History Creator / ESPN

12th Dec '17 10:22:45 AM spiritsunami
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Other shows include ''Mike & Mike'' (a morning show simulcast with ESPN Radio), ''ESPN First Take'' (formerly ''Cold Pizza''), ''Series/JimRomeIsBurning'' (until it ended), ''Series/AroundTheHorn'', ''Series/PardonTheInterruption'', ''Series/SportsNation'', ''Series/NumbersNeverLie'' and ''[[Series/DanLeBatardIsHighlyQuestionable Highly Questionable]]'', which are eight different varieties of having people [[LargeHam spouting off sports opinions]] [[NoIndoorVoice in loud voices]], which is probably the ''coolest job ever''. (Add in ''ESPN Radio'''s lineup with Mike & Mike, The Herd, SVP and Rusillo, The Dan [=LeBatard=] Show, and Sedano & Stink, and you've got thirteen.) However, there are limits to how loud and abrasive you're allowed to be in opinionating, as evidenced by the failure of ''Quite Frankly with Steven A. Smith'' (which also means Jim Rome must have mellowed out some from his days of provoking fights by equating football players to tennis players). Liberal political commentator Creator/KeithOlbermann got his start as a ''[=SportsCenter=]'' anchor (and returned to do his own sports show in 2013). Former late-night talk show host Craig Kilborn is also an ESPN alum, as are ''Series/GoodMorningAmerica'' anchors Robin Roberts and Josh Elliott. Other sports networks also host ESPN alumni (Dave Revsine and Mike Hall on the Big Ten Network, to name a couple... and Hall got his job on ESPN by winning ''Dream Job'', an [[ContestWinnerCameo ESPN reality show]].)

to:

Other shows include ''Mike ''Golic & Mike'' Wingo'' (a morning show simulcast with ESPN Radio), Radio, formerly Mike & Mike until a change in hosts), ''ESPN First Take'' (formerly ''Cold Pizza''), ''Series/JimRomeIsBurning'' (until it ended), ''Series/AroundTheHorn'', ''Series/PardonTheInterruption'', ''Series/SportsNation'', ''Series/NumbersNeverLie'' and ''[[Series/DanLeBatardIsHighlyQuestionable Highly Questionable]]'', which are eight different varieties of having people [[LargeHam spouting off sports opinions]] [[NoIndoorVoice in loud voices]], which is probably the ''coolest job ever''. (Add in ''ESPN Radio'''s lineup with Mike Golic & Mike, Wingo, The Herd, SVP and Rusillo, The Dan [=LeBatard=] Show, and Sedano & Stink, and you've got thirteen.) However, there are limits to how loud and abrasive you're allowed to be in opinionating, as evidenced by the failure of ''Quite Frankly with Steven A. Smith'' (which also means Jim Rome must have mellowed out some from his days of provoking fights by equating football players to tennis players). Liberal political commentator Creator/KeithOlbermann got his start as a ''[=SportsCenter=]'' anchor (and returned to do his own sports show in 2013). Former late-night talk show host Craig Kilborn is also an ESPN alum, as are ''Series/GoodMorningAmerica'' anchors Robin Roberts and Josh Elliott. Other sports networks also host ESPN alumni (Dave Revsine and Mike Hall on the Big Ten Network, to name a couple... and Hall got his job on ESPN by winning ''Dream Job'', an [[ContestWinnerCameo ESPN reality show]].)
1st Jul '17 12:52:14 AM erforce
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[=ESPN2=] used to broadcast even ''more'' obscure stuff in its early years, most notably ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' tournaments (yes, seriously), perhaps keying in on the "E" in ESPN. Because the channel has become more mainstream in recent years, obscure sports will have to find a new home, like [[{{Dodgeball}} the Ocho]]. (Incidentally, ESPN originally was conceived as a 24-hour version of ABC's ''Series/WideWorldOfSports''. And then, so was [=ESPN2=].)

to:

[=ESPN2=] used to broadcast even ''more'' obscure stuff in its early years, most notably ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' tournaments (yes, seriously), perhaps keying in on the "E" in ESPN. Because the channel has become more mainstream in recent years, obscure sports will have to find a new home, like [[{{Dodgeball}} [[Film/DodgeballATrueUnderdogStory the Ocho]]. (Incidentally, ESPN originally was conceived as a 24-hour version of ABC's ''Series/WideWorldOfSports''. And then, so was [=ESPN2=].)
15th Jun '17 4:32:14 AM Piterpicher
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[=ESPN2=] used to broadcast even ''more'' obscure stuff in its early years, most notably ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' tournaments (yes, seriously), perhaps keying in on the "E" in ESPN. Because the channel has become more mainstream in recent years, obscure sports will have to find a new home, like [[{{Dodgeball}} the Ocho]]. (Incidentally, ESPN originally was conceived as a 24-hour version of ABC's WideWorldOfSports. And then, so was [=ESPN2=].)

to:

[=ESPN2=] used to broadcast even ''more'' obscure stuff in its early years, most notably ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' tournaments (yes, seriously), perhaps keying in on the "E" in ESPN. Because the channel has become more mainstream in recent years, obscure sports will have to find a new home, like [[{{Dodgeball}} the Ocho]]. (Incidentally, ESPN originally was conceived as a 24-hour version of ABC's WideWorldOfSports.''Series/WideWorldOfSports''. And then, so was [=ESPN2=].)
25th Apr '17 8:45:56 PM KYCubbie
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Other shows include ''Mike & Mike'' (a morning show simulcast with ESPN Radio), ''ESPN First Take'' (formerly ''Cold Pizza''), ''Series/JimRomeIsBurning'' (until it ended), ''Series/AroundTheHorn'', ''Series/PardonTheInterruption'', ''Series/SportsNation'', ''Series/NumbersNeverLie'' and ''[[Series/DanLeBatardIsHighlyQuestionable Highly Questionable]]'', which are eight different varieties of having people [[LargeHam spouting off sports opinions]] [[NoIndoorVoice in loud voices]], which is probably the ''coolest job ever''. (Add in ''ESPN Radio'''s lineup with Mike & Mike, The Herd, SVP and Rusillo, The Dan [=LeBatard=] Show, and Sedano & Stink, and you've got thirteen.) However, there are limits to how loud and abrasive you're allowed to be in opinionating, as evidenced by the failure of ''Quite Frankly with Steven A. Smith'' (which also means Jim Rome must have mellowed out some from his days of provoking fights by equating football players to tennis players). Liberal political commentator KeithOlbermann got his start as a [=SportsCenter=] anchor (and returned to do his own sports show in 2013). Former late-night talk show host Craig Kilborn is also an ESPN alum, as are ''Series/GoodMorningAmerica'' anchors Robin Roberts and Josh Elliott. Other sports networks also host ESPN alumni (Dave Revsine and Mike Hall on the Big Ten Network, to name a couple...and Hall got his job on ESPN by winning ''Dream Job'', an [[ContestWinnerCameo ESPN reality show]].)

ESPN also has their own magazine, published every other week since 1998. It generally takes a more humorous approach than other sporting magazines, and even managed to snag Rick Reilly away from ''Magazine/SportsIllustrated'' in order to facilitate this, although ''SI'' managed to exact ''some'' measure of revenge by grabbing longtime ESPN personality Dan Patrick. Still, judging by the state of the back page of ''SI'' since Reilly left, it seems ESPN got the better end of the deal. (Speaking of deals, when ''Monday Night Football'' moved from Creator/{{ABC}} to ESPN, Disney traded Al "Do You Believe In Miracles?" Michaels to NBC Universal for the rights to an old WaltDisney character named Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, something he found amusing. Again, all true, and Oswald's return to the fold is being marked by a prominent part in ''VideoGame/EpicMickey''.) In recent years, ESPN Magazine has made an annual "Body Issue", with pictures of athletes in the nude (though no naughty bits are shown), which could be seen as a direct competitor to ''SI'''s Swimsuit Edition.

In the early 00s, ESPN opened up an Original Entertainment wing, for original movies and tv shows. This led to the short-lived cult poker themed series ''Tilt'' and the brilliant football themed series ''Playmakers'', which sadly was canceled because pressure from the NFL (the league was not happy with the way the show featured the seedier side of professional football). The backlash from the cancellation of ''Playmakers'', along with the bombing of ''Tilt'', killed any hopes of further series as critics accused ESPN of caving to pressure, resulting in them refocusing their efforts into TV movies ( ''A Season on the Brink'' (about Bobby Knight, who is now an ESPN analyst), ''The Junction Boys'' (about Paul "Bear" Bryant's first summer at Texas A&M), ''3: The Dale Earnhardt Story'' ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Self-explanatory]]),) as well as mini-serieses such as ''The Bronx is Burning'' (A miniseries about the Yankees' turbulent 1977 season), and ''Four Minutes'' (about Roger Bannister running the first 4-minute mile in 1954).

Their ''30 For 30'' series, a series of 30 documentaries on varying subjects, originally created in 2009 in celebration of ESPN's 30th anniversary by columnist BillSimmons, has been critically acclaimed, and as of 2015 is now in its third season. [[note]] Simmons, however, was let go by ESPN in May 2015, and the website ''Grantland'' he curated was also shut down a few months later. [[/note]] The five-part ''30 for 30'' documentary ''Film/OJMadeInAmerica'' ran for a week in a Santa Monica theater before it aired on ESPN, a decision that allowed the series to win the UsefulNotes/AcademyAwardForBestDocumentaryFeature.

The network also hosts their own awards show, the ''[=ESPYs=]'', celebrating the best moments and athletes in sports in the past year. The show is traditionally taped on the day after the MLB All-Star Game, a day where none of the four major US sports has anything going on so as to ensure maximum participation from the athletes. From year one, the highlight of the event is usually the speech given to the recipient of the Arthur Ashe Courage Award, first given to Jim Valvano, who was in the last stages of cancer; he gave his famous "Don't give up" speech that year, and ESPN honors his memory each year by maintaining the V Foundation for Cancer Research, holding a charity auction week every year leading up to the [=ESPYs=] where fans can bid on major fan experiences. Other prominent speeches from winners of that award (and the subsequently created Jimmy V Award for Perseverence) include Stuart Scott, Caitlyn Jenner, and Craig Sager.

to:

Other shows include ''Mike & Mike'' (a morning show simulcast with ESPN Radio), ''ESPN First Take'' (formerly ''Cold Pizza''), ''Series/JimRomeIsBurning'' (until it ended), ''Series/AroundTheHorn'', ''Series/PardonTheInterruption'', ''Series/SportsNation'', ''Series/NumbersNeverLie'' and ''[[Series/DanLeBatardIsHighlyQuestionable Highly Questionable]]'', which are eight different varieties of having people [[LargeHam spouting off sports opinions]] [[NoIndoorVoice in loud voices]], which is probably the ''coolest job ever''. (Add in ''ESPN Radio'''s lineup with Mike & Mike, The Herd, SVP and Rusillo, The Dan [=LeBatard=] Show, and Sedano & Stink, and you've got thirteen.) However, there are limits to how loud and abrasive you're allowed to be in opinionating, as evidenced by the failure of ''Quite Frankly with Steven A. Smith'' (which also means Jim Rome must have mellowed out some from his days of provoking fights by equating football players to tennis players). Liberal political commentator KeithOlbermann Creator/KeithOlbermann got his start as a [=SportsCenter=] ''[=SportsCenter=]'' anchor (and returned to do his own sports show in 2013). Former late-night talk show host Craig Kilborn is also an ESPN alum, as are ''Series/GoodMorningAmerica'' anchors Robin Roberts and Josh Elliott. Other sports networks also host ESPN alumni (Dave Revsine and Mike Hall on the Big Ten Network, to name a couple... and Hall got his job on ESPN by winning ''Dream Job'', an [[ContestWinnerCameo ESPN reality show]].)

ESPN also has their its own magazine, published every other week since 1998. It generally takes a more humorous approach than other sporting magazines, and even managed to snag Rick Reilly away from ''Magazine/SportsIllustrated'' in order to facilitate this, although ''SI'' managed to exact ''some'' measure of revenge by grabbing longtime ESPN personality Dan Patrick. Still, judging by the state of the back page of ''SI'' since Reilly left, it seems ESPN got the better end of the deal. (Speaking of deals, when ''Monday Night Football'' moved from Creator/{{ABC}} to ESPN, Disney traded Al "Do You Believe In Miracles?" Michaels to NBC Universal for the rights to an old WaltDisney Creator/WaltDisney character named Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, something he found amusing. Again, all true, and Oswald's return to the fold is being marked by a prominent part in ''VideoGame/EpicMickey''.) In recent years, ESPN Magazine ''ESPN [[SpellMyNameWithAThe The]] Magazine'' has made an annual "Body Issue", with pictures of athletes in the nude (though no naughty bits are shown), which could be seen as a direct competitor to ''SI'''s Swimsuit Edition.

In the early 00s, ESPN opened up an Original Entertainment wing, for original movies and tv shows. This led to the short-lived cult poker themed series ''Tilt'' and the brilliant football themed series ''Playmakers'', which sadly was canceled because pressure from the NFL (the league was not happy with the way the show featured the seedier side of professional football). The backlash from the cancellation of ''Playmakers'', along with the bombing of ''Tilt'', killed any hopes of further series as critics accused ESPN of caving to pressure, resulting in them refocusing their efforts into TV movies ( ''A (''A Season on the Brink'' (about Bobby Bob Knight, who is now an ESPN analyst), ''The Junction Boys'' (about Paul "Bear" Bryant's first summer at Texas A&M), ''3: The Dale Earnhardt Creator/DaleEarnhardt Story'' ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Self-explanatory]]),) as well as mini-serieses mini-series such as ''The Bronx is Burning'' (A (a miniseries about the Yankees' turbulent 1977 season), and ''Four Minutes'' (about Roger Bannister running the first 4-minute mile in 1954).

Their ''30 For 30'' series, a series of 30 documentaries on varying subjects, originally created in 2009 in celebration of ESPN's 30th anniversary by columnist BillSimmons, [[Creator/TheSportsGuy Bill Simmons]], has been critically acclaimed, and as of 2015 is now has been in its third season."season" since 2015. [[note]] Simmons, however, was let go by ESPN in May 2015, and the website ''Grantland'' he curated was also shut down a few months later. [[/note]] The five-part ''30 for 30'' documentary ''Film/OJMadeInAmerica'' ran for a week in a theaters in Santa Monica theater and New York City before it aired on ESPN, a decision that allowed the series to win the UsefulNotes/AcademyAwardForBestDocumentaryFeature.

The network also hosts their own awards show, the ''[=ESPYs=]'', celebrating the best moments and athletes in sports in the past year. The show is traditionally taped on the day after the MLB All-Star Game, a day where none of the four major US sports has anything going on so as to ensure maximum participation from the athletes. From year one, the highlight of the event is usually the speech given to the recipient of the Arthur Ashe Courage Award, first given to Jim Valvano, who was in the last stages of cancer; he gave his famous "Don't give up" speech that year, and ESPN honors his memory each year by maintaining the V Foundation for Cancer Research, holding a charity auction week every year leading up to the [=ESPYs=] where fans can bid on major fan experiences. Other prominent speeches from winners of that award (and the subsequently created Jimmy V Award for Perseverence) Perseverance) include Stuart Scott, Caitlyn Jenner, and Craig Sager.
25th Apr '17 8:39:28 PM KYCubbie
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Other shows include ''Mike and Mike In the Morning'' (Simulcast with ESPN Radio), ''ESPN First Take'' (formerly ''Cold Pizza''), ''Series/JimRomeIsBurning'' (until it ended), ''Series/AroundTheHorn'', ''Series/PardonTheInterruption'', ''Series/SportsNation'', ''Series/NumbersNeverLie'' and ''Series/DanLeBatardIsHighlyQuestionable'', which are eight different varieties of having people [[LargeHam spouting off sports opinions]] [[NoIndoorVoice in loud voices]], which is probably the ''coolest job ever''. (Add in ''ESPN Radio'''s lineup with Mike & Mike, The Herd, SVP and Rusillo, The Dan [=LeBatard=] Show, and Sedano & Stink, and you've got thirteen.) However, there are limits to how loud and abrasive you're allowed to be in opinionating, as evidenced by the failure of ''Quite Frankly with Steven A. Smith'' (which also means Jim Rome must have mellowed out some from his days of provoking fights by equating football players to tennis players). Liberal political commentator KeithOlbermann got his start as a [=SportsCenter=] anchor (and returned to do his own sports show in 2013). Former late-night talk show host Craig Kilborn is also an ESPN alum, as are ''Series/GoodMorningAmerica'' anchors Robin Roberts and Josh Elliott. Other sports networks also host ESPN alumni (Dave Revsine and Mike Hall on the Big Ten Network, to name a couple...and Hall got his job on ESPN by winning ''Dream Job'', an [[ContestWinnerCameo ESPN reality show]].)

to:

Other shows include ''Mike and Mike In the Morning'' (Simulcast & Mike'' (a morning show simulcast with ESPN Radio), ''ESPN First Take'' (formerly ''Cold Pizza''), ''Series/JimRomeIsBurning'' (until it ended), ''Series/AroundTheHorn'', ''Series/PardonTheInterruption'', ''Series/SportsNation'', ''Series/NumbersNeverLie'' and ''Series/DanLeBatardIsHighlyQuestionable'', ''[[Series/DanLeBatardIsHighlyQuestionable Highly Questionable]]'', which are eight different varieties of having people [[LargeHam spouting off sports opinions]] [[NoIndoorVoice in loud voices]], which is probably the ''coolest job ever''. (Add in ''ESPN Radio'''s lineup with Mike & Mike, The Herd, SVP and Rusillo, The Dan [=LeBatard=] Show, and Sedano & Stink, and you've got thirteen.) However, there are limits to how loud and abrasive you're allowed to be in opinionating, as evidenced by the failure of ''Quite Frankly with Steven A. Smith'' (which also means Jim Rome must have mellowed out some from his days of provoking fights by equating football players to tennis players). Liberal political commentator KeithOlbermann got his start as a [=SportsCenter=] anchor (and returned to do his own sports show in 2013). Former late-night talk show host Craig Kilborn is also an ESPN alum, as are ''Series/GoodMorningAmerica'' anchors Robin Roberts and Josh Elliott. Other sports networks also host ESPN alumni (Dave Revsine and Mike Hall on the Big Ten Network, to name a couple...and Hall got his job on ESPN by winning ''Dream Job'', an [[ContestWinnerCameo ESPN reality show]].)
10th Mar '17 1:14:07 PM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The network also hosts their own awards show, the ''ESPYs'', celebrating the best moments and athletes in sports in the past year. The show is traditionally taped on the day after the MLB All-Star Game, a day where none of the four major US sports has anything going on so as to ensure maximum participation from the athletes. From year one, the highlight of the event is usually the speech given to the recipient of the Arthur Ashe Courage Award, first given to Jim Valvano, who was in the last stages of cancer; he gave his famous "Don't give up" speech that year, and ESPN honors his memory each year by maintaining the V Foundation for Cancer Research, holding a charity auction week every year leading up to the ESPYs where fans can bid on major fan experiences. Other prominent speeches from winners of that award (and the subsequently created Jimmy V Award for Perseverence) include Stuart Scott, Caitlyn Jenner, and Craig Sager.

to:

The network also hosts their own awards show, the ''ESPYs'', ''[=ESPYs=]'', celebrating the best moments and athletes in sports in the past year. The show is traditionally taped on the day after the MLB All-Star Game, a day where none of the four major US sports has anything going on so as to ensure maximum participation from the athletes. From year one, the highlight of the event is usually the speech given to the recipient of the Arthur Ashe Courage Award, first given to Jim Valvano, who was in the last stages of cancer; he gave his famous "Don't give up" speech that year, and ESPN honors his memory each year by maintaining the V Foundation for Cancer Research, holding a charity auction week every year leading up to the ESPYs [=ESPYs=] where fans can bid on major fan experiences. Other prominent speeches from winners of that award (and the subsequently created Jimmy V Award for Perseverence) include Stuart Scott, Caitlyn Jenner, and Craig Sager.
7th Mar '17 2:09:07 PM jamespolk
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Their ''30 For 30'' series, a series of 30 documentaries on varying subjects, originally created in 2009 in celebration of ESPN's 30th anniversary by columnist BillSimmons, has been critically acclaimed, and as of 2015 is now in its third season. [[note]] Simmons, however, was let go by ESPN in May 2015, and the website ''Grantland'' he curated was also shut down a few months later. [[/note]] The five-part ''30 for 30'' documentary ''Series/OJMadeInAmerica'' ran for a week in a Santa Monica theater before it aired on ESPN, a decision that allowed the series to win the UsefulNotes/AcademyAwardForBestDocumentaryFeature.

to:

Their ''30 For 30'' series, a series of 30 documentaries on varying subjects, originally created in 2009 in celebration of ESPN's 30th anniversary by columnist BillSimmons, has been critically acclaimed, and as of 2015 is now in its third season. [[note]] Simmons, however, was let go by ESPN in May 2015, and the website ''Grantland'' he curated was also shut down a few months later. [[/note]] The five-part ''30 for 30'' documentary ''Series/OJMadeInAmerica'' ''Film/OJMadeInAmerica'' ran for a week in a Santa Monica theater before it aired on ESPN, a decision that allowed the series to win the UsefulNotes/AcademyAwardForBestDocumentaryFeature.
7th Mar '17 1:51:42 PM jamespolk
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Their ''30 For 30'' series, a series of 30 documentaries on varying subjects, originally created in 2009 in celebration of ESPN's 30th anniversary by columnist BillSimmons, has been critically acclaimed, and as of 2015 is now in its third season. [[note]] Simmons, however, was let go by ESPN in May 2015, and the website ''Grantland'' he curated was also shut down a few months later. [[/note]]

to:

Their ''30 For 30'' series, a series of 30 documentaries on varying subjects, originally created in 2009 in celebration of ESPN's 30th anniversary by columnist BillSimmons, has been critically acclaimed, and as of 2015 is now in its third season. [[note]] Simmons, however, was let go by ESPN in May 2015, and the website ''Grantland'' he curated was also shut down a few months later. [[/note]]
[[/note]] The five-part ''30 for 30'' documentary ''Series/OJMadeInAmerica'' ran for a week in a Santa Monica theater before it aired on ESPN, a decision that allowed the series to win the UsefulNotes/AcademyAwardForBestDocumentaryFeature.
27th Feb '17 7:25:06 PM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rsz_espn-red-logo-large_9965.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:The Worldwide Leader in Sports]]

to:

[[quoteright:350:http://static.[[quoteright:320:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rsz_espn-red-logo-large_9965.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:The [[caption-width-right:320:The Worldwide Leader in Sports]]
15th Feb '17 9:08:13 PM KYCubbie
Is there an issue? Send a Message


ESPN and its many affiliated networks, [=ESPN2, ESPNews=], [[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment ESPN Deportes]] (Spanish-language), ESPNU, ESPN Classic, ESPN Plus (which syndicates sports events to local TV stations), ESPN America (a European network that shows US and Canadian sports), ESPN UK (which scored a slice of the domestic English Premiership after the demise of Setanta Sports-- Craig Ferguson's dream come true!), TSN (Canada's English-language ESPN), RDS (Canada's French-language ESPN) and ESPN 3D, along with online affiliate [[strike:ESPN360.com]] [=ESPN3.com=], broadcast sports and sports news around the world. (Yes, even ESPN Classic has the occasional live broadcast, usually when there are so many games going on at once that there wouldn't be enough space otherwise--like the end of the college football season. Also the aforementioned 50-year-old Roger Clemens' first start for the Sugar Land Skeeters.)

to:

ESPN and its many affiliated networks, [=ESPN2, ESPNews=], [[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment ESPN Deportes]] (Spanish-language), ESPNU, ESPN Classic, ESPN Plus (which syndicates sports events to local TV stations), ESPN America (a European network that shows US and Canadian sports), BT Sport ESPN UK (which (originally ESPN UK, which scored a slice of the domestic English Premiership after the demise of Setanta Sports-- Craig Ferguson's dream come true!), TSN (Canada's English-language ESPN), RDS (Canada's French-language ESPN) and ESPN 3D, along with online affiliate [[strike:ESPN360.com]] [=ESPN3.com=], broadcast sports and sports news around the world. (Yes, even ESPN Classic has the occasional live broadcast, usually when there are so many games going on at once that there wouldn't be enough space otherwise--like the end of the college football season. Also the aforementioned 50-year-old Roger Clemens' first start for the Sugar Land Skeeters.)
This list shows the last 10 events of 36. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.ESPN