History BrokenAesop / ComicBooks

13th May '16 12:34:36 PM NNinja
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13th May '16 12:33:40 PM NNinja
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13th May '16 12:33:31 PM NNinja
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** Also, after decades of using mutants as a metaphor for an [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything oppressed minority]] that we should love and respect, Joe Quesada mandates the Decimation event, in which a vast majority of the Marvel universe's mutants are depowered and there are in the low three digits of mutants left. What made it worse is the justification. Quesada claimed Marvel ''had'' to decimate the mutant population because Creator/GrantMorrison had established that there were millions of mutants across the globe, and that in Quesada's eyes, that meant the FantasticRacism element no longer worked. Specifically, he pointed out that mutants were supposed to be victims of bigotry, and yet had their own neighborhoods, culture, music, and even languages. In real life, many minority groups have ''all'' those things and yet still suffer discrimination from the majority, meaning there's no reason mutants couldn't have numbered in the millions and still have been targeted by normal humans. Quesada's explanation is tantamount to saying that black people, Asian people, Latino people, or LGBT people no longer experience discrimination because "Hey, at least they have their own neighborhoods and pop culture figures!"
29th Mar '16 4:55:02 AM supergod
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*** More generally, over most of a century of comics Batman has racked up a body count unequaled by many national armies, starting with two outright murders in the very first book he appears in and continuing intermittently into the new 52. Special mention goes to locking up K G Beast in a lightless sewer to slowly starve to death in the 1980s, and to murdering petty criminals by burning them alive and shooting protesters (with a gun) from horseback while Frank Miller was writing. It happens regularly enough even in his campiest periods that the [[Anvilicious numerous lectures]] the books give about how killing is wrong and guns are bad tend to come across as a bit of a mixed message.
28th Mar '16 2:26:52 AM WhatRayDid
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Added DiffLines:

*** More generally, over most of a century of comics Batman has racked up a body count unequaled by many national armies, starting with two outright murders in the very first book he appears in and continuing intermittently into the new 52. Special mention goes to locking up K G Beast in a lightless sewer to slowly starve to death in the 1980s, and to murdering petty criminals by burning them alive and shooting protesters (with a gun) from horseback while Frank Miller was writing. It happens regularly enough even in his campiest periods that the [[Anvilicious numerous lectures]] the books give about how killing is wrong and guns are bad tend to come across as a bit of a mixed message.
14th Mar '16 9:08:16 AM Morgenthaler
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** Furthermore, even if you ignore evil mutants who use their powers for terrorism, it's not uncommon for a mutant's powers to get out of control and end up hurting or killing a lot of people or causing a ton of property damage, giving humans a valid for not wanting them around. Even worse, for all their talk about wanting equality with mankind, we almost never see the X-Men try and welcome regular humans be around them. And they don't really try to make the few humans who do try to be around them feel welcome. For example, the Xavier Institute once employed a regular human nurse named Annie. At one point when they needed her help with a group of crucified mutants, Jean Grey used her telepathy to call her and was [[WhatTheHellHero annoyed when she panicked after hearing Jean's voice in her head without any warning]] and the group talked down to her for being human.

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** Furthermore, even if you ignore evil mutants who use their powers for terrorism, it's not uncommon for a mutant's powers to get out of control and end up hurting or killing a lot of people or causing a ton of property damage, giving humans a valid reason for not wanting them around. Even worse, for all their talk about wanting equality with mankind, we almost never see the X-Men try and welcome regular humans be around them. And they don't really try to make the few humans who do try to be around them feel welcome. For example, the Xavier Institute once employed a regular human nurse named Annie. At one point when they needed her help with a group of crucified mutants, Jean Grey used her telepathy to call her and was [[WhatTheHellHero annoyed when she panicked after hearing Jean's voice in her head without any warning]] and the group talked down to her for being human.
7th Feb '16 1:27:34 PM morenohijazo
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23rd Jan '16 9:21:47 AM morenohijazo
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* ''ComicBook/ZipiYZape'': Several, usually courtesy of the twins' parents. For example: Mr. Pantuflo has promised, several times, that if their twins get an A he will buy them a bike, the object of their desires. They got an A once ([[StatusQuoIsGod they got As quite frequently in fact]]), not because of any academic prowess, but they got it fairly. So Mr. Pantuflo was obliged to "[[ExactWords buy them what they wrote on a piece of paper]]" they gave him before. The paper was, predictably, full of typos ("We wan a visikle wit too weels") so Mr. Pantuflo said "I don't know what a "visikle" is, it's not in the dictionary - so I'm not buying it.". Kids, don't bother being a good kid, unless your ortography is good your parents will screw you in a technicality.

to:

* ''ComicBook/ZipiYZape'': Several, usually courtesy of the twins' parents. For example: Mr. Pantuflo has promised, several times, that if their twins get an A he will buy them a bike, the object of their desires. They got an A once ([[StatusQuoIsGod they got As quite frequently in fact]]), not because of any academic prowess, but they got it fairly. So Mr. Pantuflo was obliged to "[[ExactWords buy them what they wrote on a piece of paper]]" they gave him before. The paper was, predictably, full of typos ("We wan a visikle wit too weels") so Mr. Pantuflo said "I don't know what a "visikle" 'visikle' is, it's not in the dictionary - so I'm not buying it.". " Kids, don't bother being a good kid, kid: unless your ortography spelling is good good, your parents will screw you in on a technicality.
29th Dec '15 8:14:09 AM Anddrix
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* ''ComicBook/MarvelAdventures Comicbook/SpiderMan'' # 39 has a foreign exchange student named Kristoff show up at Peter's school, and make a speech about how, unlike many of his countrymen, he doesn't hate America. Peter shows him around, and they talk until it's revealed that Kristoff is from Latveria, home of SelfDemonstrating/DoctorDoom. Peter freaks out a bit but accepts him for it. Then the Comicbook/FantasticFour show up, attacking Kristoff seemingly just because of his Latverian origin, calling him a "potential threat to national security", and taking him away. So, it turns out that he's just a normal, nice kid and the Aesop is that ethnic prejudice is wrong, right? ... well, no, because it turns out that he was ActuallyADoombot, and Spidey and the FF have to beat him up. So, the Aesop is that you should never trust people from enemy countries, even when they seem to be perfectly nice, and that it's totally logical to seize and search people who ''might'' be a problem.

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* ''ComicBook/MarvelAdventures Comicbook/SpiderMan'' # 39 has a foreign exchange student named Kristoff show up at Peter's school, and make a speech about how, unlike many of his countrymen, he doesn't hate America. Peter shows him around, and they talk until it's revealed that Kristoff is from Latveria, home of SelfDemonstrating/DoctorDoom.Doctor Doom. Peter freaks out a bit but accepts him for it. Then the Comicbook/FantasticFour show up, attacking Kristoff seemingly just because of his Latverian origin, calling him a "potential threat to national security", and taking him away. So, it turns out that he's just a normal, nice kid and the Aesop is that ethnic prejudice is wrong, right? ... well, no, because it turns out that he was ActuallyADoombot, and Spidey and the FF have to beat him up. So, the Aesop is that you should never trust people from enemy countries, even when they seem to be perfectly nice, and that it's totally logical to seize and search people who ''might'' be a problem.
31st Oct '15 4:14:32 PM nombretomado
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** Also, there's a comment about Supergirl's actions as a superhero was an abuse of power, acting outside the law, only to disregard this and comment about how inefficient police work is and how much more effective she was as a superpowered vigilante and how she should go back to being a vigilante. Then it breaks ''that'' aesop because standard police work (like forensics) did more to uncover what happened to TheAtom than vigilantism.

to:

** Also, there's a comment about Supergirl's actions as a superhero was an abuse of power, acting outside the law, only to disregard this and comment about how inefficient police work is and how much more effective she was as a superpowered vigilante and how she should go back to being a vigilante. Then it breaks ''that'' aesop because standard police work (like forensics) did more to uncover what happened to TheAtom ComicBook/TheAtom than vigilantism.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=BrokenAesop.ComicBooks