History Creator / AlfredBester

27th Jul '16 6:54:39 PM PaulA
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* BadassCreed: He is credited with inventing the Green Lantern Oath.
27th Jul '16 2:19:44 AM PaulA
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* AdamAndEvePlot: Played with in "Adam and No Eve"; the protagonist would be happy to fulfill the plot, but no woman is available as he is the last human alive. At the end of the story he drowns himself so that his bacteria will survive in the ocean and hopefully evolve into a new sentient species one day--needing no Adam and no Eve.



* AnachronisticClue: * In "Disappearing Act", a few people during a war develop what seems to be an ability to teleport. Further investigation shows that they apparently travel in time. However, when a historian is brought in to research, it turns out all the stories are obvious {{Anachronism Stew}}s... because these people have found a way to literally spend time in their HappyPlace, even one which is a piece of HollywoodHistory.

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* AmputationStopsSpread: In ''The Deceivers'', mine workers who steal "novaseed" gems -- a sort of universal catalyst -- must then have their hand amputated to prevent the novaseed-triggered matter-to-energy reaction from slowly consuming their entire body. Novaseed gems are so valuable on the black market there is apparently no shortage of miners willing to trade a hand for economic security.
* AnachronisticClue: * In "Disappearing Act", a few people during a war develop what seems to be an ability to teleport. Further investigation shows that they apparently travel in time. However, when a historian is brought in to research, it turns out all the stories are obvious {{Anachronism Stew}}s... because these people have found a way to literally spend time in their HappyPlace, even one which is a piece of HollywoodHistory.



* ButWhatAboutTheAstronauts: In "Adam and No Eve", a scientist develops a prototype spaceship using a kind of atomic engine, and poo-poos his colleagues fears that it will kill all life on Earth when he fires it up. He goes into orbit and returns to find that he's killed all life on earth. His solution is to die near some biomass and let the bacteria living in his gut start the evolution process all over again.

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* BornInTheWrongCentury: "Hobson's Choice" deconstructs the hell out of this trope. The main character lives in the aftermath of a nuclear apocalypse. He believes he lives in the worst time ever and dreams of escaping to the past. He discovers time travelers appearing from a small town and finds out that they are being sent there as a form of therapy because they believe that his time period is a Golden Age. The time travel technicians point out to him that in real life it would be nearly impossible for anyone to adapt adequately to live in a past time period. The time travelers are being sent back as a form of therapy to get them to readjust to life in their present, and most soon come back after finding they can't live in that time period. It is also pointed out that there is probably no point in time that someone, somewhere, and somewhen doesn't think is a golden age.
* BreakOutTheMuseumPiece: "The Probable Man" has a traveler to an AfterTheEnd world reviving a forgotten Diesel dump-truck "tractor" that had been preserved in a museum, using it as a makeshift armored fighting vehicle.
* ButWhatAboutTheAstronauts: In "Adam and No Eve", a scientist develops a prototype spaceship using a kind of atomic engine, and poo-poos his colleagues fears that it will kill all life on Earth when he fires it up. He goes into orbit and returns to find that he's killed all life on earth. His solution is to die near some biomass and let the bacteria living in his gut start the evolution process all over again.



* {{Fiction 500}}: In ''The Computer Connection'', the character nicknamed 'the Greek Syndicate' owns 15% of the whole world. Well, "fourteen point nine one seven percent, but who counts?"



* GodIsInept: In "Hell is Forever", five people are given the chance to mold reality to their liking. It doesn't go well for any of them, though the one for the character Digby Finchley fits the trope the best; it turns out that if you want to create a universe, a firm working knowledge of thermodynamics may be important.



* LonelyDollGirl: Linda Nielsen in "They Don't Make Life Like They Used To" is one of the last humans on earth AfterTheEnd, and is competent and practical, but cherishes her dolls as companions.



* {{Mutants}}: The escapism inherent in this trope was subverted as early as 1954, in the short story "5,271,009." Here, the main character is put in a ''LotusEaterMachine'' and experiences multiple juvenile fantasies, each of which is explained by "a mysterious mutant strain in his makeup that makes him different."

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* MadScientist: Professor Henry Hassell, the protagonist of "The Men Who Murdered Mohammed", whose response to finding his wife in the arms of another man is to whip up a time machine so he can go and kill the other man's grandfather. The story also cites Ampere and Boltzman as examples of Real Life "mad professors".
* TemporalParadox: "The Men Who Murdered Mohammed" involves a professor burning with rage over his wife's affair, who decides to eliminate the other man. He does this by first killing the man's father before he was born, to no effect, he then goes and kills his grandfather. Again nothing. Soon, he's gone on a killing spree against many key figures in history, all in the hopes that one of them would end the existence of his wife's lover. He discovers that no matter how much he changes history, it all continues to make no change in the present. All he succeeds in doing is erasing ''himself'' from history.
* {{Mutants}}: The escapism inherent in this trope was subverted as early as 1954, in the short story "5,271,009." Here, the main character is put in a ''LotusEaterMachine'' LotusEaterMachine and experiences multiple juvenile fantasies, each of which is explained by "a mysterious mutant strain in his makeup that makes him different."
18th Jun '16 11:08:36 PM Doug86
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A highly influential science fiction author, Alfred Bester was pretty much the Orson Welles of the literary world: an overweight, gregarious man who took chances with the format like nothing seen before. His works include ''Literature/TheDemolishedMan'' (the first winner of the Hugo Award), ''Literature/TheStarsMyDestination'', and stories in comics like ''ComicStrip/ThePhantom'' and several [[Creator/DCComics DC]] characters. The latter gave us easily his most famous pop culture contribution in the Comicbook/GreenLantern oath. His short-story "Fondly Fahrenheit" was turned into a made-for-TV movie, ''Murder and the Android'' in 1959.

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A highly influential science fiction author, Alfred Bester was pretty much the Orson Welles of the literary world: an overweight, gregarious man who took chances with the format like nothing seen before. His works include ''Literature/TheDemolishedMan'' (the first winner of the Hugo Award), ''Literature/TheStarsMyDestination'', and stories in comics like ''ComicStrip/ThePhantom'' and several [[Creator/DCComics DC]] characters. The latter gave us easily his most famous pop culture contribution in the Comicbook/GreenLantern Franchise/GreenLantern oath. His short-story "Fondly Fahrenheit" was turned into a made-for-TV movie, ''Murder and the Android'' in 1959.
17th Jun '16 9:20:54 PM Doug86
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A highly influential science fiction author, Alfred Bester was pretty much the Orson Welles of the literary world: an overweight, gregarious man who took chances with the format like nothing seen before. His works include ''Literature/TheDemolishedMan'' (the first winner of the Hugo Award), ''Literature/TheStarsMyDestination'', and stories in comics like ''ComicStrip/ThePhantom'' and several [[DCComics DC]] characters. The latter gave us easily his most famous pop culture contribution in the Comicbook/GreenLantern oath. His short-story "Fondly Fahrenheit" was turned into a made-for-TV movie, ''Murder and the Android'' in 1959.

to:

A highly influential science fiction author, Alfred Bester was pretty much the Orson Welles of the literary world: an overweight, gregarious man who took chances with the format like nothing seen before. His works include ''Literature/TheDemolishedMan'' (the first winner of the Hugo Award), ''Literature/TheStarsMyDestination'', and stories in comics like ''ComicStrip/ThePhantom'' and several [[DCComics [[Creator/DCComics DC]] characters. The latter gave us easily his most famous pop culture contribution in the Comicbook/GreenLantern oath. His short-story "Fondly Fahrenheit" was turned into a made-for-TV movie, ''Murder and the Android'' in 1959.
10th Jun '16 11:56:42 PM Morgenthaler
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He was the namesake of characters in two later classic sci-fi TV shows, ''Series/BabylonFive'' and ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' and a character in one of the ''CallahansCrosstimeSaloon'' stories.

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He was the namesake of characters in two later classic sci-fi TV shows, ''Series/BabylonFive'' and ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' and a character in one of the ''CallahansCrosstimeSaloon'' ''Literature/CallahansCrosstimeSaloon'' stories.
28th Dec '15 9:29:35 AM 69BookWorM69
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Added DiffLines:

* AnachronisticClue: * In "Disappearing Act", a few people during a war develop what seems to be an ability to teleport. Further investigation shows that they apparently travel in time. However, when a historian is brought in to research, it turns out all the stories are obvious {{Anachronism Stew}}s... because these people have found a way to literally spend time in their HappyPlace, even one which is a piece of HollywoodHistory.
13th Jun '14 6:00:21 PM Bissek
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Added DiffLines:

* BadassCreed: He is credited with inventing the Green Lantern Oath.
12th Oct '13 10:06:22 AM DocLoki
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He was the namesake of characters in two later classic sci-fi TV shows, ''Series/BabylonFive'' and ''Series/{{Firefly}}''.

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He was the namesake of characters in two later classic sci-fi TV shows, ''Series/BabylonFive'' and ''Series/{{Firefly}}''.
''Series/{{Firefly}}'' and a character in one of the ''CallahansCrosstimeSaloon'' stories.
14th Jul '13 1:47:29 PM DragonHawk
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* EarthAllAlong: In the short story "Adam and No Eve", an experimental space flight sets off a chain reaction that devastates and sterilized the world, leaving the pilot of the spaceship as the last survivor. [[spoiler: The story ends with the reveal that the planet will be reoccupied by life evolved from the pilot's gut microbes, and that present-day Earth is the result.]]

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* EarthAllAlong: In the short story "Adam and No Eve", an experimental space flight sets off a chain reaction that devastates and sterilized the world, leaving the pilot of the spaceship as the last survivor. [[spoiler: The story ends with the reveal that the planet will be reoccupied by life evolved from the pilot's gut microbes, and that present-day Earth is the result.]]
21st Apr '13 9:52:25 PM WillBGood
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* WhatDidIDoLastNight: ''Golem[[superscript:100]]'' has a place where two characters take drugs. The next ten pages or so are freaky concept art with no pictures. Then the text restores, and a policeman explains to them just what they were doing that time (each art piece represents about an hour of debauchery, such as streaking an entire city block).

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* WhatDidIDoLastNight: ''Golem[[superscript:100]]'' has a place where two characters take drugs. The next ten pages or so are freaky concept art with no pictures. minimal text. Then the regular text restores, and a policeman explains to them just what they were doing that time (each art piece represents about an hour of debauchery, such as streaking an entire city block).
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.AlfredBester