History Characters / Warhammer40000XenoRaces

10th Mar '16 1:41:51 PM Willbyr
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The alien factions in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' are treated as...well, alien. Mankind had made non-aggression pacts with a number of alien races during the Age of Technology, but these were lost as part of the Age of Strife's consequences. A fundamental tenet of the Emperor's rise to power was the superiority of humans to all things alien. In the time since his rise to the Golden Throne, this has become a fundamental part of the Imperial Creed, albeit exaggerated from the Emperor's own views. A level of xenophobia which ranges from suspicion to virulent and violent hatred is cultivated in all parts of the Imperium, and "Fear the alien" and "Suffer not the alien to live" are common themes and catchphrases. The Inquisition's Ordo Xenos was specifically created to study alien races to discover weaknesses the Imperium can take advantage of, and works to crush or subvert alien influence on Imperial worlds or worlds the Imperium would like to control. They also work with the Deathwatch, a specialized division of the Space Marines consisting of Marines from many different chapters who have shown particular skill in fighting aliens.

Despite this bias, temporary alliances or truces with various xenos factions do happen on rare occasions, especially when dealing with common enemies or when Inquisitors deem them necessary to further their plans. There are a very small number of xenos races, such as the Jokaero, who have actually been embraced by the Imperium for various reasons, mostly their lack of sentience. Possessing xenos weapons and/or artifacts would most likely mean a messy end for any normal Imperial citizen if discovered. However, Rogue Traders can freely handle and deal with them as long as their overall goal is in the Imperium's favor. Some Inquisitors, especially in the Ordo Xenos, also use xenos items, but this is often frowned upon by more Puritanical Inquisitors and the Ordo Hereticus.

In keeping with this general theme, very few stories from the Black Library have been told from an alien perspective. [[Literature/ThePathOfTheEldar A trilogy of Craftworld Eldar-centered books]] concluded in late 2012, and a trilogy of Dark Eldar-centered books completed in 2014. The short story collection ''Fear the Alien'' contains two stories which feature sections from the points of view of an Ork warboss and an Eldar Harlequin as well. The video game ''FireWarrior'' and its novelization follow the adventures of a Tau [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Fire Warrior]]. In addition, the sixth edition of the game's basic rulebook introduced various ways for Imperial and xenos races to team up in combat, although these come with their own conditions and drawbacks. The seventh edition rules kept this system but tweaked it to allow all xenos races to ally with Imperial forces, something the previous version didn't allow for Tyranids.

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The alien factions in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' are treated as...well, alien. Mankind had made non-aggression pacts with a number of alien races during the Age of Technology, but these were lost as part of when human civilization fell apart during the Age of Strife's consequences.Strife, many of these aliens turned on human worlds and attacked them for plunder or simple destruction. A fundamental tenet of the Emperor's rise to power was the superiority of humans to all things alien. In the time since his rise to interment in the Golden Throne, this has become a fundamental part of the Imperial Creed, albeit exaggerated from the Emperor's own views. A level of xenophobia which ranges from suspicion to virulent and violent hatred is cultivated in all parts of the Imperium, and "Fear the alien" and "Suffer not the alien to live" are common themes and catchphrases. The Inquisition's Ordo Xenos was specifically created to study alien races to discover weaknesses the Imperium can take advantage of, and works to crush or subvert alien influence on Imperial worlds or worlds the Imperium would like to control. They also work with the Deathwatch, a specialized division of the Space Marines consisting of Marines from many different chapters who have shown particular skill in fighting aliens.

Despite this bias, temporary alliances or truces with various xenos factions do happen on rare occasions, especially when dealing with common enemies or when Inquisitors deem them necessary to further their plans. There are a very small number of xenos races, such as the Jokaero, who have actually been embraced by the Imperium for various reasons, mostly their lack of sentience. Possessing xenos weapons and/or artifacts would most likely mean a messy end for any normal Imperial citizen if discovered. However, discovered, but Rogue Traders can freely handle and deal with them as long as their overall goal is in the Imperium's favor. Some Inquisitors, especially in the Ordo Xenos, also use xenos items, but this is often frowned upon by more Puritanical Inquisitors and the Ordo Hereticus.

In keeping with this general theme, very few stories from the Black Library have been told from an alien perspective. [[Literature/ThePathOfTheEldar A trilogy of Craftworld Eldar-centered books]] concluded in late 2012, and a trilogy of Dark Eldar-centered books completed concluded in 2014. The short story collection ''Fear the Alien'' contains two stories which feature sections from the points of view of an Ork warboss and an Eldar Harlequin as well. The video game ''FireWarrior'' ''VideoGame/FireWarrior'' and its novelization follow the adventures of a Tau [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Fire Warrior]]. In addition, the sixth edition of the game's basic rulebook introduced various ways for Imperial and xenos races to team up in combat, although these come with their own conditions and drawbacks. The seventh edition rules kept this system but tweaked it to allow all xenos races to ally with Imperial forces, something the previous version didn't allow for Tyranids.






** In third edition, the Hrud are rough expies of ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'''s Skaven, a race of [[RodentsOfUnusualSize rat-men]]. By fourth edition, they had been {{Ret Con}}ned into creatures with large eyes and exoskeletons. They still retain the aspect of sentient vermin, closely associated with trash and decay.

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** In third edition, the Hrud are were rough expies of ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'''s Skaven, a race of [[RodentsOfUnusualSize rat-men]]. By fourth edition, they had been {{Ret Con}}ned into creatures with large eyes and exoskeletons. They still retain the aspect of sentient vermin, closely associated with trash and decay.



** The Eldar, [[CantArgueWithElves naturally]], find ''mon-keigh'' to be (at best) brutish and ignorant barbarians blundering their way through the Eldar's birthright. To the Dark Eldar, humans are basically livestock.

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** The Eldar, [[CantArgueWithElves naturally]], find ''mon-keigh'' to be (at best) brutish and ignorant barbarians blundering their way through the Eldar's birthright.birthright, and at worst as little better than vermin. To the Dark Eldar, humans are basically livestock.



** Tyranids think we're [[ToServeMan delicious]].
* IdiotSavant: The Jokaero. They can build almost any kind of machine, but have only animal intelligence. Due to this they are one of the only Xeno races tolerated by the Imperium.

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** Tyranids think we're [[ToServeMan delicious]].
see humans as just another source of biomass.
* IdiotSavant: The Jokaero. They can build almost any kind of machine, but have only animal intelligence. Due to this they are one of the only Xeno xenos races tolerated by the Imperium.
10th Mar '16 4:51:39 AM MinisterOfSinister
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* TeethClenchedTeamwork: In-game, this is the essential meaning of the "Allies of Convenience" and "Desperate Allies" levels in the Allies matrix. Allies at these levels are treated as enemy units, but can't be acted against by your primary detachment; they fight alongside each other but that's it. The difference is that at the Desperate Allies level, a die roll can potentially paralyze your forces, representing them being so paranoid about their "allies" that they're spending all their time watching each other for betrayal instead of the real opponent. For instance, in the 7th edition rules all Imperial forces are Allies of Convenience with the Eldar but are Desperate Allies with the Tau and Necrons.

to:

* TeethClenchedTeamwork: In-game, this is the essential meaning of the "Allies of Convenience" and "Desperate Allies" levels in the Allies matrix. Allies at these levels are treated as enemy units, but can't be acted against by your primary detachment; they fight alongside each other but that's it. The difference is that at the Desperate Allies level, a die roll can potentially paralyze your forces, representing them being so paranoid about their "allies" that they're spending all their time watching each other for betrayal instead of the real opponent. For instance, in the 7th edition rules all Imperial forces are Allies of Convenience with the Eldar but are Desperate Allies with the Tau and Necrons. Interestingly, the Tau are Allies of Convenience with Eldar and Necrons and Desperate Allies with the Orks.
16th Aug '15 5:28:50 PM MarqFJA
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27th May '15 3:10:46 AM TARINunit9
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* GodzillaThreshold: In-game, this is represented by the 7th edition rules' version of the "Come the Apocalypse, but Not Before" level in the Allies matrix. In the 6th edition rules, this level was reserved for the Tyranids and kept them from allying with any other faction. In the 7th edition rules, this was tweaked to mean factions so antithetical to each other that teaming up is only done as the most desperate of measures. This is represented by these allies following the Desperate Allies rules (see TeethClenchedTeamwork below for details) but with the further restriction of not being able to deploy within 12" of each other on the battlefield. Tyranids are still at this level with all other factions, but Imperial forces are also here with anything Chaos-related.

to:

* GodzillaThreshold: In-game, this is represented by the 7th edition rules' version of the "Come the Apocalypse, but Not Before" level in the Allies matrix. In the 6th edition rules, this level was reserved for the Tyranids and kept them from allying with any other faction. In the 7th edition rules, this was tweaked to mean factions so antithetical to each other that teaming up is only done as the most desperate of measures.measures -- or, depending on how you play it in the narrative, two enemies who just happen to attack a third mutual enemy at the same time. This is represented by these allies following the Desperate Allies rules (see TeethClenchedTeamwork below for details) but with the further restriction of not being able to deploy within 12" of each other on the battlefield. Tyranids are still at this level with all other factions, but Imperial forces are also here with anything Chaos-related.
28th Nov '14 2:01:41 PM Willbyr
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* TeethClenchedTeamwork: In-game, this is the essential meaning of the "Allies of Convenience" and "Desperate Allies" levels in the Allies matrix. Allies at these levels are treated as enemy units, but can't be acted against by your primary detachment; they fight alongside each other but that's it. The difference is that at the Desperate Allies level, a die roll can potentially paralyze your forces, representing them being so paranoid about their "allies" that they're spending all their time watching them for betrayal instead of the real opponent. For instance, in the 7th edition rules all Imperial forces are Allies of Convenience with the Eldar but are Desperate Allies with the Tau and Necrons.

to:

* TeethClenchedTeamwork: In-game, this is the essential meaning of the "Allies of Convenience" and "Desperate Allies" levels in the Allies matrix. Allies at these levels are treated as enemy units, but can't be acted against by your primary detachment; they fight alongside each other but that's it. The difference is that at the Desperate Allies level, a die roll can potentially paralyze your forces, representing them being so paranoid about their "allies" that they're spending all their time watching them each other for betrayal instead of the real opponent. For instance, in the 7th edition rules all Imperial forces are Allies of Convenience with the Eldar but are Desperate Allies with the Tau and Necrons.
28th Nov '14 1:55:55 PM Willbyr
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* GodzillaThreshold: In-game, this is represented by the 7th edition rules' version of the "Come the Apocalypse, but Not Before" level in the Allies matrix. In the 6th edition rules, this level was reserved for the Tyranids and kept them from allying with any other faction. In the 7th edition rules, this was tweaked to mean factions so antithetical to each other that teaming up is only done as the most desperate of measures. This is represented by these allies following the Desperate Allies rules (see TeethClenchedTeamwork below for details) but with the further restriction of not being able to deploy within 12" of each other on the battlefield.

to:

* GodzillaThreshold: In-game, this is represented by the 7th edition rules' version of the "Come the Apocalypse, but Not Before" level in the Allies matrix. In the 6th edition rules, this level was reserved for the Tyranids and kept them from allying with any other faction. In the 7th edition rules, this was tweaked to mean factions so antithetical to each other that teaming up is only done as the most desperate of measures. This is represented by these allies following the Desperate Allies rules (see TeethClenchedTeamwork below for details) but with the further restriction of not being able to deploy within 12" of each other on the battlefield. Tyranids are still at this level with all other factions, but Imperial forces are also here with anything Chaos-related.
28th Nov '14 1:54:49 PM Willbyr
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In keeping with this general theme, very few stories from the Black Library have been told from an alien perspective. [[Literature/ThePathOfTheEldar A trilogy of Craftworld Eldar-centered books]] concluded in late 2012, and a trilogy of Dark Eldar-centered books completed in 2014. The short story collection ''Fear the Alien'' contains two stories which feature sections from the points of view of an Ork warboss and an Eldar Harlequin as well. The video game ''FireWarrior'' and its novelization follow the adventures of a Tau [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Fire Warrior]]. In addition, the sixth edition of the game's basic rulebook features various ways for Imperial and xenos races to team up in combat, although these come with their own conditions and drawbacks.

to:

In keeping with this general theme, very few stories from the Black Library have been told from an alien perspective. [[Literature/ThePathOfTheEldar A trilogy of Craftworld Eldar-centered books]] concluded in late 2012, and a trilogy of Dark Eldar-centered books completed in 2014. The short story collection ''Fear the Alien'' contains two stories which feature sections from the points of view of an Ork warboss and an Eldar Harlequin as well. The video game ''FireWarrior'' and its novelization follow the adventures of a Tau [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Fire Warrior]]. In addition, the sixth edition of the game's basic rulebook features introduced various ways for Imperial and xenos races to team up in combat, although these come with their own conditions and drawbacks.
drawbacks. The seventh edition rules kept this system but tweaked it to allow all xenos races to ally with Imperial forces, something the previous version didn't allow for Tyranids.



* GodzillaThreshold: In-game, this is represented by the 7th edition rules' version of the "Come the Apocalypse, but Not Before" level in the Allies matrix. In the 6th edition rules, this level was reserved for the Tyranids and kept them from allying with any other faction. In the 7th edition rules, this was tweaked to mean factions so antithetical to each other that teaming up is only done as the most desperate of measures. This is represented by these allies following the Desperate Allies rules (see TeethClenchedTeamwork below for details) but with the further restriction of not being able to deploy within 12" of each other on the battlefield.



** The Eldar, [[CantArgueWithElves naturally]], find ''mon-keigh'' to be brutish and ignorant barbarians blundering their way through the Eldar's birthright.
** Orks find humans to be entertaining foes (ironically enough for a lot of the reasons that humans find Orks dangerous), though they don't understand how we can tell who's in charge since, with the obvious exception of the Space Marines, we're all about the same size.

to:

** The Eldar, [[CantArgueWithElves naturally]], find ''mon-keigh'' to be (at best) brutish and ignorant barbarians blundering their way through the Eldar's birthright.
birthright. To the Dark Eldar, humans are basically livestock.
** Orks find humans to be entertaining foes (ironically enough for a lot of the reasons that humans find Orks dangerous), though they don't understand how we can tell who's in charge since, with the obvious exception of the Space Marines, we're all about the same size. This is part of the reason Orks like taking [[CommissarCap Commissar's caps]] as trophies, as their distinctiveness, to an Ork, must mean they're a better fighter than the other 'umies.




to:

* TeethClenchedTeamwork: In-game, this is the essential meaning of the "Allies of Convenience" and "Desperate Allies" levels in the Allies matrix. Allies at these levels are treated as enemy units, but can't be acted against by your primary detachment; they fight alongside each other but that's it. The difference is that at the Desperate Allies level, a die roll can potentially paralyze your forces, representing them being so paranoid about their "allies" that they're spending all their time watching them for betrayal instead of the real opponent. For instance, in the 7th edition rules all Imperial forces are Allies of Convenience with the Eldar but are Desperate Allies with the Tau and Necrons.
24th May '14 7:52:03 AM Willbyr
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In keeping with this general theme, very few stories from the Black Library have been told from an alien perspective. [[Literature/ThePathOfTheEldar A trilogy of Craftworld Eldar-centered books]] concluded in late 2012, and ''Path of the Renegade'' is the first in a new series of Dark Eldar-centered books. The short story collection ''Fear the Alien'' contains two stories which feature sections from the points of view of an Ork warboss and an Eldar Harlequin as well. The video game ''FireWarrior'' and its novelization follow the adventures of a Tau [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Fire Warrior]]. In addition, the sixth edition of the game's basic rulebook features various ways for Imperial and xenos races to team up in combat, although these come with their own conditions and drawbacks.

to:

In keeping with this general theme, very few stories from the Black Library have been told from an alien perspective. [[Literature/ThePathOfTheEldar A trilogy of Craftworld Eldar-centered books]] concluded in late 2012, and ''Path of the Renegade'' is the first in a new series trilogy of Dark Eldar-centered books.books completed in 2014. The short story collection ''Fear the Alien'' contains two stories which feature sections from the points of view of an Ork warboss and an Eldar Harlequin as well. The video game ''FireWarrior'' and its novelization follow the adventures of a Tau [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Fire Warrior]]. In addition, the sixth edition of the game's basic rulebook features various ways for Imperial and xenos races to team up in combat, although these come with their own conditions and drawbacks.



* '''[[Characters/Warhammer40000Eldar The Eldar]]''', elf-like humanoids who once ruled the galaxy, but they were undone by their own decadence, and have fractured into a number of different factions. Though fragile and few in number, they possess deadly warrior skills, exotic and advanced weaponry, and formidable psychic powers.

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* '''[[Characters/Warhammer40000Eldar The Eldar]]''', elf-like humanoids who once ruled the galaxy, but they were undone by their own decadence, and have fractured into a number of different factions. Though fragile and few in number, they possess deadly warrior skills, exotic and advanced weaponry, and formidable psychic powers.
23rd May '14 9:26:43 PM Tacitus
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Added DiffLines:

* ProudWarriorRace: The Viskeons, a race mentioned in the background for an ''TabletopGame/{{Inquisitor}}'' special character, believed in honorable conflict and so [[HonorBeforeReason completely disdained ranged weaponry]]. [[TheChessmaster Eldrad Ulthran]] subtly steered a splinter of Hive Fleet Kraken away from an Eldar Maiden World toward the Viskeon homeworld. [[CurbStompBattle They didn't last a single night]].
14th Mar '14 3:54:50 AM Willbyr
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In keeping with this general theme, very few stories from the Black Library have been told from an alien perspective. [[Literature/ThePathOfTheEldar A trilogy of Craftworld Eldar-centered books]] concluded in late 2012, and ''Path of the Renegade'' is the first in a new series of Dark Eldar-centered books. The short story collection ''Fear the Alien'' contains two stories which feature sections from the points of view of an Ork warboss and an Eldar Harlequin as well. And video game ''FireWarrior'' and its novelization follow the adventures of a Tau [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Fire Warrior]]. In addition, the sixth edition of the game's basic rulebook features various ways for Imperial and xenos races to team up in combat, although these come with their own conditions and drawbacks.

to:

In keeping with this general theme, very few stories from the Black Library have been told from an alien perspective. [[Literature/ThePathOfTheEldar A trilogy of Craftworld Eldar-centered books]] concluded in late 2012, and ''Path of the Renegade'' is the first in a new series of Dark Eldar-centered books. The short story collection ''Fear the Alien'' contains two stories which feature sections from the points of view of an Ork warboss and an Eldar Harlequin as well. And The video game ''FireWarrior'' and its novelization follow the adventures of a Tau [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Fire Warrior]]. In addition, the sixth edition of the game's basic rulebook features various ways for Imperial and xenos races to team up in combat, although these come with their own conditions and drawbacks.
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