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[003] gjjones Current Version
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Hello. Since we still don't know what will happen for season 4, I'm going to throw out a few guesses here to avoid a potential heated debate as per ProgrammeNote before it can be posted on the main page:

As most of the events in Volumes 5-7 were in the third season of the anime, I think that's some of the important stuff that was left out of the adaptation would be moved to the fourth season. Or maybe it could be expanded to 24 episodes to make up for what happened at least. But we could be wrong. Thoughts?
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''Comparing Stalin to Hitler was not intended to be a parlour game on my part,''
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\'\'Comparing Stalin to Hitler was not intended to be a parlour game on my part,\'\'
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Without real comparisons and understanding the political context of Eastern Europe in that time and place, and the political implications of making utterances on the same theme[[note]]In Lithuania, Rachel Margolis, a 90 year old woman who survived the Holocaust there and bear in mind that the Baltics, proportionately was the most deadly area of the Holocaust with 99% murdered, and there the killing began before the Nazis arrived, and even after that, the majority of Jewish people were murdered by local collaborators and served as a partisan and fought alongside the Red Army is branded a
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Without real comparisons and understanding the political context of Eastern Europe in that time and place, and the political implications of making utterances on the same theme[[note]]In Lithuania, Rachel Margolis, a 90 year old woman who survived the Holocaust there and bear in mind that the Baltics, proportionately was the most deadly area of the Holocaust with 99% murdered, and there the killing began before the Nazis arrived, and even after that, the majority of Jewish people were murdered by local collaborators and served as a partisan and fought alongside the Red Army is branded a \"war criminal\" by Lithuanian nationalists and she cannot return to Lithuania, all as a direct result of saying, on the part of some frankly irresponsible, indifferent and short-sighted organizations, that Hitler and Stalin are one and the same. She\'s not the only one to suffer so, and the people in the Baltics who never truly dealt with their responsibility in the Holocaust are now content to be even less accomodating. So I find it curious you describe it as \"political and legal manoeuvering\". This isn\'t an academic or sober debate about totalitaranism, it\'s simply an excuse that allows individuals across Eastern Europe to whitewash their past, and this has been increasingly clear, for instance in Ukraine where they are naming streets after the infamously brutal Stepan Bandera.[[/note]], it\'s basically a parlour game. This UsefulNotes is meant for a general readership about a highly controversial and dangerous individual, so you should tell them why said person is controversial and disturbing, and divisive.

\'\'Also, I would like to point out that you used a potentially bad choice of words\'\'

My apologies. I meant \"acceptable numbers\" to the Soviets. I don\'t mean acceptable in any human rights sense of the term. The Orthodox Church was revived in a major way during the end of Stalin\'s era with 22,000 New churches which Khruschev and others brought down to 6800 around the time of the end of the Cold War. So that\'s why Stalin cannot be considered anti-theistical in connexion with the context. Not to mention that there are Churches in Russia which venerate Stalin as an Orthodox saint, and that a number of scholars argue that the Soviet Union inverted Orthodox rituals consciously and unconsciously, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NBpm3CnGT30 as this gentlemen describes with Lenin\'s tomb]].

Stalin was a highly mercurial person...at one time he\'ll be philanthropic and another time he\'ll persecute, often the same groups. Like in the 30s he continued Lenin\'s anti-racist policy, and at the end of 40s offered support for Israel and played a key role in the UN in securing it recognition. Then after that, a sharp about-face to anti-semitism. And of course in the 30s, he and Comintern consistently mounted an international anti-fascist front and kept making overtures to the liberal nations that got rebuffed. And then that ended with the Pact in 1939.

As for Christopher Hitchens, well he maybe anti-theistical but he sure did get comfy with the Christian Right and their support of the Iraq War (which the Catholic Church, his old enemy, opposed).
Changed line(s) 1 from:
''Comparing Stalin to Hitler was not intended to be a parlour game on my part,''
to:
\'\'Comparing Stalin to Hitler was not intended to be a parlour game on my part,\'\'
Changed line(s) 3 from:
Without real comparisons and understanding the political context of Eastern Europe in that time and place, and the political implications of making utterances on the same theme[[note]]In Lithuania, Rachel Margolis, a 90 year old woman who survived the Holocaust there and bear in mind that the Baltics, proportionately was the most deadly area of the Holocaust with 99% murdered, and there the killing began before the Nazis arrived, and even after that, the majority of Jewish people were murdered by local collaborators and served as a partisan and fought alongside the Red Army is branded a
to:
Without real comparisons and understanding the political context of Eastern Europe in that time and place, and the political implications of making utterances on the same theme[[note]]In Lithuania, Rachel Margolis, a 90 year old woman who survived the Holocaust there and bear in mind that the Baltics, proportionately was the most deadly area of the Holocaust with 99% murdered, and there the killing began before the Nazis arrived, and even after that, the majority of Jewish people were murdered by local collaborators and served as a partisan and fought alongside the Red Army is branded a \"war criminal\" by Lithuanian nationalists and she cannot return to Lithuania, all as a direct result of saying, on the part of some frankly irresponsible, indifferent and short-sighted organizations, that Hitler and Stalin are one and the same. She\'s not the only one to suffer so, and the people in the Baltics who never truly dealt with their responsibility in the Holocaust are now content to be even less accomodating. So I find it curious you describe it as \"political and legal manoeuvering\". This isn\'t an academic or sober debate about totalitaranism, it\'s simply an excuse that allows individuals across Eastern Europe to whitewash their past, and this has been increasingly clear, for instance in Ukraine where they are naming streets after the infamously brutal Stepan Bandera.[[/note]], it\'s basically a parlour game. This UsefulNotes is meant for a general readership about a highly controversial and dangerous individual, so you should tell them why said person is controversial and disturbing, and divisive.

\'\'Also, I would like to point out that you used a potentially bad choice of words\'\'

My apologies. I meant \"acceptable numbers\" to the Soviets. I don\'t mean acceptable in any human rights sense of the term. The Orthodox Church was revived in a major way during the end of Stalin\'s era with 22,000 New churches which Khruschev and others brought down to 6800 around the time of the end of the Cold War. So that\'s why Stalin cannot be considered anti-theistical in connexion with the context. Not to mention that there are Churches in Russia which venerate Stalin as an Orthodox saint, and that a number of scholars argue that the Soviet Union inverted Orthodox rituals consciously and unconsciously, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NBpm3CnGT30 as this gentlemen describes with Lenin\'s tomb]].

Stalin was a highly mercurial person...at one time he\'ll be philanthropic and another time he\'ll persecute, often the same groups. Like in the 30s he continued Lenin\'s anti-racist policy, and at the end of 40s offered support for Israel and played a key role in the UN in securing it recognition. Then after that, a sharp about-face to anti-semitism. And of course in the 30s, he and Comintern consistently mounted an international anti-fascist front and kept making overtures to the liberal nations that got rebuffed. And then that ended with the Pact in 1939.

As for Christopher Hitchens, well he maybe anti-theistical but he sure did get comfy with the Christian Right and their support of the Iraq War (which the Catholic Church, his old enemy, opposed).

\'\'Stalin and Hilter had several things in common and despite whatever positive accomplishments they may have made both were tyrants with the blood of millions on their hands and neither should be defended or have excuses made for them.\'\'

That would be a hard proposition because a lot of contemporary society is a result of Stalin\'s policies...like Poland has Wroclaw. Before the war it was Breslau and it and other territories were German. All as a result of Stalin-approved border measures and population transfers (which made these regions far more homogenous and more nationalist too), which despite the ColdWar ending, are more or less intact in many of the ci-devant WarsawPact nations.
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