History Creator / LouisLAmour

3rd Nov '17 4:40:50 PM dlchen145
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A TropeCodifier for TheWestern genre, Louis L'Amour (born Louis La Moore, but he changed his name because EverythingSoundsSexierInFrench) wrote eighty-six novels and several more short stories over the course of his life. TheWestern was his prefered genre, though he refered to all his novels as "frontier stories" and he wrote historical fiction set in other eras as well, plus the occasional thriller or fantasy.

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A TropeCodifier for TheWestern genre, Louis L'Amour (born Louis La Moore, but he changed his name because EverythingSoundsSexierInFrench) EverythingSoundsSexierInFrench, March 22, 1908 June 10, 1988) wrote eighty-six novels and several more short stories over the course of his life. TheWestern was his prefered genre, though he refered to all his novels as "frontier stories" and he wrote historical fiction set in other eras as well, plus the occasional thriller or fantasy.
27th Aug '17 9:17:28 PM PaulA
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* ArentYouGoingToRavishMe: In ''The Walking Drum'', Kerbouchard and Comtesse Suzanne are incognito in Kiev as brother and sister, meaning they must share a room at an inn. She defiantly tells him that she has a dagger and ''will'' kill him if he tries anything. Kerbouchard, who had no intentions of the sort, teases her about it, getting her even more worried, and then simply goes to sleep, knowing that while he's having a peaceful night's sleep, she'll be lying awake all night worrying and wishing he'd at least ''try'' so she could get some sleep. And yes, she's a little insulted in the morning that he didn't even consider it.


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* BoomTown:
** Tell Sackett founds one of these almost inadvertently in ''Sackett'', as a cover for his more profitable gold strike some distance away.
** In ''Fallon'', the titular character starts a boomtown on top of a boomtown.
** In ''The Iron Marshall'' it's pointed out several times that the town didn't exist just a year before.
** In ''Bendigo Shafter'', building a town is the whole point.


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* ChangingOfTheGuard: Happens repeatedly in his generational saga about the Sackett family.


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* DeterminedWidow: Mary Breydon in ''The Cherokee Trail''.


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* TheGunfighterWannabe: ''Sackett'' has one of the hanger-on type of gunfighter wannabe.


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* GunTwirling: In an effort to subvert this trope, L'Amour had one of his characters twirling his gun and accidentally killing a man. When he's hanged, the townspeople put a sign around his neck saying "This was no accident".


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* NewOldWest: ''The Broken Gun'' is set in the 1950s, with a reporter following up on century-old journal pages stuffed in a revolver.


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* ThePioneer: Barnabas Sackett, founder of the Sackett dynasty, starting in ''Sackett's Land''.


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* {{Prospector}}: In ''Sackett'', Tell Sackett more or less stumbles into becoming one.


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* RetiredGunfighter: Kilkenny, in several books by Louis L'Amour, is TheDrifter because he wants to retire, but people won't let him once they find out who he is.
* TheSheriff: In ''The Daybreakers'', Orrin Sackett parlays his successful term as a town marshal for Mora, New Mexico to run for county sheriff. His brother Tyrel's turn as town marshal for a small mining town doesn't go as well, though he makes a fine deputy sheriff later.
* SouthernGentleman: Drake Morrell from ''Bendigo Shafter''.


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* TrainJob: ''The Trail to Peach Meadow Canyon'' has the protagonist plan out the robbery of a train carrying a fortune in gold.
24th Aug '17 1:31:45 AM PaulA
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!!'''He and his books provide examples of the following tropes:'''

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!!'''He and his books provide !!Works by Louis L'Amour with their own pages:

* ''Literature/LastOfTheBreed''

!!Other works by Louis L'Amour contain
examples of the following tropes:'''
of:



* ProudWarriorRaceGuy: Joe Mack of ''Literature/LastOfTheBreed''. American jet fighter pilot and proud Sioux warrior.
24th Aug '17 1:23:03 AM PaulA
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* AndNowForSomethingCompletelyDifferent: Almost all his books were westerns, but towards the end of his life he branched out to other genres. The most obvious example is ''The Haunted Mesa'', which is a TrappedInAnotherWorld HeroicFantasy. Another is The Walking Drum, which is still historical fiction, but is about the Moorish Empire.
* AntiHero: A great deal of his protagonists fall into this category, sticking a whole lot closer to a code of honor (don't hit women, don't steal cattle, don't shoot a man in the back, etc.) than actual laws. Most would fall into III or IV, but some are II instead. It's rare that the protagonist isn't at least a KnightInSourArmor.

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* AndNowForSomethingCompletelyDifferent: Almost all his books were westerns, but towards the end of his life he branched out to other genres. The most obvious example is ''The Haunted Mesa'', which is a TrappedInAnotherWorld HeroicFantasy. Another is The ''The Walking Drum, Drum'', which is still historical fiction, but is about the Moorish Empire.
* AntiHero: A great deal of his protagonists fall into this category, sticking a whole lot closer to a code of honor (don't hit women, don't steal cattle, don't shoot a man in the back, etc.) than actual laws. Most would fall into III or IV, but some are II instead. It's rare that the protagonist isn't at least a KnightInSourArmor.



* DatingCatwoman: Literally. At one point, L'Amour was engaged to Julie Newmar, [[Series/{{Batman}} the original Catwoman]].



* PrintLongRunners: ''The Sacketts'' goes on for seventeen books, plus two short stories.
24th Aug '17 1:18:45 AM PaulA
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* AlwaysFemale tropes that apply:
** {{My Girl is Not a Slut}} - the heroines, and their boyfriends, regard even dancing in saloon as a {{Fate Worse Than Death}}
** {{Daddys Little Villain}}, and ''how'': see, e.g., ''The Daybreakers'', ''Lando,'' ''The Lonely Men'' and ''Kiowa Trail.'' L'Amour's good girls become grown-up pioneer women and cut the cord with their fathers.
** with a sprinkling of FemmeFatale on occasion, although direct "sexiness" or any mention of sex at all is extremely rare. He will mention that they have "Curves in all the right places"



* DaddysLittleVillain: see, e.g., ''The Daybreakers'', ''Lando'', ''The Lonely Men'' and ''Kiowa Trail''. L'Amour's good girls become grown-up pioneer women and cut the cord with their fathers.



* FemmeFatale: On occasion, although direct "sexiness" or any mention of sex at all is extremely rare. He will mention that they have "curves in all the right places".



* MyGirlIsNotASlut: The heroines, and their boyfriends, regard even dancing in saloon as a FateWorseThanDeath.



* ThirstyDesert: One of L'amour's standard plots is to throw the protagonist in the middle of a desert with no water, no horse, and no friendly faces for miles. Like many of his other standard scenarios, he based this on real experiences--in this case, walking out of Death Valley when he was a young man. The Sonoran Desert tends to be the specific desert used.



* ThirstyDesert: One of L'amour's standard plots is to throw the protagonist in the middle of a desert with no water, no horse, and no friendly faces for miles. Like many of his other standard scenarios, he based this on real experiences--in this case, walking out of Death Valley when he was a young man. The Sonoran Desert tends to be the specific desert used.
25th Jun '17 11:15:39 AM nombretomado
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Where other adventure writers can talk the talk, L'Amour walked the adventurer walk. At the age of fifteen he left home and began WalkingTheEarth, eventually becoming a merchant seaman and then serving with the United States Army in WorldWarTwo, and at one point or another visited every continent except Antarctica.

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Where other adventure writers can talk the talk, L'Amour walked the adventurer walk. At the age of fifteen he left home and began WalkingTheEarth, eventually becoming a merchant seaman and then serving with the United States Army in WorldWarTwo, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, and at one point or another visited every continent except Antarctica.
13th Dec '16 2:05:13 AM Xtifr
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A TropeCodifier for TheWestern genre, '''Louis L'Amour''' (born Louis La Moore, but he changed his name because EverythingSoundsSexierInFrench) wrote eighty-six novels and several more short stories over the course of his life. TheWestern was his prefered genre, though he refered to all his novels as "frontier stories" and he wrote historical fiction set in other eras as well, plus the occasional thriller or fantasy.

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A TropeCodifier for TheWestern genre, '''Louis L'Amour''' Louis L'Amour (born Louis La Moore, but he changed his name because EverythingSoundsSexierInFrench) wrote eighty-six novels and several more short stories over the course of his life. TheWestern was his prefered genre, though he refered to all his novels as "frontier stories" and he wrote historical fiction set in other eras as well, plus the occasional thriller or fantasy.
14th Nov '16 1:14:25 PM creepingdeath
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* BeingGoodSucks: In ''Sackett'', Tell thinks this as he has to carry down a {{Mook}}, who had been trying to kill him, but had broken his leg down a mountain, while the mook is on a makeshift stretcher, with a woman, [[UpToEleven in a snowstorm]] with more bad guys chasing them. When they make it down, the mook is [[{{Understatement}} understandably impressed]].
8th Nov '16 7:01:27 PM dlchen145
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* BadAss: If there aren't a few characters in the book who qualify, it ain't L'Amour.
27th Sep '16 9:08:20 PM Nylsa
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* OldShame: The Hopalong Cassidy novels.



* WriteWhatYouKnow: Apparently every single geographic feature in his books existed in real life and he saw them himself while WalkingTheEarth. His biography states that if there's any stream mentioned in one of his stories, you can find that stream exactly where he put it in RealLife, and the water will be good to drink. This probably explains why his descriptions of the land are so vivid and detailed, he described places he'd actually been and streams he'd actually drunk from.
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