History Comicbook / TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen

1st Oct '17 1:15:15 AM JulianLapostat
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** Likewise, "God" as in [[spoiler:''Literature/MaryPoppins'' is much closer to the book character by P. L. Travers than the Disney version. The book version of Mary Poppins was a woman who was strange and otherworldly and had adventures in multiple dimensions, and her harsh, unsentimental, and even cold demeanor in her appearance at the end of ''Century:2009'' was closer to the book character, and was the true source as to why she disliked the Disney version]].
1st Oct '17 1:08:05 AM JulianLapostat
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** Even his take on the Antichrist[=/=]Moonchild is a lot more accurate to the books in some details than the movies. For instance, the character has GreenEyes which the movies removed, because the actor complained about the contacts. Like [[spoiler:where the movies made Ron Weasley into an AdaptationalWimp, his brief on-panel appearance in ''Century:2009, shows him alongside Severus Snape, to be the only one to be brave enough to talk to Harry and reason with him where everyone else is cowering in fear or crying in anguish]].

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** Even his take on the Antichrist[=/=]Moonchild is a lot more accurate to the books in some details than the movies. For instance, the character has GreenEyes which the movies removed, because the actor complained about the contacts. Like [[spoiler:where the movies made Ron Weasley into an AdaptationalWimp, his brief on-panel appearance in ''Century:2009, shows him alongside Severus Snape, to be the only one to be brave enough to talk to Harry and reason with him where everyone else is cowering in fear or crying in anguish]].anguish. Likewise Harry Potter's more angsty appearance here reflects his arc in [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix Book 5]] which also had sections where he was worried he would be possessed by the BigBad and felt resentment at his mentor for manipulating him, much of which was removed in the movies]].
1st Oct '17 1:04:46 AM JulianLapostat
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* TruerToTheText: Part of Moore's focus is how fiction gets adapted and regurgitated far away from the darker and harsher context of the originals, is to restore elements that more famous versions have neglected.
** Mina Murray is celebrated and commemorated for her part as the protagonist of ''Literature/{{Dracula}}'' rather than the Count, Van Helsing and other elements which have supplied the cottage industry of vampire films, who by contrast are barely referred to and alluded to. Likewise, unlike more modern neo-victorian takes like ''Series/PennyDreadful'' or the film adaptation, Moore makes it clear that Mina received no vampire powers from her encounter with Dracula, which is true to Bram Stoker's novel, which never portrayed a clear correlation between vampire bites and vampirism and likewise Moore portrays [[spoiler:a much grizzlier look at what a bite from a being with teeth of a vampire bat would look like]].
** Captain Nemo's background as a Sikh Prince and a NGOSuperpower ruler of his own island nation gets restored from ''Literature/TheMysteriousIsland'', in a sharp departure from the European and White Captain Nemo played by Creator/JamesMason which was previously the most influential take on the character.
** Even his take on the Antichrist[=/=]Moonchild is a lot more accurate to the books in some details than the movies. For instance, the character has GreenEyes which the movies removed, because the actor complained about the contacts. Like [[spoiler:where the movies made Ron Weasley into an AdaptationalWimp, his brief on-panel appearance in ''Century:2009, shows him alongside Severus Snape, to be the only one to be brave enough to talk to Harry and reason with him where everyone else is cowering in fear or crying in anguish]].
1st Oct '17 12:45:02 AM JulianLapostat
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* Volume 4: The Tempest -- The purported GrandFinale of the entire series. It will be a six issue series released in 2018. A multi-century arc that ties together all the plotlines from the earlier stories and settings, mixed with ''Literature/We''.

to:

* Volume 4: The Tempest -- The purported GrandFinale of the entire series. It will be a six issue series released in 2018. A multi-century arc that ties together all the plotlines from the earlier stories and settings, mixed with ''Literature/We''.''Literature/{{We}}''.
27th Sep '17 2:20:53 PM JulianLapostat
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* LostInImitation: This is one of the key themes of the comic from direct WordOfGod. To begin with the original series was about how certain famous Victorian archetypal characters became overexposed and over-interpreted that aspects of the original context were AdaptedOut. However there is some critique of whether Moore is as much rooting it out or making new ones of his own. Some specific character examples:
** The comic was one of the few to show Captain Nemo as a Sikh Prince as he was in Creator/JulesVerne's ''Literature/TheMysteriousIsland'' rather than the more famous incarnations by the likes of James Mason, and likewise the fact that the originally villainous and ambiguous Nemo eventually inspired and codified the ScienceHero. However in this process, Moore had made the Nautilus look far more Indian than the Nemo of the original book would have ever had it.
** Allan Quatermain in his original from started as the GreatWhiteHunter but became more weak and vulnerable over the course of his stories. Something that was not as well to follow in his adaptations. In this comic however Moore has put Quatermain much further down the pike than anything ever suggested in the books.

to:

* LostInImitation: This is one of the key themes of the comic from direct WordOfGod. To begin with the original series was about how certain famous Victorian archetypal characters became overexposed and over-interpreted that aspects of the original context were AdaptedOut. However there is some critique of whether Moore is as much rooting it out or making new ones of his own. Some specific AdaptedOut, likewise how character examples:
archetypes who are originally villainous in the Victorian era later came to be seen as heroic, while other character archetypes who were heroes are constantly given AdaptationalHeroism by having their questionable parts AdaptedOut:
** The comic was is one of the few to show Captain Nemo as a Sikh Prince as he was in Creator/JulesVerne's ''Literature/TheMysteriousIsland'' rather than the more famous incarnations by the likes of James Mason, and likewise the fact that the originally villainous villainous, and morally ambiguous Nemo Nemo, eventually inspired and codified the ScienceHero. However in this process, Moore had made the Nautilus look far more Indian than the Nemo of the original book would have ever had it.
ScienceHero.
** Allan Quatermain in his original from started as the GreatWhiteHunter but became more weak and vulnerable over the course of his stories. Something that was not as well to follow in his adaptations. adaptations and later inspirations who took him as the model for the AdventureArchaeologist. In this comic however Moore has put takes this to CharacterExaggeration with Quatermain much further down as a barely functional addict who keeps falling off the pike than anything ever suggested in the books.wagon.



** This was especially tackled hard by Moore in his parody of James Bond, by essentially showing how Creator/IanFleming's original character was far more nasty and borderline sociopathic than the charming AdaptationalHeroism given to him in the movies. Which in direct terms is not a lie. Movie Bond was LighterAndSofter than Book Bond, but also Fleming himself started watering down Bond in the book series at it went on. Moore's interpretation of this bond like Quatermain before him just kept getting worse.
** Moore's ''Century'' trilogy kept noting how culture kept being LostInImitation well into the 21st Century with popular franchises and their blockbuster movies being forged from "reassuring imagery from the 1940s". Of course subverted by more historical mindsets that would make similar arguments that every era is taking cues from the eras of the past they most want to emphasize.

to:

** This was especially tackled hard by Moore in his parody of James Bond, by essentially showing how Creator/IanFleming's original character was far more nasty and borderline sociopathic than the charming AdaptationalHeroism given to him in the movies. Which in direct terms is not a lie. Movie Bond was indeed made LighterAndSofter than Book Bond, but also Fleming book!Bond[[note]]Fleming himself started watering down Bond in the book series at it went on. Moore's interpretation on[[/note]] and the character's initial popularity owed greatly to the misogyny and sexism of this bond like Quatermain before him just kept getting worse.
TheFifties.
** Moore's ''Century'' trilogy kept noting how culture kept being LostInImitation well into the 21st Century with popular franchises and their blockbuster movies being forged from "reassuring imagery from the 1940s". Of course subverted by more historical mindsets that would make similar arguments that every era is taking cues from the eras of the past they most want to emphasize.



* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: The [[AuthorAppeal real]] [[NewMediaAreEvil reason]] is obvious, but from a Watsonian perspective, what happened to almost every major literary character since the middle of the twentieth century? Indeed, it is worth noting that in the older volumes Moore dove deep into many literary sources in building the world of the league, from the major players to the background characters. But by the time of ''1969'' and ''2009'', the number of literary sources takes a severe nosedive. The world of the League having been built on the back of literature itself, is constantly picked apart and depicted as collapsing. This however falls a bit flat when the better part of over half a century's worth of characters and stories are completely absent.

to:

* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: The [[AuthorAppeal real]] [[NewMediaAreEvil reason]] is obvious, but from a Watsonian perspective, what happened to almost every major literary character since the middle of the twentieth century? Indeed, it is worth noting that in the older volumes Moore dove deep into many literary sources in building the world of the league, from the major players to the background characters. But by the time of ''1969'' and ''2009'', the number of literary sources takes a severe nosedive. The world of nosedive, and indeed references are made to generally obscure cult films like ''Film/{{Performance}}'' or ''Film/GetCarter'' and the League having been built main cultural symbol of TheOughties that Moore focuses on the back of literature itself, is constantly picked apart and depicted as collapsing. This however falls a bit flat when the better part of over half a century's worth of characters and stories are completely absent.[[Literature/HarryPotter You-Know-Who]].
27th Sep '17 2:08:15 PM Homemaderat
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* LostInImitation: One of the key themes of the comic:
** To begin with the original series was about how certain famous Victorian archetypal characters became overexposed and over-interpreted that aspects of the original context were AdaptedOut. The comic was one of the few to show Captain Nemo as a Sikh Prince as he was in Creator/JulesVerne's ''Literature/TheMysteriousIsland'' rather than the more famous incarnations by the likes of James Mason, and likewise the fact that the originally villainous and ambiguous Nemo eventually inspired and codified the ScienceHero. Allan Quatermain was far more flawed and vulnerable than his later stories, with Dr. Jekyll he {{Lampshaded}} how a character who was originally villainous would become the inspiration for the far more anti-heroic Hulk, by retro-fitting the latter character to his precursor. What was percieved as strange and monstrous later became acceptable and safe, mostly by being watered down in subsequent adaptations.
** This was especially tackled hard by Moore in his parody of James Bond, by essentially showing how Creator/IanFleming's original character was far more nasty and borderline sociopathic than the charming AdaptationalHeroism given to him in the movies. Moore's ''Century'' trilogy kept noting how culture kept being LostInImitation well into the 21st Century with popular franchises and their blockbuster movies being forged from "reassuring imagery from the 1940s".

to:

* LostInImitation: One This is one of the key themes of the comic:
**
comic from direct WordOfGod. To begin with the original series was about how certain famous Victorian archetypal characters became overexposed and over-interpreted that aspects of the original context were AdaptedOut. However there is some critique of whether Moore is as much rooting it out or making new ones of his own. Some specific character examples:
**
The comic was one of the few to show Captain Nemo as a Sikh Prince as he was in Creator/JulesVerne's ''Literature/TheMysteriousIsland'' rather than the more famous incarnations by the likes of James Mason, and likewise the fact that the originally villainous and ambiguous Nemo eventually inspired and codified the ScienceHero. However in this process, Moore had made the Nautilus look far more Indian than the Nemo of the original book would have ever had it.
**
Allan Quatermain was far in his original from started as the GreatWhiteHunter but became more flawed weak and vulnerable over the course of his stories. Something that was not as well to follow in his adaptations. In this comic however Moore has put Quatermain much further down the pike than his later stories, with anything ever suggested in the books.
** With
Dr. Jekyll he {{Lampshaded}} how a character who was originally villainous would become the inspiration for the far more anti-heroic Hulk, by retro-fitting the latter character to his precursor. What was percieved as strange and monstrous later became acceptable and safe, mostly by being watered down in subsequent adaptations.
adaptations. Moore based his version of Hyde on the growth interpretation of one line in the original story. (The alternate being health)
** This was especially tackled hard by Moore in his parody of James Bond, by essentially showing how Creator/IanFleming's original character was far more nasty and borderline sociopathic than the charming AdaptationalHeroism given to him in the movies. Which in direct terms is not a lie. Movie Bond was LighterAndSofter than Book Bond, but also Fleming himself started watering down Bond in the book series at it went on. Moore's interpretation of this bond like Quatermain before him just kept getting worse.
**
Moore's ''Century'' trilogy kept noting how culture kept being LostInImitation well into the 21st Century with popular franchises and their blockbuster movies being forged from "reassuring imagery from the 1940s".1940s". Of course subverted by more historical mindsets that would make similar arguments that every era is taking cues from the eras of the past they most want to emphasize.



* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: The [[AuthorAppeal real]] [[NewMediaAreEvil reason]] is obvious, but from a Watsonian perspective, what happened to almost every major literary character since the middle of the twentieth century? Indeed, it is worth noting that in the older volumes Moore dove deep into many literary sources in building the world of the league, from the major players to the background characters. But by the time of ''1969'' and ''2009'', the number of literary sources takes a severe nosedive. The world of the League, and therefore, of literature itself, is constantly picked apart and depicted as collapsing, but it falls a bit flat when the reason for that seems to stem from the better part of over half a century's worth of characters and stories are completely absent.

to:

* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: The [[AuthorAppeal real]] [[NewMediaAreEvil reason]] is obvious, but from a Watsonian perspective, what happened to almost every major literary character since the middle of the twentieth century? Indeed, it is worth noting that in the older volumes Moore dove deep into many literary sources in building the world of the league, from the major players to the background characters. But by the time of ''1969'' and ''2009'', the number of literary sources takes a severe nosedive. The world of the League, and therefore, League having been built on the back of literature itself, is constantly picked apart and depicted as collapsing, but it collapsing. This however falls a bit flat when the reason for that seems to stem from the better part of over half a century's worth of characters and stories are completely absent.
12th Aug '17 11:23:28 PM jormis29
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* UncannyValley: In-universe, [[spoiler:the frozen corpse of Stardust the Super-Wizard. Both Moore's text and O'Neill's illustration for the piece emphasize [[http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-KVAvuR0Cpjw/TgmFW64bizI/AAAAAAAAFmc/S6qweQbB46A/s1600/superwizard.jpg just how warped a Fletcher Hanks creation would look in real life]], with its enormous stature, tiny head, and compacted rippling muscles.]]

to:

* UncannyValley: In-universe, [[spoiler:the frozen corpse of Stardust the Super-Wizard.ComicBook/StardustTheSuperWizard. Both Moore's text and O'Neill's illustration for the piece emphasize [[http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-KVAvuR0Cpjw/TgmFW64bizI/AAAAAAAAFmc/S6qweQbB46A/s1600/superwizard.jpg just how warped a Fletcher Hanks creation would look in real life]], with its enormous stature, tiny head, and compacted rippling muscles.]]
25th Jul '17 8:15:00 PM jormis29
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* GrandTheftMe: This is how Oliver Haddo has been keeping himself alive throughout the 20th century as his original body and subsequent ones aged and died. Among his more notable victims were Cosmo Gallion, the villain from ''TheAvengers'' episode "Warlock", and [[spoiler: Tom Riddle AKA Voldemort]]. He planned to take over the body of Turner from ''{{Performance}}'' but was stopped when Johnny Dean killed Cosmo's body mid-transit, forcing him to improvise.

to:

* GrandTheftMe: This is how Oliver Haddo has been keeping himself alive throughout the 20th century as his original body and subsequent ones aged and died. Among his more notable victims were Cosmo Gallion, the villain from ''TheAvengers'' ''Series/TheAvengers'' episode "Warlock", and [[spoiler: Tom Riddle AKA Voldemort]]. He planned to take over the body of Turner from ''{{Performance}}'' but was stopped when Johnny Dean killed Cosmo's body mid-transit, forcing him to improvise.
22nd Jul '17 7:48:55 PM DuckDuckNoose
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* UncannyValley: In-universe, [[spoiler:the frozen corpse of Stardust the Super-Wizard. Both Moore's text and O'Neill's illustration for the piece emphasize [[http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-QArsmfayr3o/T-zHF2jeBPI/AAAAAAAAADg/-qA9dyc2DZ0/s1600/Stardust+imprisoned.jpg just how warped a Fletcher Hanks creation would look in real life]], with its enormous stature, tiny head, and compacted rippling muscles.]]

to:

* UncannyValley: In-universe, [[spoiler:the frozen corpse of Stardust the Super-Wizard. Both Moore's text and O'Neill's illustration for the piece emphasize [[http://2.[[http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-QArsmfayr3o/T-zHF2jeBPI/AAAAAAAAADg/-qA9dyc2DZ0/s1600/Stardust+imprisoned.com/-KVAvuR0Cpjw/TgmFW64bizI/AAAAAAAAFmc/S6qweQbB46A/s1600/superwizard.jpg just how warped a Fletcher Hanks creation would look in real life]], with its enormous stature, tiny head, and compacted rippling muscles.]]
20th Jul '17 10:15:53 PM JulianLapostat
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to:

* Volume 4: The Tempest -- The purported GrandFinale of the entire series. It will be a six issue series released in 2018. A multi-century arc that ties together all the plotlines from the earlier stories and settings, mixed with ''Literature/We''.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Comicbook.TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen