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Jan 4th 2019 at 10:58:40 AM

Battlefield Hospital ships.

I was wondering as a concept should they ONLY arrive after their side has won? Or should it be somewhat after the fighting has died down?

And how would you protect them if they were needed in combat heavy situations?

Assume soft sci-fi verse.

TuefelHundenIV Watchman of the Apocalypse from Wandering Relationship Status: [TOP SECRET]
Watchman of the Apocalypse
Jan 4th 2019 at 12:38:56 PM

Take a look at real-world examples for a start. Like the USNS Comfort The ship supports US amphibious ops or operations afloat. It is part of US Sealift Command. They don't ride the front line but sit back in a protected or safe area to receive casualties and medical cases.

Basically, you avoid putting the hospital ship in harm's way if you can help it.

"Who watches the watchmen?"
TacticalFox88 from USA Relationship Status: Dating the Doctor
Jan 4th 2019 at 1:12:11 PM

Um...does it at least have anti submarine capability? Though Iím sure itís probably a war crime to sink a hospital ship, Iím sure someoneís at least thought about it

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MajorTom Eye'm the cutest! Relationship Status: Barbecuing
Eye'm the cutest!
Jan 4th 2019 at 5:13:34 PM

^ Hospital ships came under attack (on both sides) on several occasions in both world wars,

"Allah may guide their bullets, but Jesus helps those who aim down the sights."
TuefelHundenIV Watchman of the Apocalypse from Wandering Relationship Status: [TOP SECRET]
Watchman of the Apocalypse
Jan 4th 2019 at 10:42:34 PM

Indeed they have. For WWII aircraft and Submarines seemed to be the chief culprits as well as a few lost to sea mines.

Edited by TuefelHundenIV on Jan 4th 2019 at 12:42:56 PM

"Who watches the watchmen?"
MajorTom Eye'm the cutest! Relationship Status: Barbecuing
Eye'm the cutest!
Jan 5th 2019 at 7:11:41 AM

A British battleship blasted one in the First World War.

"Allah may guide their bullets, but Jesus helps those who aim down the sights."
Jan 6th 2019 at 10:43:09 AM

Okay. That makes sense. Could space hospitals have EMS like dropships? Iím thinking of it like either C Ombat search and rescue or just as a way to bring patients back to the mothership

TuefelHundenIV Watchman of the Apocalypse from Wandering Relationship Status: [TOP SECRET]
Watchman of the Apocalypse
Jan 6th 2019 at 12:51:16 PM

I don't see why not. IIRC the modern ships can have helipads or take boats alongside. We also use our hospital ships as aide ships for disasters.

"Who watches the watchmen?"
TacticalFox88 from USA Relationship Status: Dating the Doctor
Jan 6th 2019 at 1:31:43 PM

Iíd probably say hospital dropships might be a tad different than ones on combat starships.

Though thatís got me think. Wouldnít certain wounds prevent a medic dropship from returning to orbit?

Edited by TacticalFox88 on Jan 6th 2019 at 4:32:42 AM

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Jan 6th 2019 at 1:50:45 PM

I would like to note that even though the hospital ships themselfs stayed back, coast gaurd cutters were deployed INTO combat zones with the sole intent of picking up people who needed medical attention or lost there ships.

Like, high intensity combat zones too, they were zipping around during D-Day picking up people who had there landing craft destroyed, or there ship hit, or that fell overboard...

Its kind of sad they aren't more well known, because even though they weren't fighting back, they were fired upon by the shore batteries, and multiple of them took massive hits, sometimes even put out of comission, but they still did this.

....

So yea, while the hospital ships stay out of combat, they had what were basically aquatic battle ambulances that do not wait and bring the people back to them.

Belisaurius Artisan of Auspicious Artifacts from Big Blue Nowhere Relationship Status: Having tea with Cthulhu
Artisan of Auspicious Artifacts
Jan 6th 2019 at 2:46:02 PM

[up][up]You'd usually stock these ambulance dropships with enough medical equipment to stabilize the wounded so they can be moved to the hospital ship. If you can't stabilize them then you take them to the hospital ship anyway. After all, staying in the field would probably kill them too.

[up]Helicopters did similar runs in vietnam too.

Edited by Belisaurius on Jan 6th 2019 at 7:14:39 AM

AFP The Great and Wonderful from The Pale Blue Dot Relationship Status: In Lesbians with you
The Great and Wonderful
Jan 6th 2019 at 3:01:34 PM

The Coast Guard has a long and storied history of being found where the fire was hot. There is even a Cutter that was involved in the fighting during the Pearl Harbor raid (although any claims that USCGC Taney was at Pearl Harbor is slightly in error; Taney was berthed at Honolulu Harbor nearby and, while she was not directly subjected to Japanese attack, did employ her Anti-Air batteries against any Japanese planes that flew too close)

Coasties also performed anti-submarine patrols in WWI and WWII. The largest American loss of life in a naval engagement in WWI was the USCGC Tampa, struck by a German torpedo in the Bristol Channel while trying to make port at Milford Haven, Wales. The cutter was lost with all hands, with 111 Coast Guardsmen, 4 US Navy Sailors, and 16 passengers including 11 Royal Navy personnel going down with the ship.

EDIT: One thing the hospital ship might be used for is deploying hospitals. Dropships could carry personnel, equipment, shelters, etc. that would be used to establish a dirtside hospital without the ship necessarily needing to hang around to do its thing. The hospital ship could move to other areas of concern, or pull back and only show up when mass casualty evacuations are needed.

Edited by AFP on Jan 6th 2019 at 4:03:18 AM

Quod Scripsi Scripsi (until I use the edit function...)
Jan 6th 2019 at 8:20:29 PM

So it could stand to reason these ships wouldnít be under the Navy at all, but part of the coast guard.

Jan 6th 2019 at 8:37:26 PM

The Navy operates hospital ships and medevac units as well.

Most large ships will have their own trauma center onboard to theoretically take care of things during a fight. Dedicated hospital ships are usually more focused on longer-term care, or mass casualty care.

Edited by archonspeaks on Jan 6th 2019 at 8:38:28 AM

MajorTom Eye'm the cutest! Relationship Status: Barbecuing
Eye'm the cutest!
Jan 6th 2019 at 8:42:35 PM

, coast gaurd cutters were deployed INTO combat zones with the sole intent of picking up people who needed medical attention or lost there ships.

Like, high intensity combat zones too,

US Coast Guard vessels were on numerous occasions on the "front lines" of the war at sea in WW 2. Sometimes doing search and rescue/recovery, sometimes being an extra ship doing the shooting.

It was a lot more "militaristic" back then, less like the law enforcement and rescue group it is today.

Of course, the same mission also applied to Navy ships in the same war (on both sides). A common sight during naval engagements were ships moving in to pick up survivors and wounded from stricken/sunk/sinking friendly ships even as the battle was ongoing provided they themselves weren't under fire. (Again, on both sides.)

Edited by MajorTom on Jan 6th 2019 at 8:43:14 AM

"Allah may guide their bullets, but Jesus helps those who aim down the sights."
TacticalFox88 from USA Relationship Status: Dating the Doctor
Jan 8th 2019 at 5:22:49 PM

So we all know the whole asteroid field in sci fi is pretty much false considering the distances between asteroid...what about an ice field? Say something cause a planetoids like Pluto to come apart? Could you get the same effect?

Trying to create a tactical situation where infrantry marines can sneak inside a station in the middle Of an ice field. Though Iím sure thermal detection might be their greatest challenge

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Fighteer Geronimo! from the Time Vortex Relationship Status: Dancing with Captain Jack Harkness
Geronimo!
Jan 9th 2019 at 3:46:36 AM

Nah. The myth of the Asteroid Thicket trope has nothing to do with the composition of the objects. It doesn't matter what they are made of. The densest collection of matter in the Solar System that isn't in a star, planet, moon, or asteroid is in the rings of Saturn, which reach a peak density roughly comparable to Earth atmosphere, but an average density about 10,000 times less.

Flying through those at interplanetary velocity would suck quite a bit, but at thicknesses ranging from 5 to 100 m, you wouldn't be in them for long.

If an icy body in the outer solar system were to shatter, perhaps from some sort of collision, the density of debris could make it quite dangerous to be near for a few days, but over time it would settle out to the same average density as everything else in the area.

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MajorTom Eye'm the cutest! Relationship Status: Barbecuing
Eye'm the cutest!
Jan 9th 2019 at 6:23:06 AM

Or it would re-coalesce into something vaguely planet-like.

The Asteroid Thicket as seen in Hollywood isn't a long-term feature of space though under certain circumstances it is possible. A real-world example would be a planet that has partially or completely broken by impact would turn into an Asteroid Thicket for a period of time until either gravity pulled at least most of it back together or it disperses apart. Depending on the scale and velocities involved it may take more than a few days but definitely not a long term thousands or millions of years worth of existence thing.

"Allah may guide their bullets, but Jesus helps those who aim down the sights."
AFP The Great and Wonderful from The Pale Blue Dot Relationship Status: In Lesbians with you
The Great and Wonderful
Jan 10th 2019 at 1:13:09 AM

So, when I first saw The Empire Strikes Back, I honestly thought the Asteroid Chase took place in the remnants of Alderaan, six or seven year old me thought that was a neat bit of continuity.

Quod Scripsi Scripsi (until I use the edit function...)
MajorTom Eye'm the cutest! Relationship Status: Barbecuing
Eye'm the cutest!
Jan 10th 2019 at 7:52:48 AM

Alderaan had a space slug infested with mynocks in it?

Man, the galaxy is a strange place.

"Allah may guide their bullets, but Jesus helps those who aim down the sights."
AFP The Great and Wonderful from The Pale Blue Dot Relationship Status: In Lesbians with you
The Great and Wonderful
Jan 10th 2019 at 3:02:44 PM

Star Wars is the kind of universe where Rogue One gave us a temple guard decked out in body armor with a BFG and I was just like "well yeah, have you seen the kind of stuff out there he'd need to guard the temple against?"

But yeah, as I recall, one of the old Legends novels, about Luke's Jedi students, had a gaggle of them led by Han and Leia's kids go on a pilgrimage to Alderaan to find a fragment of the old homeworld to give to Leia as a gift. They end up getting in trouble on the way, running into one of the space worms, and actually get rescued by Boba Fett (there's no current bounty on them or the Solos, so Boba doesn't see any conflict of interests here).

Edited by AFP on Jan 10th 2019 at 4:05:26 AM

Quod Scripsi Scripsi (until I use the edit function...)
Jan 10th 2019 at 11:13:39 PM

But back to the original point....would most humans show up on thermals in an...ice like field?

Jan 10th 2019 at 11:17:27 PM

Sure. It wouldnít really make a difference, especially not in space. Itís already cold out there.

Edited by archonspeaks on Jan 10th 2019 at 11:18:04 AM

AFP The Great and Wonderful from The Pale Blue Dot Relationship Status: In Lesbians with you
The Great and Wonderful
Jan 11th 2019 at 1:35:33 AM

Well, unless they had cooled to the same temperature as the surrounding ice field, which would make defense against them much easier but search and rescue operations to find them much more difficult.

Living breathing humans should show up like flares on a thermal scanner in frozen environments, unless maybe they were wearing very well insulated suits.

Edited by AFP on Jan 11th 2019 at 2:36:13 AM

Quod Scripsi Scripsi (until I use the edit function...)
Fighteer Geronimo! from the Time Vortex Relationship Status: Dancing with Captain Jack Harkness
Geronimo!
Jan 11th 2019 at 3:45:04 AM

In normal atmospheric conditions, humans radiate about 100 W. I'm not sure how being in space would affect that, but absent other conditions, that radiant heat would only last for a short while, since the human would, you know, die.

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