History Anime / PokeMon

24th Jun '16 8:45:47 PM nombretomado
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** This is actually averted in many instances (mostly the movies), even while FourKidsEntertainment was handling it. For example, ''Anime/Pokemon4Ever'' actually has Sammy say that Celebi was going to die. However, it's still softened a bit -- in the original, it's already dead by that point. They also didn't make any attempt to cover up [[spoiler:Latios's]] death in ''Anime/PokemonHeroes'' or Lucario and Sir Aaron's deaths in ''Anime/PokemonLucarioAndTheMysteryOfMew''.

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** This is actually averted in many instances (mostly the movies), even while FourKidsEntertainment Creator/FourKidsEntertainment was handling it. For example, ''Anime/Pokemon4Ever'' actually has Sammy say that Celebi was going to die. However, it's still softened a bit -- in the original, it's already dead by that point. They also didn't make any attempt to cover up [[spoiler:Latios's]] death in ''Anime/PokemonHeroes'' or Lucario and Sir Aaron's deaths in ''Anime/PokemonLucarioAndTheMysteryOfMew''.



* ThinlyVeiledDubCountryChange: During the early days, despite taking place in a FantasyCounterpartCulture, it was far more numerous with its Japanese set pieces, a fact that FourKidsEntertainment did its best to try and "correct". [[Memes/{{Pokemon}} Jelly filled donuts]], anyone? However, once the series started to become the cultural phenomena it is today, the writers started to make a better effort to make it more 'cultural neutral' to make it more easier on dubbers... though examples still pop up from time to time.

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* ThinlyVeiledDubCountryChange: During the early days, despite taking place in a FantasyCounterpartCulture, it was far more numerous with its Japanese set pieces, a fact that FourKidsEntertainment Creator/FourKidsEntertainment did its best to try and "correct". [[Memes/{{Pokemon}} Jelly filled donuts]], anyone? However, once the series started to become the cultural phenomena it is today, the writers started to make a better effort to make it more 'cultural neutral' to make it more easier on dubbers... though examples still pop up from time to time.
24th Jun '16 5:38:48 AM Clare
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** The rivalry between Ash and Gary is set up in the show's very first episode and establishes that a victory over Gary is one of Ash's important long-term goals. After "Showdown at the Po-ké Corral" has Ash promise Gary that they would finally fight during the Indigo League, Gary is eliminated in a fight against a different trainer during the first round of the tournament.

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** The rivalry between Ash and Gary is set up in the show's very first episode and establishes that a victory over Gary is one of Ash's important long-term goals. After "Showdown at the Po-ké Corral" has Ash promise Gary that they would finally fight during the Indigo League, Gary is eliminated in a fight against a different trainer during in the first fourth round of the tournament.tournament; Ash goes out in the following round.
18th Jun '16 3:24:38 PM SheldonDinkleburg
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* {{Justification}}: In the games, the AI rarely ever switches Pokémon, even when it would benefit them to do so and even though it's essential to two-player battling strategy. For this reason, Gym Battles in the anime have the referee announce that the Gym Leader is not allowed to switch Pokémon.
15th Jun '16 5:23:59 PM acrobox
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* ArcHero: While Ash is the show's constant protagonist, each new region after Johto switches up the team he travels with -- after Misty and Brock in Kanto and Johto, it's May, Max, and Brock in Hoenn, Dawn and Brock in Sinnoh, Iris and Cilan in Unova, and Clemont, Bonnie, and Serena in Kalos. Each new {{Deuteragonist}} has their own arc, personality, and motivations, and more relationships with the natives of each region.
13th Jun '16 6:44:51 AM Psi001
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* NonchalantDodging: Due to the turn based battle methods being imported from the games, the anime adds the ability to "dodge" command a Pokemon. Whenever a CurbstompBattle is demanded for the plot, expect this to get spammed a lot.
4th Jun '16 4:05:17 PM morenohijazo
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* ForgottenFramingDevice: The movies tend to start with narration, but unlike episodes of the show, the narrator doesn't come back at the end.
29th May '16 8:35:17 PM Tavernier
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** When Ash was allowed to ''keep'' powerful Pokémon, they would often have personality quirks, flaws, or foibles designed to prevent them from operating at maximum (or even remotely decent) efficiency. Most famously, Ash's Charizard was temperamental and often simply refused to lift a finger to help Ash in his battles. Late in the Orange Islands ([=EP105=]), Charizard is moved by Ash's devotion and finally decides to get its butt in gear. However, in the Johto arc, Ash is told that Charizard is too powerful and that he's been abusing its superiority, and the writers have him leave Charizard in the [[HiddenElfVillage Charicific Valley]] for training ([=EP134=])[[note]]The writers had apparently been planning this for a while, writing scenes to downplay Charizard's actual strength, such as when the Chikorita Ash would eventually catch managed to ''slam it into a mountainside''[[/note]]. So, for the 89 episodes Ash had a Charizard (he first achieved the form in [=EP046=]), Charizard was obedient for less than 30 of them before the writers did away with him. This made room for Cyndaquil, a little badger cub with powerful fire attacks... hampered by serious ignition problems.

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** When Ash was allowed to ''keep'' powerful Pokémon, they would often have personality quirks, flaws, or foibles designed to prevent them from operating at maximum (or even remotely decent) efficiency. Most famously, Ash's Charizard was temperamental and often simply refused to lift a finger to help Ash in his battles. Late in the Orange Islands ([=EP105=]), Charizard is moved by Ash's devotion and finally decides to get its butt in gear. However, in the Johto arc, Ash is told that Charizard is too powerful and that he's been abusing its superiority, and the writers have him leave Charizard in the [[HiddenElfVillage Charicific Valley]] for training ([=EP134=])[[note]]The writers had apparently been planning this for a while, writing scenes to downplay Charizard's actual strength, such as when the Chikorita Ash would eventually catch managed to ''slam it into a mountainside''[[/note]]. So, for the 89 episodes Ash had a Charizard (he first achieved the form in [=EP046=]), Charizard the lizard was obedient loyal for less than 30 of them before the writers did away with him. This made room for Cyndaquil, a little badger cub with powerful fire attacks... hampered by serious ignition problems.
29th May '16 8:34:39 PM Tavernier
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** When Ash was allowed to ''keep'' powerful Pokémon, they would often have personality quirks, flaws, or foibles designed to prevent them from operating at maximum (or even remotely decent) efficiency. Most famously, Ash's Charizard was temperamental and often simply refused to lift a finger to help Ash in his battles. Late in the Orange Islands ([=EP105=]), Charizard is moved by Ash's devotion and finally decides to get its butt in gear. However, in the Johto arc, Ash is told that Charizard is too powerful and that he's been abusing its superiority, and the writers have him leave Charizard in the [[HiddenElfVillage Charicific Valley]] for training ([=EP134=])[[note]]The writers had apparently been planning this for a while, writing scenes to downplay Charizard's actual strength, such as when the Chikorita Ash would eventually catch managed to ''slam it into a mountainside''[[/note]]. So, for the 89 episodes Ash had a Charizard (he first achieved the form in EP046), Charizard was obedient for less than 30 of them before the writers did away with him. This made room for Cyndaquil, a little badger cub with powerful fire attacks... hampered by serious ignition problems.

to:

** When Ash was allowed to ''keep'' powerful Pokémon, they would often have personality quirks, flaws, or foibles designed to prevent them from operating at maximum (or even remotely decent) efficiency. Most famously, Ash's Charizard was temperamental and often simply refused to lift a finger to help Ash in his battles. Late in the Orange Islands ([=EP105=]), Charizard is moved by Ash's devotion and finally decides to get its butt in gear. However, in the Johto arc, Ash is told that Charizard is too powerful and that he's been abusing its superiority, and the writers have him leave Charizard in the [[HiddenElfVillage Charicific Valley]] for training ([=EP134=])[[note]]The writers had apparently been planning this for a while, writing scenes to downplay Charizard's actual strength, such as when the Chikorita Ash would eventually catch managed to ''slam it into a mountainside''[[/note]]. So, for the 89 episodes Ash had a Charizard (he first achieved the form in EP046), [=EP046=]), Charizard was obedient for less than 30 of them before the writers did away with him. This made room for Cyndaquil, a little badger cub with powerful fire attacks... hampered by serious ignition problems.
29th May '16 8:33:54 PM Tavernier
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** When Ash was allowed to ''keep'' powerful Pokémon, they would often have personality quirks, flaws, or foibles designed to prevent them from operating at maximum (or even remotely decent) efficiency. Most famously, Ash's Charizard was temperamental and often simply refused to lift a finger to help Ash in his battles. Late in the Orange Islands ([=EP105=]), Charizard is moved by Ash's devotion and finally decides to get its butt in gear. However, in the Johto arc, Ash is told that Charizard is too powerful and that he's been abusing its superiority, and the writers have him leave Charizard in the [[HiddenElfVillage Charicific Valley]] for training ([=EP134=])[[note]]The writers had apparently been planning this for a while, writing scenes to downplay Charizard's actual strength, such as when the Chikorita Ash would eventually catch managed to ''slam it into a mountainside''[[/note]]. Look at those episode numbers again -- Ash gets to enjoy a hard-earned, obedient Charizard for ''less than thirty straight episodes''. This made room for Cyndaquil, a little badger cub with powerful fire attacks hampered by serious ignition problems.

to:

** When Ash was allowed to ''keep'' powerful Pokémon, they would often have personality quirks, flaws, or foibles designed to prevent them from operating at maximum (or even remotely decent) efficiency. Most famously, Ash's Charizard was temperamental and often simply refused to lift a finger to help Ash in his battles. Late in the Orange Islands ([=EP105=]), Charizard is moved by Ash's devotion and finally decides to get its butt in gear. However, in the Johto arc, Ash is told that Charizard is too powerful and that he's been abusing its superiority, and the writers have him leave Charizard in the [[HiddenElfVillage Charicific Valley]] for training ([=EP134=])[[note]]The writers had apparently been planning this for a while, writing scenes to downplay Charizard's actual strength, such as when the Chikorita Ash would eventually catch managed to ''slam it into a mountainside''[[/note]]. Look at those episode numbers again -- So, for the 89 episodes Ash gets to enjoy had a hard-earned, obedient Charizard (he first achieved the form in EP046), Charizard was obedient for ''less less than thirty straight episodes''. 30 of them before the writers did away with him. This made room for Cyndaquil, a little badger cub with powerful fire attacks attacks... hampered by serious ignition problems. problems.
** Ash's Sceptile is another good example -- it evolved from Grovyle to protect a Meganium it had fallen for... only to learn Meganium loved another. Its heartbreak crippled it so completely it couldn't use any special moves.



** This eventually led to the writers utilizing the BagOfSpilling with the start of the new series, ''Advanced Generation'' (and all subsequent new series) - Ash leaves his entire team, sans Pikachu, at Oak's lab just before he enters a new region, though the narrative justifies this (somewhat) by him ''wanting'' to start from scratch and learn new things. At least he brings back his old team members for tournaments...

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** This eventually led to the writers utilizing the BagOfSpilling with the start of the each new series, from ''Advanced Generation'' (and all subsequent new series) - on -- Ash leaves his entire team, sans Pikachu, at Oak's lab just before he enters a new region, though the region. The narrative justifies this (somewhat) by him ''wanting'' to start from scratch and learn new things. things, and can (usually) be counted on to find some new way to DePower Pikachu accordingly. At least he brings back his old team members for tournaments...tournaments....
29th May '16 8:24:37 PM Tavernier
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* DramaPreservingHandicap: A variant -- Ash is only rarely allowed to have and use powerful, evolved Pokémon on his team. He's been allowed to keep evolved Pokémon on his team in the most recent seasons, but the early show (the Takeshi Shudo era) deliberately went out of its way to ''submarine'' Ash's journey ToBeAMaster. Butterfree was released to go participate in his mating season, Primeape was given to a boxer to go be trained[[note]]After winning the tournament it had just participated in... no, that makes no sense to us, either[[/note]] (in the very episode that ''it began to listen to Ash'', no less), Pidgeotto evolved into Pidgeot and was left with a flock of other Pidgey and Pidgeotto in the very first episode of the Orange Islands arc, the list goes on. (Misty had some of this, too -- when she returns to Cerulean City to briefly star in her sisters' underwater ballet, the episode ends with Misty's sisters relieving her of Starmie and Horsea).
** When he was allowed to ''keep'' powerful Pokémon, they would often have personality quirks, flaws, or foibles designed to prevent them from operating at maximum (or even remotely decent) efficiency. Most famously, Ash's Charizard was temperamental and often simply refused to lift a finger to help Ash in his battles. Late in the Orange Islands ([=EP105=]), Charizard is moved by Ash's devotion and finally decides to get its butt in gear. However, in the Johto arc, Ash is told that Charizard is too powerful and that he's been abusing its superiority, and the writers have him leave Charizard in the [[HiddenElfVillage Charicific Valley]] for training ([=EP134=])[[note]]The writers had apparently been planning this for a while, writing scenes to downplay Charizard's actual strength, such as when the Chikorita Ash would eventually catch managed to ''slam it into a mountainside''[[/note]]. Look at those episode numbers again -- Ash gets to enjoy a hard-earned, obedient Charizard for ''less than thirty straight episodes''. This made room for Cyndaquil, a little badger cub with powerful fire attacks hampered by its serious ignition problems. More recently, in XY, Ash's Goomy quickly evolved into a Sliggoo and then into a Goodra, a powerful pseudo-legendary Pokémon, and it had no issues obeying Ash. Soon after it fully evolved, Ash released it so that it could be with its friends at its swamp home.

to:

* DramaPreservingHandicap: A variant -- Ash is only rarely allowed to have and use powerful, evolved Pokémon on his team. He's been allowed to keep evolved Pokémon on his team in One of the most recent seasons, but recurring oddities of the show, especially of the early show (the era under Takeshi Shudo era) deliberately went out of its way Shudo's pen, was the fact that events kept conspiring to ''submarine'' Ash's journey ToBeAMaster. Butterfree ToBeAMaster by preventing him from having Pokémon that were both powerful (read: fully-evolved) and competent -- they could be one or the other, not both.
** Ash's Butterfree, the first Pokemon he'd ever fully evolved,
was released to go participate in his mating season, season. [[PutOnABus He hasn't been seen since outside of rare flashbacks.]]
** Ash's
Primeape was given left Ash's team to receive training from a boxer professional boxing coach to go be trained[[note]]After winning the tournament it become a P-1 Champion... except Primeape had just participated in... no, that makes no sense to us, either[[/note]] (in the already become a P-1 Champion in ''that very episode''[[note]]As a matter of fact, the reason Ash entered the P-1 competition in the first place was to convince the coach to retire from training Pokemon in the first place[[/note]]. Insultingly, this was also the episode that ''it in which the normally belligerent and disobedient Primeape finally bonded with Ash and began to listen to Ash'', no less), commands. He also hasn't been seen much outside of cameos in future Japanese openings.
** Ash's
Pidgeotto evolved into Pidgeot and was left with a flock of other Pidgey and Pidgeotto in the very first episode of the Orange Islands arc, arc. (Couldn't have Ash ''flying'' around the list goes on. (Misty islands, now could we?) Despite his promise to return after he was done in the islands, Ash's writers haven't bothered with the bird in years.
** Misty
had some of this, too -- when she returns to Cerulean City to briefly star in her sisters' underwater ballet, the episode ends with Misty's sisters relieving her of Starmie and Horsea).
Horsea.
** When he Ash was allowed to ''keep'' powerful Pokémon, they would often have personality quirks, flaws, or foibles designed to prevent them from operating at maximum (or even remotely decent) efficiency. Most famously, Ash's Charizard was temperamental and often simply refused to lift a finger to help Ash in his battles. Late in the Orange Islands ([=EP105=]), Charizard is moved by Ash's devotion and finally decides to get its butt in gear. However, in the Johto arc, Ash is told that Charizard is too powerful and that he's been abusing its superiority, and the writers have him leave Charizard in the [[HiddenElfVillage Charicific Valley]] for training ([=EP134=])[[note]]The writers had apparently been planning this for a while, writing scenes to downplay Charizard's actual strength, such as when the Chikorita Ash would eventually catch managed to ''slam it into a mountainside''[[/note]]. Look at those episode numbers again -- Ash gets to enjoy a hard-earned, obedient Charizard for ''less than thirty straight episodes''. This made room for Cyndaquil, a little badger cub with powerful fire attacks hampered by its serious ignition problems. problems.
**
More recently, in XY, Ash's Goomy quickly evolved into a Sliggoo and then into a Goodra, a powerful pseudo-legendary Pokémon, and it had no issues obeying Ash. Soon after it fully evolved, Ash released it so that it could be with its friends at its swamp home.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Anime.PokeMon