History Creator / WarnerBrosRecords

9th Mar '17 2:55:48 PM MarkLungo
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[[quoteright:300:[[Music/TheDoobieBrothers http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/wb_records_9484.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:300:The mid-'70s "Burbank label". The street doesn't actually exist, at least not in Burbank; the painting was inspired by art from a 1920s orange crate.]]

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[[quoteright:300:[[Music/TheDoobieBrothers [[quoteright:350:[[Music/TheDoobieBrothers http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/wb_records_9484.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:300:The mid-'70s [[caption-width-right:350:The mid-70s "Burbank label". The street doesn't actually exist, at least not in Burbank; the painting was inspired by art from a 1920s orange crate.]]
9th Mar '17 11:48:20 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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Warner Bros. Records began as an offshoot of the [[Creator/WarnerBros film studio]]. Like many of its artists, it was given "the chance to fail" until it emerged not only as a successful label, but a major force in the music industry.

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Warner Bros. Records began in 1958 as an offshoot of the [[Creator/WarnerBros film studio]]. Like many of its artists, it was given "the chance to fail" until it emerged not only as a successful label, but a major force in the music industry.
5th Mar '17 4:58:56 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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By the late [[TheFifties 1950s]], the film industry was in decline thanks to TV and other factors. Meanwhile, the music industry was on an upswing, and movie studios were taking advantage of it. Creator/{{MGM}} Records had been successful for years; Creator/{{Paramount}} had just bought Dot Records; Creator/UnitedArtistsRecords, Creator/TwentiethCenturyFox Records, and Creator/ColumbiaPictures' Colpix label were entering the fray; even Creator/{{Disney}} had a small pop label, Buena Vista. (Creator/{{Universal}} reversed the pattern--they were owned ''by'' a record company, US Decca.) The final impetus was provided by Tab Hunter, a Warners contract player who moved into music and had several hit singles--for Dot. After a failed attempt to buy the Imperial label, WB took the plunge; on 19 March 1958, Warner Bros. Records opened for business.

to:

By the late [[TheFifties 1950s]], the film industry was in decline thanks to TV and other factors. Meanwhile, the music industry was on an upswing, and movie studios were taking advantage of it. Creator/{{MGM}} Records had been successful for years; Creator/{{Paramount}} had just bought Dot Records; Creator/UnitedArtistsRecords, Creator/TwentiethCenturyFox Records, and Creator/ColumbiaPictures' Colpix label were entering the fray; even Creator/{{Disney}} had a small pop label, Buena Vista.Vista, and way-past-its-prime Creator/RKOPictures had a short-lived attempt with the RKO Unique label. (Creator/{{Universal}} reversed the pattern--they were owned ''by'' a record company, US Decca.) The final impetus was provided by Tab Hunter, a Warners contract player who moved into music and had several hit singles--for Dot. After a failed attempt to buy the Imperial label, WB took the plunge; on 19 March 1958, Warner Bros. Records opened for business.
4th Mar '17 3:13:38 PM Spinosegnosaurus77
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Added DiffLines:

* Music/WakaFlockaFlame
28th Feb '17 9:38:34 AM Mdumas43073
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[[quoteright:350:[[Music/TheDoobieBrothers http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/wb_records_9484.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:350:The mid-70s "Burbank label". The street doesn't exist, at least not in Burbank; the painting was inspired by art from a 1920s orange crate.]]

->''"Whenever a mystique forms around a corporation, as it has with Apple or Microsoft, and as it did around Warner/[[Creator/RepriseRecords Reprise]], I always think it's excessive, because it's still a corporation. And when you dealt with Warners on business, you may as well have been dealing with a mortgage broker. They were tough. Mo [Ostin], Joe Smith, whomever you dealt with. Though not on record budgets--I never heard that I couldn't use an orchestra, for instance. The main thing about the label, though, is that they gave you the chance to fail. [[DoingItForTheArt They put up with you if what you were doing was good in, let's say, an aesthetic way]]. [[ProtectionFromEditors There was no A&R department that passed judgment]]. If it felt like somebody was doing something---they'd let you fail, and fail again, and fail again. And fail forever. Like me, and [Ry] Cooder, and [[Music/BonnieRaitt Bonnie [Raitt]]], for a time. Now that's gone. You can't find it. And that's a very big thing."''\\
--'''Music/RandyNewman''' on his old employer

to:

[[quoteright:350:[[Music/TheDoobieBrothers [[quoteright:300:[[Music/TheDoobieBrothers http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/wb_records_9484.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:350:The mid-70s [[caption-width-right:300:The mid-'70s "Burbank label". The street doesn't actually exist, at least not in Burbank; the painting was inspired by art from a 1920s orange crate.]]

->''"Whenever a mystique forms around a corporation, as it has with Apple or Microsoft, and as it did around Warner/[[Creator/RepriseRecords Reprise]], I always think it's excessive, because it's still a corporation. And when you dealt with Warners on business, you may as well have been dealing with a mortgage broker. They were tough. Mo [Ostin], Joe Smith, whomever you dealt with. Though not on record budgets--I never heard that I couldn't use an orchestra, for instance. The main thing about the label, though, is that they gave you the chance to fail. [[DoingItForTheArt They put up with you if what you were doing was good in, let's say, an aesthetic way]]. [[ProtectionFromEditors There was no A&R department that passed judgment]]. If it felt like somebody was doing something---they'd let you fail, and fail again, and fail again. And fail forever. Like me, and [Ry] Cooder, and [[Music/BonnieRaitt Bonnie [Raitt]]], for a time. Now that's gone. You can't find it. And that's a very big thing."''\\
--'''Music/RandyNewman'''
"''
-->--'''Music/RandyNewman'''
on his old employer
19th Feb '17 2:32:07 PM MarkLungo
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Added DiffLines:

* Music/{{Wire}}*
19th Feb '17 12:12:34 PM MarkLungo
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In 1963, Warners bought Music/FrankSinatra's struggling indie label Creator/RepriseRecords, just in time for Ol' Blue Eyes to begin a career comeback. A few years later, Reprise manager Mo Ostin helped bring both labels into the PsychedelicRock era by signing Music/JimiHendrix to Sinatra's imprint. Music/TheGratefulDead were already part of the Warner Bros. stable, and these two acts became the wave of Warners' future, attracting the new generation of GenreMotif/{{Rock}} musicians with their combination of artistic credibility and high sales.

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In 1963, Warners bought Music/FrankSinatra's struggling indie label Creator/RepriseRecords, just in time for Ol' Blue Eyes to begin a career comeback.CareerResurrection. A few years later, Reprise manager Mo Ostin helped bring both labels into the PsychedelicRock era by signing Music/JimiHendrix to Sinatra's imprint. Music/TheGratefulDead were already part of the Warner Bros. stable, and these two acts became the wave of Warners' future, attracting the new generation of GenreMotif/{{Rock}} musicians with their combination of artistic credibility and high sales.
19th Feb '17 12:10:13 PM MarkLungo
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Warner Bros.' salvation began with another group of siblings--Music/TheEverlyBrothers, who had been consistent hitmakers for the independent Cadence label. Warners wooed them away with an unprecedented million-dollar contract in 1960, and while the hits dried up after a while, the Everlys stayed on the label for years afterward. WB's next major act was Creator/BobNewhart, whose chart-topping debut album established Warner Bros. as ''the'' label for RecordedAndStandUpComedy for decades to come. The next big signing was FolkMusic trio Music/PeterPaulAndMary, whose numerous hits included "Music/PuffTheMagicDragon".

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Warner Bros.' salvation began with another group of siblings--Music/TheEverlyBrothers, who had been consistent hitmakers for the independent Cadence label. Warners wooed them away with an unprecedented million-dollar contract in 1960, and while the hits dried up after a while, the Everlys stayed sold well enough to stay on the label for years afterward. WB's next major act was Creator/BobNewhart, whose chart-topping debut album established Warner Bros. as ''the'' label for RecordedAndStandUpComedy for decades to come. The next big signing was FolkMusic trio Music/PeterPaulAndMary, whose numerous hits included "Music/PuffTheMagicDragon".
19th Feb '17 12:08:37 PM MarkLungo
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The label's formative years provided a lot of EarlyInstallmentWeirdness. Besides the expected soundtrack [=LPs=], there were stereo demonstration records, {{Concept Album}}s with titles like ''Terribly Sophisticated Songs (A Collection Of Unpopular Songs For Popular People)'', and musical excursions by actors like ''Franchise/{{Dragnet}}'' creator/star Creator/JackWebb, who ''recited'' love songs in his Sgt. Friday monotone. Space Age GenreMotif/{{Jazz}} and GenreMotif/EasyListening ruled, and GenreMotif/{{Rock}} was almost non-existent. Unsuprisingly, only a handful of WB's releases charted. The few hits it managed were tied to the studio's popular TV series ''77 Sunset Strip''; the soundtrack album sold well, and actor Edd Byrnes (who played the show's BreakoutCharacter Kookie) had a fluke novelty hit with "Kookie, Kookie (Lend Me Your Comb)". Still, the successes were far outweighed by the failures. Warner Bros. Records was losing money, and the company was almost shut down--but fortunately, it was given one more chance to fail. And as with society in general, TheSixties changed everything.

to:

The label's formative years provided a lot of EarlyInstallmentWeirdness. Besides the expected soundtrack [=LPs=], there were stereo demonstration records, {{Concept Album}}s with titles like ''Terribly Sophisticated Songs (A Collection Of Unpopular Songs For Popular People)'', and musical excursions by actors like ''Franchise/{{Dragnet}}'' creator/star Creator/JackWebb, who ''recited'' love songs in his Sgt. Friday monotone. Space Age GenreMotif/{{Jazz}} and GenreMotif/EasyListening ruled, and GenreMotif/{{Rock}} RockAndRoll was almost non-existent. Unsuprisingly, only a handful of WB's releases charted. The few hits it managed were tied to the studio's popular TV series ''77 Sunset Strip''; the soundtrack album sold well, and actor Edd Byrnes (who played the show's BreakoutCharacter Kookie) had a fluke novelty hit with "Kookie, Kookie (Lend Me Your Comb)". Still, the successes were far outweighed by the failures. Warner Bros. Records was losing money, and the company was almost shut down--but fortunately, it was given one more chance to fail. And as with society in general, TheSixties changed everything.
19th Feb '17 12:06:50 PM MarkLungo
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By the late [[TheFifties 1950s]], the film industry was in decline thanks to TV and other factors. Meanwhile, the music industry was on an upswing, and movie studios were taking advantage of it. Creator/{{MGM}} Records had been successful for years; Creator/{{Paramount}} had just bought Dot Records; Creator/UnitedArtistsRecords, Creator/TwentiethCenturyFox Records and Creator/ColumbiaPictures' Colpix label were entering the fray; even Creator/{{Disney}} had a small pop label, Buena Vista. (Creator/{{Universal}} reversed the pattern--they were owned ''by'' a record company, US Decca.) The final impetus was provided by Tab Hunter, a Warners contract player who moved into music and had several hit singles--for Dot. After a failed attempt to buy the Imperial label, WB took the plunge; on 19 March 1958, Warner Bros. Records opened for business.

to:

By the late [[TheFifties 1950s]], the film industry was in decline thanks to TV and other factors. Meanwhile, the music industry was on an upswing, and movie studios were taking advantage of it. Creator/{{MGM}} Records had been successful for years; Creator/{{Paramount}} had just bought Dot Records; Creator/UnitedArtistsRecords, Creator/TwentiethCenturyFox Records Records, and Creator/ColumbiaPictures' Colpix label were entering the fray; even Creator/{{Disney}} had a small pop label, Buena Vista. (Creator/{{Universal}} reversed the pattern--they were owned ''by'' a record company, US Decca.) The final impetus was provided by Tab Hunter, a Warners contract player who moved into music and had several hit singles--for Dot. After a failed attempt to buy the Imperial label, WB took the plunge; on 19 March 1958, Warner Bros. Records opened for business.
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