History Comicbook / AllStarBatmanAndRobinTheBoyWonder

12th Dec '17 3:25:18 PM Odinfrost137
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--> "WHAT TIME IS IT?!" - [[WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall Linkara]] and many others frustrated about all the X hours earlier"
3rd Dec '17 10:47:26 AM nombretomado
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* DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment: [[SignatureStyle Very often throughout the text. Again and again. There is repetition. Statements are made. Hammered. Insistent. Again and again. Relentless. Tireless. Again and again.]][[note]][[AtopTheFourthWall Linkara]] accurately compares the dialogue to [[Film/ManosTheHandsofFate Torgo's]] VerbalTic.[[/note]]

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* DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment: [[SignatureStyle Very often throughout the text. Again and again. There is repetition. Statements are made. Hammered. Insistent. Again and again. Relentless. Tireless. Again and again.]][[note]][[AtopTheFourthWall ]][[note]][[WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall Linkara]] accurately compares the dialogue to [[Film/ManosTheHandsofFate Torgo's]] VerbalTic.[[/note]]
24th Nov '17 9:41:17 PM JulianLapostat
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** On a meta-level, Batman and comics in general hasn't been a KidAppealCharacter since TheEighties, thanks largely to Creator/FrankMiller himself, and none of the Robins in Batman's main continuity at the time of this comic's publication had been "Age 12". The kid sidekick concept which Robin popularized hasn't been as common and prevalent as it was in the Silver Age, so in a large sense the comic mainly works for those readers who know and remember the old Robin from the Creator/BillFinger-Dick Sprang era, without meaningfully having anything to say to the NostalgiaFilter or broader historical meaning of that connection.
24th Nov '17 9:34:07 PM JulianLapostat
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** Essentially the early issues, about Dick Grayson being "drafted" by Batman into his war on crime, the TrainingFromHell sequences, and the Justice League raising issues about Batman potentially kidnapping an orphan, mirrors common complaints about Batman and Robin, namely that a KidSidekick travelling alongside a hero is reckless child endangerment, and the way the various Robins become Batman's partner-in-crime, can be seen as drafting ChildSoldiers rather than allowing the kids to [[WishFulfillment share a fantasy]], and the overall treatment can seem like abuse and negligence from another angle. The problem is that rather than tackle the subtext of the trope and bring it to light, t a KidSidekick travelling alongside a hero is reckless child endangerment, and the way the various Robins become Batman's partner-in-crime, can be seen as drafting ChildSoldiers rather than allowing the kids to [[WishFulfillment share a fantasy]], and the overall treatment can seem like abuse and negligence from another angle. The problem is that rather than tackle the subtext of the trope and bring it to light, Miller ''literally'' has Batman kidnap and draft Robin as a child-soldier, subject him to emotional, physical, and psychological abuse, and more or less [[{{Gaslighting}} gaslights]] him into accepting that Batman is boss, and not to be second-guessed, all of which is played as an unironic mutually cathartic team-building exercise rather than a ''ComicBook/MarshalLaw'' type spoof, and the comic itself isn't clear if this is a good or bad thing.

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** Essentially the early issues, about Dick Grayson being "drafted" by Batman into his war on crime, the TrainingFromHell sequences, and the Justice League raising issues about Batman potentially kidnapping an orphan, mirrors common complaints about Batman and Robin, namely that a KidSidekick travelling alongside a hero is reckless child endangerment, and the way the various Robins become Batman's partner-in-crime, can be seen as drafting ChildSoldiers rather than its original intent (i.e. a medium for allowing the kids to [[WishFulfillment share a fantasy]], and the overall treatment can seem like abuse and negligence from another angle. The problem is that rather than tackle the subtext fantasy]] of being a part of the trope and bring it to light, t a KidSidekick travelling alongside a hero is reckless child endangerment, and the way the various Robins become Batman's partner-in-crime, can be seen as drafting ChildSoldiers rather than allowing the kids to [[WishFulfillment share a fantasy]], and the overall treatment can seem like abuse and negligence from another angle.hero's adventures). The problem is that rather than tackle the subtext of the trope and bring it to light, Miller ''literally'' has Batman kidnap and draft Robin as a child-soldier, subject him to emotional, physical, and psychological abuse, and more or less [[{{Gaslighting}} gaslights]] him into accepting that Batman is boss, and not to be second-guessed, all of which is played as an unironic mutually cathartic team-building exercise rather than a ''ComicBook/MarshalLaw'' type spoof, and the comic itself isn't clear if this is a good or bad thing.
24th Nov '17 9:32:17 PM JulianLapostat
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** Essentially the early issues, about Dick Grayson being "drafted" by Batman into his war on crime, the TrainingFromHell sequences, and the Justice League raising issues about Batman potentially kidnapping an orphan, mirrors common complaints about Batman and Robin, namely that a KidSidekick travelling alongside a hero is reckless child endangerment, and the way the various Robins become Batman's partner-in-crime, can be seen as drafting ChildSoldiers rather than allowing the kids to [[WishFulfillment share a fantasy]], and the overall treatment can seem like abuse and negligence from another angle. The problem is that rather than tackle the subtext of the trope and bring it to light, Miller ''literally'' has Batman kidnap and draft Robin as a child-soldier, subject him to emotional, physical, and psychological abuse, and more or less [[{{Gaslighting}} gaslights]] him into accepting that Batman is boss, and not to be second-guessed, all of which is played as an unironic mutually cathartic team-building exercise rather than a ''ComicBook/MarshalLaw'' type spoof.

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** Essentially the early issues, about Dick Grayson being "drafted" by Batman into his war on crime, the TrainingFromHell sequences, and the Justice League raising issues about Batman potentially kidnapping an orphan, mirrors common complaints about Batman and Robin, namely that a KidSidekick travelling alongside a hero is reckless child endangerment, and the way the various Robins become Batman's partner-in-crime, can be seen as drafting ChildSoldiers rather than allowing the kids to [[WishFulfillment share a fantasy]], and the overall treatment can seem like abuse and negligence from another angle. The problem is that rather than tackle the subtext of the trope and bring it to light, t a KidSidekick travelling alongside a hero is reckless child endangerment, and the way the various Robins become Batman's partner-in-crime, can be seen as drafting ChildSoldiers rather than allowing the kids to [[WishFulfillment share a fantasy]], and the overall treatment can seem like abuse and negligence from another angle. The problem is that rather than tackle the subtext of the trope and bring it to light, Miller ''literally'' has Batman kidnap and draft Robin as a child-soldier, subject him to emotional, physical, and psychological abuse, and more or less [[{{Gaslighting}} gaslights]] him into accepting that Batman is boss, and not to be second-guessed, all of which is played as an unironic mutually cathartic team-building exercise rather than a ''ComicBook/MarshalLaw'' type spoof.spoof, and the comic itself isn't clear if this is a good or bad thing.
** Furthermore, critiquing the idea of Robin as an AudienceSurrogate and how he vicariously enjoys the superhero fantasy that a young audience identifies with, doesn't quite follow when most of the book is openly presented from Batman's point of view, and it isn't Robin gradually coming to see Batman's strange and bizarre world as normal and worth living in, by surrendering his agency, so much as Batman slowly imposing his view and authority on a small child. In addition the comic is clearly aimed at teenagers and adults in its content, its tone, and violence, and deconstructing the idea of Robin without actually addressing the audience the kid sidekick is intended for, more or less prevents it from having anything to say, unlike ''WesternAnimation/BatmanBeyondReturnOfTheJoker'' which was addressed to children and largely did play the same trope for dramatic effect and tragedy.
24th Nov '17 9:25:49 PM JulianLapostat
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* IndecisiveDeconstruction: The entire comic explores at its heart, the classic-team up between Batman and Robin, the role of the KidSidekick, and the nature of the KidSidekick as an AudienceSurrogate to make the hero relateable, but it raises these points without following on, nor does it properly cohere with the rest of the book:
** Essentially the early issues, about Dick Grayson being "drafted" by Batman into his war on crime, the TrainingFromHell sequences, and the Justice League raising issues about Batman potentially kidnapping an orphan, mirrors common complaints about Batman and Robin, namely that a KidSidekick travelling alongside a hero is reckless child endangerment, and the way the various Robins become Batman's partner-in-crime, can be seen as drafting ChildSoldiers rather than allowing the kids to [[WishFulfillment share a fantasy]], and the overall treatment can seem like abuse and negligence from another angle. The problem is that rather than tackle the subtext of the trope and bring it to light, Miller ''literally'' has Batman kidnap and draft Robin as a child-soldier, subject him to emotional, physical, and psychological abuse, and more or less [[{{Gaslighting}} gaslights]] him into accepting that Batman is boss, and not to be second-guessed, all of which is played as an unironic mutually cathartic team-building exercise rather than a ''ComicBook/MarshalLaw'' type spoof.
** The other theme in the book is that Batman's negative, dark, and violent personality has a negative influence on society and culture. With Black Canary and Batgirl being inspired to becoming violent superheroes by following his example, except only in the case of Batgirl is it portrayed as a bad thing. And in another instance where Batman saves a woman from rape, she on seeing Batman attack her assailaint grins at seeing his cathartic violence. So the comic itself is not sure whether Batman's violence and behaviour is a good and bad thing, and as such the big dramatic moment [[spoiler:where Dick Grayson injures Hal Jordan's collarbone and Bruce chastises himself and Robin]] doesn't make internal or external sense, or go anywhere.
18th Nov '17 4:02:08 PM VoxAquila
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* BigBad: The Joker is ultimately responsible for the murder of Robin's parents.
14th Nov '17 4:48:09 AM VoxAquila
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* AdaptationalNationality: Black Canary becomes Irish.
30th Sep '17 3:28:03 PM Tuckerscreator
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** Barbara Gordon's existence. The story explicitly takes place a few years after the Joker's first appearance, which happened right at the end of ''ComicBook/BatmanYearOne''. In taht story, the Gordons don't have any kids, with Jim even lamenting that it'd be wrong to bring a child into Gotham. Given Barbara's age, it's impossible that she was born after James. It's possible that she's Jim's niece in this version, but given that the series plays on the Silver Age quite a bit, it's more than likely she's his biological daughter and there's some snarl in effect.

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** Barbara Gordon's existence. The story explicitly takes place a few years after the Joker's first appearance, which happened right at the end of ''ComicBook/BatmanYearOne''. In taht that story, the Gordons don't have any kids, with Jim even lamenting that it'd be wrong to bring a child into Gotham. Given Barbara's age, it's impossible that she was born after James. It's possible that she's Jim's niece in this version, but given that the series plays on the Silver Age quite a bit, it's more than likely she's his biological daughter and there's some snarl in effect.
6th Jul '17 6:55:31 AM NightShade96
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The original ''ComicBook/AllStarDCComics'' title. Ran from 2005 until 2008. When DC announced the book it was widely anticipated as Creator/FrankMiller's return to the site of two of his greatest books - ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' and ''ComicBook/BatmanYearOne'', this time with the tale of Robin's origin, and illustrated by Jim Lee.

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The original ''ComicBook/AllStarDCComics'' title. Ran from 2005 until 2008. When DC announced the book it was widely anticipated as Creator/FrankMiller's return to the site of two of his greatest books - -- ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' and ''ComicBook/BatmanYearOne'', this time with the tale of Robin's origin, and illustrated by Jim Lee.



Not to be confused Scott Snyder's 2016 series ''[[http://www.newsarama.com/28600-rebirth-q-a-scott-snyder-on-all-star-batman.html All-Star Batman]]'', which Snyder heavily emphasizes has nothing to do with this.

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Not to be confused Scott Snyder's with Creator/ScottSnyder's 2016 series ''[[http://www.newsarama.com/28600-rebirth-q-a-scott-snyder-on-all-star-batman.html All-Star Batman]]'', which Snyder heavily emphasizes has nothing to do with this.
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