History Comicstrip / Peanuts

11th Sep '16 6:49:15 PM TropesForever
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* BreakoutCharacter: Snoopy, in the late '50s. There's a reason the official name of the strip's website was "snoopy.com" for much of the internet era (both before and years after Schulz's death).

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* BreakoutCharacter: Snoopy, in BreakoutCharacter:
** Snoopy. The first couple of years of
the late '50s.strip had him being a non-entity who never spoke and was treated as a secondary character. But he quickly became arguably the most famous character of the series. There's a reason the official name of the strip's website was "snoopy.com" for much of the internet era (both before and years after Schulz's death).death).
** Alternatively, you have Lucy (upstaging original female lead characters Patty and Violet) and Peppermint Patty, who had her own supporting cast of sorts (Franklin, Marcie, and occasionally José Peterson).
** Schulz admitted in the liner notes to one book that Peppermint Patty was probably the only one of his characters besides Charlie Brown who could carry a strip by herself.
10th Sep '16 3:04:28 PM NOYB
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When the kids weren't in school, they were usually playing baseball or having amazingly sophisticated intellectual conversations while leaning on a brick wall. Over the years, the strip became famous for its psychological realism, bordering on an all-out satire of more typically sentimental kiddie comics, though it arguably took a turn away from the philosophical toward more direct comedy relatively early in its run (around 1970). Charlie Brown developed from a standard "lovable loser" into a sensitive and intelligent Everyman, whose relentless track record of failure meant he struggled perpetually with the Really Big Questions. Alternately aiding and exasperating him in his quest were his best friend Linus, a philosopher who sucked his thumb and carried a SecurityBlanket, and Linus' big sister Lucy, a bossy, brassy self-described "fussbudget" who already knew what the universe's major problem was: it never asked ''her'' what to do.

to:

When the kids weren't in school, they were usually playing baseball or having amazingly sophisticated intellectual conversations while leaning on a brick wall. Over the years, the strip became famous for its psychological realism, bordering on an all-out satire of more typically sentimental kiddie comics, though it arguably took a turn away from the philosophical toward more direct comedy relatively early in its run (around 1970). Charlie Brown developed from a standard "lovable loser" into a sensitive and intelligent Everyman, whose relentless track record of failure meant he struggled perpetually with the Really Big Questions. Alternately aiding and exasperating him in his quest were his best friend Linus, a philosopher who sucked his thumb and carried a SecurityBlanket, and Linus' Linus's big sister Lucy, a bossy, brassy self-described "fussbudget" who already knew what the universe's major problem was: it never asked ''her'' what to do.



*** We see an adult doctor (or, rather, [[StylisticSuck Linus' drawing of one]]) in [[http://www.gocomics.com/peanuts/1964/11/08 this 1964 strip]].

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*** We see an adult doctor (or, rather, [[StylisticSuck Linus' Linus's drawing of one]]) in [[http://www.gocomics.com/peanuts/1964/11/08 this 1964 strip]].



* AnimateInanimateObject: Linus' blanket was depicted as alive in one story arc, and spent the week terrorizing Lucy.

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* AnimateInanimateObject: Linus' Linus's blanket was depicted as alive in one story arc, and spent the week terrorizing Lucy.



* MaybeMagicMaybeMundane: Is the Great Pumpkin a jerkass genie, putting Linus' faith to test for no good reason? Does it have so high and over-the-top standards, that not even Linus is considered worthy? Or is it as everybody else says: the Great Pumpkin does not exist, and it's just a stupid belief of Linus?

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* MaybeMagicMaybeMundane: Is the Great Pumpkin a jerkass genie, putting Linus' Linus's faith to test for no good reason? Does it have so high and over-the-top standards, that not even Linus is considered worthy? Or is it as everybody else says: the Great Pumpkin does not exist, and it's just a stupid belief of Linus?



** Linus' annual vigils for the Great Pumpkin.

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** Linus' Linus's annual vigils for the Great Pumpkin.
6th Sep '16 9:52:13 PM Ezclee4050
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* NeverTrustATitle: ''You're Not Elected, Charlie Brown'' is actually about Linus running in a school election (though technically Charlie Brown ''isn't'' elected so it's still accurate).
2nd Sep '16 8:18:55 AM KnownUnknown
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* GuiltByAssociationGag: A common gag - the kids, especially Sally, find some way to blame Charlie Brown for everything that goes badly, even if he had nothing to do with it. Charlie Brown, naturally, rarely even knows what's going on.
28th Aug '16 6:05:33 PM jccw227
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** In March of 1993, Charlie Brown finally hit the winning home run in a baseball game.
24th Aug '16 4:50:49 AM LadyJaneGrey
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** And it's just as well they aren't seen, because the rare situations where the main characters had to interact with them portrayed them as ''incompetent''. In one story arc, Charlie Brown went to talk to his pediatrician to find out why the school board (which the doctor was a member of) had banned a book called ''The Three Bunny Wunnies Freak Out'' from the school library. The doctor fainted. The nurse later told Charlie Brown that little kids made him nervous. (Remember, this was a ''pediatrician''.) Later, Charlie Brown told Linus that the doctor admitted that he only reads medical journals, but the pictures upset him.
** Another story arc shows that Peppermint Patty's teacher is a LawfulStupid type. A hole in the ceiling classroom was causing rain to fall on Patty's head. According to Marcie, the teacher couldn't move Patty to another desk, because that would [[SkewedPriorities disrupt the alphabetical seating arrangement.]]


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* AfraidOfNeedles:
** Linus is not only afraid of getting shots, he's scared when he has to get a sliver taken out of his finger with a needle or tweezers. (For the latter, Charlie Brown gave some advice, telling him to pretend he was being tortured by pirates who wanted him to tell them where the gold was buried. After having his mother remove the sliver -- indicated by an off-panel scream from Linus -- he came back and said, "I told them where the gold was buried!")
** In one arc, Lucy and Peppermint Patty wanted to get their ears pierced, [[SarcasmMode and Marcie was a big help]], telling them about all the dangers of getting that done by an unskilled amateur; Patty almost freaked when Marcie mentioned a penicillin shot. Eventually they decided to go the safe route and have a doctor do it, but Lucy chickened out and ran after hearing Patty overreact to it.
** One strip shows ''the entire cast of the strip'' trying to pry Snoopy off of a tree, with Snoopy pleading, "I don't ''want'' another rabies shot!" (Fortunately, he got it.)
22nd Aug '16 8:14:14 PM dsneybuf
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* ''You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown'' (1967)

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* ''You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown'' ''Theatre/YoureAGoodManCharlieBrown'' (1967)
22nd Aug '16 9:36:43 AM Morgenthaler
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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Peanuts_gang_sm_4663.png]]
[[caption-width-right:350: [-[[ThrowTheDogABone A rare winning moment for Good Ol' Charlie Brown.]]-] \\

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[[quoteright:350:http://static.[[quoteright:310:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Peanuts_gang_sm_4663.png]]
[[caption-width-right:350: [[caption-width-right:310: [-[[ThrowTheDogABone A rare winning moment for Good Ol' Charlie Brown.]]-] \\
9th Aug '16 3:44:09 PM CamelCase
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* TakeThat:
** Over the years ''Magazine/{{MAD}}'' magazine was very fond of parodying ''Peanuts'' in their publication. Schulz got back by featuring Alfred E. Neuman in one 1973 strip.
** The short-lived '80s character "Tapioca Pudding" was a TakeThat to MerchandiseDriven franchises like ''WesternAnimation/StrawberryShortcake''. Her father works in licensing and is planning to put her likeness on lunchboxes and countless other knickknacks.

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* TakeThat:
** Over the years ''Magazine/{{MAD}}'' magazine was very fond of parodying ''Peanuts'' in their publication. Schulz got back by featuring Alfred E. Neuman in one 1973 strip.
**
TakeThat: The short-lived '80s character "Tapioca Pudding" was a TakeThat to MerchandiseDriven franchises like ''WesternAnimation/StrawberryShortcake''. Her father works in licensing and is planning to put her likeness on lunchboxes and countless other knickknacks.
9th Aug '16 6:36:34 AM patrickab13
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*** In one particularly egregious example, Patty let Charlie Brown take over for her as pitcher with her team leading 50-0 and two outs in the bottom of the ninth. They lost 51-50.
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