History Creator / PGWodehouse

12th Apr '16 5:54:40 AM Gallimaufry
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** Even more so with the golfer stories, as the younger players have learned to dread when The Oldest Member starts an unavoidable story. (Mr. Mulliner's audience tends to be more receptive, for most part.) TurnedUpToEleven when a golfer (who clearly have been scarred by The Oldest Member in the past) finds his way to The Angler's Rest, and finds out the hard wahy that ''there is another...''
23rd Dec '15 3:29:40 PM Geoduck
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* UnreliableNarrator: Mr. Mulliner.

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* UnreliableNarrator: Mr. Mulliner.Mulliner is a fisherman spinning tales in his local pub; Wodehouse deliberately used him to frame the more ridiculous story ideas that occurred to him.
23rd Dec '15 3:24:31 PM Geoduck
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* BrickJoke: With the Ukridge story "A Bit of Luck for Mabel", he manages to make the ''title'' into one of these.
29th Nov '15 10:54:15 AM gallium
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* CelebrityParadox: Short story "The Clicking of Cuthbert", 1922, via a bragging Russian novelist.
--> "No novelists anywhere any good except me. P G Wodehouse and Tolstoi not bad. Not good, but not bad."
21st Nov '15 12:53:00 PM gurkle2
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* AuthorAvatar: Corky Corcoran in the ''Ukridge'' series, whose life incorporates a few details of Wodehouse's own early career (like living in a boarding-house run by a retired butler).
28th Jul '15 9:19:06 PM Geoduck
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Beginning his career [[TheEdwardianEra in the earliest years of the 20th century]] as a writer of topical verse for the newspapers, he first made a name as an author mainly of boys' school stories. Wodehouse soon moved into the more lucrative field of light romance, and finally, in the late Twenties, settled on the pure comedies he preferred, and which he continued writing up to his last book (published posthumously as ''Sunset at Blandings''). He additionally wrote the book to several long-running Broadway [[{{Musical}} musicals]], adapted some others to the stage, and rewrote Music/ColePorter's ''Theatre/AnythingGoes''.

In 1940 Wodehouse was living in France when [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII the Germans]] showed up. After spending nearly a year in internment as an enemy alien, he was released and allowed to live in Berlin and occupied Paris. While in Berlin, he recorded six radio broadcasts recounting his experiences as a captive of the Germans. They were meant to be humorous talks in typical Wodehouse style, and they contained no pro-German or anti-British propaganda, but when second-hand information about their production finally filtered back to England, they went over very badly. His former friend Creator/AAMilne said that Wodehouse should be tried for treason as a German collaborator. MI-5 judged that Wodehouse had exhibited poor judgement but was not a traitor. Wodehouse reacted to the criticism by emigrating to the United States, becoming an American citizen, and never coming back to England for the rest of his life. He still got a knighthood from Queen Elizabeth II in 1975. He died the same year at the age of 93, saying that with his knighthood and a waxwork in Madame Tussauds, he had achieved all of his life's ambitions. Nevertheless, he worked right to the end; his last Jeeves novel was published a few months before his death and he was working on a Blandings novel when he died.

to:

Beginning his career [[TheEdwardianEra in the earliest years of the 20th century]] as a writer of topical verse for the newspapers, he first made a name as an author mainly of boys' school stories. Wodehouse soon moved into the more lucrative field of light romance, and finally, in the late Twenties, settled on shifted permanently to the pure comedies he preferred, and which he continued writing up to his last book (published posthumously as ''Sunset at Blandings'').preferred. He additionally wrote the book to several long-running Broadway [[{{Musical}} musicals]], adapted some others to the stage, and rewrote Music/ColePorter's ''Theatre/AnythingGoes''.

In 1940 Wodehouse was living in France when [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII the Germans]] showed up. After spending nearly a year in internment as an enemy alien, he was released and allowed to live in Berlin and occupied Paris. While in Berlin, he recorded six radio broadcasts recounting his experiences as a captive of the Germans. They were meant to be humorous talks in typical Wodehouse style, and they contained no pro-German or anti-British propaganda, but when second-hand information about their production finally filtered back to England, they went over very badly. His former friend Creator/AAMilne said that Wodehouse should be tried for treason as a German collaborator. MI-5 judged that Wodehouse had exhibited poor judgement but was not a traitor. Wodehouse reacted to the criticism by emigrating to the United States, becoming an American citizen, and never coming back to England for the rest of his life. He still got a knighthood from Queen Elizabeth II in 1975. He died the same year at the age of 93, saying that with his knighthood and a waxwork in Madame Tussauds, Tussaud's, he had achieved all of his life's ambitions. Nevertheless, he worked right to the end; his last Jeeves novel was published a few months before his death and he was working on a Blandings novel when he died.
passed away, which was published posthumously and half-finished as ''Sunset at Blandings''.



* AuthorExistenceFailure: ''Sunset At Blandings'' was published posthumously, only half-finished.

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* AuthorExistenceFailure: As noted above, ''Sunset At Blandings'' was published posthumously, only half-finished.



-->'''Bertie''': I've never been able to bear with fortitude anything in the shape of a kid with golden curls. Confronted with one, I feel the urge to drop things on him from a height.
-->'''Jeeves''': Many strong natures are affected in the same way, sir.

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-->'''Bertie''': I've never been able to bear with fortitude anything in the shape of a kid with golden curls. Confronted with one, I feel the urge to drop things on him from a height.
-->'''Jeeves''':
height.\\
'''Jeeves''':
Many strong natures are affected in the same way, sir.



---> '''Oldest Member''': Do you love her?
---> '''Young Man''': Madly.
---> '''Oldest Member''': And how do you find it affects your game?
---> '''Young Man''': I've started shanking a bit.
---> '''Oldest Member''': I am sorry, but not surprised. Either that or missing short putts is what happens on these occasions. I doubt if golfers ought to fall in love. I have known it to cost men ten shots in a medal round.

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---> '''Oldest Member''': Do you love her?
--->
her?\\
'''Young Man''': Madly.
--->
Madly.\\
'''Oldest Member''': And how do you find it affects your game?
--->
game?\\
'''Young Man''': I've started shanking a bit.
--->
bit.\\
'''Oldest Member''': I am sorry, but not surprised. Either that or missing short putts is what happens on these occasions. I doubt if golfers ought to fall in love. I have known it to cost men ten shots in a medal round.



* ExtremeDoormat: Ukridge's friend and faithful chronicaller "Corky" Corcoran lets himself be talked into just about anything, although at least as a writer he is able make a bit of money selling the resulting narratives.

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* ExtremeDoormat: Ukridge's friend and faithful chronicaller chronicler "Corky" Corcoran lets himself be talked into just about anything, although at least as a writer he is able make a bit of money selling the resulting narratives.



* MeetCute: Averted surpisingly often when you consider that each book typically has three or four couples. However, it does happen sometimes:

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* MeetCute: Averted surpisingly surprisingly often when you consider that each book typically has three or four couples. However, it does happen sometimes:



* ToughRoom: The golf stories are told by the Oldest Member to various young men, who desperately try to avoid having to listen to them.

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* ToughRoom: The golf stories are told by the Oldest Member to various young men, who desperately try to avoid having to listen to them. Mulliner also sometimes traps people into hearing his tales of his countless relatives.
30th Jun '15 9:47:04 PM jayoungr
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* BizarreAndImprobableGolfGame

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* BizarreAndImprobableGolfGameBizarreAndImprobableGolfGame: Many, particularly in the Oldest Member stories.



** Also Bill in ''Doctor Sally.''

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** Also Bill in ''Doctor Sally.''Sally''--or as Sally would put it, he loses control of his vascular motors.



* GrandeDame: Wodehouse (very likely under the inspiration of Creator/WSGilbert) may well claim to be the patron saint of this trope, for well over sixty years he devised every variation imaginable, from the lovable Aunt Dahlia to the truly horrible Heloise, Princess von und zu Dwornitzchek (a RichBitch who is not even funny). Perhaps the most typical is the formidable Lady Constance (she is, of course, the sister of the many-sistered Lord Emsworth in the "Blandings Castle" saga), but the apotheosis is Bertie's Aunt Agatha, who "chews broken bottles and kills rats with her teeth."

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* GrandeDame: Wodehouse (very likely under the inspiration of Creator/WSGilbert) may well claim to be the patron saint of this trope, for trope. For well over sixty years years, he devised every variation imaginable, from the lovable Aunt Dahlia to the truly horrible Heloise, Princess von und zu Dwornitzchek (a RichBitch who is not even funny). Perhaps the most typical is the formidable Lady Constance (she is, of course, the sister of the many-sistered Lord Emsworth in the "Blandings Castle" saga), but the apotheosis is Bertie's Aunt Agatha, who "chews broken bottles and kills rats with her teeth."



* HeroOfAnotherStory: A minor character in one book or story will often appear as a major character in another. For instance, Monty Bodkin, a supporting character in ''[[Literature/BlandingsCastle Heavy Weather]],'' is the hero of ''The Luck of the Bodkins'' and ''Pearls, Girls, and Monty Bodkin.''

to:

* HeroOfAnotherStory: A minor character in one book or story work will often appear as a major character in another. For instance, Monty Bodkin, a supporting character in ''[[Literature/BlandingsCastle Heavy Weather]],'' is the hero of ''The Luck of the Bodkins'' and ''Pearls, Girls, and Monty Bodkin.''



* InsecureLoveInterest: Archie to Lucille in ''Indiscretions of Archie''. Bill to Elizabeth in ''Uneasy Money''.

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* InsecureLoveInterest: InsecureLoveInterest:
**
Archie to Lucille in ''Indiscretions of Archie''. Archie''.
**
Bill to Elizabeth in ''Uneasy Money''.



* LiquidCourage: Wodehouse ''loves'' this trope. Several of his books feature timid young men having a slug of brandy or the like when nerving themselves up to propose to their dream girls. A particularly notable incident involving Gussie Fink-Nottle and some spiked orange juice appears in ''Right Ho, [[Literature/JeevesAndWooster Jeeves]].''



** Males with two-syllable names ending in -ie, like Freddie or Reggie, are generally silly asses -- and males with nicknames, ''e.g''., Barmy or Bingo, are not to be taken seriously even by the silly asses.

to:

** Males with two-syllable names ending in -ie, like Freddie or Reggie, are generally silly asses -- and males asses.
** Males
with nicknames, ''e.g''., Barmy or Bingo, are not to be taken seriously even by the silly asses.



* WeaknessTurnsHerOn: Sometimes used to explain how an UpperClassTwit can still be a ChickMagnet; a man who's sufficiently ditzy and helpless awakens a girl's maternal instinct.
** See for example Jane Hubbard (big game hunter) and Eustace Hignett (poet) in ''The Girl on the Boat''.

to:

* WeaknessTurnsHerOn: Sometimes used to explain how an UpperClassTwit can still be a ChickMagnet; a man who's sufficiently ditzy and helpless awakens a girl's maternal instinct.
**
instinct. See for example Jane Hubbard (big game hunter) and Eustace Hignett (poet) in ''The Girl on the Boat''.
30th Jun '15 10:54:40 AM jayoungr
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* ChekhovsGun: As noted above, these are often put on display, most notably in Right Ho, Jeeves: "We stayed at Cannes about two months, and except for the fact that Aunt Dahlia lost her shirt at baccarat and Angela nearly got inhaled by a shark while aquaplaning, a pleasant time was had by all." The shark is the indirect cause of Angela's severed engagement later in the novel.

to:

* ChekhovsGun: As noted above, these are often put on display, most notably in Right ''Right Ho, Jeeves: Jeeves:'' "We stayed at Cannes about two months, and except for the fact that Aunt Dahlia lost her shirt at baccarat and Angela nearly got inhaled by a shark while aquaplaning, a pleasant time was had by all." The shark is the indirect cause of Angela's severed engagement later in the novel.



* CoolOldGuy: The Wodehouseverse has a fair few of 'em. Uncle Fred and the Honourable Galahad are perhaps the best examples, regularly helping their younger acquaintances out of trouble, often with rather impressive [[ZanyScheme Zany Schemes]].

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* CoolOldGuy: The Wodehouseverse has a fair few of 'em. Uncle Fred and the [[Literature/BlandingsCastle Honourable Galahad Galahad]] are perhaps the best examples, regularly helping their younger acquaintances out of trouble, often with rather impressive [[ZanyScheme Zany Schemes]].



** Also Bill in ''Doctor Sally.''



* HeroOfAnotherStory: A minor character in one book or story will often appear as a major character in another. For instance, Monty Bodkin, a supporting character in ''[[Literature/BlandingsCastle Heavy Weather]],'' is the hero of ''The Luck of the Bodkins'' and ''PearlsGirlsAndMontyBodkin.''

to:

* HeroOfAnotherStory: A minor character in one book or story will often appear as a major character in another. For instance, Monty Bodkin, a supporting character in ''[[Literature/BlandingsCastle Heavy Weather]],'' is the hero of ''The Luck of the Bodkins'' and ''PearlsGirlsAndMontyBodkin.''Pearls, Girls, and Monty Bodkin.''



* TheVerse: Virtually all of his works seem to be set in the same world; major characters from one work will often be mentioned casually in another.

to:

* TheVerse: Virtually all of his works seem to be set in the same world; major characters from one work will often be mentioned casually in another.another, and the same fictional locations pop up in various works as well.
30th Jun '15 9:39:26 AM jayoungr
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* HeroOfAnotherStory: A minor character in one book or story will often appear as a major character in another. For instance, Monty Bodkin, a supporting character in ''[[Literature/BlandingsCastle Heavy Weather]],'' is the hero of ''The Luck of the Bodkins'' and ''PearlsGirlsAndMontyBodkin.''


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* TheVerse: Virtually all of his works seem to be set in the same world; major characters from one work will often be mentioned casually in another.
30th Jun '15 9:31:53 AM jayoungr
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* GeekyTurnOn: Sally in ''Doctor Sally'' starts to take an interest in Bill when she finds out he's not just an IdleRich butterfly, but she ''really'' warms up when she finds out he can recite all the common bacteria found in milk.

to:

* GeekyTurnOn: Sally in ''Doctor Sally'' starts to take an interest in Bill when she finds out he's not just an IdleRich butterfly, layabout, but she ''really'' warms up when she finds out he can recite all the common bacteria found in milk.



** Jane Hubbard in ''The Girl on the Boat.''



* MeaningfulName: Wodehouse had his own NamingConventions. Men with simple one or two-syllable first names, such as Bill or Jimmy, are likely to be the hero, especially in his early romances; likewise, heroines will have simple one or two-syllable names like Joan or Betty. Girls with two-syllable [[TomboyishName masculine sounding names]] ending in -y or -ie, like Billie or Corky, are likely to be perky, fun-loving, and rather dangerous to their male attachments. Males with two-syllable names ending in -ie, like Freddie or Reggie, are generally silly asses -- and males with nicknames, ''e.g''., Barmy or Bingo, are not to be taken seriously even by the silly asses. Young men with names like serious romantic heroes, such as Desmond or Derek, are often heels, as are men whose names end in -o, like Orlo or Rollo; young women with poetic or pretentious names like Kathrynne or Melusine are usually pills.

to:

* MeaningfulName: Wodehouse had his own NamingConventions.
**
Men with simple one or two-syllable first names, such as Bill or Jimmy, are likely to be the hero, especially in his early romances; likewise, romances.
** Likewise,
heroines will have simple one one- or two-syllable names like Joan or Betty. Betty.
**
Girls with two-syllable [[TomboyishName masculine sounding names]] ending in -y or -ie, like Billie or Corky, are likely to be perky, fun-loving, and rather dangerous to their male attachments. attachments.
**
Males with two-syllable names ending in -ie, like Freddie or Reggie, are generally silly asses -- and males with nicknames, ''e.g''., Barmy or Bingo, are not to be taken seriously even by the silly asses.
**
Young men with names like serious romantic heroes, such as Desmond or Derek, are often heels, as are men whose names end in -o, like Orlo or Rollo; young Rollo.
** Young
women with poetic or pretentious names like Kathrynne or Melusine are usually pills.
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