keeps her in his mind for three years until he can find her again. After he tracks her down at college, he shows up at her door and proposes marriage (again, he has never said one word to the woman). The woman, Sandra, tells him that she is already engaged, which prompts the self-absorbed ass-fucker to increase his obsessive behavior. He buys her thousands of flowers, hires a sky writer, and shouts at her window that he will indeed marry her. Some of the less sophisticated members of the audience might find this stalker-like behavior romantic, but as it was yet another example of Edward’s puffed up vanity, I couldn’t help but vomit throughout. This isn’t an old softie we are watching here, but a man so self-obsessed that he will not accept rejection. Everyone and everything must be caught, stripped, and placed in his ever-expanding trophy case. Another example of Edward’s ego occurs when Will’s wife is discussing her recently published photos at the dinner table. Rather than ask the young woman to elaborate, Edward uses this as a springboard to bore the family further with another tale that they have heard hundreds of times. Edward simply cannot listen to someone else talk for more than five seconds without having to add his own bullshit. A life force this big and this self-important does not have time for other people and simply tunes out if other egos intrude on his party. It is conceivable to spend a lifetime with this man without getting to know the real person, or having him know the real you. He will talk over you, through you, and without regard for other opinions until he literally beats you into submission. I have no doubt that many people watching it found a familiar point of reference, as we all know a relative who believes the dinner doesn’t truly begin until he or she enters the goddamn room. Common sense dictates that Edward is just one of those people who likes to add color to life and is merely a harmless clown. But the “people person” — the back-slapper and the hand-shaker — is not at all harmless, for at bottom, what he that kind of "people person" really wants is absolute control. He wants to be talked about when he’s not around, and whenever he arrives, he wants to be the first person consulted. By intruding on the lives of everyone and talking without interruption, he doesn’t want others to forget that without him, their lives just wouldn’t be as spirited. My sympathy was with poor Will, who never knew his father because the man was too busy constructing an image to distract us from the real prick beneath the lies. And my disgust also extended to Edward’s wife Sandra, as her only lines consist of enabling Edward to be such a bastard. Apparently it doesn’t bother her that Edward hasn’t uttered one word that wasn’t in service of cock-eyed fantasy. If Edward Bloom reminds you of that slightly kooky uncle you haven’t seen in years, then maybe you should give it a shot. But I’m not about to enjoy the sort of behavior from a relative that would cause me to leave the room, simply because it takes place in a movie. Ironically, this film made me think of one of Tim Burton's true masterpieces, ''Film/EdWood'', because the titular character of that film is so much like Edward Bloom. They are both avatars for Burton himself, who is quite content to indulge his own fantasies, yet seems to have no regard for his audience.
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