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[003] David7204 Current Version
Changed line(s) 1 from:
...That really sounds sketchy to me. You\'re making it sound like the fuel melts but nothing else is damaged. If there\'s enough heat the melt the fuel, surely there\'s enough to damage the physical structure of the fuel rods and whatever other assemblies are inside the core. A quick Google search reveals uranium dioxide doesn\'t melt until almost 3,000 degrees C. I\'m skeptical of you saying there\'s \
to:
...That really sounds sketchy to me. You\\\'re making it sound like the fuel melts but nothing else is damaged. If there\\\'s enough heat the melt the fuel, surely there\\\'s enough to damage the physical structure of the fuel rods and whatever other assemblies are inside the core. A quick Google search reveals uranium dioxide doesn\\\'t melt until almost 3,000 degrees C. I\\\'m skeptical of you saying there\\\'s \\\"nothing to melt\\\" when there\\\'s solid matter and lots of heat in both fission and fusion reactors. Even if the fuel itself doesn\\\'t melt, damage to other elements of the core by excess heat sure seems to quality as a meltdown by Wikipedia\\\'s definition.

Also, as I said, this wouldn\\\'t be due to a random accident. It would be due to someone having full and deliberate control of the reactor, including the fuel injection systems.


Changed line(s) 1 from:
...That really sounds sketchy to me. You\'re making it sound like the fuel melts but nothing else is damaged. If there\'s enough to heat the melt the fuel, surely there\'s enough to damage the physical structure of the fuel rods and whatever other assemblies are inside the core. A quick Google search reveals uranium dioxide doesn\'t melt until almost 3,000 degrees C. I\'m skeptical of you saying there\'s \
to:
...That really sounds sketchy to me. You\\\'re making it sound like the fuel melts but nothing else is damaged. If there\\\'s enough heat the melt the fuel, surely there\\\'s enough to damage the physical structure of the fuel rods and whatever other assemblies are inside the core. A quick Google search reveals uranium dioxide doesn\\\'t melt until almost 3,000 degrees C. I\\\'m skeptical of you saying there\\\'s \\\"nothing to melt\\\" when there\\\'s solid matter and lots of heat in both fission and fusion reactors.

Also, as I said, this wouldn\\\'t be due to a random accident. It would be due to someone having full and deliberate control of the reactor, including the fuel injection systems.


Changed line(s) 1 from:
...That really sounds sketchy to me. You\'re making it sound like the fuel melts but nothing else is damaged. If there\'s enough to heat the melt the fuel, surely there\'s enough to damage the physical structure of the fuel rods and whatever other assemblies are inside the core. I\'m skeptical of you saying there\'s \
to:
...That really sounds sketchy to me. You\\\'re making it sound like the fuel melts but nothing else is damaged. If there\\\'s enough to heat the melt the fuel, surely there\\\'s enough to damage the physical structure of the fuel rods and whatever other assemblies are inside the core. A quick Google search reveals uranium dioxide doesn\\\'t melt until almost 3,000 degrees C. I\\\'m skeptical of you saying there\\\'s \\\"nothing to melt\\\" when there\\\'s solid matter and lots of heat in both fission and fusion reactors.

Also, as I said, this wouldn\\\'t be due to a random accident. It would be due to someone having full and deliberate control of the reactor, including the fuel injection systems.


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