History Creator / ChristopherMarlowe

23rd Feb '16 6:07:55 AM JulianLapostat
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* YouKilledMyFather: ''Tamburlaine''

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* YouKilledMyFather: ''Tamburlaine''''Tamburlaine'' and ''Edward II'' where the young Prince avenges his father's death by conspirators[[note]]And probably greatly inspired Theatre/{{Hamlet}}[[/note]]
23rd Feb '16 6:06:34 AM JulianLapostat
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Added DiffLines:

* HyperlinkStory: His ''Edward II'' comes very close to this. Despite the title, Edward II is not really the central hero, and he has equal presence with Mortimer, with Isabella, with Kent and others. A lot of the decisive actions and best lines are done by one-scene characters like Lightborn, and Gaveston despite casting a good impression dies midway through the story.


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* SacredHospitality: The violation of this by a conspirator of Edward II is a crucial plot in the play.
23rd Feb '16 5:53:34 AM JulianLapostat
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* AmbiguouslyGay: Not at all ambiguous in ''Edward II'' where Edward and Gaveston are, even with all the euphemisms, plainly lovers. Likewise, there's Jupiter and Ganymede in ''Dido, Queen of Carthage''. Marlowe is generally regarded today as a gay artist.



Goes to discover countries yet unknown.

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Goes to discover countries yet unknown. [[note]]This comparison of death to a traveller to discover countries yet unknown is similar to Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'s famous soliloquy describing death as "the undiscovered country" from which "no traveller returns". It was likely an intentional ShoutOut to Marlowe[[/note]]
** Edward II also insists on facing death with dignity but he's been horribly treated (imprisoned in a cell where the castle's privy shaft offloads toilet-water with shit and urine into the room) and Lightborn intends to brutally torture him to death, that his agony is prolonged, painful and humiliating what with the AssShove.



* GambitPileup: Edward II is so densely plotted with many gambits and factions that it's amazing the story works on the whole.



* HistoricalHeroUpgrade: Edward II is considered by historians to be a very weak king and ruler, so much so that Marlowe's play is considered the most sympathetic portrayal of the character in both fiction and history.

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* HistoricalHeroUpgrade: Edward II is considered by historians to be a very weak king and ruler, so much so that Marlowe's play is considered the most sympathetic portrayal of the character in both fiction and history. In the play, Edward II heroically supports his lower-class lover over a corrupt nobility that seeks to keep them apart, who refuse any compromise and whose death is stomach churning and painful.



* LoverAndBeloved: Zeus and Ganymede in ''Dido, Queen of Carthage''.

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* LoverAndBeloved: Zeus and Ganymede in ''Dido, Queen of Carthage''. Edward II and Piers Gaveston in ''Edward II''.



** ''Edward II'' has the King and Piers Gaveston humiliate the Catholic Archbishop for opposing Gaveston's presence and has the King mocking the Church, which probably went down very well with the Protestant prejudices of his time.



* RoyalBrat: ''Edward II''.

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* RoyalBrat: ''Edward II''. His son "Edward III" is a rare positive version since he uses his authority to drive away usurpers and treacherous courtiers.


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* StarcrossedLovers: Edward II and Gaveston, Dido and Aeneas.
23rd Feb '16 5:42:43 AM JulianLapostat
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Added DiffLines:

* FaceDeathWithDignity: Mortimer at the end of ''Edward II'':
--> '''Mortimer''': Base Fortune, now I see, that in thy wheel\\
There is a point, to which when men aspire, \\
They tumble headlong down: that point I touch’d, \\
And, seeing there was no place to mount up higher, \\
Why should I grieve at my declining fall?—\\
Farewell, fair queen; weep not for Mortimer,\\
That scorns the world, and, as a traveller,\\
Goes to discover countries yet unknown.
8th Feb '16 5:24:05 AM JulianLapostat
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* AffectionateNickname: "Kit" Marlowe is used by his friends in fictional stories.

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* AffectionateNickname: "Kit" Marlowe is used by his friends in fictional stories.stories, based on his real nickname. Incidentally this inspired the Creator/KitHarington's name as well.
8th Feb '16 12:29:19 AM JulianLapostat
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!! Marlowe in HistoricalFiction

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!! Marlowe in HistoricalFictionFiction
8th Feb '16 12:02:25 AM JulianLapostat
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* ICouldaBeenAContender: Fictional stories of Marlowe play up the poignance of his death, and how he had a chance to be as great and famous as Shakespeare had he not died. Shakespeare and Ben Jonson and others remember their old friend and wonder mourn how he was TooCoolToLive. [[invoked]]

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* ICouldaBeenAContender: Fictional stories of Marlowe play up the poignance of his death, and how he had a chance to be as great and famous as Shakespeare had he not died. Shakespeare and Ben Jonson and others remember their old friend and wonder mourn how he was TooCoolToLive. [[invoked]]
7th Feb '16 11:48:30 PM JulianLapostat
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* CreateYourOwnVillain: Marlowe's ''The Jew of Malta'' while not free of the anti-semitism of its premise at the very least has a Jewish protagonist as a VillainProtagonist (where ''Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice'' has a Jewish BigBad and supporting character). Barrabas also makes it clear that his actions are inspired by racism and oppression at the hands of Christians and Muslims.

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* CreateYourOwnVillain: Marlowe's ''The Jew of Malta'' while not free of the anti-semitism of its premise at the very least has a Jewish protagonist as a VillainProtagonist (where ''Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice'' has a Jewish BigBad and supporting character). Barrabas also makes it clear that his actions are inspired by racism and oppression at the hands of Christians and Muslims.
7th Feb '16 11:46:27 PM JulianLapostat
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* HistoricalDomainCharacter: He appears in ShakespeareInFiction and his dramatic death has also been portrayed in a series of novels, most notably Creator/AnthonyBurges' ''A Dead Man in Deptford''.

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* HistoricalDomainCharacter: He appears in ShakespeareInFiction and his dramatic death has also been portrayed in a series of novels, most notably Creator/AnthonyBurges' Creator/AnthonyBurgess' ''A Dead Man in Deptford''.
7th Feb '16 11:45:17 PM JulianLapostat
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* AdaptationalHeroism: Marlowe gives this to Dido, adapted from Literature/TheAeneid



* WomanScorned: ''Dido, Queen of Carthage'' is a classical example.



** Creator/RupertEverett plays Marlowe similarly in ''Film/ShakespeareInLove'' giving professional advice and some uncredited doctoring on ''Romeo and Juliet'' and then being killed by Shakespeare's nemesis in a case of PoorCommunicationKills. Marlowe's death makes Shakespeare feeling very guilty.

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** Creator/RupertEverett Rupert Everett plays Marlowe similarly in ''Film/ShakespeareInLove'' giving professional advice and some uncredited doctoring on ''Romeo and Juliet'' and then being killed by Shakespeare's nemesis in a case of PoorCommunicationKills. Marlowe's death makes wracks Shakespeare feeling very guilty.with guilt.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.ChristopherMarlowe