History Awesome / ProGaming

11th Mar '17 3:54:06 PM santos32
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* Here's something on the ProfessionalWrestling front: Wrestling/KennyOmega and Wrestling/XavierWoods went first to 5 [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rc8iOeB3y4U at CEO 2016]], putting on a show for the crowd.
2nd Feb '17 2:01:58 PM BossKey
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* Boston Major Finals Game 3

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* %%* Boston Major Finals Game 33
* Starladder i-League Season 3 qualifiers, Team Ad Finem vs. Alliance: Game 1 was fairly standard as far as professional Dota 2 goes, except for one particular moment which managed to be equal parts awesome and hilarious. Ad Finem, with a solid lead thus far, has Madara (Lone Druid) go for Roshan, a move which would greatly reduce Alliance's chances of victory due to Madara causing them quite a few problems throughout the game. Alliance's Handsken, playing Pudge, then throws a blind hook into the Roshan pit and manages to hook Madara out ''[[ImprobableAimingSkills from behind his Spirit Bear]]'', netting an easy kill and allowing Alliance to win the fight for Roshan. Ad Finem never fully recovers from what the commentators dubbed the "bullshit hook" ([[NotMakingThisUpDisclaimer no, really]]) and eventually lose to Alliance.
31st Jan '17 1:54:45 PM OldBen
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* NiP are a team who have done, beyond their tournament successes, what very few - if any at all - Counterstrike pro teams have done. Played against ''themselves''. Specifically, through showmatches at the likes of Dreamhack, fans and viewers are finally able to see what would happen if the modern (2013) line-up - consisting of Xist, Friberg, GeT_RiGhT, Fifflaren and f0rest - took on the old-school 2005 line-up (Heaton, Ahl, Fisker, Zet and Potti). It's about as awesome as you think it is. And they've not settled for doing this once.
* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9WV1-AklbEQ Here]] sNax from Virtus Pro demonstrated that in Counter Strike, patience, planning and really, ''really'' clear mind are just as important as shooting skill.

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* NiP [=NiP=] are a team who have done, beyond their tournament successes, what very few - if any at all - Counterstrike pro teams have done. Played against ''themselves''. Specifically, through showmatches at the likes of Dreamhack, fans and viewers are finally able to see what would happen if the modern (2013) line-up - consisting of Xist, Friberg, GeT_RiGhT, Fifflaren and f0rest - took on the old-school 2005 line-up (Heaton, Ahl, Fisker, Zet and Potti). It's about as awesome as you think it is. And they've not settled for doing this once.
* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9WV1-AklbEQ Here]] sNax from Virtus Pro Virtus.pro demonstrated that in Counter Strike, patience, planning and really, ''really'' clear mind are just as important as shooting skill. skill.
* Performing an ace (5 kills in one round) in a professional game? Always an awesome moment. Doing it while being outnumbered? Even more awesome. Acing enemy team in a 1v5 situation ''and'' in a match-deciding round? Sounds almost too great to be true, but in Dreamhack ZOWIE Open 2016 semifinals, Neo from Virtus.pro [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLXQMMJmt-w managed to pull it off]].
20th Jan '17 7:15:25 AM PokemonMasterJamal
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* At EVO 2011, Spark shows off just how much of a StoneWall [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IPWpby1jbnU Hakumen can be,]] Made awesome and hilarious by how much of a fan favorite Spark was, to the point that almost every combo and between-match break had a crowd cheering him on.

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* At EVO 2011, Spark shows off just how much of a StoneWall [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IPWpby1jbnU Hakumen can be,]] Made awesome and hilarious by how much of a fan favorite Spark was, to the point that almost every combo and between-match break had a crowd cheering him on. Morever, he started Top 8 from ''losers'' and ended up taking the entire tournament.
5th Jan '17 8:47:11 AM spackolos
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* Boston Major Finals Game 3
2nd Jan '17 6:00:48 AM Morgenthaler
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* Both ''Final Round 19'' and ''[=NorCal=] Regionals 2016'' saw Korean Street Fighter god [[TheAce Infiltration]] score two consecutive first place wins, not only qualifying him for the Capcom Cup, but also denying Japanese SF god Tokido in both tournaments' Grand Finals. [[DefiantToTheEnd Though it wasn't for a lack of trying on Tokido's part]], especially considering [[BadAss he fought through Loser's Bracket both tournaments to make it to Grand Finals]].

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* Both ''Final Round 19'' and ''[=NorCal=] Regionals 2016'' saw Korean Street Fighter god [[TheAce Infiltration]] score two consecutive first place wins, not only qualifying him for the Capcom Cup, but also denying Japanese SF god Tokido in both tournaments' Grand Finals. [[DefiantToTheEnd Though it wasn't for a lack of trying on Tokido's part]], especially considering [[BadAss he fought through Loser's Bracket both tournaments to make it to Grand Finals]].Finals.
29th Dec '16 6:30:13 AM Dravencour
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** To summarize: [[spoiler:after getting his ass kicked by Kenshiro, Rei gets smacked around some more, culminating in a Zankai Ken being put on him, which will kill him in roughly thirty seconds. Rei promptly uses this time to completely thrash on Ken, winning the round just as the timer is just about to end and canceling the technique. So what does Ken do for the third round? Bust out the Hyakuretsu Ken and put him down for a Fatal KO]].
28th Dec '16 8:54:24 AM urielzet
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*** The [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsL18ezyNFU Grand Finals]] itself was one of, if not THE most exciting tournament match of the entire year. Chanel's Alisa went up against Saint's Jack-7. Saint was on the loser's side and had to win three matches to reset the bracket, and then win another three matches to win the whole thing. Saint takes three matches and gets the reset, seemingly without any problem. Saint continues winning and gets another two matches with the same apparent ease. The apparent common thread was that the stage they played on had no walls; Jack-7, as noted by the commentators repeatedly, had more of an advantage without walls because he could get the space he needed without worrying about an opponent's offense decimating him with a wall. On the sixth match, with Saint apparently on tournament point, the stage changes to a walled stage, and suddenly Chanel manages to fight Saint off and get his first win. On the next match, the stage reverts to a wall-less stage, but Chanel rides the momentum and wins again, tying the score 2-2. The deciding match is set on a walled stage, and both players give their all, taking it all the way to a final round. Saint pulls out all the stops and defeats Chanel with a throwback Jack-2 attack grab to win the global finals. As a bonus, he continued the trend started by Nobi in 2016 of the EVO champion winning the global tournament; Saint was also the 2016 EVO champion earlier in the year.

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*** The [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsL18ezyNFU Grand Finals]] itself was one of, if not THE most exciting tournament match of the entire year. Chanel's Alisa went up against Saint's Jack-7. Saint was on the loser's side and had to win three matches to reset the bracket, and then win another three matches to win the whole thing. Saint takes three matches and gets the reset, seemingly without any problem. Saint continues winning and gets another two matches with the same apparent ease. The apparent common thread was that the stage they played on had no walls; Jack-7, as noted by the commentators repeatedly, had more of an advantage without walls because he could get the space he needed without worrying about an opponent's offense decimating him with against a wall.wall due to his large hitbox. On the sixth match, with Saint apparently on tournament point, the stage changes to a walled stage, and suddenly Chanel manages to fight Saint off and get his first win. On the next match, the stage reverts to a wall-less stage, but Chanel rides the momentum and wins again, tying the score 2-2. The deciding match is set on a walled stage, and both players give their all, taking it all the way to a final round. Saint pulls out all the stops and defeats Chanel with a throwback Jack-2 attack grab to win the global finals. As a bonus, he continued the trend started by Nobi in 2016 2015 of the EVO champion winning the global tournament; Saint was also the 2016 EVO champion earlier in the year.
28th Dec '16 8:47:35 AM urielzet
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* 2016 was an amazing year to be a ''Tekken'' fan. Considering the newest installment at that time, ''Tekken 7'', had not yet been released for consoles, at the very least, longtime fans of the series were given one hell of a show by the various professional tournaments across the globe, which fans were able to watch live on Twitch or easily find videos of on [=YouTube=].
** The hype all started at [[https://youtu.be/xu8lswCKLcY?t=26559 the end of the 2015 global tournament,]] which unveiled the updated title ''Fated Retribution'', along with a completely unexpected character reveal: [[Franchise/StreetFighter Akuma]]. There were no leaks prior to the trailer, and absolutely no hints to this came from Bandai Namco or elsewhere, which is particularly impressive given how information leaks can be a pressing problem among gaming companies in recent years.
** Anakin from Atlanta was one of the earliest 2016 tournament qualifiers for North America; however, he did so before the ''Fated Retribution'' update was available in the US. Because of this, and also because he wanted more experience with the game, he gave up his qualifying spot at least twice within the year before deciding to hold on to it until the North American finals. That means he won one tournament to qualify before giving up his spot; won another, qualified, and gave it up again; then won yet another tournament and finally decided to keep his qualifying spot.
** Rip, a pro Tekken player who's also famous as a commentator for and streamer of the game, had to fight hard for his spot in the North American finals. He came close more than a few times (including coming second place against Anakin in one tournament) before finally securing his spot during the middle of the year.
** In large part due to Akuma becoming part of ''Tekken'', several notable ''Street Fighter'' players ventured into the professional ''Tekken'' scene, including Justin Wong, who participated in several tournaments. The most infamous ''SF'' player who did this, however, was Korean player Poongko, who not only participated in a few tournaments across North America, but actually won first place in [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I3FUzugI3SE two]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3SsZiQNE5yI events]] as well. Unfortunately for the North Americans, only native first-placers were allowed to qualify for the North American finals, meaning the second-placers who lost to Poongko were not eligible to qualify. Prior to this year, the highest-placing North American players used to be eligible for the qualifying spot.
** Because of the many spots left open toward the end of the North American Tekken Tour, the Last Chance Qualifier held a day before the North American Finals had a total of ''nine'' tournaments back-to-back, which took over 15 hours all in all. It was a grueling experience for all its participants, especially since they were single-elimination tournaments, but a lot of players were still willing to take the opportunity to qualify for the North American Finals the following day.
** The North American Finals itself was quite an experience. The top 3 players, who qualified for the global tournament, included ITS Princess Ling, who qualified at one of the latter events of the tour; Anakin; and Mr. Naps, who qualified very early in the year, but unlike Anakin, chose to hold on to his spot. Mr. Naps's first-place finish in the North American Finals was made more impressive by how close he came to not even making it to the top 8 because of a three-way tie earlier in the tournament, where both his competitors were already one win ahead of him before he managed to move on.
** The 2016 global finals had more than a few highlights even before the Grand Finals.
*** In a surprising twist for the North Americans, the only qualifier from the region who made it to top 16 was Princess Ling; both Anakin and Mr. Naps were unable to secure enough wins to make it. Princess Ling didn't last long among the top 16 as well, coming up against more well-versed Korean and Japanese players.
*** Famed Tekken players Knee and Nobi were also eliminated within the top 16. Knee has been a longtime Tekken veteran and was one of the more favored players to win; Nobi was the 2015 EVO and global tournament champion, and was unable to defend his title.
*** The aforementioned AK, the youngest of the 32 qualifiers at 16 years old, went up to top 8 before losing against Korean player Saint in [[https://youtu.be/iaL1bMqXT3s?t=26781 a heavily contested battle.]]
*** The [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsL18ezyNFU Grand Finals]] itself was one of, if not THE most exciting tournament match of the entire year. Chanel's Alisa went up against Saint's Jack-7. Saint was on the loser's side and had to win three matches to reset the bracket, and then win another three matches to win the whole thing. Saint takes three matches and gets the reset, seemingly without any problem. Saint continues winning and gets another two matches with the same apparent ease. The apparent common thread was that the stage they played on had no walls; Jack-7, as noted by the commentators repeatedly, had more of an advantage without walls because he could get the space he needed without worrying about an opponent's offense decimating him with a wall. On the sixth match, with Saint apparently on tournament point, the stage changes to a walled stage, and suddenly Chanel manages to fight Saint off and get his first win. On the next match, the stage reverts to a wall-less stage, but Chanel rides the momentum and wins again, tying the score 2-2. The deciding match is set on a walled stage, and both players give their all, taking it all the way to a final round. Saint pulls out all the stops and defeats Chanel with a throwback Jack-2 attack grab to win the global finals. As a bonus, he continued the trend started by Nobi in 2016 of the EVO champion winning the global tournament; Saint was also the 2016 EVO champion earlier in the year.
18th Dec '16 12:17:38 PM Origin
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* One from the ''very'' old-school: the [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XTWsE4z4JLM "Motobox"]]. Team 3D facing off against SK. An unorthodox tactic culminates in Moto getting boosted onto one of the crates littering a bombsite on the map Inferno. Whether deliberately or otherwise, Moto - armed with nothing but a silenced pistol - continues to walk until he falls down the back of the crate, landing himself in a concealed spot but ''completely unable to move''. Only able to look out and see two areas - one of which just so happening to be a common location to plant the bomb - Moto elects to try and make the best of the situation. In a predicament that ''should'' have had him mopped up (as the last 3D member standing) in short order, he manages to take out four members of one of the best teams in the world at the time and get a humble shipping crate catapulted into legend in the process.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Awesome.ProGaming