History BritishEnglish / EnglishSlangAToF

6th Oct '17 8:59:21 AM JMQwilleran
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* ''''Fairy cake''''': A cupcake, generally one a bit smaller than you would typically see in the U.S.

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* ''''Fairy '''''Fairy cake''''': A cupcake, generally one a bit smaller than you would typically see in the U.S.
6th Oct '17 8:58:59 AM JMQwilleran
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* '''Fairy cake''': A cupcake, generally one a bit smaller than you would typically see in the U.S.
* '''Fancy''': Multiple meanings:

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* '''Fairy cake''': ''''Fairy cake''''': A cupcake, generally one a bit smaller than you would typically see in the U.S.
* '''Fancy''': '''''Fancy''''': Multiple meanings:
6th Oct '17 8:58:28 AM JMQwilleran
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Added DiffLines:

* '''Fairy cake''': A cupcake, generally one a bit smaller than you would typically see in the U.S.
30th Sep '17 7:53:02 PM nombretomado
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* '''Football''': Always used to describe [[FootyRules the sport also known as Soccer]]. If you want to talk about gridiron use the phrase "American Football" while you're here or everyone will assume you're talking about our version.

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* '''Football''': Always used to describe [[FootyRules [[UsefulNotes/FootyRules the sport also known as Soccer]]. If you want to talk about gridiron use the phrase "American Football" while you're here or everyone will assume you're talking about our version.
2nd Sep '17 10:17:26 AM Bisected8
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** "Builder's tea" is strong cheap tea with plenty of milk and sugar, said to be favored by builders taking (frequent) breaks.
* '''''Bum''''': [[Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus bottom. Backside. Rump. Sit-upon.]] Inoffensive (similar in strength to "butt"), but works produced and set in America often have the word "bum" (used in the American sense) altered to "tramp" if they're intended to reach British audiences, if only because the original word would sound unintentionally humorous.
** May also be used in a colloquial sense as slang for the act of anal sex (typically with homosexual connotations; one who does so is a "bummer", so that word as used by Eaglelanders tends to raise a laugh), and by extension as a way of indicating a preoccupation with something (neither use is very polite). For example "Stop bumming that album."

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** "Builder's tea" is strong cheap strong, cheap, tea with plenty of milk and sugar, said sugar. Said to be favored favoured by builders taking (frequent) breaks.
* '''''Bum''''': [[Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus bottom. Backside. Rump. Sit-upon.]] Inoffensive (similar in strength to "butt"), but works produced and set in America often have the word "bum" (used in the American sense) altered to "tramp" if they're intended to reach British audiences, if only because the original word would sound unintentionally humorous.
humorous and not immediately understood.
** May also be used in a colloquial sense as slang for the act of anal sex (typically with homosexual connotations; one who does so is a "bummer", so that word as used by Eaglelanders tends to raise a laugh), and by extension laugh). By extension; as a way of indicating a preoccupation with something something, or sycophancy, in the case of a person (neither use is very polite). For example "Stop bumming that album."album".
1st Sep '17 6:08:11 PM DavidDelony
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** "Builder's tea" is cheap tea with plenty of milk and sugar, said to be favored by builders taking (frequent) breaks.

to:

** "Builder's tea" is strong cheap tea with plenty of milk and sugar, said to be favored by builders taking (frequent) breaks.
1st Sep '17 6:04:00 PM DavidDelony
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* '''''Aerial''''': A US TV or radio antenna.

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* '''''Aerial''''': A US TV or radio antenna.
10th Aug '17 10:47:46 AM DavidDelony
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* Fringe: The part of the hair that hangs over the forehead, called "bangs" in American English.

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* Fringe: '''''Fringe''''': The part of the hair that hangs over the forehead, called "bangs" in American English.
16th Jul '17 9:12:32 AM nombretomado
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* '''''Boxhead''''' Originally military slang for a German, military or civilian. Originated in the 1980's when the General Officer Commanding British forces in West Germany noted that nearly forty years after the end of {{WW2}}, British service personnel were still using the derogatory word "Squarehead" for Germans. Orders went out that This Will Cease Forthwith and disciplinary Measures Will Follow. Overnight, Germans became Boxheads - a reference to the same hairstyle that led to the original insult...

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* '''''Boxhead''''' Originally military slang for a German, military or civilian. Originated in the 1980's when the General Officer Commanding British forces in West Germany noted that nearly forty years after the end of {{WW2}}, UsefulNotes/WW2, British service personnel were still using the derogatory word "Squarehead" for Germans. Orders went out that This Will Cease Forthwith and disciplinary Measures Will Follow. Overnight, Germans became Boxheads - a reference to the same hairstyle that led to the original insult...
17th Jun '17 2:19:44 PM nombretomado
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If you want to learn more, {{Wikipedia}} [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_and_short_scales has an article about it]].

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If you want to learn more, {{Wikipedia}} Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_and_short_scales has an article about it]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=BritishEnglish.EnglishSlangAToF