History Comicstrip / Peanuts

4th Dec '16 2:13:09 AM C2
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As of 2011, Creator/BoomStudios produced a few comics books of the series (part of the Creator/KaboomComics line) with both new content as well as old strips.

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As of 2011, Creator/BoomStudios produced a few comics books of the series (part of the Creator/KaboomComics line) with both new content as well as old strips.
strips. ''Peanuts'' comic stories had been previously commissioned for Creator/DellComics in the late 50's and early 60's.
4th Dec '16 2:09:09 AM C2
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The complete ''Peanuts'' comic strip archive can be viewed at [[http://www.gocomics.com/peanuts GoComics.com]]. See also the [[http://www.peanuts.com/ official Peanuts web site]]. Fantagraphics Books has been publishing a multi-volume series collecting the strip's complete run in dead-tree format since 2004; the series, which will eventually encompass 26 volumes, is expected to be finished in 2016.

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The complete ''Peanuts'' comic strip archive can be viewed at [[http://www.gocomics.com/peanuts GoComics.com]]. See also the [[http://www.peanuts.com/ official Peanuts web site]]. Fantagraphics Books has been publishing a multi-volume series collecting the strip's complete run in dead-tree format since 2004; the series, which will eventually encompass encompasses 26 volumes, is expected to be was finished in 2016.
3rd Dec '16 9:30:53 PM TropesForever
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One of the most popular and influential NewspaperComics of all time, ''Peanuts'' was introduced on October 2, 1950. The strip had its origins as a successor to ''Li'l Folks'', a weekly feature Schulz had drawn for his hometown newspaper in the late '40s.''Peanuts'' ended its long newspaper run almost immediately after the TurnOfTheMillennium, with the final weekday strip being published on January 3, 2000. The final Sunday strip ran on February 13 of that year... which, as it turned out, was [[{{Retirony}} one day after Charles Schulz died in his sleep]] at the age of 77. Since then, the comic has kept a place in many newspapers by way of reruns.

to:

One of the most popular and influential NewspaperComics of all time, ''Peanuts'' was introduced on October 2, 1950. The strip had its origins as a successor to ''Li'l Folks'', a weekly feature Schulz had drawn for his hometown newspaper in the late '40s. ''Peanuts'' ended its long newspaper run almost immediately after the TurnOfTheMillennium, with the final weekday strip being published on January 3, 2000. The final Sunday strip ran on February 13 of that year... which, as it turned out, was [[{{Retirony}} one day after Charles Schulz died in his sleep]] at the age of 77. Since then, the comic has kept a place in many newspapers by way of reruns.
reruns.

It launched [[Franchise/{{Peanuts}} the franchise of the same name]].
3rd Dec '16 1:54:21 PM TropesForever
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One of the most popular and influential NewspaperComics of all time, ''Peanuts'' was introduced on October 2, 1950. The strip had its origins as a successor to ''Li'l Folks'', a weekly feature Schulz had drawn for his hometown newspaper in the late '40s. The strip's cast grew as time went on -- well, sort of; consensus is their age topped out at about 6 (Linus and Sally) to 8 (Charlie Brown, Lucy, et al.) -- but adults were always conspicuous by their absence, famously represented in the TV specials by unintelligible offscreen "wah-wah" noises produced by a muted trombone. (This was originally due to the editor's restrictions on the strip: to fit the kids in at a decent size in the small panels, he put the "camera" at their height and did away with anyone taller.)

When the kids weren't in school, they were usually playing baseball or having amazingly sophisticated intellectual conversations while leaning on a brick wall. Over the years, the strip became famous for its psychological realism, bordering on an all-out satire of more typically sentimental kiddie comics, though it arguably took a turn away from the philosophical toward more direct comedy relatively early in its run (around 1970). Charlie Brown developed from a standard "lovable loser" into a sensitive and intelligent Everyman, whose relentless track record of failure meant he struggled perpetually with the Really Big Questions. Alternately aiding and exasperating him in his quest were his best friend Linus, a philosopher who sucked his thumb and carried a SecurityBlanket, and Linus's big sister Lucy, a bossy, brassy self-described "fussbudget" who already knew what the universe's major problem was: it never asked ''her'' what to do.

The supporting cast included Charlie's little sister Sally, a [[DumbBlonde ditz-in-embryo]] whose literalist streak was only equaled by her crush on an appalled Linus; Schroeder, a handsome neighbor boy who -- much to Lucy's chagrin -- lived only to play [[LudwigVanBeethoven Beethoven]] on his toy piano (with painted-on black keys), and Franklin, the smart black kid who quietly integrated the strip in the late 1960s. "Peppermint" Patty, the tough {{tomboy}} from across town, and Marcie, her meek bespectacled acolyte, were frequent visitors.

One unique character, The Little Red-Haired Girl, was never seen, heard, or named (except in certain TV specials, but [[WordOfGod as Schulz made very clear]], [[CanonDiscontinuity those don't count]]). She was Charlie Brown's Ideal, and thus in a sense everyone's, so Schulz wisely let each of those readers envision her for themselves.

Then there was Snoopy, beagle extraordinaire. Nominally Charlie Brown's pet, he actually lived in an incredibly rich world of his own imagination, acknowledging the existence of "that round-headed kid" only when hungry. Over the years Snoopy would invent literally dozens of alternate personae, the most famous of which is the [[AcePilot WWI Flying Ace]], perpetually locked in combat with the RedBaron. Attending and often abetting Snoopy in his fantasies was his little yellow bird buddy Woodstock, who took to hanging out at the doghouse while he failed to get the knack of the whole "migrating" deal.

''Peanuts'' ended its long newspaper run almost immediately after the TurnOfTheMillennium, with the final weekday strip being published on January 3, 2000. The final Sunday strip ran on February 13 of that year... which, as it turned out, was [[{{Retirony}} one day after Charles Schulz died in his sleep]] at the age of 77. Since then, the comic has kept a place in many newspapers by way of reruns.

to:

One of the most popular and influential NewspaperComics of all time, ''Peanuts'' was introduced on October 2, 1950. The strip had its origins as a successor to ''Li'l Folks'', a weekly feature Schulz had drawn for his hometown newspaper in the late '40s. The strip's cast grew as time went on -- well, sort of; consensus is their age topped out at about 6 (Linus and Sally) to 8 (Charlie Brown, Lucy, et al.) -- but adults were always conspicuous by their absence, famously represented in the TV specials by unintelligible offscreen "wah-wah" noises produced by a muted trombone. (This was originally due to the editor's restrictions on the strip: to fit the kids in at a decent size in the small panels, he put the "camera" at their height and did away with anyone taller.)\n\nWhen the kids weren't in school, they were usually playing baseball or having amazingly sophisticated intellectual conversations while leaning on a brick wall. Over the years, the strip became famous for its psychological realism, bordering on an all-out satire of more typically sentimental kiddie comics, though it arguably took a turn away from the philosophical toward more direct comedy relatively early in its run (around 1970). Charlie Brown developed from a standard "lovable loser" into a sensitive and intelligent Everyman, whose relentless track record of failure meant he struggled perpetually with the Really Big Questions. Alternately aiding and exasperating him in his quest were his best friend Linus, a philosopher who sucked his thumb and carried a SecurityBlanket, and Linus's big sister Lucy, a bossy, brassy self-described "fussbudget" who already knew what the universe's major problem was: it never asked ''her'' what to do. \n\nThe supporting cast included Charlie's little sister Sally, a [[DumbBlonde ditz-in-embryo]] whose literalist streak was only equaled by her crush on an appalled Linus; Schroeder, a handsome neighbor boy who -- much to Lucy's chagrin -- lived only to play [[LudwigVanBeethoven Beethoven]] on his toy piano (with painted-on black keys), and Franklin, the smart black kid who quietly integrated the strip in the late 1960s. "Peppermint" Patty, the tough {{tomboy}} from across town, and Marcie, her meek bespectacled acolyte, were frequent visitors. \n\nOne unique character, The Little Red-Haired Girl, was never seen, heard, or named (except in certain TV specials, but [[WordOfGod as Schulz made very clear]], [[CanonDiscontinuity those don't count]]). She was Charlie Brown's Ideal, and thus in a sense everyone's, so Schulz wisely let each of those readers envision her for themselves.\n\nThen there was Snoopy, beagle extraordinaire. Nominally Charlie Brown's pet, he actually lived in an incredibly rich world of his own imagination, acknowledging the existence of "that round-headed kid" only when hungry. Over the years Snoopy would invent literally dozens of alternate personae, the most famous of which is the [[AcePilot WWI Flying Ace]], perpetually locked in combat with the RedBaron. Attending and often abetting Snoopy in his fantasies was his little yellow bird buddy Woodstock, who took to hanging out at the doghouse while he failed to get the knack of the whole "migrating" deal.\n\n''Peanuts'' ended its long newspaper run almost immediately after the TurnOfTheMillennium, with the final weekday strip being published on January 3, 2000. The final Sunday strip ran on February 13 of that year... which, as it turned out, was [[{{Retirony}} one day after Charles Schulz died in his sleep]] at the age of 77. Since then, the comic has kept a place in many newspapers by way of reruns.






!!Frequent ''Peanuts'' {{Trope}}s:

* Snoopy's imagined personae: UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne flying ace, novelist, attorney, golf pro, Beagle Scout leader, 'Mad Punter', tennis player, hockey player, streaker, vulture, helicopter, Easter Beagle, Flashbeagle, Joe Cool, etc. etc.
** Leading Charlie Brown to ask, "Why can't I have a [[IJustWantToBeNormal normal dog]] like everyone else?"
** Also, Snoopy's fights against the cat next door (represented by her swipes through his doghouse ceiling) and his tennis playing against the garage door.
* Charlie Brown's baseball team: Generally visible in these sequences were himself as pitcher, Schroeder as catcher, Linus at second base, Snoopy at shortstop, and -- most memorably -- Lucy in right field. The team seemed to lose almost every game[[note]]Although they are occasionally seen playing for the championship, implying they won a few games over the course of the season, won some games by forfeit, and later in the strip's run won a few games the old-fashioned way in ThrowTheDogABone moments[[/note]] ''unless'' Charlie Brown was unable to play for some reason, in which case they seemed to ''win'' every game (usually with Linus on the mound).
* [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption Charlie Brown trying to kick the football and Lucy yanking the ball away.]] (Schulz briefly toyed with the idea of having him ''finally'' kick the football, but realized that the entire 'football' gag was about Charlie Brown's unending sense of optimism, rather than Lucy simply being mean).
** During the arc in which Charlie is seriously ill in the hospital (see under LittlestCancerPatient below), Lucy vows that if he recovers she'll let him kick the ball for real. Come time to make good, she indeed doesn't pull the football away... but in true Charlie Brown fashion, he ''kicks her arm instead''.
** In the very last football strip, Lucy is called in for lunch and entrusts the ball to Rerun, who goes outside and enacts the ritual off-stage. When Lucy later asked him whether he pulled it away, the answer is: "You'll never know..."
** Also, Snoopy never shoots down the Red Baron, Linus never sees the Great Pumpkin rise from the pumpkin patch, [[AllLoveIsUnrequited all the love is unrequited]], etc...
* Lucy and her "[[TheShrink Psychiatric Help]] 5 Cents" booth (a parody of a lemonade stand). Charlie Brown went through a ''lot'' of nickels.
--> '''Franklin:''' Are you a real psychiatrist?
--> '''Lucy:''' Was the lemonade ever any good?
* Charlie Brown's unrequited admiration of the Little Red-Haired Girl...well, not exactly unrequited, as on no recorded occasion did he get himself under enough control to speak to her in the first place.[[note]]In the 1967 TV special ''You're In Love, Charlie Brown'', Charlie Brown accidentally confesses his love for her -- in front of his entire class. Later, he finds a note pinned on him from the Little Red-Haired Girl herself, where she confesses she also likes him a lot. However, as noted above, Charles Schulz considered this CanonDiscontinuity.[[/note]]
** For that matter, AllLoveIsUnrequited: there's also Lucy and Schroeder, Sally and Linus, Linus and [[HotForTeacher Miss Othmar]], Peppermint Patty [[LoveTriangle (and Marcie)]] and Charlie Brown...
* Linus sitting up waiting for the Great Pumpkin each [[HalloweenEpisode Halloween]], and/or attempting to convince others to do the same.
* Various attempts to separate Linus and his blanket, by either Lucy or his "blanket-hating grandmother."
** Or a certain beagle.
* Frieda (she of the "naturally curly hair") attempting to roust Snoopy into chasing rabbits.
* Sally's...[[{{Malaproper}} creative]]...school reports: "Butterflies are free. What does this mean? This means you can have as many of them as you want."
--> '''Sally:''' So much for higher thought.
* Lucy leaning on Schroeder's piano, trying to get his attention. Or sometimes Snoopy and/or Woodstock playing around with the notes coming from the piano.
* Peppermint Patty in class, [[BookDumb trying and failing hopelessly]] to figure out what's going on. This sometimes extends to her misunderstanding some concept so ''completely'', and ignoring all rational warnings from Marcie, that she would find herself publicly humiliated.
** For a long time, she didn't realize that Snoopy was a dog and just called him "The funny looking kid with the big nose."
* Marcie [[TheyCallMeMisterTibbs calling Peppermint Patty "sir"]], over [[DontCallMeSir the latter's objections]]. Conversely, Patty was the only one who called Charlie Brown "Chuck" on a regular basis (although Marcie also did at first, but later switched to calling him "Charles").
** At first Peppermint Patty's standard reply was: "Stop calling me sir," but eventually she just gave up. Marcie is the only one who calls Charlie Brown "Charles".
*** In later strips, a girl Charlie Brown meets at camp calls him "Brownie Charles" because, when they met, he was so nervous that he flubbed up his own name.
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!! Various works based on ''Peanuts'':
[[index]]

[[AC:Television Specials that have Their Own Pages]][[note]] TheOtherWiki has a far more complete list of the specials [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peanuts_filmography here.]][[/note]]

* ''WesternAnimation/ACharlieBrownChristmas'' (1965)
* ''WesternAnimation/ItsTheGreatPumpkinCharlieBrown'' (1966)
* ''WesternAnimation/ACharlieBrownThanksgiving'' (1973)
* ''WesternAnimation/WhatANightmareCharlieBrown'' (1978)
* ''WesternAnimation/WhyCharlieBrownWhy'' (1990)
* ''WesternAnimation/HappinessIsAWarmBlanketCharlieBrown'' (2011)

[[AC:[[TheMovie Feature Films]]]]

* ''WesternAnimation/ABoyNamedCharlieBrown'' (1969)
* ''WesternAnimation/SnoopyComeHome'' (1972)
* ''WesternAnimation/RaceForYourLifeCharlieBrown'' (1977)
* ''WesternAnimation/BonVoyageCharlieBrown [-(and Don't Come Back!!)-]'' (1980)
* ''WesternAnimation/ThePeanutsMovie'' (2015)

[[AC:TV Series]]

* ''The Charlie Brown and Snoopy Show'' (CBS, 1983-5)
* ''Peanuts'' (Boomerang, 2016)

[[AC:Musicals]][[note]]Both were adapted into [=TV=] specials in TheEighties[[/note]]

* ''Theatre/YoureAGoodManCharlieBrown'' (1967)
* ''Snoopy: The Musical'' (1975)

[[AC:VideoGames]]

* ''VideoGame/SnoopyVsTheRedBaron'' (2006)
** ''VideoGame/SnoopyFlyingAce'' (2010)
* ''Snoopy's Grand Adventure'' (2015)

[[AC:{{Fan Work}}s]]

* ''Theatre/DogSeesGod: Confessions of a Teenaged Blockhead''
* ''Webcomic/WeaponBrown''

[[/index]]

----
26th Nov '16 11:10:36 AM Morgenthaler
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Added DiffLines:

* AbridgedForChildren: Charles Schulz poked fun at this trope in an early '60s comic strip:
-->'''Violet:''' What are you reading?\\
'''Charlie Brown:''' This is an adaptation of Sherlock Holmes.\\
'''Violet:''' An adaptation?\\
'''Charlie Brown:''' Yes, it's been adapted for children... It's not unlike drinking diluted root beer!
24th Nov '16 8:23:16 AM Random888
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13th Nov '16 10:59:47 AM jccw227
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Added DiffLines:

* WorthIt: Lucy asks Linus if she should get her ears pierced, and he suggest instead that she get her mouth boarded up. Lucy slugged him, and Linus said that was worth getting hit. Maybe not getting hit twice, but definitely once
12th Nov '16 11:51:06 PM jccw227
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Added DiffLines:

* YouKnowImBlackRight: During a baseball game, one kid on Peppermint Patty's team, Thibault, [[StayInTheKitchen was angry that Marcie was playing on the team, and refused to play baseball with a girl.]] Peppermint Patty responded with "What do you think ''I'' am, you blockhead?" and threatened to shred him if he said anything else.
9th Nov '16 12:47:23 PM jetsetter21$
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*
''WesternAnimation/ACharlieBrownThanksGiving''

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*
''WesternAnimation/ACharlieBrownThanksGiving''
* ''WesternAnimation/ACharlieBrownThanksgiving'' (1973)
9th Nov '16 12:42:22 PM jetsetter21$
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''WesternAnimation/ACharlieBrownThanksgiving''

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''WesternAnimation/ACharlieBrownThanksgiving''''WesternAnimation/ACharlieBrownThanksGiving''
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Comicstrip.Peanuts