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A lot of the summary is actually taken out of context, to the point that I was surprised to see this example listed under this trope. For starters, the author himself is bisexual, and the events that transpired that resulted in Sam\'s getting outed was due to the very brutal investigation on the portrayal of violence in comic books meant for young audiences, his sexuality being outed as a casualty of said investigation (which happened during a court proceeding that was publicly broadcasted to the nation at the time), no doubt done so to fan the flames of parental concern (as another aside, Sam was investigated largely because he was one of the major writers of comic books, having co-created the in-story popular superhero the Escapist, and contributing to a multitude of other works in the industry afterward). The entire investigation would eventually see the Comics Code Authority (or just the Comics Code) being founded, which would later plague comic books for over half a century as no comic book would see publication if the content was deemed \
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A lot of the summary is actually taken out of context, to the point that I was surprised to see this example listed under this trope. For starters, the author himself is bisexual, and the events that transpired that resulted in Sam\\\'s getting outed was due to the very brutal investigation on the portrayal of violence in comic books meant for young audiences, his sexuality being outed as a casualty of said investigation (which happened during a court proceeding that was publicly broadcasted to the nation at the time), no doubt done so to fan the flames of parental concern (as another aside, Sam was investigated largely because he was one of the major writers of comic books, having co-created the in-story popular superhero the Escapist, and contributing to a multitude of other works in the industry afterward). The entire investigation would eventually see the Comics Code Authority (or just the Comics Code) being founded, which would later plague comic books for over half a century as no comic book would see publication if the content was deemed \\\"inappropriate\\\" by the CCA (thankfully defunct as of 2011 when the last major publishers ditched the CCA entirely). This tidbit is important as the novel is largely a big love note to the GoldenAgeOfComicbooks, more than anything else.

While Sam\\\'s relationship with Tracy contributes a lot to Sam\\\'s later development, it isn\\\'t uncommon to see a similar situation relationship-wise between a heterosexual pairing, where the surviving lover mourns WhatCouldHaveBeen, regretting their choices, and the usual stuff. I\\\'d have to re-read it again to see if Chabon may have unintentionally written it to come off as a Bury Your Gays moment. Though it should also be noted that Sam\\\'s relationship with Rosa was less for his sake and more of hers, as Joe\\\'s abandonment would have had her harshly persecuted for being a young, single mother in the 1940s. The two are amicable friends and their marriage was done largely out of responsibility and not as a lesson indicating that Sam would be happier with Rosa (and as his guilt would indicate, he is not), and Sam happily steps out so that Joe could assume his role as a father.

Again, I\\\'d have to reread to be sure, but there\\\'s a lot of background context that makes this less of a Bury Your Gays example than it seems.
Changed line(s) 1 from:
A lot of the summary is actually taken out of context, to the point that I was surprised to see this example listed under this trope. For starters, the author himself is bisexual, and the events that transpired that resulted in Sam\'s getting outed was due to the very brutal investigation on the portrayal of violence in comic books meant for young audiences, his sexuality being outed as a casualty of said investigation (which happened during a court proceeding that was publicly broadcasted to the nation at the time), no doubt done so to fan the flames of parental concern (as another aside, Sam was investigated largely because he was one of the major writers of comic books, having co-created the in-story popular superhero the Escapist, and contributing to a multitude of other works in the industry afterward). The entire investigation would eventually see the Comics Code Authority (or just the Comics Code) being founded, which would later plague comic books for over half a century as no comic book would see publication if the content was deemed \
to:
A lot of the summary is actually taken out of context, to the point that I was surprised to see this example listed under this trope. For starters, the author himself is bisexual, and the events that transpired that resulted in Sam\\\'s getting outed was due to the very brutal investigation on the portrayal of violence in comic books meant for young audiences, his sexuality being outed as a casualty of said investigation (which happened during a court proceeding that was publicly broadcasted to the nation at the time), no doubt done so to fan the flames of parental concern (as another aside, Sam was investigated largely because he was one of the major writers of comic books, having co-created the in-story popular superhero the Escapist, and contributing to a multitude of other works in the industry afterward). The entire investigation would eventually see the Comics Code Authority (or just the Comics Code) being founded, which would later plague comic books for over half a century as no comic book would see publication if the content was deemed \\\"inappropriate\\\" by the CCA (thankfully defunct as of 2011 when the last major publishers ditched the CCA entirely). This tidbit is important as the novel is largely a big love not to the GoldenAgeofComicbooks, more than anything else.

While Sam\\\'s relationship with Tracy contributes a lot to Sam\\\'s later development, it isn\\\'t uncommon to see a similar situation relationship-wise between a heterosexual pairing, where the surviving lover mourns WhatCouldHaveBeen, regretting their choices, and the usual stuff. I\\\'d have to re-read it again to see if Chabon may have unintentionally written it to come off as a Bury Your Gays moment. Though it should also be noted that Sam\\\'s relationship with Rosa was less for his sake and more of hers, as Joe\\\'s abandonment would have had her harshly persecuted for being a young, single mother in the 1940s. The two are amicable friends and their marriage was done largely out of responsibility and not as a lesson indicating that Sam would be happier with Rosa (and as his guilt would indicate, he is not), and Sam happily steps out so that Joe could assume his role as a father.

Again, I\\\'d have to reread to be sure, but there\\\'s a lot of background context that makes this less of a Bury Your Gays example than it seems.
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