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slimcoder I'm No One Special. Just a Passing Pro Wrestler.
I'm No One Special. Just a Passing Pro Wrestler.
Dec 3rd 2018 at 4:11:08 AM

That is indeed a block especially since I have issues socializing with people (I be a rather sheltered person).

Huh, not sure who to talk too.

Though my issue is I donít know how to come up with very flowery & detailed names befitting noble aristocratic or deity-like characters.

Edited by slimcoder on Dec 3rd 2018 at 4:36:43 AM

Redmess Redmess from Netherlands
Redmess
Dec 3rd 2018 at 5:21:06 AM

Try a library that has a section on cultural or literary studies. A university library would usually be a good start, I think. And don't be afraid to hit some actual academic research if you want to go really in depth.

What do you mean exactly when you say Western is an American genre? Do you mean that the genre is always set in America? Or that it is produced there? Because neither of those is strictly true. In the latter case, arguably Western could also be called an Italian genre.

I think that RDR is popular because there is always an underlying interest in the genre, even if that is not always clear from what is currently being produced in film. And genres do go through declines and revivals, as do individual works and authors. The popularity of RDR could be an indication that the genre is set for a revival.

Edited by Redmess on Dec 3rd 2018 at 2:25:57 PM

M84 Freedom is the right of all sentient beings Relationship Status: Chocolate!
Freedom is the right of all sentient beings
Dec 3rd 2018 at 5:25:21 AM

I'm well aware of the Spaghetti Western.

Disgusted, but not surprised
blkwhtrbbt The Dragon of the Eastern Sea from Doesn't take orders from Vladimir Putin Relationship Status: I'm just a poor boy, nobody loves me
The Dragon of the Eastern Sea
Dec 3rd 2018 at 8:12:50 AM

Spaghetti Westerns will always have one critical weakness though; they are written by Europeans and filmed in Europe. There's an authenticity that's difficult to match if a film is shot in and written by the people of the country it represents. It's part of the success of Mulan; the art direction and artwork was done entirely by Chinese people and China experts. Take a look at the names in the credits.

Oh hey, person who wants to write Chinese-inspired fiction;

Start off by adapting a known Chinese history or legend. Try adapting Romance of the Three Kingdoms, or the Communist revolution. That'll give you a feel for the names, and for the culture.

I am an American of completely Chinese descent, and even I have trouble inventing names. Taking names from legend and history seems to be the go-to in Asian fantasy fiction. How many characters from Japanese media have names like "Masamune" or "Hattori", like "Ishida" or "Matsura"? Just don't go for the big obvious ones. Nobody names their OC "Tokugawa" or "Nobunaga", for instance.

Say to the others who did not follow through You're still our brothers, and we will fight for you
Dec 3rd 2018 at 2:27:14 PM

I find making names primarily becomes difficult when you go further back in time, because then you have to parse whether a name makes sense for an archaic setting, whether it's something the average person might have vs something much more significant, or whether those names you got from that novel that inspired you really fit the characters you are trying to make.

For some cultures the internet isn't even all that sufficient, and you have to hunt down physical books for naming conventions instead.

"The difference between reality and fiction is that fiction has to make sense." - Tom Clancy, paraphrasing Mark Twain.
Redmess Redmess from Netherlands
Redmess
Dec 3rd 2018 at 2:34:38 PM

A handy shortcut would be to read some books written in that time and culture for inspiration, and to get a feel for the names.

InkDagger Relationship Status: Dancing with Captain Jack Harkness
Dec 3rd 2018 at 2:48:29 PM

I'd like to point out that using elements from any culture IS ALWAYS Cultural Appropriation. Its a neutral term. Its not good. Its not bad. It just describes a thing.

I could write a story with the most detailed and respectful take on Chinese Mythology and Folklore, but it would still be considered cultural appropriation.

It's usually only a negative if its done badly.

As far as 'America is too young and has little history of its own', America, especially early America, had a lot of culture clash between the immigrants as they brought history, traditions, and values to a new place. Not to mention the vlaues and history that were here before us.

Surely that could be relevant to such a narrative set in the west? Rather American Gods-esque?

Edited by InkDagger on Dec 3rd 2018 at 2:50:41 AM

Redmess Redmess from Netherlands
Redmess
Dec 3rd 2018 at 3:55:34 PM

And don't forget that all those Europeans, Africans and Asians migrating to America brought their own folklore and superstitions with them. If you believe in ghosts and werewolves and fantastical creatures on one continent, you don't suddenly stop believing it on another. And myths can grow fast, certainly in a few centuries.

InkDagger Relationship Status: Dancing with Captain Jack Harkness
Dec 3rd 2018 at 4:23:22 PM

Which is basically how stories like American Gods or Iron Druid Chronicles work. American Gods specifically shows people migrating to America and bringing their gods with them.

M84 Freedom is the right of all sentient beings Relationship Status: Chocolate!
Freedom is the right of all sentient beings
Dec 3rd 2018 at 4:23:31 PM

Then make that culture clash a plot point. Do not just throw in magic or wizards or dragons and cowboys together for the hell of it.

Disgusted, but not surprised
Redmess Redmess from Netherlands
Redmess
Dec 3rd 2018 at 4:41:59 PM

Or else have such creatures explicitly migrate as well. Incorporating such a migrating fantasy element into a story about one of the failed colonies would be a great story idea, for instance.

InkDagger Relationship Status: Dancing with Captain Jack Harkness
Dec 3rd 2018 at 4:57:54 PM

You don't HAVE to though. Just because there is an external justification for the idea doesn't mean that it HAS to be made explicit within the material itself. There are merits to having a fantastic world to tell a story in and just having a fun adventure in it and not making some grand sweeping statement about the world or the cultures in it.

Iron Druid Chronicles, for all its wealth of well researched info on mythology and other cultures and adventures than span the world, it doesn't really SAY much about it. They exist and interact in cool dynamics, but its not part of any moral or message really. Its just... neat. And that's ok too.

Particuarly since I don't think Westerns TEND to make big sweeping statements about human nature. A lot of them ARE small scale character driven stories that don't reach beyond their own contexts. And that's ok. Some of the best movies and stories that people love and remember DON'T do that. Mad Max, Pirates of the Caribbean, Indiana Jones, etc. They're fun adventures and action flicks. They have some values and messages here and there, but they're not ABOUT those things as a whole in some grand scale.

Hell, Pirates in of itseld has a bunch of fantastic elements like Krakens, zombies, voodoo witches, and cursed chests and no one really bats an eye at them. Does the world really change with the acknowledgement of these curses, witches, gods, and unspeakable beasts? Not really. Hell, I don't think anyone really questions Blackbeard's magic sword in the 4th movie.

Does RDR 2 have any big message or theme about humanity and people as a whole? About the West? Not really. RDR did a lot more philosophising on the nature of the world and dealt with the dying outlaw Wild West culture more. RDR 2 is a ensemble character piece. And that's ok.

Rationalinsanity from Halifax, Canada Relationship Status: It's complicated
Dec 3rd 2018 at 5:21:25 PM

Just cleared Chapter 2 before calling it a night. Going to focus on treasure hunts tomorrow, and grab some of the pricier camp upgrades.

Politics is the skilled use of blunt objects.
M84 Freedom is the right of all sentient beings Relationship Status: Chocolate!
Freedom is the right of all sentient beings
Dec 3rd 2018 at 5:33:17 PM

[up][up]RDR 2 doesn't say more about it because RDR already did. RDR 2 being a prequel is less End of an Age and more "beginning of the end". We get to see the gang near their peak then watch it all go to hell. What happens to them reflects what starts to happen to the whole idea of a "Wild West".

Disgusted, but not surprised
Dirtyblue929 Armchair Developer from Secret Bunker Relationship Status: Don't hug me; I'm scared
Armchair Developer
Dec 5th 2018 at 8:43:33 PM

Heard a long while back that Nas of all people was on the soundtrack, and I finally found where.

I'm left to wonder how many people have actually heard it considering it only plays in the "Get the Money" path of Arthur's final mission, which the vast majority of players I've seen never bothered with, even on low-honor runs. It isn't even required for 100% Completion! Here's hoping for a full version with more than three lines of lyrics once the OST drops.

I... rise... to the top.
I... can... not be stopped.
I stand... unshaken.

Edited by Dirtyblue929 on Dec 5th 2018 at 8:59:23 AM

"Oh, no; I'm not brave enough for politics."
Weirdguy149 The most dangerous salesman from Sega Headquarters Relationship Status: I'd jump in front of a train for ya!
The most dangerous salesman
Dec 6th 2018 at 7:09:12 PM

RDR 2 seems to be kicking butt at the Game Awards this year.

SEGA SATURN!
Mizerous Fallen Maiden from Mistral Relationship Status: Brewing the love potion
Fallen Maiden
Dec 6th 2018 at 7:13:07 PM

It is the only game that matters at the awards shame for Nintendo's only nominated games...

Dim Blaze
Rationalinsanity from Halifax, Canada Relationship Status: It's complicated
Dec 6th 2018 at 10:35:10 PM

Did a pair of treasure hunts, and now the economy is broken.[lol]

Politics is the skilled use of blunt objects.
Dec 6th 2018 at 11:31:30 PM

I know, right?

"The difference between reality and fiction is that fiction has to make sense." - Tom Clancy, paraphrasing Mark Twain.
blkwhtrbbt The Dragon of the Eastern Sea from Doesn't take orders from Vladimir Putin Relationship Status: I'm just a poor boy, nobody loves me
The Dragon of the Eastern Sea
Dec 7th 2018 at 12:53:37 AM

Buy the Arabian in Saint Denis to balance it out again.

Say to the others who did not follow through You're still our brothers, and we will fight for you
Dirtyblue929 Armchair Developer from Secret Bunker Relationship Status: Don't hug me; I'm scared
Armchair Developer
Dec 7th 2018 at 1:05:29 PM

So Rockstar was surprisingly good on their word about fixing RDO's ridiculously stingy economy, as shown in this analysis video. From the looks of it, prices on weapons have dropped by 30-40% depending on the item. Hard-to-catch animals and fish have increased in value, while easy-to-catch ones have decreased slightly. Most importantly, cash rewards from missions have been increased from 80-120%, while gold rewards appear to have undergone a flat quadruple.

Edited by Dirtyblue929 on Dec 7th 2018 at 1:08:02 AM

"Oh, no; I'm not brave enough for politics."
InkDagger Relationship Status: Dancing with Captain Jack Harkness
Dec 7th 2018 at 6:28:43 PM

People have suggested that they were ALWAYS going to lower the numbers and knew people would complain, but they also realized they'd get showered in compliments of 'listening to the community' and etc after doing so.

Kind of like when a work does something REALLY risque for the sake of knowing it'll be rejected and going the step down to what they wanted anyway, but it looks better in comparison to what they had before. I know there's a trope for that but I can't remember what it was.

I'm thinking of Censor Decoy.

Edited by InkDagger on Dec 7th 2018 at 6:29:47 AM

Rationalinsanity from Halifax, Canada Relationship Status: It's complicated
Dec 7th 2018 at 9:17:24 PM

Did a bank robbery, and with the camp fully upgraded I may never need money again.[lol]

Man, do I suck at horse breaking. Trying to get the Arabian wild horse in the mountains and well...hail to save scumming.

Politics is the skilled use of blunt objects.
Mr_Madman Almighty Janitor from Eagleland, World of Badass Relationship Status: Brony
Almighty Janitor
Dec 8th 2018 at 4:50:50 PM

Something I noticed is this game does in fact have a Chunky Salsa Rule. Certain weapons or conditions will in fact kill you regardless of protections. Melee weapons, having your head blown to bits, taking a tomahawk, and being shot in the head also qualifies.

I am not here for glory. In fact, I seek enlightenment.
Dec 9th 2018 at 12:33:32 PM

More irritation, this time with the way the game shuffles around your weapon loadout whenever it wants to.

Just did the serial killer quest, finished it up, dropped the guy off. He attacks the Sheriff, of course, and it's on me to save him. Easy, right?

Except the gun the game put in my hands happened to be the only one of my entire repertoire that had no bullets (my Varmint Rifle). which wasn't the last gun I used ( Midnight's pistol) or even in my loadout beforehand (it replaced my Semi-Auto shotgun). By the time I realized, the window closed, I missed out on honor and cash, and the Sheriff is so mad at me he won't let me anywhere near him.

And, I mean, I didn't need those things, but still. What the hell?

I'm also starting to get annoyed at the game being finicky bout what it chooses to count for challenges. I've basically given up on the "drag a person behind your horse" challenge, because the game never counts it whenever I try (or stops counting it halfway through), and here's no way to tell if the game is game is counting it except to realize that you're not getting credit after the fact. I had the same problem doing the "shoot rabbits on horseback" challenge: the game would just ignore it half the time.

Edited by KnownUnknown on Dec 9th 2018 at 12:34:57 PM

"The difference between reality and fiction is that fiction has to make sense." - Tom Clancy, paraphrasing Mark Twain.

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