History Creator / ThomasPaine

7th Apr '17 3:58:27 PM nombretomado
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* ButNotTooForeign: There is some debate among historians as to whether Paine should be counted as an American or an Englishman. Usually, which side you are on depends on which side of ThePond you are on. Paine did consider himself American, for what it's worth, especially since the English charged him with sedition and chased him to France and he refused to return ever again to England (and never did).

to:

* ButNotTooForeign: There is some debate among historians as to whether Paine should be counted as an American or an Englishman. Usually, which side you are on depends on which side of ThePond UsefulNotes/ThePond you are on. Paine did consider himself American, for what it's worth, especially since the English charged him with sedition and chased him to France and he refused to return ever again to England (and never did).
1st Feb '17 11:31:52 AM JulianLapostat
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* ButNotTooForeign: There is some debate among historians as to whether Paine should be counted as an American or an Englishman. Usually, which side you are on depends on which side of ThePond you are on. Paine did consider himself American, for what it's worth.

to:

* ButNotTooForeign: There is some debate among historians as to whether Paine should be counted as an American or an Englishman. Usually, which side you are on depends on which side of ThePond you are on. Paine did consider himself American, for what it's worth.worth, especially since the English charged him with sedition and chased him to France and he refused to return ever again to England (and never did).
27th Nov '16 3:05:09 PM tvtropesruinedmylife22
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In 1760, Pain's wife and first child died during childbirth, and his corset business went under. This drove a depressed Pain to drink, and he started voicing his opposition to British politics and especially the monarchy during his drunken fits. Within a few years, he had added the -e- and his situation improved somewhat. Concurrently, this was the beginning of Paine's involvement in radical politics. He started writing campaign songs for politicians and writing articles in favor of reforms, such as higher pay for excise officers. After gaining a reputation in England for being a rabble-rouser and a drunkard, Creator/BenjaminFranklin, impressed by his writing skills, invited Paine to the other side of the Atlantic in 1774.

to:

In 1760, Pain's wife and first child died during childbirth, and his corset business went under. This drove a depressed Pain to drink, and he started voicing his opposition to British politics and especially the monarchy during his drunken fits. Within a few years, he had added the -e- to his name and his situation improved somewhat. Concurrently, this was the beginning of Paine's involvement in radical politics. He started writing campaign songs for politicians and writing articles in favor of reforms, such as higher pay for excise officers. After gaining a reputation in England for being a rabble-rouser and a drunkard, Creator/BenjaminFranklin, impressed by his writing skills, invited Paine to the other side of the Atlantic in 1774.
13th Sep '16 12:47:23 PM JulianLapostat
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** He also held ''shockingly'' progressive views regarding women for his time. Before he even wrote ''Common Sense'', he wrote an article criticizing the ways women are oppressed in society and defending their rights at a time when most men thought they had none.
** In short, Paine was probably in possession of a time machine, though such radical ideas weren't all that unusual at the time. Paine may have agitated against slavery but the Jacobins in France, at the height of the ReignOfTerror, [[GreyAndGrayMorality actually abolished slavery, the first European country to do so in the modern era]].

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** He also held ''shockingly'' progressive views regarding women for his time. Before he even wrote ''Common Sense'', he wrote an article criticizing the ways women are oppressed in society and defending their rights at a time when most men thought they had none. That said, [[WhatTheHellHero when Paine served on the 1792 Girondin Constitution Committee, he and others did not put the vote for women into the lists]].
** In short, Paine was probably in possession anticipated a lot of a time machine, modern liberal ideas though such as noted by Eric Hobsbawm, while he was undoubtedly radical ideas weren't all that unusual at the time.in an Anglo-American context, he was fairly moderate on other issues. Paine may have agitated against slavery but the Jacobins in France, at the height of the ReignOfTerror, [[GreyAndGrayMorality actually abolished slavery, the first European country to do so in the modern era]].
28th Jul '16 12:04:51 PM JulianLapostat
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Paine continued to live in France until 1802. Despite his imprisonment during the Terror, Paine was critical of the Directory government that followed. He was especially disappointed by the post-Thermidor Constitution which reversed many of the proposals in the 1793 Constitution (finished by the Jacobins but based on the groundwork done by the Girondin Committee on which Paine had served), chiefly universal male suffrage and lack of property restrictions. He also met Napoleon during this time and discussed [[NotSoAboveItAll an invasion of England, for which he wrote a pamphlet]]. He wrote an infamous open letter where he declared that George Washington was the head of a wild conspiracy that was responsible for his imprisonment. He was not without his reasons: the order of his arrest, written in UsefulNotes/MaximilienRobespierre's own hand, stated that he was arrested for the interest of "America and France" which considering that then-ambassador Gouvernor Morris refused to intervene and continued to do so after Robespierre's downfall, proved in the opinion of Paine, and some historians, complicity on the part of the American government to get him guillotined[[note]]Indeed, there is a record that petitioners on Paine's behalf appealed to the revolutionary tribunals for his release on the grounds that Paine was an American citizen, which France considered their ally, but the judge in question stated that Paine was technically a British subject since he had never officially taken citizenship with the new American government. He would have qualified for asylum status but Ambassador Morris did not give him this recognition despite staying in Paris during the entire period of the Terror and Paine's imprisonment, not even helping him after Robespierre's downfall[[/note]]. At this point, Paine's loss-of-favor with his former allies turned to outright hatred. He continued writing controversial and radical pamphlets, most notably 1795's ''Agrarian Justice''. In this pamphlet, Paine introduced a concept that is now called "guaranteed minimum income," a sort of welfare program where all citizens and families are paid a sufficient living income. He also gave the world an early argument for providing welfare for the elderly and public education for children. Because of this, the Social Security website credits Paine as the first American to promote the idea of a welfare system. Paine's other activities during this period involved founding several deist temples and societies in France.

to:

Paine continued to live in France until 1802. Despite his imprisonment during the Terror, Paine was critical of the Directory government that followed. He was especially disappointed by the post-Thermidor Constitution which reversed many of the proposals in the 1793 Constitution (finished by the Jacobins but based on the groundwork done by the Girondin Committee on which Paine had served), chiefly universal male suffrage and lack of property restrictions. He also met Napoleon during this time and discussed [[NotSoAboveItAll an invasion of England, for which he wrote a pamphlet]]. He wrote an infamous open letter where he declared that George Washington was the head of a wild conspiracy that was responsible for his imprisonment. He was not without his reasons: the order of his arrest, written in UsefulNotes/MaximilienRobespierre's own hand, stated that he was arrested for the interest of "America and France" which considering that then-ambassador Gouvernor Morris refused to intervene and continued to do so after Robespierre's downfall, proved in the opinion of Paine, and some historians, complicity on the part of the American government to get him guillotined[[note]]Indeed, there guillotined[[note]]There is a record that petitioners on Paine's behalf appealed to the revolutionary tribunals for his release on the grounds that Paine was an American citizen, which France considered their ally, but the judge in question stated that Paine was technically a British subject since he had never officially taken citizenship with the new American government. He would have qualified for asylum status but Ambassador Morris did not give him this recognition despite staying in Paris during the entire period of the Terror and Paine's imprisonment, not even helping him after Robespierre's downfall[[/note]].downfall. Morris was opposed to Paine's vocal support for the Revolution because he felt it upset America's neutrality, and likewise served as an invitation and endorsement for radicalism back home[[/note]]. At this point, Paine's loss-of-favor with his former allies turned to outright hatred. He continued writing controversial and radical pamphlets, most notably 1795's ''Agrarian Justice''. In this pamphlet, Paine introduced a concept that is now called "guaranteed minimum income," a sort of welfare program where all citizens and families are paid a sufficient living income. He also gave the world an early argument for providing welfare for the elderly and public education for children. Because of this, the Social Security website credits Paine as the first American to promote the idea of a welfare system. Paine's other activities during this period involved founding several deist temples and societies in France.
28th Jul '16 12:01:45 PM JulianLapostat
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He served on the Constitutional Committee headed by the Girondins, the pro-war faction of the Revolution who, like Paine, advocated for war against neighboring powers to "spread the Revolution"[[note]]Ironically, despite being highly anglophile, the Girondins declared war on England[[/note]]. Paine didn't speak French and did not really make a great effort to learn the language which made him dependent on the English-speaking multilingual elite of the Girondins rather than the Jacobins who were populist and Parisian in base, ironically putting the famous radical (by Anglo-American standards) to a moderate position. Paine did not win himself favors when he argued against executing King Louis XVI and instead suggested he be sent to America as a noble hostage. During the ReignOfTerror, Paine along with many English expats trapped in France was placed under arrest and imprisoned at the Palais de Luxembourg, and while in prison, he began to write ''The Age of Reason'', a pamphlet that advocated {{UsefulNotes/Deism}} while also criticizing organized religion, particularly Christianity and the Bible. He had actually began work for this before his arrest and was conducting research at Saint-Denis when he was captured. This highly controversial book earned Paine a good deal of condemnation since it put forth criticism of traditional Christianity in an accessible manner for the common man. Paine remained imprisoned for the entirety of the Terror, and was released six months after Thermidor, upon the arrival of the new American ambassador to France, future President UsefulNotes/JamesMonroe, then secured his release, though Paine remained imprisoned up to six months later.

Paine continued to live in France until 1802. Despite his imprisonment during the Terror, Paine was critical of the Directory government and the post-Thermidor Constitution which reversed many of the proposals in the 1793 Constitution (finished by the Jacobins but based on the groundwork done by the Girondin Committee), chiefly universal male suffrage and lack of property restrictions. He also met Napoleon during this time and discussed [[NotSoAboveItAll an invasion of England, for which he wrote a pamphlet]]. He wrote an infamous open letter where he declared that George Washington was the head of a wild conspiracy that was responsible for his imprisonment. He was not without his reasons: the order of his arrest, written in UsefulNotes/MaximilienRobespierre's own hand, stated that he was arrested for the interest of "America and France" which considering that then-ambassador Gouvernor Morris refused to intervene and continued to do so after Robespierre's downfall, proved in the opinion of Paine, and some historians, complicity on the part of the American government to get him guillotined[[note]]Indeed, there is a record that petitioners on Paine's behalf appealed to the revolutionary tribunals for his release on the grounds that Paine was an American citizen, which France considered their ally, but the judge in question stated that Paine was technically a British subject since he had never officially taken citizenship with the new American government. He would have qualified for asylum status but Ambassador Morris did not give him this recognition despite staying in Paris during the entire period of the Terror and Paine's imprisonment, not even helping him after Robespierre's downfall[[/note]]. At this point, Paine's loss-of-favor with his former allies turned to outright hatred. He continued writing controversial and radical pamphlets, most notably 1795's ''Agrarian Justice''. In this pamphlet, Paine introduced a concept that is now called "guaranteed minimum income," a sort of welfare program where all citizens and families are paid a sufficient living income. He also gave the world an early argument for providing welfare for the elderly and public education for children. Because of this, the Social Security website credits Paine as the first American to promote the idea of a welfare system. Paine's other activities during this period involved founding several deist temples and societies in France.

to:

He served on the Constitutional Committee headed by the Girondins, the pro-war faction of the Revolution who, like Paine, advocated for war against neighboring powers to "spread the Revolution"[[note]]Ironically, despite being highly anglophile, the Girondins declared war on England[[/note]]. Paine didn't speak French and did not really make a great effort to learn the language which made him dependent on the English-speaking multilingual elite of the Girondins rather than the Jacobins who were populist and Parisian in base, ironically putting the famous radical (by Anglo-American standards) to a moderate position. Paine did not win himself favors when he argued against executing King Louis XVI and instead suggested he be sent to America as a noble hostage. During the ReignOfTerror, Paine along with many English expats trapped in France was placed under arrest and imprisoned at the Palais de Luxembourg, and while in prison, he began to write ''The Age of Reason'', a pamphlet that advocated {{UsefulNotes/Deism}} while also criticizing organized religion, particularly Christianity and the Bible. He had actually began work for this before his arrest and was conducting research at Saint-Denis when he was captured. This highly controversial book earned Paine a good deal of condemnation since it put forth criticism of traditional Christianity in an accessible manner for the common man. Paine man and this meant that it would eventually be read by a far bigger public than other anti-religious pamphlets put forth by Creator/{{Voltaire}} and Denis Diderot, among others. He remained imprisoned for the entirety of the Terror, and was released six months after Thermidor, upon the arrival of the new American ambassador to France, future President UsefulNotes/JamesMonroe, then secured his release, though Paine remained imprisoned up to six months later.UsefulNotes/JamesMonroe.

Paine continued to live in France until 1802. Despite his imprisonment during the Terror, Paine was critical of the Directory government and that followed. He was especially disappointed by the post-Thermidor Constitution which reversed many of the proposals in the 1793 Constitution (finished by the Jacobins but based on the groundwork done by the Girondin Committee), Committee on which Paine had served), chiefly universal male suffrage and lack of property restrictions. He also met Napoleon during this time and discussed [[NotSoAboveItAll an invasion of England, for which he wrote a pamphlet]]. He wrote an infamous open letter where he declared that George Washington was the head of a wild conspiracy that was responsible for his imprisonment. He was not without his reasons: the order of his arrest, written in UsefulNotes/MaximilienRobespierre's own hand, stated that he was arrested for the interest of "America and France" which considering that then-ambassador Gouvernor Morris refused to intervene and continued to do so after Robespierre's downfall, proved in the opinion of Paine, and some historians, complicity on the part of the American government to get him guillotined[[note]]Indeed, there is a record that petitioners on Paine's behalf appealed to the revolutionary tribunals for his release on the grounds that Paine was an American citizen, which France considered their ally, but the judge in question stated that Paine was technically a British subject since he had never officially taken citizenship with the new American government. He would have qualified for asylum status but Ambassador Morris did not give him this recognition despite staying in Paris during the entire period of the Terror and Paine's imprisonment, not even helping him after Robespierre's downfall[[/note]]. At this point, Paine's loss-of-favor with his former allies turned to outright hatred. He continued writing controversial and radical pamphlets, most notably 1795's ''Agrarian Justice''. In this pamphlet, Paine introduced a concept that is now called "guaranteed minimum income," a sort of welfare program where all citizens and families are paid a sufficient living income. He also gave the world an early argument for providing welfare for the elderly and public education for children. Because of this, the Social Security website credits Paine as the first American to promote the idea of a welfare system. Paine's other activities during this period involved founding several deist temples and societies in France.
28th Jul '16 11:57:01 AM JulianLapostat
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He served on the Constitutional Committee headed by the Girondins, the pro-war faction of the Revolution who, like Paine, advocated for war against neighboring powers to "spread the Revolution"[[note]]Ironically, despite being highly anglophile, the Girondins declared war on England[[/note]]. Paine didn't speak French and did not really make a great effort to learn the language which made him dependent on the English-speaking multilingual elite of the Girondins rather than the Jacobins who were populist and Parisian in base, ironically putting the famous radical (by Anglo-American standards) to a moderate position. Paine did not win himself favors when he argued against executing King Louis XVI and instead suggested he be sent to America as a noble hostage. During the ReignOfTerror, Paine along with many English expats trapped in France was placed under arrest and imprisoned at the Palais du Luxembourg, and while in prison, he began to write ''The Age of Reason'', a pamphlet that advocated {{UsefulNotes/Deism}} while also criticizing organized religion, particularly Christianity and the Bible. He had actually began work for this before his arrest and was conducting research at Saint-Denis when he was captured. This highly controversial book earned Paine a good deal of condemnation since it put forth criticism of traditional Christianity in an accessible manner for the common man. Paine remained imprisoned for the entirety of the Terror, and was released six months after Thermidor, upon the arrival of the new American ambassador to France, future President UsefulNotes/JamesMonroe, then secured his release, though Paine remained imprisoned up to six months later.

to:

He served on the Constitutional Committee headed by the Girondins, the pro-war faction of the Revolution who, like Paine, advocated for war against neighboring powers to "spread the Revolution"[[note]]Ironically, despite being highly anglophile, the Girondins declared war on England[[/note]]. Paine didn't speak French and did not really make a great effort to learn the language which made him dependent on the English-speaking multilingual elite of the Girondins rather than the Jacobins who were populist and Parisian in base, ironically putting the famous radical (by Anglo-American standards) to a moderate position. Paine did not win himself favors when he argued against executing King Louis XVI and instead suggested he be sent to America as a noble hostage. During the ReignOfTerror, Paine along with many English expats trapped in France was placed under arrest and imprisoned at the Palais du de Luxembourg, and while in prison, he began to write ''The Age of Reason'', a pamphlet that advocated {{UsefulNotes/Deism}} while also criticizing organized religion, particularly Christianity and the Bible. He had actually began work for this before his arrest and was conducting research at Saint-Denis when he was captured. This highly controversial book earned Paine a good deal of condemnation since it put forth criticism of traditional Christianity in an accessible manner for the common man. Paine remained imprisoned for the entirety of the Terror, and was released six months after Thermidor, upon the arrival of the new American ambassador to France, future President UsefulNotes/JamesMonroe, then secured his release, though Paine remained imprisoned up to six months later.
28th Jul '16 11:55:28 AM JulianLapostat
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After the Revolution he turned his eyes back to Europe, moving back to Great Britain in 1787. He tried to inspire a revolution against the country's constitutional democracy, but only ended up gaining the disapproval of many of his former allies. Many historians have noted the influence of Paine's writings in this period upon strengthening the liberal cause in Britain, later allowing the passage of laws which made the country more democratic - such as the Reform Bill of 1832, which gave every MP a constituency of similar population and at one stroke eliminated the infamous 'rotten boroughs' which had plagued the system for centuries. In 1789 UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution broke out across the Channel, and many intellectuals in Great Britain initially wrote passionate pieces sympathetic to the revolutionaries, but the Tories who saw the events in France as an invitation for radicalism against England mounted a backlash, with Edmund Burke becoming the main figurehead. Paine wrote his ''Rights of Man'' in 1791 as a rebuttal to Burke's famous critique. Paine took Burke's criticism as a form of betrayal since Edmund Burke supported the American revolution but argued against the French for its far more radical and thorough democratic framework. Paine was charged with seditious libel and forced to flee England before he could be arrested and stand trial for it and was found guilty for failing to attend the trial ''in absentia''. [[YouCantGoHomeAgain He never returned to England again]]. In France, Paine was declared an honorary citizen for his support of the French Revolution and was even elected to the French National Convention in 1792.

to:

After the Revolution he turned his eyes back to Europe, moving back to Great Britain in 1787. He tried to inspire a revolution against the country's constitutional democracy, but only ended up gaining the disapproval of many of his former allies. Many historians have noted the influence of Paine's writings in this period upon strengthening the liberal cause in Britain, later allowing the passage of laws which made the country more democratic - such as the Reform Bill of 1832, which gave every MP a constituency of similar population and at one stroke eliminated the infamous 'rotten boroughs' which had plagued the system for centuries. In 1789 UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution broke out across the Channel, and many intellectuals in Great Britain initially wrote passionate pieces sympathetic to the revolutionaries, but the Tories who political elite saw the events in France as an invitation for homegrown radicalism against England and mounted a backlash, with Edmund Burke becoming the main figurehead. backlash. Paine wrote his ''Rights ''The Rights of Man'' in 1791 as a rebuttal to Edmund Burke's famous critique.critique in his ''Reflections on the Revolution in France''[[note]]A key text in conservative ideology if actually quite weak and dated as observations on the events[[/note]]. Paine took Burke's criticism as a form of betrayal since Edmund Burke supported the American revolution but argued against the French for its far more radical and thorough democratic framework. Paine was charged with seditious libel and forced to flee England before he could be arrested and stand trial for it and was found guilty for failing to attend the trial ''in absentia''. [[YouCantGoHomeAgain He never returned to England again]]. In France, Paine was declared an honorary citizen for his support of the French Revolution and was even elected to the French National Convention in 1792.
28th Jul '16 11:52:38 AM JulianLapostat
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->''"We have it in our power to begin the world again."''\\
'''Thomas Paine'''

to:

->''"We have it in our power to begin the world again."''\\
'''Thomas Paine'''
"''
28th Jul '16 11:52:18 AM JulianLapostat
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-->'''Thomas Paine'''

to:

-->'''Thomas '''Thomas Paine'''
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