History Creator / Gottlieb

1st Apr '16 4:16:47 PM themisterfree
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In 1983, the Coca-Cola Company purchased Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, and transferred their pinball assets to a new subsidiary, Mylstar Electronics. After the video-game shakedown of the eighties, a management group continued manufacturing pinball machines as Premier Technology, then as Gottlieb once again. In 1987, The Coca-Cola Company sold Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, to CPT Holdings. In 1991, CPT Holdings, along with its Gottlieb/Mylstar/Premiere video game and Columbia Pictures movie divisions, was purchased by ''Creator/{{Sony}}'', thus naming it ''Creator/SonyPictures'' (the Q*Bert franchise is currently owned by Sony Pictures Consumer Products (through Sony Pictures' ''Creator/{{Columbia Pictures}}'' division), a private video game sublabel of ''Creator/SonyComputerEntertainment'').

to:

In 1983, the Coca-Cola Company purchased Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, Creator/ColumbiaPictures, and transferred their pinball assets to a new subsidiary, Mylstar Electronics. After the video-game shakedown of the eighties, a management group continued manufacturing pinball machines as Premier Technology, then as Gottlieb once again. In 1987, The Coca-Cola Company sold spun-off Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, to CPT Holdings. as Columbia Pictures Entertainment (after the failure of ''Film/{{Ishtar}}''). In 1991, CPT Holdings, CPE, along with its Gottlieb/Mylstar/Premiere video game and Columbia Pictures movie divisions, assets, was purchased by ''Creator/{{Sony}}'', Creator/{{Sony}}, thus naming it ''Creator/SonyPictures'' Creator/SonyPictures (the Q*Bert franchise is currently owned by Sony Pictures Consumer Products (through Sony Pictures' ''Creator/{{Columbia Pictures}}'' division), Products, which explains why Columbia's credited for Q-Bert's appearance in ''Film/WreckItRalph''), a private video game sublabel of ''Creator/SonyComputerEntertainment'').
Creator/SonyComputerEntertainment.
7th Mar '16 3:39:07 PM FurryKef
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In 1983, the Coca-Cola Company purchased Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, and transferred their pinball assets to a new subsidiary, Mylstar Electronics. After the video-game shakedown of the eighties, a management group continued manufacturing pinball machines as Premier Technology, then as Gottlieb once again. In 1987, The Coca-Cola Company sold Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, to CPT Holdings. In 1991, CPT Holdings, along with its' Gottlieb/Mylstar/Premiere video game and Columbia Pictures movie divisions, was purchased by ''Creator/{{Sony}}'', thus naming it ''Creator/SonyPictures'' (the Q*Bert franchise is currently owned by Sony Pictures Consumer Products (through Sony Pictures' ''Creator/{{Columbia Pictures}}'' division), a private video game sublabel of ''Creator/SonyComputerEntertainment'').

to:

In 1983, the Coca-Cola Company purchased Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, and transferred their pinball assets to a new subsidiary, Mylstar Electronics. After the video-game shakedown of the eighties, a management group continued manufacturing pinball machines as Premier Technology, then as Gottlieb once again. In 1987, The Coca-Cola Company sold Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, to CPT Holdings. In 1991, CPT Holdings, along with its' its Gottlieb/Mylstar/Premiere video game and Columbia Pictures movie divisions, was purchased by ''Creator/{{Sony}}'', thus naming it ''Creator/SonyPictures'' (the Q*Bert franchise is currently owned by Sony Pictures Consumer Products (through Sony Pictures' ''Creator/{{Columbia Pictures}}'' division), a private video game sublabel of ''Creator/SonyComputerEntertainment'').
3rd Mar '16 9:38:44 AM StFan
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As with other arcade game makers, Gottlieb attempted to break into the field of VideoGames. Their first title was 1980's ''New York! New York!'', a lackluster vertical shooter licensed from Sigma Enterprises. Their second game was ''VideoGame/QBert'', a puzzle-jumping game that rode the popularity of ''VideoGame/{{Pac-Man}}'' to fame and fortune. Unfortunately, Gottlieb could not capitalize on the success of ''Q*Bert'', and their other video games -- including ''Reactor, Q*Bert Qubes, Mad Planets, M.A.C.H. 3,'' and ''Krull'' -- were lost in the crowd.

to:

As with other arcade game makers, Gottlieb attempted to break into the field of VideoGames. Their first title was 1980's ''New York! New York!'', a lackluster vertical shooter licensed from Sigma Enterprises. Their second game was ''VideoGame/QBert'', a puzzle-jumping game that rode the popularity of ''VideoGame/{{Pac-Man}}'' ''VideoGame/PacMan'' to fame and fortune. Unfortunately, Gottlieb could not capitalize on the success of ''Q*Bert'', and their other video games -- including ''Reactor, Q*Bert Qubes, Mad Planets, M.A.C.H. 3,'' and ''Krull'' -- were lost in the crowd.
5th Feb '16 5:49:15 PM nombretomado
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Gottlieb was an American company once famous for their arcade {{Pinball}} machines. Established by David Gottlieb in 1927 (as "D. Gottlieb & Co."), the company started off producing pinball machines, but later expanded into bowling games, bat-and-balls, and other {{Arcade Game}}s.

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Gottlieb was an American company once famous for their arcade {{Pinball}} machines. Established by David Gottlieb in 1927 (as "D. Gottlieb & Co."), the company started off producing pinball machines, but later expanded into bowling games, bat-and-balls, and other {{Arcade UsefulNotes/{{Arcade Game}}s.
15th Jan '16 10:28:23 AM Mikeyfan93
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Gottlieb will forever be associated with pinball history for two significant contributions: ''Pinball/BaffleBall'' (1931), the first successful coin-operated pinball game, and ''Humpty Dumpty'' (1947), the first pinball game to use electro-mechanical flippers. Despite this, the company was overall actually fairly conservative; the company was one of the last to abandon "wedgehead" designs, was late to multiplayer games, did not switch to solid state electronics until the late 1970s, and switched to dot matrix displays one year after they were introduced.

to:

Gottlieb will forever be associated with pinball history for two significant contributions: ''Pinball/BaffleBall'' (1931), the first successful coin-operated pinball game, and ''Humpty Dumpty'' (1947), the first pinball game to use electro-mechanical flippers. Despite this, the company was overall actually fairly conservative; the company was one of the last to abandon "wedgehead" designs, was late to multiplayer games, did not switch to solid state electronics until the late 1970s, and switched to dot matrix displays in 1992, one year after they were introduced.
15th Jan '16 10:27:54 AM Mikeyfan93
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Gottlieb will forever be associated with pinball history for two significant contributions: ''Pinball/BaffleBall'' (1931), the first successful coin-operated pinball game, and ''Humpty Dumpty'' (1947), the first pinball game to use electro-mechanical flippers. Despite this, the company was overall actually fairly conservative; the company was one of the last to abandon "wedgehead" designs, was late to multiplayer games, and did not switch to solid state electronics until the late 1970s.

to:

Gottlieb will forever be associated with pinball history for two significant contributions: ''Pinball/BaffleBall'' (1931), the first successful coin-operated pinball game, and ''Humpty Dumpty'' (1947), the first pinball game to use electro-mechanical flippers. Despite this, the company was overall actually fairly conservative; the company was one of the last to abandon "wedgehead" designs, was late to multiplayer games, and did not switch to solid state electronics until the late 1970s.
1970s, and switched to dot matrix displays one year after they were introduced.
22nd Oct '15 4:27:53 PM dustyroxybethany56
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In 1983, the Coca-Cola Company purchased Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, and transferred their pinball assets to a new subsidiary, Mylstar Electronics. After the video-game shakedown of the eighties, a management group continued manufacturing pinball machines as Premier Technology, then as Gottlieb once again. In 1987, The Coca-Cola Company sold Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, to CPT Holdings. In 1991, CPT Holdings, along with its' Gottlieb/Mylstar/Premiere video game and Columbia Pictures movie divisions, was purchased by ''Creator/{{Sony}}'', thus naming it ''Creator/SonyPictures'' (the Q*Bert franchise is currently owned by Sony Pictures Consumer Products (through Sony Pictures' ''Creator/Columbia Pictures'' division), a private video game sublabel of ''Creator/SonyComputerEntertainment'').

to:

In 1983, the Coca-Cola Company purchased Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, and transferred their pinball assets to a new subsidiary, Mylstar Electronics. After the video-game shakedown of the eighties, a management group continued manufacturing pinball machines as Premier Technology, then as Gottlieb once again. In 1987, The Coca-Cola Company sold Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, to CPT Holdings. In 1991, CPT Holdings, along with its' Gottlieb/Mylstar/Premiere video game and Columbia Pictures movie divisions, was purchased by ''Creator/{{Sony}}'', thus naming it ''Creator/SonyPictures'' (the Q*Bert franchise is currently owned by Sony Pictures Consumer Products (through Sony Pictures' ''Creator/Columbia Pictures'' ''Creator/{{Columbia Pictures}}'' division), a private video game sublabel of ''Creator/SonyComputerEntertainment'').
22nd Oct '15 4:27:36 PM dustyroxybethany56
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In 1983, the Coca-Cola Company purchased Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, and transferred their pinball assets to a new subsidiary, Mylstar Electronics. After the video-game shakedown of the eighties, a management group continued manufacturing pinball machines as Premier Technology, then as Gottlieb once again. In 1987, The Coca-Cola Company sold Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, to CPT Holdings. In 1991, CPT Holdings, along with its' Gottlieb/Mylstar/Premiere video game and Columbia Pictures movie divisions, was purchased by ''Creator/{{Sony}}'', thus naming it ''Creator/SonyPictures'' (the Q*Bert franchise is currently owned by Sony Pictures Consumer Products (through Sony Pictures' Columbia Pictures division), a private video game sublabel of ''Creator/SonyComputerEntertainment'').

to:

In 1983, the Coca-Cola Company purchased Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, and transferred their pinball assets to a new subsidiary, Mylstar Electronics. After the video-game shakedown of the eighties, a management group continued manufacturing pinball machines as Premier Technology, then as Gottlieb once again. In 1987, The Coca-Cola Company sold Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, to CPT Holdings. In 1991, CPT Holdings, along with its' Gottlieb/Mylstar/Premiere video game and Columbia Pictures movie divisions, was purchased by ''Creator/{{Sony}}'', thus naming it ''Creator/SonyPictures'' (the Q*Bert franchise is currently owned by Sony Pictures Consumer Products (through Sony Pictures' Columbia Pictures ''Creator/Columbia Pictures'' division), a private video game sublabel of ''Creator/SonyComputerEntertainment'').
22nd Oct '15 4:27:08 PM dustyroxybethany56
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In 1983, the Coca-Cola Company purchased Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, and transferred their pinball assets to a new subsidiary, Mylstar Electronics. After the video-game shakedown of the eighties, a management group continued manufacturing pinball machines as Premier Technology, then as Gottlieb once again. In 1987, The Coca-Cola Company sold Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, to CPT Holdings. In 1991, CPT Holdings, along with its' Gottlieb/Mylstar/Premiere video game and Columbia Pictures movie divisions, was purchased by ''Creator/{{Sony}}'', thus naming it ''Creator/SonyPictures'' (the Q*Bert franchise is currently owned by Sony Pictures Consumer Products (through Sony Pictures' Columbia Pictures division), a private video game sublabel of ''Creator/SonyComputerEntertainmentAmerica'').

to:

In 1983, the Coca-Cola Company purchased Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, and transferred their pinball assets to a new subsidiary, Mylstar Electronics. After the video-game shakedown of the eighties, a management group continued manufacturing pinball machines as Premier Technology, then as Gottlieb once again. In 1987, The Coca-Cola Company sold Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, to CPT Holdings. In 1991, CPT Holdings, along with its' Gottlieb/Mylstar/Premiere video game and Columbia Pictures movie divisions, was purchased by ''Creator/{{Sony}}'', thus naming it ''Creator/SonyPictures'' (the Q*Bert franchise is currently owned by Sony Pictures Consumer Products (through Sony Pictures' Columbia Pictures division), a private video game sublabel of ''Creator/SonyComputerEntertainmentAmerica'').
''Creator/SonyComputerEntertainment'').
22nd Oct '15 4:26:53 PM dustyroxybethany56
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In 1983, the Coca-Cola Company purchased Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, and transferred their pinball assets to a new subsidiary, Mylstar Electronics. After the video-game shakedown of the eighties, a management group continued manufacturing pinball machines as Premier Technology, then as Gottlieb once again. In 1987, The Coca-Cola Company sold Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, to CPT Holdings. In 1991, CPT Holdings, along with its' Gottlieb/Mylstar/Premiere video game and Columbia Pictures movie divisions, was purchased by ''Creator/{{Sony}}'', thus naming it ''Creator/SonyPictures'' (the Q*Bert franchise is currently owned by Sony Pictures Consumer Products (through Sony Pictures' Columbia Pictures division), a private video game sublabel of ''Creator/SonyComputerEntertainment'').

to:

In 1983, the Coca-Cola Company purchased Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, and transferred their pinball assets to a new subsidiary, Mylstar Electronics. After the video-game shakedown of the eighties, a management group continued manufacturing pinball machines as Premier Technology, then as Gottlieb once again. In 1987, The Coca-Cola Company sold Gottlieb's parent company, Columbia Pictures, to CPT Holdings. In 1991, CPT Holdings, along with its' Gottlieb/Mylstar/Premiere video game and Columbia Pictures movie divisions, was purchased by ''Creator/{{Sony}}'', thus naming it ''Creator/SonyPictures'' (the Q*Bert franchise is currently owned by Sony Pictures Consumer Products (through Sony Pictures' Columbia Pictures division), a private video game sublabel of ''Creator/SonyComputerEntertainment'').
''Creator/SonyComputerEntertainmentAmerica'').
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.Gottlieb